Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 08, 2006

Here’s some more information on Dale Humpherys with a bit more detail on the actual treatment:

Since the publication of my article “Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Injectable Vitamin B1 and Liver Extract” in the TLfDP in the Feb/March 2000 issue, I have received hundreds of calls from doctors and patients wanting more information on this safe, effective, and inexpensive treatment which reverses and cures Multiple Sclerosis.

Dr. F.R. Klenner’s medical paper was published in the June and July 2000 edition of the TLfDP. Dr. H.T.R. Mount’s medical paper on the successful treatment of MS with vitamin B1 and liver extract was also published in the Feb/March 2000 issue of the TLfDP. It is interesting to note these two MDs were treating MS in the 1940s and ’50s with the same two essential ingredients — injectable B1 and liver extract, yet they were unaware of each other. Dr. Klenner in Reidsville, North Carolina and Dr. Mount in Ottawa, Ontario. Dr. Mount felt paralysis was a contraindication to his type of therapy, whereas Dr. Klenner was treating MS patients with paralysis intensively and successfully with vitamins A, C, E and all of the B vitamins and other metabolites in addition to the vitamin B1 and liver extract injections.

As many readers know, we had serious problems from 1998 on as the FDA Pharmaceutical monolith attempted to stop this treatment by refusing to allow the release of vitamin injectables and liver extract from the large labs producing them, which were under FDA control. It was a desperate situation for us and we survived by importing them from Mexico where these injectables are available without a prescription. Compounding pharmacies in the US began to produce the vitamin B1 injectables in 2000. They were able to do this because compounding pharmacies are under State control. The FDA went to court in January 2001 in New York and attempted to gain control of compounding pharmacies and they were denied that right. These pharmacies then began to produce Liver Extract also and we were assured of a reliable source of supply.

There are currently two pharmacies producing B1, 200mg per ml. and liver extract with two more coming on line, one in Canada and one in the US. With increasing numbers of patients becoming aware of this treatment, the demand will increase.

Dr. Klenner believed MS to have a viral cause. With a degree in Biochemistry he was able to understand what was happening in MS. The virus damaged the cells of the central nervous system rendering them incapable of maintaining homeostasis or normal metabolism by retaining adequate B1 within the cells, resulting in a deterioration of the myelin sheath surrounding the nerve and eventual paralysis. By raising the level of B1 in the body with a daily injection, a level could be maintained allowing normal metabolism to be continued, resulting in myelin sheath regeneration and recovery. In reality, MS is a deficiency disease caused by a viral inflammation of the central nervous system which can be reversed with adequate B1 and liver extract injections. Recovery can be enhanced with the addition of vitamins A, C, E, and B-complex and other metabolites in addition to a healthful diet and lifestyle.

I have followed this protocol for over 25 years. Following two severe attacks of MS in 1973 I could walk only a short distance and was forced to discontinue working — my doctors said I would be in a wheelchair soon. After beginning treatment with Dr. Klenner I was able to return to work within 6 months — but it was two years before I became symptom-free. I have enjoyed excellent health since.

The protocol of Dr. Klenner’s I have followed consists of: (1) a daily intramuscular injection of vitamin B1 of 300 to 400 mg. The correct dosage can be determined by the level of fatigue the patient experiences. Some patients require 300 to 400 mg daily to experience relief of fatigue symptoms. The B1 is available in a strength of 200mg per ml. So a 200 mg injection would be 1cc. Twice weekly 1cc of liver extract is added to the B1 injection so extra injections aren’t needed. The B1 injectable comes in a 30cc bottle and lasts for two to four weeks. The liver extract comes in a 10cc vial and lasts 5 weeks. The syringe is a 25 gauge by five-eighths inch 3cc syringe.

Note: B1 is not well absorbed in oral form — the daily injection is required for life for successful treatment and recovery.

Oral Vitamin Regimen

1) 5 grams daily in divided doses of Calcium Ascorbate (buffered Vitamin C) which is available in 500mg tablets. This boosts the immune system and eliminates or shortens recovery time from colds and flu.
2) Vitamin E 400 to 1000 IU daily
3) B-100 tablet. This tablet contains 100mg of all of the B vitamins.
4) B12 — One tablet (sublingual — dissolved under the tongue) daily. One to 2mg strength.
5) Niacin. Once or twice weekly, 100 to 300mg before breakfast. This is a vasodilator and opens the blood vessels allowing the nutrients to rebuild the myelin sheath damaged by MS. This will produce a flush and reddening of the skin for about 30 minutes, which most patients say they enjoy. It is advisable to lie down and cover up for the period of the flush.

Diet

A high protein diet is required to rebuild the myelin sheath. Examples: Breakfast — 1 or 2 eggs poached, with fruit and cereal. Lunch — fish and vegetables (steamed) and fruit. Supper — chicken or beef with vegetables and fruit. Soy, cheese and dairy products are a good source of protein if well tolerated.

One 500mg digestive enzyme tablet taken with each meal can often improve digestion and absorption.

Injectables are presently available at two compounding pharmacies with a prescription and are shipped to Canada and all parts of the US:

Optioncare Pharmacy, Aurora, Illinois — 630-859-0333 or 800-679-4667
College Pharmacy, Colorado Springs, Colorado — 800-888-9358

Prices at last quote:

Thiamine 200mg per ml. 30cc $15.00;
Liver Extract 10cc $25.00.

Dale Humpherys
#103 9905 5th St.
Sidney, BC V8L 2X6
Canada
250-655-6616

Medical Journal Articles on MS

1. Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Injectable Vitamin B1 and Liver Extract, by Dale Humpherys. Issue #199/200, Feb/March 2000, TLfDP, page 58-60.

2. Multiple Sclerosis and Other Demyelinating Diseases by Dr. H.T.R. Mount, MD. Issue #199/200, Feb/March 2000, TlfDP.

3. Response of Peripheral and Central Nervous System Pathology to Mega Doses of the Vitamin B Complex and other Metabolites. Part 1 by Dr. F.R. Klenner. Issue #203, June 2000, TLfDP, page 86. Part two, Issue #204, July 2000, page 52.

4. Letters to the Editor. Injectable Liver Extract available for MS and ALS by Dale Humpherys. Issue #219, October 2001, TLfDP, pg 98.

