Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for July 03, 2006

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I have always felt better after soaking in a nice hot bath. It’s something I’ve noticed since I started having my stomach problems. I always thought it was the soothing effect of the hot water but could it have anything to do with the magnesium in the water?

So I ask Doctor Google about the absorption of magnesium in bath water:

Report on Absorption of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salts) across the skin

Analyses:
Magnesium levels in blood and urine were measured by a flame photometric method using magnesium nitrate as a reference standard. Sulfate was measured by anion-specific high pressure liquid chromatography (hplc), calibrated with a turbidimetric method and with sodium sulfate standards.

Results:
After initial pilot studies, all volunteers took baths (temperatures 50-55°C) and stayed in the bath for 12 minutes. They added varying amounts of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salts) to the bath before entry and ensured that the salts were completely in solution.

Blood/Urine Samples:
Blood samples were taken before the first bath, at 2h after the first bath and at 2h after the 7th consecutive bath. Baths were taken daily at the same time for 7 days for the experiment. Urine samples were collected before the first bath and then 2h after the first bath and at all subsequent baths . Urine samples were also taken 24h after the last bath. All urine samples were corrected for creatinine content.

Results:

Magnesium levels in blood are very tightly controlled. Of 19 subjects, all except 3 showed a rise in magnesium concentrations in plasma, though this was small in some cases. The values before the first bath were, mean 104.68 ± 20.76 ppm/ml; after the first bath the mean was 114.08 ± 25.83 ppm/ml. Continuation of bathing for 7 days in all except 2 individuals gave a rise to a mean of 140.98 ± 17.00ppm/ml. Prolonged soaking in Epsom salts therefore increases blood magnesium concentrations. Measurement of magnesium levels in urine showed a rise from the control level, mean 94.81 ± 44.26 ppm/ml to 198.93 ± 97.52 ppm/ml after the first bath. Those individuals where the blood magnesium levels were not increased had correspondingly large increases in urinary magnesium showing that the magnesium ions had crossed the skin barrier and had been excreted via the kidney, presumably because the blood levels were already optimal. Generally, urinary magnesium levels 24h after the first bath fell from the initial values found after day 1 (mean 118. 43 ± 51.95) suggesting some retention of magnesium in tissues after bathing as blood levels were still high. Measurement of magnesium levels in urine 24h after the 7th bath gave values almost back to control levels.

Sulfate

Free inorganic sulfate levels in plasma rose in all subjects after bathing in Epsom salts (mean pre-bath, 3.28 nmol/mg protein ± 1.40, 2h after 1st bath, mean 5.59 nmol/mg protein ± 3.08). In some individuals, the level post-bath reached > 9 nmol/mg protein. The plasma levels after 7 days showed a mean of 3.57 nmol/mg protein ± 1.70, lower than the peak value, suggesting that sulfate stores in the body were being filled. Analysis of the urine samples again showed an increase in sulfate concentrations (pre-bath mean 623.74 ± 352.34 nmols/ml, 2h post bath 1093.30 ± 388.79 nmoles/ml, 24h after 1st bath 899.83 ± 483.16 nmols/ml. Sulfate excretion in urine in some individuals was only slightly higher after 7 days bathing than the pre-bath levels.

Other Factors

Gender Differences:

Males had slightly higher levels of blood magnesium than females (109.0 ± 14.4 ppm/ml v. 87.7 ± 6.3 ppm/ml. Females had higher free plasma sulfate than males (3.26 ± 0.86 nmol/mg. v. 2.54 ± 0.53 nmol/ug) although these differences were not significant. The mean levels of both magnesium and sulfate were almost identical for males and females after bathing.

Optimum Epsom Salt Levels:

There was a wide individual variation in this parameter. However, all individuals had significant rises in plasma magnesium and sulfate at a level of 1% Epsom salts .This equates to 1g MgS04/100ml water; 600g Epsom salts/60 litres, the standard size UK bath taken in this project (~15 US gallons). However, most volunteers had significantly raised Mg/S04 levels on baths with 400g MgS04 added. Above the 600g/bath level, volunteers complained that the water felt \’soapy\’. Although this project did not specifically set out to answer the question of how frequently baths should be taken, the results are consistent with saturation of the skin (and possibly the gut ) transporters .These proteins are not well understood or described but, at least for sulfate, they are believed to be high affinity but low capacity.The values obtained suggest that most people would find maximal benefit by bathing 2 or 3 times/ week, using 500-600g Epsom salts each time.

Conclusion

Bathing in Epsom salts is a safe and easy way to increase sulfate and magnesium levels in the body.

Epsom salts are pure magnesium. WOW! Off to Shoppers Drug Mart for some Epsom salts!

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

Silica:

We are born with an abundance of silica and relatively low amounts of calcium. Then with every advancement in chronological age, the amount of calcium increases and the amount of silica decreases within the body. Silica enhances the function of iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium and boron, and is essential for bone development and growth. Bones need silica to re-calcify and to strengthen bone tissue. A silica deficiency in tissue causes a calcium deficiency which, in turn, results in a loss of tissue elasticity.

