Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for October 21, 2007

Time to change up the vitamins a little. Today I’m going to add potassium. People with stressed adrenals are supposed to be low in potassium and it’s something I’ve added here and there but to change things up, I’ll add it again. I’ve also read about people with high sugar diets who can have low levels of potassium. It’s worth trying it again. I’m always thinking that I’m missing something obvious or overlooked something simple but until I get it, I will keep trying…

Also been doing a lot of reading about something called Glutathione and how a supplement called “NAC” can help.

7 Natural Ways To Increase Glutathione Production

Glutathione has recently become a cornerstone to improving health naturally.

You may already be aware that increasing the amount of glutathione your body produces each day is very beneficial to many of the natural systems that make and keep you HEALTHY.

Hopefully, you are also keenly aware that your personal level of glutathione directly affects your body’s ability to reduce and control chronic inflammation.

So, how does one increase personal glutathione production?

7 Natural Glutathione Boosters

L-Cysteine
Since the amount of cysteine in our body determines how much glutathione your body can make, why not just eat cysteine as a supplement? Well, you can, but research shows there would be negligible benefits and potential risks. Cysteine taken as a dietary supplement can promote hypercysteinemia and potential toxicity.

L-Methionine
Methionine is indeed a precursor of glutathione but the metabolic transformation of methionine into glutathione is a complex process which has the potential for “going astray”. For example, methionine is also a precursor of homocysteine, a risk factor in the development of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries).

Melatonin
Melatonin is produced by the pineal gland in the brain and has many roles in the body, one being its ability to raise glutathione levels in certain tissues of the body, including brain, liver, and muscle tissue. The long term safety of products that promote melatonin production has not been established and should be used in consultation with appropriate health professionals.

Glutamine
Glutamine is an amino acid found in abundance in our body. It is tremendously beneficial to the body and is easily found in a healthy diet. Also, supplemental glutamine must be kept absolutely dry or it will degrade into ammonia, a toxin to the body. Due to its abundance in a healthy diet and the risks of storing it, glutamine is not an ideal supplement.

Lipoic Acid (alpha-lipoic acid)
Lipoic acid occurs naturally in the body but can also be taken as a supplement with effectiveness. This supplement works well in conjunction with healthy levels of glutathione but studies show that if taken by a person whose glutathione levels are too low, lipoic acid actually promotes oxidation.

Silymarin (milk thistle)
This herbal extract seems to stimulate the growth and regeneration of damaged liver cells but also has been shown to significantly increase glutathione production. However, some toxic reactions are noted by some, such as gas, cramps and diarrhea.

Whey Proteins
Fresh or “bioactive” milk whey contains potent glutathione precursors. Unfortunately, by the time milk reaches your table, it has been pasteurized and has lost its bioactivity, and its glutathione enhancing benefits. However, a neutraceutical called Immunocal is available which is essentially the whey proteins harvested from milk and kept in a bioactive or undenatured state. There are no known side effects associated with taking bioactive whey proteins and, since there is no lactose in whey proteins, lactose intolerant people are not adversely affected.

Here’s another suggestion I found:

Raise glutathione levels:

  • Selenium 200 mcg/day
  • N-acetyl-cysteine 1-2000 mg/day (especially if prone to nasal congestion)
  • l-glutamine: 3,000 mg/day (especially if prone to stomach irritation)
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January 17, 2008 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 27, 2007

Just before going to bed, I wanted to review my blog to read the entries regarding the zinc. I came across an entry I did when I suspected high sugar intake was the cause of my problems. I couldn’t believe it. Right there in front of my eyes were Choline and Inositol. I’m not sure how I missed that? Maybe because I didn’t know what they were? God I can’t believe I missed that! I feel like I’m so thorough at everything I do.

Entry for January 07, 2007

Vitamin/Minerals (Factors that inhibit absorption) : Excessive Sugar

Vitamin B (complex), Vitamin B-2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B-5 (Pantothenic Acid), Niacin (nicotinic acid), Chromium, Choline, Copper, Inositol, Phosphorus, Potassium and Magnesium.

August 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

Today I’m back at work so my routine is a bit more stable. I’ve decided to take three doses of 300mg calcium/magnesium in the 1/1 ratio along with the phosphorus and vitamin D. No reason for the change just want to keep trying something different until I find something that works.

I also changed the zinc dosage from two doses of 50 mg to three doses of 30 mg. I didn’t take any niacin today as I’m still not convinced that it’s the cause of the vibration although I didn’t have any all weekend.

By the end of the work day the eyes aren’t as itchy and the stuffiness in my nose feels better than usual. I’ll keep doing this combination of minerals for sure!

The million dollar question….Will it have any effect on the vibration?

I’ve always been very confused as to why taking extra calcium would make the vibration stronger and today I still don’t have an answer. I’m wondering if the magnesium deficiency caused a high calcium ratio? What are the effects of low magnesium and the effect on calcium?

Calcium

Elevated calcium levels are associated with arthritic / joint and vascular degeneration, calcification of soft tissue, hypertension and stroke, an increase in VLDL triglycerides, gastrointestinal disturbances, mood and depressive disorders, chronic fatigue, increased alkalinity, and general mineral imbalances.

If magnesium is insufficient potassium and calcium will be lost in the urine and calcium will be deposited in the soft tissues (kidneys, arteries, joints, brain, etc.).

Calcium Synergists

Copper is required to fix calcium in the bones and helps raise the tissue calcium level. Many people have biologically unavailable copper which causes their calcium problems. In fast oxidizers, copper deficiency contributes to a calcium deficiency. Adequate adrenal hormone levels are also essential for proper calcium metabolism.

Calcium Antagonists

Sugar upsets the calcium/phosphorus ratio in the blood more than any other single factor, according to researcher Dr. Melvin Page. It also stresses the adrenal glands and upsets the hormone balance which affects calcium metabolism.

Copper Bio-Unavailability A Major Cause of Candida Infection

The most commonly observed mineral imbalance we find in many patients with Candida infection is termed bio-unavailable copper. Bio-unavailable copper is indicated on a tissue mineral test. Other mineral indicators of a candida overgrowth are an elevated calcium level, elevated calcium/magnesium ratio, or a low sodium/potassium ratio.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Chromium is closely associated with the pancreas, and therefore helps to alleviate symptoms of a hypoglycemic and/or diabetic condition by balancing the blood sugar. Chromium helps us to burn fat, build muscle mass, and properly metabolize calories.

Chromium is zapped out of our bodies in our youth as a result of eating starchy demineralized foods and refined sugar. Most chromium deficiencies are chronic. It is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium.

Chromium is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium. Seems like an obvious place to look? But then again, I’ve tried chomium before without the same success but I’ll bet it was because I had to fix the imbalance with copper first. And here’s a site that says that exact thing.

“The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance.”

So it’s not only copper, it was the other minerals as well…

CHROMIUM

Chromium deficiency is a major factor in the development of heart disease (heart attacks, hardening of the arteries). Chromium is stored principally in the kidneys, spleen and testes, with trace amounts found in the heart, lungs, pancreas and brain. The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance as well.

Chromium helps the body regulate metabolism, and regulate insulin and blood sugar levels. Chromium helps the body lose weight by stimulating enzymes that metabolize glucose for energy. It plays an important role in the liver synthesis of fatty acids (burns fat). When the body is deficient in chromium, twice the amount of time is needed for insulin to remove glucose from the blood. Chromium enhances insulin performance and glucose utilization and helps carry proteins. Chromium works best if taken before meals. Refined sugar causes the body to deplete chromium more rapidly. Strenuous exercise can also deplete chromium levels. The elderly are unable to store as much chromium in the body as are younger people. The refining of starches and carbohydrates robs foods of chromium. If you are American you have less chromium in the soil compared to European soil.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 15, 2007

Here’s an excerpt from Dr. Jenson’s guide to Body Chemistry and Nutrition. I read this book several months ago and it was great. But now I was looking for something on phosphorus and what a gold mine. This guy is incredible!

“sugar upsets the calcium-phosphorus balance.”

Phosphorus

Phosphorus does not occur in a free state but in the form of phosphates and alkaline salts. It is in the bones in the form of calcium and magnesium phosphate (where it does not glow in the dark) and is an important electrolyte as well. Blood concentrations of phosphorus and calcium reveal a teeter-totter effect-if one is up the other is down. The body contains about 800 grams of phosphorus at any particular time. It Buctuates in its interaction with calcium and requires the help of vitanlin D to be assimilated &-om the small intestine. Seventy to 80 percent of this stored phosphorus is in the bones and teeth, 10 percent is in muscle tissue, and the rest is in the blood, the cells, the fluid surrounding the cells, and in the nerves and brain. Phosphorus, like calcium, is needed by every cell in the body.

Phosphorus plays the starring role in many body functions. As a key ingredient of the energy production process in every cell of the body, adenosine triphosphate helps transform glucose into energy and carbon dioxide. Most enzyme reactions involving B-complex vitamins as cofactors can only take place in the presence of phosphorus. As an essential part of the nucleic acids DNA and RNA, it influences cell reproduction and protein formation.

Phosphorus helps transport and break down fats. A chemical called phosphocreatin energizes muscle contractions. Lecithin, which contains phosphorus, helps keep cholesterol in solution so it can’t deposit on arterial walls and cause cardiovascular disease. Male seminal fluid is mostly lecithin. Lecithin helps substances pass through cell membranes and participates in breaking down fats. About 70 percent of the phosphorus in foods is assimilated into our bodies, unlike calcium, of which only 20 to 30 percent is absorbed from food in the small intestine.

Excess phosphorus and magnesium in the blood hinder absorption of calcium from food. (Calcium, in turn, hinders absorption of iron.) If the intake of calcium, phosphorus, or vitamin D is too low, bones don’t grow properly. Phosphorus, in the form of electrically charged phosphate ions, has a significant influence on water balance and osnlotic pressure in the body. Phosphate in the blood helps maintain the acid-alkaline balance. An acid phosphate (monosodium phosphate) works with an alkaline phosphate (disodium phosphate) to stabilize this balance.

Healing of broken bones, rickets, and osteomalacia is speeded up when there is sufficient phosphorus working with calcium and vitamin D.

CAUSES OF PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY

Antacids with aluminum block phosphorus intake, as will an excess of iron. Lack of vitamin D or a high blood level of calcium will block phosphorus assimilation. The hormone calcitonin causes rapid loss of phosphorus, and sugar upsets the calcium-phosphorus balance.

From another web site, I found this:

Fructose: A recent study of 11 adult men found that a diet high in fructose (20% of total calories) resulted in increased urinary loss of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance (i.e., daily loss of phosphorus was higher than daily intake). This effect was more pronounced if the diet was also low in magnesium.