5. The True Story of FDA Terrorism, by Dale Humpherys, TlfDP, Issue #228, July 2002, page 115.

Note to Pharmacies: When shipping to Canada, put on outside of package: “Prescription Medicine.” This is important. If “vitamins” is written on the package the patient must pay extra taxes.

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August 8, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2006

Did some searching tonight for injectable vitamins and I came across this interesting story. I wonder if Benfotamine would be a help to him instead of the daily injections?

Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Injectable Vitamin B1 & Liver Extract

Originally published in TOWNSEND LETTER for DOCTORS & PATIENTS, February/March 2000

This is a case history of a recovery from a disease which exacts a terrible price in suffering and hardship from its victims and their families and for which orthodox medicine stubbornly insists there is no successful treatment.

MS has been reversed and cured by two doctors working independently and apparently unaware of each other since the 1940s. These two men were Dr. F.R. Klenner, MD of Reidsville, North Carolina and Dr. H.T.R. Mount, MD of Ottawa, Ontario. Dr. Klenner makes this claim in his medical paper “Response of Peripheral and Central Nerve Pathology to Mega-doses of the Vitamin B-Complex and other Metabolites,” in the Journal of Applied Nutrition, fall 1973. “Any victim of MS who will dramatically flush with the use of nicotinic acid and who has not yet progressed to the stage of myelin degeneration, as witnessed by sustained ankle clonus elicited in the orthodox manner, can be cured with the adequate employment of thiamin HCL and other factors of the vitamin B complex in conjunction with essential proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and injectable Liver Extract. If sustained ankle clonus is not B1 lateral, then it is not a deterrent. We have had patients who did demonstrate B1 lateral sustained ankle clonus, and who were in wheelchairs, and who returned to normal activities after 5 to 8 years of treatment.” To cure MS is a dramatic claim to make for a disease which supposedly has no successful treatment. Dr. Klenner’s results speak for themselves.

Dr. Mount on the other hand, describes his patients as “clinically well” or “clinically improved.” For my part, MS is a brutal disease and anyone who has had it will have a reminder of it until the end of their days. The symptom that has remained with me is the heaviness in the feet when over-tired. I am otherwise symptom-free. I received many calls from doctors after my story was published and their comments during the first 5 or 10 years were “you are in remission.” Now in my 25th year I don’t hear that “remission” bit any more. Am I cured or in remission? As long as I take my intramuscular injection of B1 200 mg daily and my 2cc liver extract weekly I am completely well. Call it what you wish!

I was diagnosed in 1972 at the age of 44 and treated with a series of ACTH injections. I seemed to recover but still had extreme fatigue and numbness in my feet and legs which slowly improved. I continued to work at my profession as a teacher. In 1973 I had a second attack which was more severe, affecting my legs and arms and the fatigue forced me to quit work. I was able to be up for several hours at a time but had to spend most of my time in bed. I was again given ACTH injections which didn’t seem to have any effect. My GP and neurologist had no other treatment to offer.

They tried to encourage me by telling of the research being done on MS which was progressing rapidly and eventually would produce a drug which would cure MS, they assured me. While waiting for this cure to be discovered, I began to read extensively everything I could on MS. The exciting moment for me came when I was reading a book called How to Get Well by Dr. Paavo Airola, ND in which he said that Klenner was treating MS with much success.

After talking it over with my family I decided to go down to Reidsville, North Carolina, to see Dr. Klenner. I believed my doctors would be happy to hear this news, but when I told them they were silent and finally said, “Dale, this man Klenner is a quack — he will take your money and give you false hope. If there were a successful treatment for MS we would know about it — Don’t go.”

Thank God I ignored this medical advice.

I phoned Dr. Klenner’s office and was told by his receptionist that he didn’t book appointments but that I should come down and he would see me. This sounded strange to me — no appointment? But I booked a flight from Victoria, British ColumB1a to Reidsville, North Carolina. A long flight. Fear tugged at my heart — could I make it? I could walk only a short distance and was suffering total fatigue. When I arrived at the small town of Reidsville at 1:00 p.m. I phoned Dr. Klenner’s office and was told to come to his office at 5:00 p.m. When I arrived there was a group of perhaps 25 people standing at the bottom of a flight of stairs leading up to his office on the 2nd floor of an old frame building. They told me they were waiting to get their name on the patient list for the next day. Presently Dr. Klenner’s receptionist appeared and tacked a piece of paper to the door. This paper had 20 numbers on it. If you were fortunate you got your name on the list which were the 20 patients Dr. Klenner would see the next day. I was fortunate and met him the following day. He was working alone with his wife who was an RN and a receptionist. I learned that his receptionist had come to him in a wheelchair with MS in 1961 — she was now completely recovered and worked several days a week in his office.

Dr. Klenner examined me and confirmed the diagnosis of MS while explaining to me how the treatment worked. He said I was fortunate to come to him while still on my feet as the recovery period would be shortened considerably. I received an injection of B1 and liver extract and a copy of his protocol which I was to read that night. I saw him again the next morning and was shown how to give myself intramuscular injections and told where to order the injectables. His final words to me were that I would recover completely and could probably go back to work within a matter of months. The fatigue I had suffered for 2 years was gone after the first several injections. I couldn’t believe it. I was still weak with numbness in my feet and legs but I had my strength again. Before I left, his wife cautioned me that I must have the daily injection for life because the B1 cannot be absorbed orally in pill form.

When I was ready to leave I asked Mrs. Klenner for my bill — she said it wasn’t made up yet and they would send it to me. I never did receive a bill from Dr. Klenner — so much for the quack who would take my money in return for false hope!

When I arrived home, putting Dr. Klenner’s full treatment schedule in effect proved to be a problem. Many of the oral medications weren’t available in Canada and some of these medications such as niacin caused me some stomach distress. I shall always be grateful to Dr. Abram Hoffer who guided me through this period. Dr. Hoffer was practicing in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan at that time but he always took my many telephone calls with the grace and compassion this great physician is renowned for. Dr. Hoffer has been practicing here in Victoria for quite some time and I had occasion to see him at his office recently about a problem I was having. I presented him with a sheet of the supplements I am presently taking and he said, “Dale, this must cost you a bundle but you’ll probably live to be a hundred.” Recalling what last month’s� B1ll for supplements had been, I replied that I probably couldn’t afford to.