So as it turns out, silica is extremely important for enhancing the effects of B vitamins and magnesium. Went to the health food store and picked some up. Only one tablespoon per day.

They also had small plastic bottles of wheatgrass so I bought one of those too.

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

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On my way up to Orangeville yesterday, I was driving on highway nine and someone was building their dream home right beside high voltage transmission lines.

Hope they have a good doctor…

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

Lecithin

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system.

Besides being an important factor in controlling cholesterol levels and aiding coronary health, lecithin is involved in a myriad of body functions. Every cell of your body contains lecithin. Lecithin is responsible for maintaining the surface tension of the cell membrane. It therefore controls what goes in and out of each cell, allowing nutrients in, or wastes out. Without enough lecithin, the cell wall hardens, thus not allowing enough nutrients in or wastes out. This means premature aging of cells. The surface tension of the cell maintained by lecithin is also responsible for transmitting nerve impulses and messages through or from the cell.

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system. A key factor in proper brain and nerve transmissions is the presence of cellular substance called acetylcholine.

Until as recently as six years ago, medical researchers were using choline chloride to help their patients who suffered from these insidious brain disorders to produce more acetylcholine in their bodies. However, in 1977, Dr. Richard Wurtinan and his colleagues at Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that lecithin (which contains phosphatidyl choline) increased serum choline levels more than three times as much as the previously used choline chloride and kept those levels raised more than three times as long. This meant that researchers had found a way to significantly raise acetylcholine levels in their patients since acetylcholine production in the brain was dependent on serum choline levels.

Dr. Wartman’s research further astounded the medical community by showing that choline was taken up directly by the brain and used almost at once to help the brain make acetylcholine. This meant that the amount of lecithin (phosphatidyl choline) furnished by each meal could have a direct and almost immediate effect on the efficiency of the brain. Researchers found this so surprising because it had long been believed that the so called blood/brain barrier shielded the brain from such direct influences by nutrients and substances that are excessive or lacking in the day-to-day diet. Only a few substances such as alcohol or powerful drugs were thought to be able to cross this barrier.

Additional Findings on Lecithin’s Interaction in the Body

Without sufficient lecithin, your body cannot utilize the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. By adding an adequate amount of lecithin to your diet, you could improve your digestion and utilization of these vitamins by 100% or more if your diet is now deficient in lecithin.

When a person exercises regularly to improve their muscle tone, the amount of lecithin contained in the muscles increases. This increase in muscle lecithin is in part responsible for the greater endurance of the muscle.

Cirrhosis of the liver is no longer a disease of the heavy drinker only. Being the body’s waster disposal plant, many toxic materials, like food additives, preservatives, insecticides, growth hormones, etc., all pass through the liver. Lecithin and good general nutrition readily reverses liver damage.

W.S. Hartroff, M.D., Ph.D., reported in the American Journal of Public Health that the lack of choline was found to head infants toward high blood pressure. Furthermore, it has been found that a choline deficiency induced tendency to high blood pressure can not be reversed. Interestingly enough, human milk contains lecithin while cow’s milk does not.

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

A while back I made the discovery about the link between B1 and the myelin sheaths that protect the nerves. Today, I discover what the myelin sheaths are made out of. Sounds exactly like the feelings on the top of my head…

Nervous System Support

Vitamin B1 also plays a key role in support of the nervous system, where it permits healthy development of the fat-like coverings which surround most nerves (called myelin sheaths). In the absence of vitamin B1, these coverings can degenerate or become damaged. Pain, prickly sensations, and nerve deadening are nerve-related symptoms that can result from vitamin B1 deficiency.

Approximately 30% of your brain is composed of lecithin. Of the insulating and protective sheaths that surround your brain, spine, and thousands of miles of nerves, lecithin accounts for two-thirds of their composition; and of all the muscles in your body, your heart – the hardest muscle to fatigue – has the highest lecithin content.

Prickly sensations? I’ll add lecithin to my daily vitamins…

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 02, 2006

I came across some more interesting reading from doctor Jensen’s book today. Stupidly, I skipped the beginning of the book and starting reading at chatper one. As I was skimming through the book, I found this in the introdution:

PAGE XVI:

“Doctor Rocine showed me that every chemical element in the earth has it’s own characteristics and has it’s own story to tell, and he taught me these stories. I began to understand how these chemical elements work in the body. I learned that silicon is the magnetic element in the body and that the nerve force does not work well in the body unless it has the proper amount of silicon. It was easier to see that the body needed B vitamins because of serious deficiency diseases like Beriberi. However,I found out that without the proper chemical elements, vitamin B doesn’t remain in the body. It needs silicon to work with.

PAGE 171

“The nerves and brain are electromagnetic in function, and require silicon. The outsides of the nerves use silicon called the “magnetic element,” to increase effective nerve conduction. We must have enough silicon for the brain and nerves to have that magnetism we need in our relationships with others”

Looks like I’ll be adding Silicon (Silica) to my daily vitamins…

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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