A potential mechanism for this effect is the lack of feed back inhibition of the conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate in the liver. In other words, increased accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate in the cell does not inhibit the enzyme that phosphorylates fructose, using up large amounts of phosphate. This phenomenon is known as phosphate trapping.

This finding is relevant because fructose consumption in the U.S. has been increasing rapidly since the introduction of high fructose corn syrup in 1970, while magnesium intake has decreased over the past century.

July 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 05, 2007

I had the day off work today and something interesting happened. Usually I have my apple and a plum for breakfast every morning but today because I was home, I didn’t have any. By the early afternoon, I could really feel my candida was getting really good.

I’m going past the Naturopathic College and I decide to check and see if they have Phosphorus. If I can’t find it in a regular health store maybe they’ll have it. Nope, they have the homeopathic version but nothing in a regular supplement. I didn’t really have much time to ask them anything else so I left.

By late in the afternoon, I had an apple as a snack and for dinner I had blackberry crepes. For added flavor I decided to add some natural honey. What a mistake…

For the rest of the evening, my nose is running and I’m sneezing. I think sugar is really a cause for my allergies and I’ve really seriously cut back on the sugar and junk food but maybe I’ll stop eating fruit for a week. I felt the most improvement with the candida when I starting taking zinc, selenium and iron so maybe if I try a simple version of the candida diet, I’ll have better success?

July 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 02, 2007

Here is an amazing article that discusses the relationship between high sugar intake and phosphorus deficiency. Not only that, but it also lists the minerals required to digest sugar thus causing a deficiency and I know I have problems with most of them…

“calcium, phosphorus, chromium, magnesium, cobalt, copper, zinc and manganese. ”

I read amazing articles like this and it really makes me wonder why we as a society are so stupid when it comes to our health…because someone obviously has the knowledge. Incredible!

The Effect of Simple Sugars on the Human Body

The key to health is the moderate consumption of complex carbohydrates — from natural food sources, such as fresh vegetables and, to a lesser extent, cooked vegetables — balanced with intake of protein from a clean source, such as organically grown soy products. Anything less than this is a compromise and will eventually affect your health and/or longevity. While it is true that this stuff breaks down to simple sugars in a few hours, if you take your carbs in this fashion, the quantity will be tolerable, and it will come with other nutrients.

Here is a list of the minerals required to digest sugar: calcium, phosphorus, chromium, magnesium, cobalt, copper, zinc and manganese. These minerals are the so-called “co-factors” necessary for the proper functioning of the enzyme systems, including the enzyme systems required to metabolize sugar. These minerals have been stripped away in the refining process which produces sugar. Also, the mechanisms which produce glucose from complex carbohydrates, proteins and fats simply shut down from disuse when you continue a steady diet of simple sugars. If you don’t use it you lose it.

Thus, you become dependent on an outside source of glucose, i.e., addicted. This source usually is sucrose. Also, you lose the ability to metabolize sugar and keep it in a healthy range within the cells. You may have a normal blood sugar and a normal glucose tolerance test. Under these conditions, your doctor will tell you “no problemo.” Don’t believe it! A normal blood glucose and/or glucose tolerance test only proves that your pancreas is still healthy enough to shunt a large load of sugar to inside the cells. It is within the cells themselves where sugar does its damage.

The evolution of our enzyme systems required millions of years, and throughout those millions of years purified sugar was not available. Therefore, your body simply is not programmed to handle anything more than the quantity of simple sugars present in, for example, a couple of peaches or a couple of apples. Those peaches or apples, by the way, come with their mineral supply — and loads of other nutrients — intact. You can even overdose on natural foods and take a large hit of sugar from fruit, for example, especially dried fruit. It also is easy to juice six apples or six oranges and gulp your juice down in ten minutes whilst thinking what a wonderful thing you are doing for your body.

The first enzyme systems of your body which are upset by refined sugar are your digestive enzymes, because these are the first encountered by the sugar you put in your mouth. Because these enzymes are disabled by abnormal concentrations of sugar, food passes through your digestive tract in an undigested or a partially digested state.

Some of these large molecules enter your body through the walls of your small intestines in this undigested or partially digested state. Your body recognizes these large molecules as foreign tissue and makes antibodies to them. Thus, do food allergies develop.

Most people get twenty percent of their calories from refined sugar, an average of 130 pounds (59 kilos) per year. This is a massive and continuing upset for the body.

The usual calcium/phosphorus ratio in the serum is 10:2, a ratio of ten mg. calcium for every two mg. phosphorous per liter of serum. The ingestion of sugar alters this ratio by decreasing the phosphorus and increasing the calcium. Because calcium and phosphorus work together in the enzymatic systems of the body, a phosphorus deficiency is sensed by the body as a calcium deficiency as well as a phosphorus deficiency. The body has no readily available source of phosphorus; however, it certainly does have a ready source of calcium. Therefore, your bones and teeth are robbed of calcium to deal with this imbalance, and the result is osteoporosis of bones throughout the body and weakened tooth structure.

This extra calcium, without a complement of phosphorus to balance it, is toxic. Calcium can be in deficient supply, even though the concentration may be above normal, because insufficient phosphorus is present to enable the body to use it. Therefore, the odd situation arises of toxicity from calcium, which also is in deficient supply as far as availability to the enzyme systems is concerned.

This is called “nonfunctioning calcium,” and it leads to kidney stones, arthritis, hardening of the arteries, cataracts and plaque on the teeth. In extreme imbalance, massive calcium tumors may form in the body.

Calcium caseinate, along with oxidized cholesterol, is a major component of atherosclerotic plaques found on blood vessel walls in people with hardened arteries. This is the major cause of heart attack, and this situation can develop at a very young age thanks to degenerative illness driven by habitual simple sugar ingestion.

July 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for April 23, 2007

Came across this today on the effects of sugar. I like it because it may explain why drinking cola drinks have always had an effect on my allergies. I would mention this to every doctor and allergy specialist and they all couldn’t explain why this was happening.

The article explains that colas are extremely acidic with a pH of approximately 2.5. This acidic environment in combination with the sugar content, probably had an effect on the candida and made my “allergies” worse.

Sugar And Your Health

Sugar is a chemical combination of Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen and refers to a large group of carbohydrates that are soluble in water, sweet to the taste and either directly or indirectly fermentable. Depending on how the Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen are combined or uncombined, we get sucrose (cane or beet sugar), glucose or dextrose (grape sugar), maltose (malt sugar), fructose, levulose (honey or fruit sugar), lactose (milk sugar), etc.

Sugar is virtually devoid of any key vitamins and minerals. Sugar contains 16 calories per teaspoon but has no B vitamins, chromium, magnesium, zinc or other trace minerals that the body needs to digest and metabolize it. Thus, to fully move the sugar through your digestive system, you body has to take B vitamins and other trace minerals from the healthy the food you eat, or from vitamins and minerals that your body is storing for future use. As a result, the sugar essentially robs your body of these beneficial nutrients.  Your body could be using these nutrients for more important purposes such as fighting infections, warding off allergies, or just plain energy.

Sugar gums up the immune system. Your immune system is made up of numerous antibodies who act like Pacman and attack foreign invaders. Medical studies have found that antibody production drops after people have as little as 18 grams of sugar, about as much as you’d find in half of a can of regular soda. Sugar interferes with the cells of the immune system. Eating just 3 oz of sugar can result in a 50% reduction of the ability of the white blood cells to gobble up and kill viruses and bacteria for up to five hours.

Ingesting sugar can cause a significant rise in triglycerides, cause kidney damage, reduce helpful high density fats (lipoproteins) and promote and elevation of the harmful low density fats and all those problems associated with vitamin deficiencies.

Due to the need to use up your body’s minerals, eating sugar can cause a chromium deficiency, copper deficiency, and can interfere with absorption of calcium and magnesium. an imbalance which can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, concentration difficulties.

People need a calcium-magnesium ration of 10 to 4. Sugar causes the phosphorus and calcium levels to either decrease or increase. If one increases the other decreases and vice versa. Researchers have found that ingesting sugar increases the rate at which we excrete calcium. It pulls the calcium from our bones and tissues.

Minerals are essential to many bodily functions. They are important for bones and teeth, helping to maintain the correct acidity of the blood, have specific functions in the transmission of nerve impulse and others are important in the process of digestion.

Homeostasis is the wonderful balance in the body. It involves a continual fine-tuning of the body chemistry. The vitamins and minerals are always fluctuating a little. This is normal. However, when the fluctuations become too great for to long, disease creeps in. And then there’s this other post where all your childhood fond memories of erm sugar eating momments are quashed.. and destroyed….

SUGAR: YOU JUST LOVE YOUR CHILDREN TO DEATH

Gregory Grosbard of Miami, Florida received a U.S. patent on a process to improve the strength of plastic by using sugar. Each time plastic goes through a heat cycle, it loses strength because oxygen in the atmosphere goes into the material and creates oxygen “holes.” Mr. Grosbard found that, by mixing a small amount of sugar into the plastic material during the heat cycle, the sugar grabbed the oxygen first, preventing the oxygen holes and making the plastic stronger.

Research has shown that:

*Processed sugar blocks the absorption of calcium.

*Processed sugar produces a low oxygen environment.

*Processed sugar is extremely acidic.

*Too much processed sugar is the death of the immune system. It interrupts the Kreb’s energy cycle which in turn suppresses your immune system’s manufacture of killer cells and antibodies.

*Processed sugar depletes B vitamins which is needed by the liver to detoxify it. The liver is the most important organ when it comes to healing the body.

*Sugar does stop hiccups. The New England Journal of Medicine published the results of a study that used sugar successfully to stop hiccups in 19 out of 20 people; some of whom had been hiccupping for as long as 6 weeks.

Cancer has become the number one “killer disease in children” in the past few years. Sugar consumption is robbing the oxygen out of their little bodies and making their cells extremely acidic while shutting off their immune systems. Sugar averages for children are around 36 teaspoons a day.

The next time you feel like having a soda, just think about this: Colas are extremely acidic with a pH of approximately 2.5. It takes 32 glasses of water with a pH of 10 to neutralize that one cola. And, keep in mind that most water is relatively neutral with a pH of 7.2; water with a pH of ten is approximately one thousand times more alkaline than your run of the mill glass of water.

April 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 29, 2007

Chromium

Chromium decreases insulin resistance and reduces the body’s level of triglycerides. It also helps to control obesity and can stimulate weight loss. Proper insulin regulation promotes the production of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that controls the appetite and curbs sugar cravings.