Several years later following an interview for CBC television broadcast nationwide, I received a call from a man in Toronto who told me he had been cured of MS by Dr. H.T.R. Mount, MD of Ottawa, Ontario. This was very interesting as I was unaware anyone else was treating MS. He sent me a copy of a medical paper which appeared in the Canadian Medical Association Journal June 2nd, 1973 in which he gives 14 case histories of MS patients treated successfully. On reading this paper I was surprised to find Dr. Mount was using B1 intravenously and liver extract intramuscularly and nothing else! Dr. Klenner was treating MS intensively with vitamins A, C, E, and all of the B vitamins and other metabolites in addition to the B1 and liver extract injections. Dr. Mount felt paralysis was a contraindication to his type of therapy whereas Dr. Klenner was treating patients with paralysis with success. Dr. Mount concludes his medical paper with a call for detailed studies to enlarge its use or to circumscribe its limitations.

Why have the positive results of these two men been stonewalled by orthodox medicine for 50 years? To answer this question let’s begin with the patient who goes to his GP with neurological symptoms suggestive of MS as I did. He is then referred to a neurologist for treatment. The neurologist gives the patient steroids, usually cortisone or ACTH which do not work. This is the stage at which this patient should be treated with intramuscular injections of Bl and liver extract. Would this safe, easily administered and economical treatment work with every patient? Perhaps and perhaps not. Would it work with 8 out of 10— 5 out of 10— 1 out of 10? Cortisone with ACTH produces 0 out of 10 results, so even 1 out of 10 is a win-win situation.

It is obvious that our neurologist, who is an “advisor” to the MS Society and probably receives a stipend thereof and who probably received a grant to do research work on a cause or cure for MS at one time during or following his medical education, won’t rock the boat by using a treatment that works. This would risk the whole financial structure salaries and grants funded with public money. This is called Empire Building. When did we become a society that victimizes its most vulnerable citizens? We are seeing the same sordid situation in the Cancer industry and with the alternative therapy treatments that threaten the medical status quo.

Of great concern to patients on this treatment has been the lack of readily available supplies of injectables, thiamine 100mg per ml in 30 ml bottles and liver extract in 30 ml bottles. In Canada the Canada Health Protection Branch (the Canadian version of the FDA) wouldn’t allow pharmacies to import thiamine and liver extract which were not produced here. Patients had to import their supplies from the US with all the red tape this entailed. Most pharmacies in the US didn’t stock these supplies because of the limited demand and had to order them from suppliers. This lack of a readily available supply was a hardship for patients and many finally became discouraged and gave up.

Steris Laboratories of Phoenix, Arizona was the sole manufacturer of vitamin and liver extract injectables in the US. Two years ago the cold heavy hand of the FDA fell on Steris Labs and they were forced to stop producing vitamin injectables. This has been a tragedy for MS patients and I have received many calls from desperate people asking for help. With the FDA’s record of crackdowns on nutritional therapies and supplements, was this an orchestrated plan to eliminate one more threat to orthodox medicine (neurologists et al.) from alternative therapies? I have every reason to believe it was.

Three years ago, Merit Pharmaceuticals of Los Angeles began producing liver extract. When I learned in 1998 what had happened at Steris, I called Charles Fahr, president of Merit Labs, and asked him if he could begin producing thiamin injectable in 30 ml, 100mg per ml. He said he was considering it and would probably start in August if things looked favorable. In January of 1999 I was informed by my pharmacist in the US that thiamine was still not available. I phoned Mr. Fahr again and he said they had decided to produce a 3Oml B Complex 100 injectable which had a formulation of thiamin 100mg per ml, B6, 2mg per ml, Pantothenate 2mg per ml, B2, 2mg per ml and niacinamide 100mg per ml. I asked why the thiamin wasn’t being produced and he said he felt that the market for thiamin had been killed by the FDA action but thought that the B-complex 100 would appeal to a broader market as many doctors routinely use a B-complex injection for their patients. This was good news for us as this formula supplied the 100mg of thiamin required to treat MS. When I checked again with the pharmacy in May I was told that because of an FDA quarantine it wouldn’t be available until July. This sounded like more FDA monkey business to me and I was receiving many desperate calls from patients. I saw Dr. Hoffer about it and he suggested having a compounding pharmacy make it up here in Victoria. He called a pharmacist and was told it could be done. A 100mg per ml, 30 ml bottle would cost $30. Patients require 2 bottles per month costing $60. We were paying $8 per bottle for $16 a month for imported thiamin. More than 3 times as expensive locally, but at least the spectre of a wheelchair hanging over us has been lifted for now.

In summary, there is a roadblock at the neurologists’ door for MS victims, but there is a ray of hope. In the 20 plus years I have been working to get the word out of a successful treatment for MS, I have talked with many GPs and the majority of them have told me that they saw no harm in helping these patients with the treatment even though they felt it wouldn’t work. With the increasing acceptance of alternative therapies by many physicians and the demand by an informed public for therapies which transcend the “cut, burn and poison” routine of orthodox medicine, an exciting new era is dawning for many people stricken with diseases which were formerly considered to be untreatable.

Correspondence:

Dale Humpherys
103-9905-5th St
Sidney; BC Canada
V8L 2X6
250-655-6616

August 7, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2006

With no luck at the pharmacies or the health food stores my wife suggested that I try the Naturopath. I send her an email to see if she can order it. It is after all, a natural supplement. Here is my email:

I visited my regular doctor yesterday and we suspect that I have a Riboflavin deficiency. My Thiamine blood test came out normal so I suggested that I need Benfotamine (fat soluble B1) to help the neurological effects caused by the B2 deficiency. He is now going to refer me to a Neurologist but I suggested a pharmaceutical supplement called Riboflavin (Tetra) Butyrate for better absorption. I’ve tried several pharmacies and health food stores with no luck. I did manage to find a lab near Montreal called Kabs that have it.

Is it possible for you to order this for me?

One of the things I’ve noticed about these vitamin/mineral deficiencies is that there doesn’t seem to be any consistency. One site says one list of symptoms and another says something else. I’ve come across Riboflavin deficiency before but I discounted it and despite no improvement taking 300 mg a day, it lead me to believe it was something else.

July 22, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 06, 2006

Followed up with the doctor who did the test results for Beriberi. The secretary gave me a hard time saying that if I didn’t hear from them then the test result was normal. There is no way that it came back normal so it’s my guess that it’s not back yet.

I explained that it has been over two weeks and if it was fine, then I wanted to know. I think they should call everyone regarding the test results whether they are fine or not.

After a brief pause, she comes back on the phone and says they are still waiting for the Thiamine test.

Almost three weeks and still no results…

July 6, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

A while back I made the discovery about the link between B1 and the myelin sheaths that protect the nerves. Today, I discover what the myelin sheaths are made out of. Sounds exactly like the feelings on the top of my head…

Nervous System Support

Vitamin B1 also plays a key role in support of the nervous system, where it permits healthy development of the fat-like coverings which surround most nerves (called myelin sheaths). In the absence of vitamin B1, these coverings can degenerate or become damaged. Pain, prickly sensations, and nerve deadening are nerve-related symptoms that can result from vitamin B1 deficiency.

Approximately 30% of your brain is composed of lecithin. Of the insulating and protective sheaths that surround your brain, spine, and thousands of miles of nerves, lecithin accounts for two-thirds of their composition; and of all the muscles in your body, your heart – the hardest muscle to fatigue – has the highest lecithin content.

Prickly sensations? I’ll add lecithin to my daily vitamins…

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 21, 2006

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Back to researching B vitamins. You’d think with everything that I have read so far, I’d be an expert. Then Doctor Google comes up with this gem. Ok, I don’t have HIV or AIDS, but the article talks about B vitamin deficiencies and how Thiamine is used in treating diabetic neuropathy.

LIVING WITH HIV AS A CHRONIC, MANAGEABLE SURVIVAL DISEASE

Stanley Mirski, M.D., has reported that a large percentage of his diabetic patients who suffer from neuropathy have achieved improvements with daily thiamine supplementation in doses of 50-100 mg. Using a fat-soluble form of thiamine such as thiamine tetrahydro-furfuryl disulfide may be preferable because of the relatively poor absorption of water-soluble forms of this vitamin. This type is contained in Cardiovascular Research’s Allithiamine. A large number of HIV-positive people have reported to me their successful elimination of neuropathy with the combined use of the B vitamins discussed here. The information on acetyl-l- carnitine is too recent for much in the way of anecdotal reports to have surfaced, but it might be an important addition to improve the chances for successful elimination of neuropathy. Research has made it clear that people living with HIV are often deficient in carnitine.

WHAT!!!! There is a fat-soluble form of thiamine???!!!! I pull up the web site for the local health food store down the street and I type “thiamine tetrahydro-furfuryl disulfide” into the search engine and nothing comes up. So I search “thiamine” alone and get two results. I click on the second result because it says B1 and it’s the suppliment I already have. I click on the second one and it’s called Benfotiamine. I’ve never heard of it and they provide a link to the manufacturer’s web site. I click on that and I read about how it raises the level of thiamine in the blood. NOW THAT’S WHAT I NEED!!! And it was about three blocks away from my house the entire time.

Benfotiamine for Neuropathy, Retinopathy, and Vitamin B1 deficiency

Recent studies have shown strong evidence pointing to benfotiamine preventing and helping diabetic neuropathy and retinopathy.. The original patent on benfotiamine gave information that it is even less toxic than common vitamin B1 (thiamine hydrochloride usually).. To date, there has been no reports of any known, negative interactions with any medications.. Any condition that is the result of a thiamine deficiency will respond quite well to benfotiamine.

Benefits

Benfotiamine raises the blood level of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active co-enzyme of thiamine.

Thiamine and its Co-enzyme, TPP

Thiamine (vitamin B1) plays an essential part in the metabolism of glucose, through actions of it co-enzyme TPP (thiamine pyrophosphate). TPP is formed by the enzymatically-catalyzed addition of two phosphate groups donated by ATP to thiamine. TPP also goes by the name “thiamine diphosphate.” In the cytoplasm of the cell, glucose, a 6-carbon sugar, is metabolized to pyruvic acid, which is converted into acetyl-CoA, otherwise known as “active acetate.” Acetyl CoA enters the mitochondrion, where it serves as the starting substrate in the Kreb’s cycle (citric acid cycle). The Krebs cycle is the primary source of cellular metabolic energy. TPP, along with other co-enzymes, is essential for the removal of CO2 from pyruvic acid, which in turn is a key step in the conversion of pyruvic acid to acetyl CoA. CO2 removal from pyruvic acid is called “oxidative decarboxylation” and for this reason, TPP was originally referred to as “cocarboxylase.” TPP is thus vital to the cell’s energy supply. Benfotiamine helps maintain healthy cells in the presence of blood glucose. Acting as a biochemical “super-thiamin” it does this through several different cellular mechanisms, as discussed below.

Benfotiamine has been shown to block three of these mechanisms: the hexosamine pathway, the diaglycerol-protein kinease C pathway and the formation of Advanced Glycation End-poducts. As discussed below, benfotiamine does this by activating transketolase, a key thiamin-dependent enzyme.6 Benfotiamine stimulates tranketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for maintenance of normal glucose metabolic pathways.* Transketolase diverts the excess fructose-6-phosphate and glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate, (formed by the inhibition of GAPDH, as mentioned above), into production of pentose-5-phosphates and erythrose-4-phosphate and away from the damaging pathways. Benfotiamine activates transketolase activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells incubated in glucose. To test benfotiamine’s ability to counteract these metabolic abnormalities caused by elevated blood glucose, studies have been done in diabetic rats. Benfotiamine increases transketolase activity in the retinas of diabetic rats, while concomitantly decreasing hexosamine pathway activity, protein kinase C activity and AGE formation.

Found another web site that talks about the treatment using this suppliment.

HOW MUCH BENFOTIAMINE SHOULD I USE DAILY?

Though the body cannot use more than about 10mg of common, water-soluble vitamin B-1 per day, benfotiamine is lipid-soluble and can safely be used at much higher levels than common vitamin B-1.

Most people get excellent results in 14-21 days time using two 150mg. Capsules twice per day (two in the morning and two in the evening). Benfotiamine need not be taken with meals. Some people get better results increasing the dosage to 900mg or 1200mg per day after the first two weeks. The point here is that benfotiamine is safe at any reasonable daily usage level. An individual should merely find the level that produces the maximum beneficial effect without reaching a point of diminishing return beyond which the excess amount is wasted.