Analysis has shown that unrefined sugars and grains are rich in chromium and other essential life supporting minerals. When chromium is removed, (during the refining process into white sugar and flour) the human body does not have the element it needs to effectively deal with these two powerful energy sources. The refining of raw sugars and grains gives them a longer shelf life. It also creates foods which strip the body of chromium and other essential minerals necessary for the proper metabolism of these energy foods. Consequently the body must draw on other stores to process the sugar and flour when consumed. This subsequently leads to mineral deficiencies and an inability to deal with the body’s other demands for chromium and other minerals.

March 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 03, 2007

Came across another article that talks about the relationship between copper, zinc, weak adrenals and candida. The headlines read like a summary of my health issues:

  • “Adrenal Gland Exhaustion: A Major Cause of Copper Toxicity”
  • “Excess Sugar Intake as a Cause of Copper Toxicity and Zinc Deficiency”
  • “Candida, Stress and Copper and Hypoglycemia”

This article is one of the most amazing things I have ever read.

Insight Into Copper Elimination
By Dr. Paul C. Eck and Dr. Larry Wilson

Introduction

Years of experience in dealing with copper toxic individuals reveal that such individuals experience certain difficulties while on a nutritional correction program. One common complaint is that they are unable to take their nutritional program three times a day. Some copper-toxic individuals find it difficult to take their supplements even once a day.

Stress and Increased Metabolic Rate

Any kind of stress, physical or emotional in nature, results in a necessary increase in the metabolic rate. Any increase in the metabolic rate, whatever its cause frequently results in the release of excess copper into the blood. It is to be noted that the major internal cause of a copper toxicity problem is a reduced ability to cope with stress. It is the intent of your nutritional program to increase your ability to cope with stress, hence avoiding any future excessive buildup of copper. Many of the distressing symptoms associated with copper toxicity are due to a stress-induced zinc deficiency.

Stress as a Cause of Copper Elimination

Whenever there is an increase in one’s rate of metabolism (usually due to stress, whether physical or emotional), copper is mobilized from primary storage sites in the liver and brain and is discharged into the blood. The principal way that excess copper can be eliminated from storage sites is to increase one’s rate of metabolism. People with high tissue copper levels, because of an adrenal insufficiency problem, are very susceptible to stress and consequentially suffer from periodical elimination of copper. Enabling such individuals to better cope with stress helps to prevent a buildup of excess copper in the tissues. In other words, sensitivity to stress is greatly reduced. Major copper eliminations are thus largely eliminated.

Adrenal Gland Exhaustion: A Major Cause of Copper Toxicity

Diminished adrenal activity is perhaps the single most important physiological reason for copper toxicity problems today. When adrenal activity is insufficient, ceruloplasmin (a copper-binding protein) synthesis in the liver declines. Copper that is not bound to a protein cannot be utilized, and so it is that unbound copper begins to accumulate in various tissues and organs.

According to hair analysis research conducted by Dr. Paul C. Eck, 70-80% of people tested reveal weak adrenal glands or what is termed adrenal insufficiency! Individuals with weak adrenal glands tend to store excess copper in various body tissues, principally the liver and brain. Excessive storage of copper, as we have stated previously, eventually results in organ damage.

The Importance of Zinc & Vitamin B6

Discomforting symptoms frequently occur when the individual is eliminating copper faster than their nutrient reservoirs of vitamin B6 and zinc can contain it. Many of the symptoms associated with copper toxicity relate to a copper induced vitamin B6, zinc and vitamin C deficiency. Both vitamin B6, and vitamin C are destroyed on contact with copper.3 Along with destroying vitamin B6 and vitamin C on contact, copper, in excess, causes a relative zinc deficiency. When zinc, vitamin B6 and vitamin C reserves become adequate, the distressing symptoms of copper toxicity are largely eliminated, hence the necessity to buildup the copper-toxic individual’s storage reservoirs of the above vitamins and minerals. Until the individual’s storage reservoirs of B6, vitamin C and zinc are sufficiently replete, symptoms will continue to be manifest.

Slowing Down a Copper Elimination

Numerous methods are available for slowing down the elimination of copper. Several means of slowing-down the elimination of copper would be to reduce the supplemental dosage to once a day, take or follow the recommended program every other day, add three calcium tablets three times a day and/or temporarily increase the individual’s dietary intake of dairy products. The individual must be made aware that this is only a temporary stop gap measure, because if one remained on dairy products on a continuous basis their metabolic rate would decrease resulting in an increased storage of copper. Dairy products are often effective in reducing the symptoms of a copper elimination because they temporarily reduce the individuals temporary stress-induced excessive metabolic rate.

Inasmuch as an increase in one’s metabolic rate will cause a flare-up in symptoms associated with a copper toxicity problem it becomes necessary to temporarily slow down one’s rate of metabolism. This is accomplished by increasing one’s calcium intake, increasing one’s dairy product intake, together with an increase in dietary fat intake, such as, avocadoes, nuts, salad oils, cooking oils, dairy products, etc.) Slowing down one’s rate of metabolism is definitely of value in reducing the symptoms associated with copper toxicity. When the distressing symptoms come under control, it is time to resume the original nutritional program.

Dietary Considerations: Need for Increase in Protein Intake

One of the major problems associated with a copper toxicity problem is a copper-induced protein deficiency. This no doubt occurs, in part, because an excess of tissue copper causes a zinc deficiency. “Zinc has…been found to be important in governing the net rate of synthesis of nucleic acids and protein, thereby importantly influencing tissue growth and reparative processes…”4 Adding to the problem, individuals suffering from copper toxicity frequently develop a distaste for meat protein due to their reduced ability to digest and assimilate protein. Over a period of time, a serious protein deficiency develops. As stated previously, one major reason why copper accumulates in the body is a deficiency of protein required to bind copper, thus increasing one’s metabolic rate. Although sometimes difficult, copper-toxic individuals should attempt to increase their protein intake (eggs, fish or chicken). Soy-protein products should be avoided, unless otherwise specified, if possible, inasmuch as soy products contain relatively high amounts of copper.

Copper-toxic individuals have a great need to increase their protein intake, but usually will not partake of an increased meat protein intake until their adrenal insufficiency problem is improved or corrected. Until such time, the copper-toxic individual must avail him or herself of digestive aids including hydrochloric acid and pancreatic enzymes.

An adequate level of zinc, so necessary to prevent an excessive copper buildup depends largely on the eating of red meat protein. As stated previously, individuals suffering from copper toxicity develop a strong aversion to the eating of zinc-rich red meat protein hence the tendency to the excessive accumulation of tissue copper.

Eliminate Foods High in Copper Content

Many diets today are high in copper and low in zinc content. In particular, vegetarian proteins such as soybean, nuts, seeds, tofu, avocado and grains, often highly beneficial for others, are high in copper content. Fast food hamburgers and other popular foods are also frequently soy-based. Soybean protein is coming into wider usage, due to its low cholesterol level and lower cost.

Other high-copper foods are organ meats, shellfish, wheat germ and bran, yeast, corn oil, margarine,
and mushrooms. Except for margarine, these are excellent health foods in general, but should be temporarily avoided by copper-toxic individuals.

Special Considerations Regarding Copper Detoxification

Diet for the Copper-Toxic Individual

As stated previously, copper-toxic individuals frequently have an aversion to eating protein, particularly red meat protein. It is important for such individuals to eat some protein at least twice a day, even if the quantity is small. Meat protein is rich in zinc content, a mineral essential to prevent copper toxicity and to promote the elimination of excess copper. It is for this reason (high zinc content) that red meats are often avoided. Otherwise, progress is delayed. Strict vegetarian diets are not advisable, but may be necessary for a period of time in severe cases, until adrenal activity has been adequately reestablished.

Excessive Intake of Sweets, Fruits and Fruit Juices

The majority of copper-toxic individuals have an insatiable craving for sweets, fruit, and fruit juices. Such cravings arise from the fact that copper-toxic individuals, in general, suffer from a severe potassium deficiency. Fruit, fruit juices and vegetables are high in potassium content, and hence the craving for these foods. Such foods should be limited as much as possible for optimal results. In many cases, a high complex carbohydrate diet is necessary until adrenal activity is increased.

Excess Sugar Intake as a Cause of Copper Toxicity and Zinc Deficiency

The eating of sugar and sugar-containing foods contributes greatly to a copper toxicity problem by causing a zinc deficiency. This occurs because zinc is required for sugar and carbohydrate metabolism. The greater the sugar and carbohydrate intake, the greater the chances for a zinc deficiency to develop. Individuals suffering from copper toxicity problem usually limit their diets, to a great extent, to simple carbohydrates and carbohydrates which are rapidly absorbed (vegetable and fruit juices).

A high sugar and carbohydrate diet lower tissue zinc levels. The consequences are many.

It has been established that prolonged and repeated increases in the glucose content of the blood rid the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas almost completely of zinc. Zinc is necessary for both the production and secretion of insulin, which is necessary to burn sugars and carbohydrates.

“By means of prolonged and repeated increases in the glucose content of the blood, Maske succeeded in ridding the islets almost completely of zinc.”

In other words, the eating of a sugar and a high carbohydrate diet, which is typical of the diet preferred by the copper-toxic individual, is conducive to causing a zinc deficiency. The end-result is an inability to derive sufficient energy from the metabolism of sugar and carbohydrates with a consequent buildup of copper in the tissues.

Refining of Food Removes Zinc

Processed foods should be avoided at all costs because the refining of foods, particularly cereals and grains, removes much of the zinc contained in these foods. What zinc remaining from the refining process is unavailable because the zinc is bound to phytin. Phytic acid forms an insoluble complex with zinc rendering it biounavailable.

Candida, Stress and Copper and Hypoglycemia

Eventually, over a period of time, copper is eliminated from storage sites. Future eliminations of copper, due to stress, are thus minimized. As a result, symptoms of anxiety, migraine headaches, skin disorders, severe constipation, fears, candida infections etc., are greatly minimized.

As a result of a low blood sugar induced increased adrenalin secretion, (diminished immune response) a flare-up in candida may occur.

Often a copper elimination results in the flare-up of a candida infection and the many symptoms associated with candida.

The major reason candida continues to exist in an individual is because they are unable to reduce their excessive copper storage in the liver and in the brain. Whenever they undergo stress of any kind, copper builds up in the tissues resulting in a bio-unavailability of copper. It is the bio-unavailability of copper which permits candida to thrive. In essence, sufficient copper cannot be mobilized out of liver storage because of stress and weak adrenal glands.