Some case studies have documented daily usage in the 600mgday range and more with interesting anecdotal and clinical results: Holladay Case Studies.

Also, Dr. Brownlee participated in a clinical trial using 600mg/day: Clinical Trial Using 600mg with dramatic results after increasing daily usage to 600mg. The neuropathy symptoms ceased progression and began to reverse and people experienced a complete cessation of sciatica episodes. Also, the average blood pressure dropped from a persistent 145/90 to 120/80, without the use of other blood pressure medications.

Most people get excellent results in 14-21 days using two 150mg???!!!! How do I get a hold of this stuff?

I’m really disapointed that the naturopath didn’t mention this. I’ve been taking B Complex for so long now with very little results, you’d think she could’ve at least mentioned that there are fat soluble vitamins. She seemed more interested in talking about me in her class.

I don’t really think she did enough reading or understanding of my symptoms. It’s really hard to knock what she was doing because she gave me two suppliments that have helped me tremendously but there comes a point where you say: “This is not working.” The acupuncture doctor did that and I’ll give her the most credit for helping me figure out my symptoms and leading me on my current path to understanding the root cause even though it had nothing to do with acupuncture.

I’d love to go back to her one day not for a treatment, but to tell her all about my discoveries since I stopped the acupuncture. I’d love to see her do the cupping with no pepperoni marks and watch as my blood pressure reads normal. That would be great and maybe someday I’ll see her for another appointment. Imagine if the results came back  and I could tell her that I have Beriberi? She won’t believe it and neither will anybody else.

June 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 20, 2006

I’ve been taking higher doses of B complex and there doesn’t seem to be any improvement. In fact, in some cases it’s making me feel worse. I have a theory. If B vitamins are water soluble, then why don’t I find some kind of snack food that I could eat all day long and keep the level of B1 in my body for better absorption. So I do a quick search and discover peanuts are high in thiamine. Then I discover that Veggie Burgers are high in B vitamins because they are made from Soy. I remember from the diet diary that the veggie burger I had from Licks made me feel great and now I know why.

So I went down to Shoppers to look for some snack food and pick up some peanuts and almonds.

Tomorrow I’ll try another test. Because the higher doses don’t appear to be working better, I take my multivitamin in multiple doses throughout the day. The dosage for B1 is only 10 mg but maybe this will improve my absorption. I check the dosage for the fat soluble vitamins to make sure I’m under the toxic limit and it’s actually quite low. I won’t take any Niacin (B3) either just to see if it makes a difference.

June 20, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 20, 2006

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I was looking up the effects of B vitamins on the nervous system and I came across this something that may explain the “nerve pinching” at the top of my head as prickly sensations:

Nervous System Support

Vitamin B1 also plays a key role in support of the nervous system, where it permits healthy development of the fat-like coverings which surround most nerves (called myelin sheaths). In the absence of vitamin B1, these coverings can degenerate or become damaged. Pain, prickly sensations, and nerve deadening are nerve-related symptoms that can result from vitamin B1 deficiency.

This sure sounds familiar to me and yet all of the doctors so far have ignored it.

June 20, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 17, 2006

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Woke up early and my left arm had pins and needles. It had a totally weak feeling to the entire arm. Maybe I was sleeping on it. Nothing unusual I guess. Everybody gets pins and needles.Went to the lab for 8:00 AM.

I arrive at the lab and as I looked at the requistion form, I realize that I didn’t ask the doctor to check my triglycerides. I wanted to see if the pharmacutical doses of niacin had any effect to lower them. I had a pen with me so I figure I’ll just check it off. The only problem was that the doctor used blue ink and I only had black. Maybe the nurse won’t notice…

I take my number and sat down for a while. They call my number and I provide them with the form. Almost right away the nurse asks me if I checked the box for triglycerides. I admit that I did and I get scolded for doing so. “Only the doctor can select the boxes for testing. I explain that I didn’t want to go back to the doctor to have him select the extra box but I appologize.

It was a stupid thing for me to do but I figured because they were doing the test anyway…it would be no big deal. After going back to my seat, she calls me back up to the desk. This time I was worried that the test would be voided because of my tampering. Nope, she explains that a thiamine test is not covered by the Ontario Government and that it will cost me $50.00. Expensive, but it could be worth every penny.

So that’s why it’s not a routine test…

June 17, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 16, 2006

1150515661-hr-356

He wants to test for B1, B12, RBC folate and CRP. I had never heard of CRP so I look it up when I get home.

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a plasma protein, an acute phase protein produced by the liver.

Function
 
CRP drawn from PDB 1GNH. CRP is a member of the class of acute phase reactants as its levels rise dramatically during inflammatory processes occurring in the body. It is thought to assist in complement binding to foreign and damaged cells and affect the humoral response to disease. It is also believed to play an important role in innate immunity, as an early defense system against infections.

Diagnostic use

CRP is used mainly as a marker of inflammation. Measuring and charting C-reactive protein values can prove useful in determining disease progress or the effectiveness of treatments. Blood, usually collected in a serum-separating tube, is analysed in a medical laboratory or at the point of testing.

Various analytical methods are available for CRP determination, such as ELISA, immunoturbidimetry, rapid immunodiffusion and visual agglutination.

Viral infections tend to give a lower CRP level than bacterial infection.

How to lower: Exercise, lose weight, stop smoking, flaxseed, aspirin, niacin, statins, alcohol, clean teeth

If niacin will lower the C-reactive protein, then I don’t think I have to worry about that. B1 is the vitamin I want tested so it’s interesting that he also wants to test my level of B12. Doctor Google?

B-12 and the stomach
Stomach problems can contribute to a B-12 deficiency in two ways.

First, irritation and inflammation of the stomach can prevent the stomach cells from functioning properly. When functioning improperly, the cells may stop producing a substance required for B-12 absorption called intrinsic factor (IF). Without IF, B-12 cannot be absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract into the body’s cells.

A second way for stomach problems to create B-12 deficiency is through inadequate secretion of stomach acids. Lack of stomach acids (a condition called called hypochlorhydria) gets in the way of B-12 absorption since most B-12 in food is attached to proteins in the food, and stomach acids are necessary to release the B-12 from these proteins.

The above stomach problems that can contribute to B-12 deficiency have a wide variety of causes. These causes include abuse of over-the-counter antacids, abuse of prescription medicines used to control stomach acidity, and stomach ulcers (also called gastric ulcers), which may themselves be due to infection with the bacteria, helicobacter pylori.

WOW! This guy is right on the money. Looks like I’ve found a great doctor. Ironically, in the same walk in clinic I went to in the first place.

June 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 16, 2006

1150515382-hr-355

To the walk in clinic and I explain to the receptionist that I would like to speak to a doctor about nutritional deficiencies. It’s a friday night so it’s not too busy and I’m called in within 5 minutes.

The doctor comes in, reads my file and says “I hear you would like to speak to a doctor…well, I am one.”  I thought that was funny and I like him almost immediately. I give him the coles notes version of my history of symptoms starting with the mysterious internal vibration. I tell him about the various tests and procedures done by my regular doctor that all came up with nothing. I explain about how my research indicates that it could be a nutritional B vitamin deficiency and it’s my hunch that I have Beriberi. I’ve read that there is a blood test and I would like it done.

He says he hasn’t heard the term Beriberi since medical school and admitted that he wouldn’t even know how to treat it. I’d say he’s an older man in his mid-fifties.  I told him that from what I’ve read, it’s very easy to treat with high doses of B1 vitamins and in some cases, vitamin injections. He’s heard of B12 injections but not B1. He mentions about folic acid and I told him about my research regarding the chemical reaction of B1 with folic acid so I would really like to have that tested as well.

He questions why I think I have a nutritional B vitamin deficiency and hesitantly, I mention about how I think electromagnetic radiation had an effect on my stomach and disturbed the normal absorption of vitamins and minerals from my food. I continue my story with the purchase of the wireless intercom system and how when I discovered the symptoms to be EMF, I bought a meter to test around the house. I was probably low with B vitamins to begin with and the EMF exposure created a nutritional deficiency. Then he asks about how I learned about electromagnetic radiation. So I explain the story about the global tv show and Dr. Riina Bray.

At the end of my story I told him how I thought it sounded like something from a science fiction novel and he agreed saying this was the first time he had ever heard a story like mine.

So he writes out the lab requistion form for a blood test.

June 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 16, 2006

What is folate?

Folic acid, also called folate or folacin, is a B-complex vitamin most publicized for its importance in pregnancy and prevention of pregnancy defects.

Folic acid is one of the most chemically complicated vitamins, with a three-part structure that puts special demands on the body’s metabolism. The three primary components of folic acid are called PABA, glutamic acid, and pteridine. (Two of these components, glutamic acid and pteridine, help explain the technical chemical name for folate, namely pteroylmonoglutamate.)

As complex as this vitamin is in its structure, it is equally as complicated in its interaction with the human body. For example, most foods do not contain folic acid in the exact form described above, and enzymes inside the intestine have to chemically alter food forms of folate in order for this vitamin to be absorbed. Even when the body is operating at full efficiency, only about 50% of ingested food folate can be absorbed.

What is the function of folate?

Red blood cell formation and circulation support

One of folate’s key functions as a vitamin is to allow for complete development of red blood cells. These cells help carry oxygen around the body. When folic acid is deficient, the red bloods cannot form properly, and continue to grow without dividing. This condition is called macrocytic anemia, and one of its most common causes is folic acid deficiency.

In addition to its support of red blood cell formation, folate also helps maintain healthy circulation of the blood throughout the body by preventing build-up of a substance called homocysteine. A high serum homocysteine level (called hyperhomocysteinemia) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and low intake of folate is a key risk factor for hyperhomocysteinemia. Increased intake of folic acid, particularly by men, has repeatedly been suggested as a simply way to lower risk of cardiovascular disease by preventing build-up of homocysteine in the blood. Preliminary research also suggests that high homocysteine levels can lead to the deterioration of dopamine-producing brain cells and may therefore contribute to the development of Parkinson’s disease. Therefore, folate deficiency may have an important relationship to neurological health.

Research is now confirming a link between blood levels of folate and not only cardiovascular disease, but dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease.

One of the most recent studies, which was published in the July 2004 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition evaluated 228 subjects. In those whose blood levels of folate were lowest, the risk for mild cognitive impairment was more than tripled, and risk of dementia increased almost four fold. Homocysteine, a potentially harmful product of cellular metabolism that is converted into other useful compounds by folate, along with vitamin B6 and B 12, was also linked to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Individuals whose homocysteine levels were elevated had a 4.3 (more than four fold) increased risk of dementia and a 3.7 (almost four fold) increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.(June 30, 2004)

Research teams in the Netherlands and the U.S. have confirmed that low levels of folic acid in the diet significantly increases risk of osteporosis-related bone fractures due to the resulting increase in homocysteine levels. Homocysteine has already been linked to damage to the arteries and atherosclerosis, plus increased risk of dementia in the elderly. Now, in a study that appeared in the May 2004 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at the Eramus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Holland, and another team in Boston have confirmed that individuals with the highest levels of homocysteine have a much higher risk of osteoporotic fracture.

In the Rotterdam study, which included 2,406 subjects aged 55 years or older, those with the highest homocysteine levels, whether men or women, almost doubled their risk of fracture. The Boston team found that risk of hip fracture nearly quadrupled in men and doubled in women in the top 25% of homocysteine levels. Both groups found that folic acid reduced the risk of osteoporotic fractures by reducing high levels of homocysteine.

What factors might contribute to a deficiency of folate?

In addition to poor dietary intake of folate itself, deficient intake of other B vitamins can contribute to folate deficiency. These vitamins include B1, B2, and B3 which are all involved in folate recycling. Poor protein intake can cause deficiency of folate binding protein which is needed for optimal absorption of folate from the intestine, and can also be related to an insufficient supply of glycine and serine, the amino acids that directly participate in metabolic recycling of folate. Excessive intake of alcohol, smoking, and heavy coffee drinking can also contribute to folate deficiency.

How do other nutrients interact with folate?

Vitamins B1, B2, and B3 must be present in adequate amounts to enable folic acid to undergo metabolic recycling in the body. Excessive amounts of folic acid, however, can hide a vitamin B12 deficiency, by masking blood-related symptoms.

How is folate-deficiency anemia diagnosed?