Candida Albicans (Yeast) Infections

Copper is a stimulant to oxidative or aerobic metabolism. Copper biounavailability, deficiency or imbalance, often results in a tendency for yeast infections. Copper compounds are used commercially to inhibit growth of yeast and fungi.

March 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 20, 2007

Something weird happened today. After taking my third vitamin dosage with dinner, a few hours later, I start getting a weird mild chest pain and my hands are cold. This has happened so many times before, I know right away that it’s my magnesium level. The interesting thing? I’ve already taken my six capsules for the day. This has never happened before since I figured out the dosage for the Nu-Life brand. So I take two more and the weird feeling disappears and my hands are fine.

Maybe the extra copper is effecting my magnesium absorption? It is too much? It’s the only thing that I’ve changed so I take one 30 mg dose of zinc before going to bed. I lie down and I can feel a slightly stronger vibration than usual.

Zinc is secreted into body fluids as an antiseptic. So colds, sore throats, flu, gastro, ulcers, urinary tract infections, thrush will result in low levels as our bodies use zinc to fight infection. Also zinc lowering are – coffee, tea, alcohol, diuretics, ACE inhibitor blood pressure tablets, the Pill, HRT and anything containing the yellow, green, orange food additive tartrazine.

A simple home test for zinc, according to Dr Robert Atkins MD in his 1998 book “Dr Atkins’ Vita Nutrient Solution”, is to take a swig of liquid zinc sulphate heptahydrate (ask for it at your chemist) and swish it around in your mouth. If you immediately notice a bitter taste, you don’t have a zinc deficiency. If you taste nothing or have a delayed recognition of taste, your body needs more zinc.

Body zinc is depleted by high carbohydrate diets – grains, & vegies. Calcium supplements and high calcium foods reduce zinc absorption by half. Stress (physical, emotional or chemical) as well as pollutions, pesticides and toxic metals leave us short on zinc. We lose zinc from the body in sweat, urine, faeces, menses, pregnancy and breast feeding.

One of the first signs of zinc deficiency can be disrupted sleep patterns. According to Sherrill, D.L. et al in ARCH. INTERN. MED. 1998, “Symptoms of disturbed sleep are common in the general population, with overall prevalence rates of between 35% and 41%.” So what does this tell us about probable zinc deficiency levels in the general population of USA, let alone WA where we know there is gross soil lack of zinc?

Those with low zinc tend to eat more frequently. They may have poor concentration, poor short term memory recall, mental apathy, eczema, dermatitis, hay fever, allergies, asthma, frequent colds, sore throats, ear infections, thrush, warts. They may be fussy eaters, lose sense of taste and smell, have pre-dinner tantrums, temper outbursts, anorexia or bulimia, acne, teenage depression, be hyperactive or moody. – How about kids & grandchildren?

In pregnancy low zinc results in stretch marks and irritability. Post natal depression is more likely. The baby is likely to have reflux or colic, require extra frequent feeds and sleep poorly. There is a tendency to bite fingernails, have white spots on fingernails (indicates periods of stress eg monthly periods) smelly feet, poor healing, creaky joints, leg ulcers, and learning disorders.

That persistent cough after a cold or flu will clear quickly with zinc, as will a cold. People with low zinc may have a persistent runny nose and cough, react strangely to antihistamines, not recover quickly from illness, develop chronic fatigue, diabetes, high cholesterol, arthritis, depression, cancer.

So do I have a zinc deficiency? I’ll take two doses of zinc tomorrow and continue with the same about of copper to see if there is any change or differences. I wonder if zinc is effected by sugar?

A new review of the evidence from South Africa confirms that high consumption of added sugars contributes significantly to the incidence of dental caries and obesity. Published in this month’s Bulletin of the World Health Organization, the findings cover both rural and urban populations, and add to the growing body of global evidence on the influence of diet on chronic disease.

The paper examines the effect of added sugars on a population experiencing both under-nutrition and over-nutrition. The information was compiled as part of an effort by the South African Department of Health to advise on sugar consumption in its dietary guidelines. The researchers recommend that added sugars should form no more than 6–10% of total dietary intake. The wording of the guideline, they suggest, should be “Eat and drink food and drinks containing sugar sparingly and not between meals.”

“…in many cases sugar displaces protein consumption and significantly dilutes iron, zinc and thiamine intake.”

I’ll need to do more research…

According to the USDA, people who eat diets high in sugar get less calcium, fiber, folate, zinc, magnesium, iron and vitamins A, C and E and other nutrients than people who do not consume much sugar. The high-sugar crowd also consumes fewer fruits and vegetables.

And what about candida?

Zinc deficiency has been connected with women who have recurrent thrush. Adequate levels of zinc are critical for the optimum functioning of your immune system. People who are deficient in zinc will be susceptible to recurrent infections or infestations of any kind. If you are zinc deficient, your immune system can be compromised and your body will not be able to control yeast overgrowth.

February 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 13, 2007

A review of the blog led me into a new direction today. Back on January 07, 2007, I posted a list of vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by excessive amounts of sugar intake. On February 04, 2007, I posted a list of reasons why sugar is bad for your health. From that list, there were two minerals that I missed the first time around so I modified the original entry to add Chromium and Copper. So a quick search and I find this:

“Without copper, nerves would fray like toaster cords,” said Sharon Faelten in The Complete Book of Minerals for Health. “Cooper helps forge the protective myelin sheath around each of the millions of nerve fibers in our bodies. Calm nerves and clear thinking depend on it.

Copper is as important as calcium and zinc for bone formation, red blood cell integrity, skin and immune functions, nervous system functions, the conversion of beta-carotene to vitamin A and the processing of vitamin C, wrote Gershon M. Lesser, M.D., in Growing Younger.

And then I came across this article:

Chromium & Copper:

These two elements are the most important nutrients next to calcium and magnesium for their anti-inflammatory properties. They share left / right-sided cell receptors and are considered essential to human health. While neither one – with few exceptions – is generally found to be very deficient level-wise, chromium is on average always lower than copper, with virtually no exceptions. Copper, on the other hand is elevated in the majority of patients, which creates a chronic copper / chromium conflict ratio-wise in these individuals.

In fact, of all the patients I have tested since the mid 70’s, nearly 90% exhibited a chemical profile that in addition to their own unique chemistry contained an underlying pattern that reflected the impact of high copper levels on various opposing nutrients, which include chromium, molybdenum, sulfur, nickel, Vitamin C, hesperidin, and others. Although chromium appears to be normal on the following graph, it is very low in ratio to copper, its associated element, so when supplementing chromium, its level will generally not increase at first, but instead it will gradually lower copper, and in the example below, potassium, since they are high in ratio to chromium. Only after copper and potassium have been reduced to normal levels, chromium may at that point start to go up. However, since sufficient amounts of chromium are rarely used, in practice, copper and potassium just come down closer to normal, and chromium levels stay the same.

Magnesium levels frequently go up following long-term supplementation of chromium because of its synergism with chromium, and also because of potassium (which is a magnesium antagonist) going down, and thus not exerting an inhibiting effect on magnesium any longer.

Copper works synergistically with potassium and calcium, so when patients do exhibit low copper levels, then calcium and potassium are frequently on the low side as well. Taking a 3mg copper pill for one or two months, or less, is all that is needed for an adult to normalize any copper deficiency, and then it should always be discontinued, otherwise copper will go too high – being another reason why most people should avoid multi-mineral formulations containing more than 1 mg of copper.

The interesting thing about all of this is I started taking 3 mg of copper once a day in between two 30 mg doses of zinc a few weeks ago.

February 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 04, 2007

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After reading that sugar can have an effect on appendicitis, I decide to do some more research. My mother tells a story where I had really bad stomach pains when I was around seven years old. The doctor’s couldn’t find anything obviously wrong so one day it was so bad, she took me to the hospital emergency. There it was decided to do exploratory surgery to find out what the problem was. They came back with appendicitis and I had an appendectomy.

So here we go again…I’ve mentioned this to to every doctor so far because when I start with a new doctor, there is always the generic form that I need to fill out and the section that includes surgical procedures. How many mentioned that one of the causes of appendicitis was poor diet? Not one.

I always knew I had a long history of poor diet and high sugar I just never realized there was early warning signs at such an young age that of course went ignored.

Nutrition

In England and Wales, a study was performed to review whether low intake of fiber and high intake of sugar and meat may influence the development of acute appendicitis. The study evaluated the dietary habits of 49,690 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Although no specific correlation was found with sugar or meat, the analysis did suggest that the more fresh and frozen green vegetables and fresh and processed tomatoes people ate, the less likely they were to develop appendicitis. The researchers concluded that eating green vegetables—particularly cabbages, cauliflowers, peas, beans, and Brussels sprouts—and possibly tomatoes may protect against appendicitis.

Another study reviewed the link between abdominal microbes and the immune system in children with acute appendicitis who had or had not been breastfed. Children (mean age 7 to 8 years) with acute appendicitis were less likely to have been breastfed over a long period of time compared to a group of randomly selected children from the same geographic area. The authors suggest that human milk may boost the immune system, and it may make infections and inflammation less severe.

Another early sign of health issues? I had bed wetting problems as a child and now I’m wondering if this was a sign of poor diet and even a sign of a copper imbalance even then?

Children’s Biochemistry

Every human being begins life as a fast oxidizer. This means their hair tissue calcium and magnesium levels are low in comparison with the tissue sodium and potassium levels. Some characteristics of fast oxidation include a rapid pulse and a high degree of nervous sensitivity or irritability. Fast oxidizing children are more active. Very fast oxidation produces extreme irritability, inability to relax and often aggressive behavior. Fast oxidizers require dietary fat and calcium such as that found in full-fat milk. Children may remain fast oxidizers for years. However, in general, as one ages the oxidation rate slows.

Bed-Wetting

Children with a copper imbalance display this symptom more than other children. A copper deficiency or excess (biounavailability), can cause excessive nervousness that may result in poor bladder control. When the copper imbalance is corrected through a nutrition program, often the bed-wetting problem subsides.

Sugar and Carbohydrate Sensitivity

Many children are highly sensitive to sugar and any form of sweets in their diet. One reason for this is a fast oxidation rate. Fast oxidizers burn their food at a faster-than-normal rate. Many children are also born today with deficiencies of manganese, zinc, chromium and vanadium. These elements are involved in blood sugar regulation.

Sugar is a rapidly-absorbed food. When a high-sugar diet is coupled with a rapid rate of oxidation, it is like pouring gasoline on a fire. There is a dramatic rise in the blood sugar level, stressing the sugar regulation mechanisms and altering calcium and phosphorus levels. This can have profound effects upon mood and behavior.

Avoidance of all sugar-containing foods is a necessity for many children, especially those prone to strong sugar reactions. A diet high in sugar and carbohydrates also aggravates a chronic zinc and magnesium deficiency. Yet zinc and magnesium are precisely the minerals needed to help calm down these children. Fast oxidizers require a diet higher in fat and lower in carbohydrates. In some children, extra protein will help control blood sugar fluctuations.

Supplementing deficient minerals and feeding children a nourishing, appropriate diet for their oxidation type can help prevent and correct excessive sugar sensitivity.

Nutrition

Give your child foods high in silica, calcium and magnesium. Sesame seeds, almonds, porridge, milk pudding with figs and bananas are good sources of these minerals. Calcium and magnesium relax the system and can help counteract the nervous tension which often provokes bedwetting. All nutrients are important for healthy development of the body. Silica is highly recommended for strengthening the urinary tract, kidneys and bladder.

February 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 04, 2007

Here’s is an excerpt from another blogger on the effects of sugar and the need for chromium supplements:

Alcoholism, Candida, Diabetes & Hypoglycemia

It might be hard to find the commonality in this list but all of these issues are related to the inability to process sugar easily. Sugar issues are out of control in today’s world because of the modernization of the food industry.

Nature in her wisdom built signals into the inner workings of the human body. Each organ has an affinity and need for a particular mineral. The pancreas is the organ that largely controls sugar levels in the body and it has an affinity for the mineral chromium. When the pancreas requires additional chromium, the only way it can tell the brain to go find some is to make us crave something sweet. Sounds pretty simple, “need energy, eat something sweet, natural sweets contain chromium, everyone’s happy!” Sugar cane, maple syrup, dates, figs, all of the brown, sweet foods naturally contain chromium.

So what’s the problem? The food industry decided that white is better than brown. Then they created machinery that takes the brown out of these natural sweets. Can you guess where the chromium is in these foods? You’re correct if you said, “in the brown part!” Now comes the real problem. When the body needs chromium, the message is “eat something sweet” and the craving will go away. When you eat something sweet that has had the chromium removed, the craving doesn’t go away. This starts a vicious cycle of cravings and addictions, to say nothing of sugar imbalances and weakness of the pancreas.

Brown sugar contains no chromium. Commercial brown sugar is refined white sugar to which caramel coloring has been added. Most maple syrups contain no chromium, in fact, they don’t even contain maple syrup! They’re high fructose corn syrup with artificial coloring and flavoring added. The more natural sweeteners, like Sucanat® or Sugar in the Raw, do contain chromium so they’re more able to satisfy a craving, but they have a glycemic action in the bloodstream so they should also be used in moderation.

High blood sugar and low blood sugar are self-explanatory as sugar issues but alcoholism and candida might need additional explanation. Alcohol is a highly refined carbohydrate that goes into the body as a simple sugar. Candida is an opportunistic organism whose diet is almost exclusively sugar. Sugar also provides a sticky environment for candida to become entrenched and resistant to the normal cleansing processes of the body.

Where do you start? Obviously, you want to supplement with chromium. The most natural form is called GTF Chromium (glucose tolerance factor). It’s most readily used by the body without the irritation caused by other forms, such as chromium picolinate. It only takes small amounts of this inexpensive nutrient for you to notice a difference in sugar and carbohydrate cravings.

A combination, aptly called Sugar Reg™, contains chromium in addition to other herbs and minerals known to reduce cravings and control sugar levels in the blood. Again, it’s nice to have a combination that blends several components that work together without having to open a lot of different bottles and trying to figure out the correct proportions of the nutrients.

Another important supplement is the amino acid l-Glutamine. This amino acid is critical for brain function. This requirement of the brain is one of the main reasons for the ‘sweet craving’ signal from the pancreas. The brain works so hard and so continuously that it requires the most energy of any organ in the body. L-Glutamine quickly raises energy levels and improves cognitive function within minutes, in addition to turning off the cravings like a switch. Many alcoholics and drug addicts report almost immediate results when taking this supplement sub-lingually.

A great boon to those who suffer from candidiasis is the sweetener called Stevia. This no-calorie sweetener is 50 times sweeter than sugar and is nutritive, unlike its white sugar counterpart.

February 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 04, 2007

Since I’ve determinded that a long term diet of high sugar is possibly the main cause of my vitamins/mineral deficiencies, what other things does it effect in the body?

The list was staggering!!!!

146 Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health

By Nancy Appleton, Ph.D.
Author of LICK THE SUGAR HABIT and LICK THE SUGAR HABIT SUGAR COUNTER.

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.
2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.
3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.
4. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.
5. Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).
6. Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity and function you loose.
7. Sugar reduces high density lipoproteins.
8. Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.
9. Sugar leads to cancer of the ovaries.
10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.
11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.
12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
13. Sugar can weaken eyesight.
14. Sugar raises the level of a neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.
15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.
16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.
17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.
18. Sugar malabsorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.
19. Sugar can cause premature aging.
20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.
21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.
22. Sugar contributes to obesity
23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis.
24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.
25. Sugar can cause arthritis.
26. Sugar can cause asthma.
27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).
28. Sugar can cause gallstones.
29. Sugar can cause heart disease.
30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.
31. Sugar can cause multiple sclerosis.
32. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.
33. Sugar can cause varicose veins.
34. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.
35. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.
36. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.
37. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.
38. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.
39. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E (alpha-Tocopherol in the blood.
40. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.
41. Sugar can increase cholesterol.
42. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.
43. Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.
44. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs)(Sugar bound non-enzymatically to protein)
45. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.
46. Sugar causes food allergies.
47. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
48. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.
49. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.
50. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.
51. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA
52. Sugar can change the structure of protein.
53. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.
54. Sugar can cause cataracts.
55. Sugar can cause emphysema.
56. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.
57. Sugar can promote an elevation of low density lipoproteins (LDL).
58. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.
59. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.
60. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson’s disease.
61. Sugar can cause a permanent altering the way the proteins act in the body.
62. Sugar can increase the size of the liver by making the liver cells divide.
63. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.
64. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.
65. Sugar can damage the pancreas.
66. Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.
67. Sugar is enemy #1 of the bowel movement.
68. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).
69. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.
70. Sugar can make the tendons more brittle.
71. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.
72. Sugar plays a role in pancreatic cancer in women.
73. Sugar can adversely affect school children’s grades and cause learning disorders..
74. Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha, and theta brain waves.
75. Sugar can cause depression.
76. Sugar increases the risk of gastric cancer.
77. Sugar and cause dyspepsia (indigestion).
78. Sugar can increase your risk of getting gout.
79. Sugar can increase the levels of glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test over the ingestion of complex carbohydrates.
80. Sugar can increase the insulin responses in humans consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.
81 High refined sugar diet reduces learning capacity.
82. Sugar can cause less effective functioning of two blood proteins, albumin, and lipoproteins, which may reduce the body’s ability to handle fat and cholesterol.
83. Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.
84. Sugar can cause platelet adhesiveness.
85. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance; some hormones become underactive and others become overactive.
86. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.
87. Sugar can lead to the hypothalamus to become highly sensitive to a large variety of stimuli.
88. Sugar can lead to dizziness.
89. Diets high in sugar can cause free radicals and oxidative stress.
90. High sucrose diets of subjects with peripheral vascular disease significantly increases platelet adhesion.
91. High sugar diet can lead to biliary tract cancer.
92. Sugar feeds cancer.
93. High sugar consumption of pregnant adolescents is associated with a twofold increased risk for delivering a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant.
94. High sugar consumption can lead to substantial decrease in gestation duration among adolescents.
95. Sugar slows food’s travel time through the gastrointestinal tract.
96. Sugar increases the concentration of bile acids in stools and bacterial enzymes in the colon. This can modify bile to produce cancer-causing compounds and colon cancer.
97. Sugar increases estradiol (the most potent form of naturally occurring estrogen) in men.
98. Sugar combines and destroys phosphatase, an enzyme, which makes the process of digestion more difficult.
99. Sugar can be a risk factor of gallbladder cancer.
100. Sugar is an addictive substance.
101. Sugar can be intoxicating, similar to alcohol.
102. Sugar can exacerbate PMS.
103. Sugar given to premature babies can affect the amount of carbon dioxide they produce.
104. Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.
105. The body changes sugar into 2 to 5 times more fat in the bloodstream than it does starch.
106. The rapid absorption of sugar promotes excessive food intake in obese subjects.
107. Sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
108. Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.
109. Sugar can slow down the ability of the adrenal glands to function.
110. Sugar has the potential of inducing abnormal metabolic processes in a normal healthy individual and to promote chronic degenerative diseases.
111.. I.Vs (intravenous feedings) of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.
112. High sucrose intake could be an important risk factor in lung cancer.
113. Sugar increases the risk of polio.
114. Hi
gh sugar intake can cause epileptic seizures.
115. Sugar causes high blood pressure in obese people.
116. In Intensive Care Units, limiting sugar saves lives.
117. Sugar may induce cell death.
118. Sugar can increase the amount of food that you eat.
119. In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44% drop in antisocial behavior.
120. Sugar can lead to prostate cancer.
121. Sugar dehydrates newborns.
122. Sugar increases the estradiol in young men.
123. Sugar can cause low birth weight babies.
124. Greater consumption of refined sugar is associated with a worse outcome of schizophrenia
125. Sugar can raise homocysteine levels in the blood stream.
126. Sweet food items increase the risk of breast cancer.
127. Sugar is a risk factor in cancer of the small intestine.
128. Sugar may cause laryngeal cancer.
129. Sugar induces salt and water retention.
130. Sugar may contribute to mild memory loss.
131. As sugar increases in the diet of 10 years olds, there is a linear decrease in the intake of many essential nutrients.
132. Sugar can increase the total amount of food consumed.
133. Exposing a newborn to sugar results in a heightened preference for sucrose relative to water at 6 months and 2 years of age.
134. Sugar causes constipation.
135. Sugar causes varicous veins.
136. Sugar can cause brain decay in prediabetic and diabetic women.
137. Sugar can increase the risk of stomach cancer.
138. Sugar can cause metabolic syndrome.
139. Sugar ingestion by pregnant women increases neural tube defects in embryos.
140. Sugar can be a factor in asthma.
141. The higher the sugar consumption the more chances of getting irritable bowel syndrome.
142. Sugar could affect central reward systems.
143. Sugar can cause cancer of the rectum.
144. Sugar can cause endometrial cancer.
145. Sugar can cause renal (kidney) cell carcinoma.
146. Sugar can cause liver tumors.