Folate-deficiency anemia may be suspected from general findings from a complete medical history and physical examination. In addition, several blood tests can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. If the anemia is thought to be caused by a problem in the digestive tract, a barium study of the digestive system may be performed. Folate deficiency does not usually produce neurological problems; B12 deficiency does. Folate and B12 deficiency can be present at the same time. If B12 deficiency is treated with folate by mistake, the symptoms of anemia may lessen, but the neurological problems can become worse.

Natural forms of folic acid:

orange juice
oranges
romaine lettuce
spinach
liver
rice
barley
sprouts
wheat germ
soy beans
green, leafy vegetables
beans
peanuts
broccoli
asparagus
peas
lentils
wheat germ
chick peas (garbanzo beans)

How do I know if I’m deficent in folate? Untill I started eating healthy recently, the only thing I had on a semi-regular basis was romaine lettuce. I’m sure wheatgrass is a good substitute for the green, leafy vegetables.

What are deficiency symptoms for folate?

Because of its link with the nervous system, folate deficiency can be associated with irritability, mental fatigue, forgetfulness, confusion, depression, and insomnia. The connections between folate, circulation, and red blood cell status make folate deficiency a possible cause of general or muscular fatigue. The role of folate in protecting the lining of body cavities means that folate deficiency can also result in intestinal tract symptoms (like diarrhea) or mouth-related symptoms like gingivitis or periodontal disease.

So folate helps maintain healthy circulation of the blood throughout the body by preventing build-up of a substance called homocysteine which can lead to a higher risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease.

Another one of my “weird” symptoms is when I hold my hands over my head for more than ten seconds. I start to feel a mild numbing sensation down the length of my arms and I’m sure it’s due to a lack of blood circulation.

I think I’ve proven that I do have circulation issues so maybe I’m deficient in folic acid too. Beriberi sounds very serious and if it’s what I have then I should get a blood test to confirm it. On the way home I’ll drop into the walk in clinic and see if I can convince the doctor for a blood test. At the very least, I will be able to rule out if it comes up negative.

June 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 15, 2006

Nervous System Support

Vitamin B1 also plays a key role in support of the nervous system, where it permits healthy development of the fat-like coverings which surround most nerves (called myelin sheaths). In the absence of vitamin B1, these coverings can degenerate or become damaged. Pain, prickly sensations, and nerve deadening are nerve-related symptoms that can result from vitamin B1 deficiency.
 
A second type of connection between vitamin B1 and the nervous system involves its role in the production of the messaging molecule acetylcholine. This molecule, called a neurotransmitter, is used by the nervous system to relay messages between the nerves and muscles. Acetylcholine cannot be produced without adequate supplies of vitamin B1. Because acetylcholine is used by the nervous system to ensure proper muscle tone in the heart, deficiency of B1 can also result in compromised heart function.
 
Deficiency Symptoms
What are deficiency symptoms for vitamin B1?
Because of its ability to disrupt the body’s energy production, one of the first symptoms of vitamin B1 deficiency is loss of appetite (called anorexia) that reflects the body’s listlessness and malaise.
 
Inability of the nervous system to ensure proper muscle tone in the GI tract can lead to indigestion or constipation, and muscle tenderness, particularly in the calf muscles.
Other symptoms related to nerve dysfunction are commonly associated with thiamin deficiency, since the myelin sheaths wrapping the nerves cannot be correctly made without adequate thiamin. These nerve-related symptoms include “pins and needles” sensations or numbness, especially in the legs.
 
Toxicity Symptoms

What are toxicity symptoms for vitamin B1? Even at extremely high doses of 500 milligrams per day, vitamin B1 intake does not appear to carry a risk of toxicity. This vitamin is often supplemented in high doses during treatment of maple sugar urine disease (MSUD), and may be given intravenously in treatment of alcoholism; these clinical circumstances have provided a broad basis for determining the low risk of toxicity associated with increased intake of thiamin. In its most recent 1998 recommendations for intake of B-complex vitamins, the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences did not establish a Tolerable Upper Limit (UL) for intake of vitamin B1
 
Nutrient Interactions

How do other nutrients interact with vitamin B1? No B-complex vitamin is more dependent on its fellow B vitamins than thiamin. Absorption of thiamin into the body requires adequate supplies of vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid. A deficiency in vitamin B12 can increase loss of thiamin in the urine, and vitamin B6 also appears to help regulate distribution of thiamin throughout the body.  If folic acid is deficient in the cells, then it causes an indirect thiamine deficiency because thiamine is present but cannot be activated.
 
Maybe it’s time to research folic acid.

June 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 15, 2006

Dear Dr. Google…

I’ve been taking high doses of niacin for over a month and although there is some improvement, I still have the mysterious internal tremor and low stomach acid. I forgot to take my acidophilus this morning and I had the head pinching. It disappeared when I took the acidophilus so something is obviously still wrong. Maybe it’s not a niacin deficiency at all? I have nervous system symptoms that are effected by diet. It has to be a nutritional deficiency, I just don’t know what kind.

With the Iridology charts and the deep lines at the top of my iris suggesting something effecting the cerebrum part of my brain, I start looking up symptoms with the cerebrum. With iridology some practitioners feel they can diagnose severe disease well before symptoms present themselves. So let’s see what I find out. I start reading about a whole bunch of scary neurological disorders and nothing matches my symptoms. It has to be a nutritional deficiency.

I start googling vitamin deficiencies and I look up every one. A, B, C, D, E, K etc. After reading them all and not finding anything as a possible match, I decide search for vitamins deficiencies that can effect the brain or more importantly, the cerebrum. This time I come across a more detailed decription of a Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) deficiency.

Vitamin B1 Deficiency

Vitamin B1 (thiamin) deficiency may result from a deficiency in the diet. People whose diet consists mainly of polished (refined) white rice are at risk of vitamin B1 deficiency, because polishing removes almost all of the vitamins. Alcoholics, who often substitute alcohol for food, are at high risk of developing this deficiency.

Symptoms

Early symptoms are vague. They include fatigue, irritability, memory impairment, loss of appetite, sleep disturbances, abdominal discomfort, and weight loss. Eventually, a severe vitamin B1 deficiency (beriberi) may develop, characterized by nerve, heart, and brain abnormalities.

Brain abnormalities due to vitamin B1 deficiency occur primarily in alcoholics. Brain abnormalities may develop when a chronic vitamin B1 deficiency is suddenly worsened by a rapid, substantial decrease in the vitamin B1 level (which can be caused by an alcoholic binge) or by a sudden increase in vitamin B1 requirements (which may occur when an undernourished alcoholic is fed intravenously).