Sources:

1. Sanchez, A., et al. “Role of Sugars in Human Neutrophilic Phagocytosis,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Nov 1973;261:1180-1184.
Bernstein, J., et al. “Depression of Lymphocyte Transformation Following Oral Glucose Ingestion.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.1997;30:613.
2. Couzy, F., et al.”Nutritional Implications of the Interaction Minerals,” Progressive Food and Nutrition Science 17;1933:65-87.
3. Goldman, J., et al. “Behavioral Effects of Sucrose on Preschool Children.” Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.1986;14(4):565-577.
4. Scanto, S. and Yudkin, J. “The Effect of Dietary Sucrose on Blood Lipids, Serum Insulin, Platelet Adhesiveness and Body Weight in Human Volunteers,” Postgraduate Medicine Journal. 1969;45:602-607.
5. Ringsdorf, W., Cheraskin, E. and Ramsay R. “Sucrose,Neutrophilic Phagocytosis and Resistance to Disease,” Dental Survey. 1976;52(12):46-48.
6. Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., and Brownlee, M.”Glucose and Aging.” Scientific American. May 1987:90.
Lee, A. T. and Cerami, A. “The Role of Glycation in Aging.” Annals of the New York Academy of Science. 663:63-67.
7. Albrink, M. and Ullrich I. H. “Interaction of Dietary Sucrose and Fiber on Serum Lipids in Healthy Young Men Fed High Carbohydrate Diets.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:419-428.
Pamplona, R., et al. “Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis.” Medical Hypotheses. Mar 1993;40(3):174-81.
8. Kozlovsky, A., et al. “Effects of Diets High in Simple Sugars on Urinary Chromium Losses.” Metabolism. June 1986;35:515-518.
9. Takahashi, E., Tohoku University School of Medicine, Wholistic Health Digest. October 1982:41.
10. Kelsay, J., et al. “Diets High in Glucose or Sucrose and Young Women.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1974;27:926-936.
Thomas, B. J., et al. “Relation of Habitual Diet to Fasting Plasma Insulin Concentration and the Insulin Response to Oral Glucose,” Human Nutrition Clinical Nutrition. 1983; 36C(1):49_51.
11. Fields, M.., et al. “Effect of Copper Deficiency on Metabolism and Mortality in Rats Fed Sucrose or Starch Diets,” Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1983;113:1335-1345.
12. Lemann, J. “Evidence that Glucose Ingestion Inhibits Net Renal Tubular Reabsorption of Calcium and Magnesium.” Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. 1976 ;70:236-245.
13. Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica. Mar 2002;48;25.
Taub, H. Ed. “Sugar Weakens Eyesight,” VM NEWSLETTER;May 1986:6
14. “Sugar, White Flour Withdrawal Produces Chemical Response.” The Addiction Letter .Jul 1992:4.
15. Dufty, William. Sugar Blues. (New York:Warner Books, 1975).
16. Ibid.
17. Jones, T. W., et al. “Enhanced Adrenomedullary Response and Increased Susceptibility to Neuroglygopenia: Mechanisms Underlying the Adverse Effect of Sugar Ingestion in Children.” Journal of Pediatrics. Feb 1995;126:171-7.
18. Ibid.
19. Lee, A. T.and Cerami A. “The Role of Glycation in Aging.” Annals of the New York Academy of Science.1992;663:63-70.
20. Abrahamson, E. and Peget, A.. Body, Mind and Sugar. (New York:Avon,1977.}
21. Glinsmann, W., Irausquin, H., and Youngmee, K. “Evaluation of Health Aspects of Sugar Contained in Carbohydrate Sweeteners. F. D. A. Report of Sugars Task Force.” 1986:39.
Makinen K.K.,et al. “A Descriptive Report of the Effects of a 16_month Xylitol Chewing_Gum Programme Subsequent to a 40_Month Sucrose Gum Programme.” Caries Research. 1998; 32(2)107-12.
Riva Touger-Decker and Cor van Loveren, “Sugars and Dental Caries.”
Am. J. Clin.Nut. Oct 2003; 78:881-892.
22. Keen, H., et al. “Nutrient Intake, Adiposity, and Diabetes.” British Medical Journal. 1989; 1: 655-658.
23. Tragnone, A. et al. “Dietary Habits as Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.” Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. Jan 1995;7(1):47-51.
24. Yudkin, J. Sweet and Dangerous.. (New York;Bantam Books:1974), 129.
25. Darlington, L., Ramsey, N. W. and Mansfield, J. R. “Placebo_Controlled, Blind Study of Dietary Manipulation Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis,” Lancet. Feb 1986;8475(1):236-238.
26. Powers, L. “Sensitivity: You React to What You Eat.” Los Angeles Times. Feb. 12, 1985.
Cheng, J., et al. “Preliminary Clinical Study on the Correlation Between Allergic Rhinitis and Food Factors.” Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi Aug 2002;16(8):393-396.
27. Crook, W. J. The Yeast Connection. (TN:Professional Books, 1984)..
28. Heaton, K. “The Sweet Road to Gallstones.” British Medical Journal. Apr 14, 1984; 288:1103-1104.
Misciagna, G., et al. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1999;69:120-126.
29. Yudkin, J. “Sugar Consumption and Myocardial Infarction.” Lancet..Feb 6, 1971;1(7693):296-297.
Reiser, S. “Effects of Dietary Sugars on Metabolic Risk Factors Associated with Heart Disease.” Nutritional Health. 1985;203-216.
30. Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease. (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1974).
31. Erlander, S. “The Cause and Cure of Multiple Sclerosis, The Disease to End Disease. Mar 3, 1979;1(3):59-63.
32. Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease. (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1974.)
33. Cleave, T. and Campbell, G. Diabetes, Coronary Thrombosis and the Saccharine Disease: (Bristol, England, John Wrightand Sons, 1960).
34. Behall, K. “Influence of Estrogen Content of Oral Contraceptives and Consumption of Sucrose on Blood Parameters.” Disease Abstracts International. 1982;431-437.
35. Glinsmann, W., Irausquin, H., and K. Youngmee. Evaluation of Health Aspects of Sugar Contained in Carbohydrate Sweeteners. F. D. A. Report of Sugars Task Force.1986;39:36_38.
36. Tjäderhane, L. and Larmas, M. “A High Sucrose Diet Decreases the Mechanical Strength of Bones in Growing Rats.” Journal of Nutrition. 1998:128:1807-1810.
37. Appleton, N. New York: Healthy Bones. Avery Penguin Putnam:1989
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38. Beck_Nielsen H., Pedersen O., and Schwartz S. “Effects of Diet on the Cellular Insulin Binding and the Insulin Sensitivity in Young Healthy Subjects.” Diabetes. 1978;15:289-296 .
39. Mohanty P. et al. “Glucose Challenge Stimulates Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generation by Leucocytes.”Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Aug 2000; 85(8):2970-2973.
40. Gardner, L. and Reiser, S. “Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate on Fasting Levels of Human Growth Hormone and Cortisol.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. 1982;169:36-40.
41. Reiser, S. “Effects of Dietary Sugars on Metabolic Risk Factors Associated with Heart Disease.” Nutritional Health. 1985;203:216.
42. Preuss, H. G. “Sugar-Induced Blood Pressure Elevations Over the Lifespan of Three Substrains of Wistar Rats.” J Am Coll of Nutrition, 1998;17(1) 36-37.
43. Behar, D., et al. “Sugar Challenge Testing with Children Considered Behaviorally Sugar Reactive.” Nutritional Behavior. 1984;1:277-288.
44. Furth, A. and Harding, J. “Why Sugar Is Bad For You.” New Scientist.”Sep 23, 1989;44.
45. Lee AT, Cerami A. “Role of Glycation in Aging.” Ann N Y Acad Sci. Nov 21,1992 ;663:63-70.
46. Appleton, N. New York:Lick the Sugar Habit. (New York:Avery Penguin Putnam:1988).
47. “Sucrose Induces Diabetes in Cat.” Federal Protocol. 1974;6(97).
48. Cleave, T.:The Saccharine Disease: (New Canaan Ct: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1974).131.
49. Ibid. 132.
50. Vaccaro O., Ruth, K. J. and Stamler J. “Relationship of Postload Plasma Glucose to Mortality with 19 Year Follow-up.” Diabetes Care. Oct 15,1992;10:328-334.
Tominaga, M., et al, “Impaired Glucose Tolerance Is a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease, but Not Fasting Glucose.” Diabetes Care. 1999:2(6):920-924.
51. Lee, A. T. and Cerami, A. “Modifications of Proteins and Nucleic Acids by Reducing Sugars: Possible Role in Aging.” Handbook of the Biology of Aging. (New York: Academic Press, 1990.).
52. Monnier, V. M. “Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process.” Journal of Gerontology 1990:45(4 ):105-110.
53. Dyer, D. G., et al. “Accumulation of Maillard Reaction Products in Skin Collagen in Diabetes and Aging.” Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1993:93(6):421-422.
54. Veromann, S.et al.”Dietary Sugar and Salt Represent Real Risk Factors for Cataract Development.” Ophthalmologica. Jul-Aug 2003 ;217(4):302-307.
55. Monnier, V. M. “Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process.” Journal of Gerontology. 1990:45(4):105-110.
56. Schmidt A.M. et al. “Activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products: a mechanism for chronic vascular dysfunction in diabetic vasculopathy and atherosclerosis.” Circ Res.1999 Mar 19;84(5):489-97.
57. Lewis, G. F. and Steiner, G. “Acute Effects of Insulin in the Control of VLDL Production in Humans. Implications for Theinsulin-resistant State.” Diabetes Care. 1996 Apr;19(4):390-3
R. Pamplona, M. .J., et al. “Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis.” Medical Hypotheses. 1990;40:174-181.
58. Ceriello, A. “Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation.” Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
59. Appleton, Nancy. New York; Lick the Sugar Habit. (New York:Avery Penguin Putnam, 1988).
60. Hellenbrand, W. ”Diet and Parkinson’s Disease. A Possible Role for the Past Intake of Specific Nutrients. Results from a Self-administered Food-frequency Questionnaire in a Case-control Study.” Neurology. Sep 1996;47(3):644-650
61. Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., and Brownlee, M. “Glucose and Aging.” Scientific American. May 1987: 90.
62. Goulart, F. S. “Are You Sugar Smart?” American Fitness. Mar-Apr 1991: 34-38.
63. Ibid.
64. Yudkin, J., Kang, S. and Bruckdorfer, K. “Effects of High Dietary Sugar.” British Journal of Medicine. Nov 22, 1980;1396.
65. Goulart, F. S. “Are You Sugar Smart?” American Fitness. March_April 1991: 34-38
66. Ibid.
67. Ibid.
68. Ibid.
69. Ibid.
70. Nash, J. “Health Contenders.” Essence. Jan 1992-23: 79_81.
71. Grand, E. “Food Allergies and Migraine.”Lancet. 1979:1:955_959.
72. Michaud, D. ”Dietary Sugar, Glycemic Load, and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in a Prospective Study.” J Natl Cancer Inst. Sep 4, 2002 ;94(17):1293-300.
73. Schauss, A. Diet, Crime and Delinquency. (Berkley Ca; Parker House, 1981).
74. Christensen, L. “The Role of Caffeine and Sugar in Depression.” Nutrition Report. Mar 1991;9(3):17-24.
75. Ibid.
76. Cornee, J., et al. “A Case-control Study of Gastric Cancer and Nutritional Factors in Marseille, France,” European Journal of Epidemiology. 1995;11:55-65.
77. Yudkin, J. Sweet and Dangerous.(New York:Bantam Books,1974) 129.
78. Ibid, 44
79. Reiser, S., et al. “Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986:43;151-159.
80. Reiser,S., et al. “Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:151-159.
81. Molteni, R, et al. “A High-fat, Refined Sugar Diet Reduces Hippocampal Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor, Neuronal Plasticity, and Learning.” NeuroScience. 2002;112(4):803-814.
82. Monnier, V., “Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process.” Journal of Gerontology. 1990;45:105-111.
83. Frey, J. “Is There Sugar in the Alzheimer’s Disease?” Annales De Biologie Clinique. 2001; 59 (3):253-257.
84. Yudkin, J. “Metabolic Changes Induced by Sugar in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease and Diabetes.” Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):5-8.
85. Ibid.
86. Blacklock, N. J., “Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone.” Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):9-12.
Curhan, G., et al. “Beverage Use and Risk for Kidney Stones in Women.” Annals of Internal Medicine. 1998:28:534-340.
87. Journal of Advanced Medicine. 1994;7(1):51-58.
88. Ibid
89. Ceriello, A. “Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation.” Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
90. Postgraduate Medicine. Sept 1969:45:602-07.
91. Moerman, C. J., et al. “Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Biliary Tract Cancer.” International Journal of Epidemiology. Ap 1993;2(2):207-214.
92. Quillin, Patrick, “Cancer’s Sweet Tooth.” Nutrition Science News. Ap 2000.
Rothkopf, M.. Nutrition. July/Aug 1990;6(4).
93. Lenders, C. M. “Gestational Age and Infant Size at Birth Are Associated with Dietary Intake among Pregnant Adolescents.” Journal of Nutrition. Jun 1997;1113-1117.
94. Ibid.
95. Bostick, R. M., et al. “Sugar, Meat.and Fat Intake and Non-dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer Incidence in Iowa Women.” Cancer Causes & Control. 1994:5:38-53.
96. Ibid.
Kruis, W., et al. “Effects of Diets Low and High in Refined Sugars on Gut Transit, Bile Acid Metabolism and Bacterial Fermentation.” Gut. 1991;32:367-370.
Ludwig, D. S., et al. “High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating, And Obesity.” Pediatrics. Mar 1999;103(3):26-32.
97. Yudkin, J and Eisa, O. “Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men”. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988:32(2):53-55.
98. Lee, A. T. and Cerami A. “The Role of Glycation in Aging.” Annals of the New York Academy of Science. 1992; 663:63-70.
99. Moerman, C. et al.”Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Gallbladder Tract Cancer.” Internat J of Epi. Ap 1993; 22(2):207-214.
100. “Sugar, White Flour Withdrawal Produces Chemical Response.” The Addiction Letter. Jul 1992:4.
Colantuoni, C., et al. “Evidence That Intermittent, Excessive Sugar Intake Causes Endogenous Opioid Dependence.” Obes Res. Jun 2002 ;10(6):478-488.
101. Ibid.
102. The Edell Health Letter. Sept 1991;7:1.
103. Sunehag, A. L., et al. “Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition” Diabetes.
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104. Christensen L. et al. “Impact of A Dietary Change on Emotional Distress.” Journal of Abnormal Psychology .1985;94(4):565-79.
105. Nutrition Health Review. Fall 85. Sugar Changes into Fat Faster than Fat.”
106. Ludwig, D. S., et al. “High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating and Obesity.” Pediatrics.Mar1999;103(3):26-32.
107. Girardi, N.L.” Blunted Catecholamine Responses after Glucose Ingestion in Children with Attention Deficit Disorder.” Pediatrics Research. 1995;38:539-542.
Berdonces, J. L. “Attention Deficit and Infantile Hyperactivity.” Rev Enferm. Jan 2001;4(1)11-4
108. Blacklock, N. J. “Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone.” Nutrition Health. 1987;5(1 & 2):9-17.
109. Lechin, F., et al. “Effects of an Oral Glucose Load on Plasma Neurotransmitters in Humans.” Neurophychobiology. 1992;26(1-2):4-11.
110. Fields, M. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Aug 1998;17(4):317-321.
111. Arieff, A. I. Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco. San Jose Mercury; June 12/86. “IVs of Sugar Water Can Cut Off Oxygen to the Brain.”
112. De Stefani, E.“Dietary Sugar and Lung Cancer: a Case Control Study in Uruguay.” Nutrition and Cancer. 1998;31(2):132_7.
113. Sandler, Benjamin P. Diet Prevents Polio. Milwakuee, WI,:The Lee Foundation for for Nutritional Research, 1951.
114. Murphy, Patricia. “The Role of Sugar in Epileptic Seizures.” Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients. May, 2001.
115. Stern, N. & Tuck, M. “Pathogenesis of Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus.” Diabetes Mellitus, a Fundamental and Clinical Test. 2nd Edition, (Phil. A:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000)943-957.
116. Christansen, D. “Critical Care: Sugar Limit Saves Lives.” Science News. June 30, 2001;159:404.
117. Donnini, D. et al. “Glucose May Induce Cell Death through a Free Radical-mediated Mechanism.”Biochem Biohhys Res Commun. Feb 15, 1996:219(2):412-417.
118. Allen S. Levine, Catherine M. Kotz, and Blake A. Gosnell . “Sugars and Fats: The Neurobiology of Preference “J. Nutr.2003 133:831S-834S.
119. Schoenthaler, S. The Los Angeles Probation Department Diet-Behavior Program: Am Empirical Analysis of Six Institutional Settings. Int J Biosocial Res 5(2):88-89.
120. Deneo-Pellegrini H,. et al.Foods, Nutrients and Prostate cancer: a Case-control study in Uruguay. Br J Cancer. 1999 May;80(3-4):591-7.
121. “Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition. Diabetes. 1999 Apr;48(4):791-800.
122. Yudkin, J. and Eisa, O. “Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988;32(2):53-5.
123. Lenders, C. M. “Gestational Age and Infant Size at Birth Are Associated with Dietary Intake Among Pregnant Adolescents.” Journal of Nutrition 128; 1998::807-1810.
124. . Peet, M. “International Variations in the Outcome of Schizophrenia and the Prevalence of Depression in Relation to National Dietary Practices: An Ecological
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125. Fonseca, V. et al. “Effects of a High-fat-sucrose Diet on Enzymes in Homosysteine Metabolism in the Rat.” Metabolism. 200; 49:736-41.
126. Potischman, N, et.al. “Increased Risk of Early-stage Breast Cancer Related to Consumption of Sweet Foods among Women Less than Age 45 in the United States.” Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Dec;13(10):937-46.
127.Negri. E. et al. “Risk Factors for Adenocarcinoma of the Small Intestine.”
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128.Bosetti, C. et al. “Food Groups and Laryngeal Cancer Risk: A Case-control Study from Italy and Switzerland.” International Journal of Cancer, 2002:100(3): 355-358.
129. Shannon, M. “An Empathetic Look at Overweight.”CCL Family Found.” Nov-Dec.1993. 20(3):3-5.
130. Harry G. Preuss, M.D., of Georgetown University Medical School
131., “Health After 50.” Johns Hopkins Medical Letter. May, 1994.
132. Allen, S. “Sugars and Fats: The Neurobiology of Preference.” Journal of Nutrition. 2003;133:831S-834S.
133. Booth, D.A.M. etc al. “Sweetness and Food Selection: Measurement of Sweeteners’ Effects on Acceptance.” Sweetness. Dobbing, J., Ed., (London:Springer-Verlag, 1987).
134. Cleve, T.L On the Causation of Varicose Veins. “Bristol, England, John Wright, 1960.”
135. Cleve, T.L On the Causation of Varicose Veins. “Bristol, England, John Wright, 1960”.
136. Ket, Yaffe et al. “Diabetes, Impaired Fasting Glucose and Development of Cognitive Impairment in Older Women. Neurology 2004;63:658–663.
137. Chatenoud, Liliane et al. “Refined-cereal Intake and Risk of Selected Cancers in Italy.” Am. J. Clinical Nutrition, Dec 1999;70:1107-1110.
138. Yoo, Sunmi et al. “Comparison of Dietary Intakes Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in Young Adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study” Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):841-848.
139. Shaw, Gary M. et al. “Neural Tube Defects Associated with Maternal Periconceptional Dietary Intake of Simple Sugars and Glycemic Index.”
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141.Jarnerot, G., “Consumption of Refined Sugar by Patients with Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, or Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Scand J Gastroenterol. 1983 Nov;18(8):999-1002.
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144. Levi F, Franceschi S, Negri E, La Vecchia C. “Dietary Factors and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer. Cancer. 1993 Jun 1;71(11):3575-3581.
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February 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 04, 2007