Diagnosis and Treatment

The diagnosis is based on symptoms. Tests to confirm the diagnosis are not readily available. All forms of the deficiency are treated with vitamin B1 supplements.

A balanced diet containing all essential nutrients will prevent a thiamine deficiency and the development of beriberi. People who consume large quantities of junk food like soda, pretzels, chips, candy, and high carbohydrate foods made with unenriched flours may be deficient in thiamine and other vital nutrients. They may need to take vitamin supplements and should improve their diets. Usually there are other deficiencies in the B vitamins that will also need treatment.

Excess thiamine is excreted by the body in the urine, and negative reactions to too much thiamine are rare. Thiamine is unstable in alkali solutions, so it should not be taken with antacids or barbiturates.

Thiamine should be taken daily, with the dose depending on the severity of the disease. Additional supplements of B vitamins, a multivitamin and mineral complex, and Vitamin C are also recommended. Other alternative therapies may help relieve the person’s symptoms after the thiamine deficiency is corrected.

So maybe I had multiple B vitamin deficiencies? Another web site talks about how a B1 deficiency can lead to a disease called Beriberi :

Beriberi – this is caused by thiamin deficiency and affects the cardiovascular, muscular, gastrointestinal and nervous systems. As well as the above symptoms, a person with ‘dry’ beriberi may have: nerve degeneration, nervous tingling throughout the body, poor arm and leg coordination, and deep pain in the calf muscles. Symptoms of ‘wet’ beriberi include: an enlarged heart, heart failure and severe oedema (swelling).

Thiamine Deficiency And Dependency

The coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate, the active form of thiamine (vitamin B1), participates in carbohydrate metabolism through decarboxylation of -keto acids. Thiamine also acts as coenzyme to the apoenzyme transketolase in the pentose monophosphate pathway for glucose. Deficiency causes beriberi with peripheral neurologic, cerebral, cardiovascular, and GI manifestations.

Another site lists another set of symptoms:

Deficiency Symptoms: Depression, constipation, impaired growth in children, shortness of breath, numbness of hands and feet, weakness, fatigue, nervousness, sensitivity to noise, loss of appetite.

Inhibits Absorption: Tobacco, stress, fever, coffee, alcohol, surgery, raw clams

Enhances Absorption: B-complex, sulfur, manganese, niacin, B-2, folic acid, C, E

And then another says one of the Neurologic signs is a….TREMOR.

Pathophysiology
Nutritional disease results from Thiamine deficiency

Symptoms : Weakness, irritability, Nausea, Vomiting, Burning feet, Pruritus

Signs

Neurologic: Tremor, Diminished reflexes in lower limbs, Muscle atrophy

Cardiac: Congestive Heart Failure, Pedal Edema , Pleural Effusions

And yet another:

The following systems are most affected by beriberi:

Gastrointestinal system

When the cells of the smooth muscles in the digestive system and glands do not get enough energy from glucose, they are unable to produce more glucose from the normal digestion of food. There is a loss of appetite, indigestion, severe constipation, and a lack of hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

Nervous System

Glucose is essential for the central nervous system to function normally. Early deficiency symptoms are fatigue, irritability, and poor memory. If the deficiency continues, there is damage to the peripheral nerves that causes loss of sensation and muscle weakness, which is called peripheral neuropathy. The legs are most affected. The toes feel numb and the feet have a burning sensation; the leg muscles become sore and the calf muscles cramp. The individual walks unsteadily and has difficulty getting up from a squatting position. Eventually, the muscles shrink (atrophy) and there is a loss of reflexes in the knees and feet; the feet may hang limp (footdrop).

Cardiovascular system

There is a rapid heartbeat and sweating. Eventually the heart muscle weakens. Because the smooth muscle in the blood vessels is affected, the arteries and veins relax, causing swelling, known as edema, in the legs.

Musculoskeletal system

There is widespread muscle pain caused by the lack of TPP in the muscle tissue.

A thiamin deficiency also produces Warnicke-Korsakoff syndrome, sometimes called cerebral beriberi, a disorder of the central nervous system.

Muscles shrink (atrophy) and there is a loss of reflexes in the knees and feet? Could this explain my Plantar Fasciitis? A B1 deficiency is linked to the Gastrointestinal system and the Nervous System. The two things I have symptoms for. The two things I’ve been telling the doctors about and now I have a link to the cerebrum.

What is Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome?

Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a neurological disorder. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy and Korsakoff’s Psychosis are the acute and chronic phases, respectively, of the same disease. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is a combination of  Korsakoff’s syndrome which constitutes confusion, aphonia and confabulation and Wernicke’s encephalopathy which is nystagmus, opthalmoplegia, coma and, if untreated, death. It is also known as cerebral beriberi, which is beriberi (thiamine deficiency disease) in the brain. This results from severe acute deficiency of thiamine superimposed on a chronic deficiency. Usually found in malnourished chronic alcoholics.

Korsakoff’s syndrome, with symptoms of severe anterograde and retrograde amnesia, is caused by damage to mammillary bodies and other brain regions due to deficiency of thiamine. This is most often caused by chronic alcoholism, though other conditions including severe malnutrition, have been known to cause it. An association of Gayet-Wernicke and Korsakoff’ syndromes frequently observed in alcoholic, nutritionally deficient patients with the Gayet-Wernicke syndrome. Patients develop symptoms of the Korsakoff syndrome, mainly amnesia with a tendency to confabulate with or without polyneuropathy.

I don’t think I’ve gotten to the point of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome so it appears what I could have is a B1 deficiency that may led to it. Scary stuff…and it’s starting to make a bit more sense.

I’ve had this very weird feeling in my head almost from the time when the other symptoms started happening around July 2005. If I tilted my head back and kept it there for 5-10 seconds, when I try to bring it back, my head has a heavy sluggishness feeling. Almost like the fluid trying to balance itself. It dosen’t happen all of the time and I didn’t quite know how to explain it so I never mentioned it. The Cerebellum is the part of the brain below the back of the cerebrum and it regulates balance, posture, movement, and muscle coordination.

Down to Shoppers Drug Mart to pick up 100 mg of B1 suppliment.

June 15, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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