Step 1) Eliminate foods that feed Candida

  1. Sugar of all kinds, including fruit and dairy (except butter).
  2. Foods high in carbohydrates.
  3. All grains, nuts, seeds and legumes.

1. Eliminate sugars of all kinds, including fruits & dairy (except butter).

Candida’s main food supply is sugar and all forms of it such as lactose contained in dairy products (except butter), honey, maple syrup, molasses, glucose, fructose, lactose, and sugar substitutes, i.e. NutraSweet, aspartame, saccharin, etc. — see list below. Eliminating sugar is the most important part of the Candida Program.

All fruits, except lemons and limes, are also very high in sugar (fructose) and should not be eaten until you have cured your candida. Some vegetables that are also high in sugar must also be eliminated, i.e. carrots, yams, sweet potatoes, parsnips, beets and others.

Even though lemons and limes are allowed on the candida diet, providing many health benefits, they should not be consumed in large amounts because they contain fructose, which will feed candida.

Sugar is also contained is most processed foods such as smoked luncheon meats, ketchup, soup, etc. so reading labels carefully is very important. Reading labels can be tricky if you don’t know the many names of sugar and sweeteners. Here’s a partial list to help you.

Names for Sugar and Sweeteners (partial list)

aspartame carbohydrate carob powder corn starch crystalline dextrin dextrose disaccharides galactose glucose levulose maltitol maltodextrin maltose (malt sugar) malts of any kind manitol mannitol mono-saccharides NutraSweet polydextrose polysaccharides ribose saccharin sorghum suamiel succanat sucrose Please note, not all sugar substitutes directly feeds Candida, but all of them damage the immune system, and most are neurotoxic (causing damage and disturbances to the brain and nervous system). Stevia is the only sweetener that is allowed for candida sufferers, but it should only be consumed in very small amounts, because like all sugar it will increase cravings for sugar and high carbohydrate foods.

The fact that sugar greatly depresses the immune system has been known for many years, mainly because of Linus Pauling. He is the only person ever to receive two unshared Nobel Prizes ? for Chemistry (1954) and for Peace (1962). He concluded that white blood cells need a high dose of vitamin C, and so he developed his theory that high doses of vitamin C were needed to combat the common cold, the flu and even cancer.

Did you know that vitamin C and sugar have similar chemical structures so that means they compete with one another for entry into the cells. If there is more sugar around less vitamin C is allowed into the cell, and vice versa.

It is interesting that taking vitamin C also helps curb sugar, alcohol and high carbohydrate cravings. Since our bodies cannot make vitamin C on it’s own it must be obtained from foods or supplements on a daily basis.

Anti Fungals

Candida dislikes: Grapefruit Seed Extract Caprylic Acid, Garlic, Pau dArco, oregano and coconut oil.

These are your heavy artillery. Take as directed. Usually this involves alternating courses of two or three of these fungus busters after first completing a month on your strict anti-candida diet plan.

Expect to experience some die-back effect when you start to make all these changes. You may feel rough, perhaps worse at times than you did before starting the plan. This is a sign that the candida is dying off and your body is detoxing. For this reason, you may need to make the changes slowly, certainly not all in one go.

February 9, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 31, 2007

This article makes so much sense…it’s scary… and it all starts with the fungus…fueled by sugar, effecting the adrenal glands, effecting the thyroid…effecting the neuro-transmitters…

Add to that: Fifteen years of daily chocolate bars, candies, donuts, no fruits and a very low vegetable intake. It’s no wonder I have issues.

What is the fungal immune system?

Initially in a adult it is about 4-8 lbs of friendly bacteria in the lower gut. This comprises about 85% of all organisms in the bowels. The remaining 15% is fungus. It takes this ratio to keep the fungus in check. Fungus is the aggressor and is much more powerful than the bacteria. Fungus has no anti-bodies to protect itself but it produces very deadly mycotoxins. …

Once the fungus takes over the bowels it migrates upward until reaching the small intestine where digestion and assimilation of all nutrients takes place. However, when the small intestine fills with fungus this process cannot take place. Organs and glands are deprived of its building blocks and systems begin to fail.

Hypoglycemia

Symptoms begin to show up and are usually viewed as individual diseases themselves.

The fungus in seeking its main food of SUGAR upsets the body’s whole sugar system. The person deprived of the chaperone minerals needed to escort sugar and insulin into the cells…… becomes hypoglycemic. They now have low cellular sugar, a perfect playground for fungus to feed. However, now the cells do not have enough sugar to burn for energy so we become weak if we do not eat often and we surely do not have enough sugar to keep us alive during the night!

The brain now signals the adrenal gland to send out adrenal hormones to keep the body functioning during the night, which it does. But the side effect is that during the night the person may get hot or they may even have night sweats! The adrenal gland is now working 24 hours per day! …

This fermenting begins the failure of the THYROID to get its building blocks to produce it’s hormones in order to regulate body temperature and important help towards the making of some neuro-transmitters.

Not only does this lack of thyroid hormone produce some fatigue and make the person’s hands & feet cold but it can effect the brain in several ways. One is foggy thinking. It seems to physically interrupt short term memory because of Candida’s alcohol by-product. Alcohol is documented to cause brain and nervous system damage.

Depression
The other is in the form of depression since the thyroid may be deprived of Iodine and the amino acid tyrosine because of mal-absorption. A severe case of hypo-thyroid-ism may result. Often however, upon examination the thyroid will fall into a low-end-zone of what is considered medically OK. In most cases no hormone is given and the condition continues. …

The thyroid is also involved in the production of some neuro-transmitters. Without these they may soon feel they require a drug for problems with depression.

January 31, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 28, 2007

DRUGLESS METHODS TO HELP GET RID OF ANXIETY

NIACIN – vitamin B-3 is so effective against actual psychoses that half of all mental ward inmates in the South were able to be released once a depression-era deficiency of this vitamin was corrected. Niacin in appropriate doses acts as a natural tranquilizer and induces relaxation or sleep. It is non-addictive, cheap, and safer than any pharmaceutical product. Dosage varies with condition. The best author on the subject is Abram Hoffer, M.D., whose experience dates back to the early 1950’s. He routinely gave at least as much VITAMIN C as he did niacin.

LECITHIN – a food supplement that is high in phosphatidyl choline. The body is able to make acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, out of this. This has a sedating effect. It is interesting to note that one third of your brain, by dry weight, is lecithin. Feeding the organ what it is largely made of might help it to function better. (Don’t worry: lecithin supplements are made from soybeans.) Dosage runs in the tablespoons.

SUGAR – avoid it, to reduce anxiety symptoms. The swings from high to low blood sugar result in corresponding mood swings. Sugar is not your friend. Eat complex carbohydrates instead.

CHROMIUM may help even out the sugar mood-swings and perhaps even sugar craving. Chromium deficiency (daily intake under 50 micrograms) affects 9 out of 10 adults. Somewhere between 50 and 400 mcg of chromium substantially improves your cells ability to use insulin. Don’t gnaw on the bumper of a ’54 Cadillac because that kind of chrome is toxic. Chromium polynicotinate or chromium picolinate are safer and better absorbed.

B-COMPLEX VITAMINS also help even out your blood sugar. In addition, the metabolism of just about everything you digest hinges on one or more of this group of B-vitamins. Taken together, they are especially safe and effective. The body needs proportionally more niacin than the other B’s, so extra niacin as mentioned above is still valid.

EXERCISE reduces anxiety. Is it because you are too pooped to worry? Who cares; it helps. Exercise has many other health benefits, too, so there is no way you can lose by trying it. Start easily and work up.

HOMEOPATHIC REMEDIES such as Aconite, Coffea Cruda and Kali Phos. have been used to treat symptoms of anxiety for nearly 200 years. These very dilute natural remedies are safe and can help significantly. I recommend that you get a copy of The Prescriber, by J.H. Clarke, M.D. This very practical book concisely explains this healing approach and helps you easily select the most appropriate remedy. Homeopathic remedies are non-prescription. Many health food stores carry them. I know people who carry a bottle of Kali Phos 6X tablets in their pocket or purse, just in case.

HERBS such as chamomile and catnip make a soothing tea. There are certainly other useful herbs to consider as well. A good herb store or health food store will have books that will help you learn more.

January 28, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 23, 2007

Despite me trying to avoid sugar and eat well, I still have thrush. I’m always checking it a couple times a day to see if it gets better for worse. Tonight I’ve decided to cut out brown rice and the meats I got from the deli (Roast beef, turkey and black forest ham). My wife suggested that the meats may have sugar in them because they are the “processed” meats. Brown rice is on the accepted list of foods but I’ll try a few days without it.

January 25, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 22, 2007

Alcoholism, Candida, Diabetes & Hypoglycemia

It might be hard to find the commonality in this list but all of these issues are related to the inability to process sugar easily. Sugar issues are out of control in today’s world because of the modernization of the food industry.

Nature in her wisdom built signals into the inner workings of the human body. Each organ has an affinity and need for a particular mineral. The pancreas is the organ that largely controls sugar levels in the body and it has an affinity for the mineral chromium. When the pancreas requires additional chromium, the only way it can tell the brain to go find some is to make us crave something sweet. Sounds pretty simple, “need energy, eat something sweet, natural sweets contain chromium, everyone’s happy!” Sugar cane, maple syrup, dates, figs, all of the brown, sweet foods naturally contain chromium.

So what’s the problem? The food industry decided that white is better than brown. Then they created machinery that takes the brown out of these natural sweets. Can you guess where the chromium is in these foods? You’re correct if you said, “in the brown part!” Now comes the real problem. When the body needs chromium, the message is “eat something sweet” and the craving will go away. When you eat something sweet that has had the chromium removed, the craving doesn’t go away. This starts a vicious cycle of cravings and addictions, to say nothing of sugar imbalances and weakness of the pancreas.

Brown sugar contains no chromium. Commercial brown sugar is refined white sugar to which caramel coloring has been added. Most maple syrups contain no chromium, in fact, they don’t even contain maple syrup! They’re high fructose corn syrup with artificial coloring and flavoring added. The more natural sweeteners, like Sucanat® or Sugar in the Raw, do contain chromium so they’re more able to satisfy a craving, but they have a glycemic action in the bloodstream so they should also be used in moderation.

High blood sugar and low blood sugar are self-explanatory as sugar issues but alcoholism and candida might need additional explanation. Alcohol is a highly refined carbohydrate that goes into the body as a simple sugar. Candida is an opportunistic organism whose diet is almost exclusively sugar. Sugar also provides a sticky environment for candida to become entrenched and resistant to the normal cleansing processes of the body.

Where do you start? Obviously, you want to supplement with chromium. The most natural form is called GTF Chromium (glucose tolerance factor). It’s most readily used by the body without the irritation caused by other forms, such as chromium picolinate. It only takes small amounts of this inexpensive nutrient for you to notice a difference in sugar and carbohydrate cravings.

A combination, aptly called Sugar Reg™, contains chromium in addition to other herbs and minerals known to reduce cravings and control sugar levels in the blood. Again, it’s nice to have a combination that blends several components that work together without having to open a lot of different bottles and trying to figure out the correct proportions of the nutrients.

Another important supplement is the amino acid l-Glutamine. This amino acid is critical for brain function. This requirement of the brain is one of the main reasons for the ‘sweet craving’ signal from the pancreas. The brain works so hard and so continuously that it requires the most energy of any organ in the body. L-Glutamine quickly raises energy levels and improves cognitive function within minutes, in addition to turning off the cravings like a switch. Many alcoholics and drug addicts report almost immediate results when taking this supplement sub-lingually.

A great boon to those who suffer from candidiasis is the sweetener called Stevia. This no-calorie sweetener is 50 times sweeter than sugar and is nutritive, unlike its white sugar counterpart.

January 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

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