Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for February 25, 2007

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From the British Newspaper called the “Daily Mail”

“Every doctor he has seen has told him categorically there is nothing wrong and that his symptoms are all in his mind. ”

Allergic to electricity

As the chief executive of a high-tech food company with a turnover of £500m and 5,000 staff, you would expect Brian Stein to have all the latest electronic gizmos.

But he doesn’t even watch television or listen to a stereo system, much less use a mobile phone or computer.

He cannot travel by electric train, take a long-haul flight or drive a modern car, and long ago traded in his £50,000 BMW7 series for a Nissan that is now 12 years old and has 235,000 miles on the clock.

For the past seven years, says Brian, he has been electrosensitive, which means he reacts to the electromagnetic radiation – sometimes known as electrosmog – given off by electricity systems and appliances.

Five minutes near a mobile phone mast is enough to cause sharp pains in his head. Longer exposure produces aching muscles, heart palpitations and stomach cramps. On occasion, he says, it has caused him to bleed internally.

But every doctor he has seen has told him categorically there is nothing wrong and that his symptoms are all in his mind.

Officially in the UK, electrosensitivity does not exist. Sufferers of the condition, meanwhile, claim that as many as five per cent of the UK population could be affected.

Electrosensitivity is becoming an issue in schools, with many parents concerned that their children are exposed to more electronic gadgets than previous generations – and that we don\’t know enough about the effects of the radiation emanating from them.

While there is no scientific evidence to suggest radiation from wireless technology poses any immediate health risks, there has been little research into its long-term effects, something sufferers are clamouring for.

People who claim to be electrosensitive say they suffer disturbing symptoms such as stomach pains and palpitations whenever they are in close proximity to a mobile phone mast or a wi-finetwork \’hotspot\’. Yet most doctors say their symptoms are psychosomatic. So is this very modern-sounding malaise the ME of the Noughties?

Brian, 57, believes his symptoms began as a result of using mobile phones. “I had used one since they came on the market about 20 years ago,” recalls Brian, who runs Samworth Brothers, a Leicestershire company that supplies chilled foods to supermarket chains.

“Then seven years ago I started to experience a tingling sensation in my face and right ear, a bit like earache. It happened only while I was using the mobile phone. At first, I could use it for 20 minutes without a problem, then only for 15 minutes.

“Then one day, about a year later, as I put the phone to my head, it felt as if my eardrum had burst – there was a sharp, stabbing pain. I swore I would never use a mobile again and never have.’

Unfortunately for Brian, that was not the end of his problems. Soon after, he began to experience head pains when he sat in front of his computer or drove his car. Convinced he had a brain tumour, he visited his GP, who told him that his symptoms were not consistent with a tumour.

But his fears were not allayed and he asked to be referred to a neurologist who – at Brian’s insistence – arranged an MRI scan, which was clear.

Over the next few weeks the symptoms spread to include a sore throat, frequent chest pains and palpitations. “I wondered what the hell was happening to me,” he says.

“It was my wife who went on the internet, just over a year after I first started having problems, and found out about electrosensitivity. As I read through the list of symptoms, I ticked all the boxes. It was like a jigsaw fitting together.”

Brian began conducting a series of ‘experiments’. Driving the car made him feel unwell, but getting out of it made the symptoms subside.

From the internet he learned that old vehicles with fewer electrics are less likely to cause problems for people with electrosensitivity than more sophisticated models, so he began driving his wife’s old Nissan, which he still uses.

He also found that being near the washing machine caused a pain in his chest and watching television resulted in headaches.

Some rooms in his home caused him no problems, but in others his symptoms would flare up.

By this time Brian had made contact with Alasdair Phillips, scientific director of Powerwatch, an organisation that researches electromagnetic fields. Alasdair’s company, EMFields, sells electrosmog detectors – devices that convert electromagnetic radiation into noise.

Using one of these, Brian discovered that some rooms in his home had higher levels of radiation than others. He concluded the radiation was coming from a mobile phone mast about half a mile away, as the rooms affected were those positioned closest to it.

Delighted to have identified the cause of his illness, Brian again visited his doctor — and was shocked at his response.

“He told me that electrosensitivity did not exist and said now that the brain scan had given me the all-clear, he thought my symptoms were psychosomatic. I knew they weren\’t but it is intimidating when a doctor says that.”

Things were getting worse. Within two years of first experiencing head pains, Brian found that merely sleeping in a room with an electricity supply for more than a few nights caused him to develop pains all over his body and ringing in his ears.

At first he switched off the house electricity supply every night, but as this caused the fridge-freezer to defrost, he had a special extension built, using a silver-plated insulating material that screens out virtually all radiation. This is where he now sleeps.

Although neither his wife nor his three grown-up children suffer from the problem, they try to be sympathetic.

“The children get exasperated that they cannot watch the television when they come to visit,” he says, “but they are very understanding. It does make our home life challenging.

“One of the biggest problems is staying in hotels when I am in London on business. If the room has wireless internet access, I wake up at 1am trembling, with ringing in my ears.”

All electrical appliances have been removed from his office and his secretary handles his e-mails. “Instead of doing presentations from a laptop, we use slides and overhead projectors.

“If somebody needs to get hold of me, they leave a voicemail message which I collect from a land line. I have never lost a contract through being out of touch.

“Because I am the chief executive, I can modify my environment. However, as a trustee of the EM Radiation Research Trust, which lobbies for more research on electromagnetic radiation, I have met many people who are severely electrosensitive like me. Everyone apart from me has had to give up work.”

Nobody knows how many people in the UK suffer from electrosensitivity because the symptoms vary from person to person and the condition is not recognised by most doctors.

A review carried out by the Government’s Health Protection Agency in 2005 estimated that somewhere between a few people per thousand and a few per million are affected by symptoms they believe to have been caused by electromagnetic radiation.

But others put the figure much higher. Professor Olle Johansson, from the Karolinska Institute’s department of neuroscience in Sweden, where electrosensitivity is recognised as a disability, estimates the prevalence of the condition in his country at three per cent.

In the capital, Stockholm, sufferers can have their homes adapted to screen out sources of electromagnetic radiation. They can even rent council-owned cottages in areas of low radiation.

And according to a report published by the Swiss Government in 2005, “electric
ity supply systems, appliances and transmitters for various wireless applications generate electrosmog that can be harmful to our health”.

In contrast, the British Health protection Agency report investigated various symptoms attributed to electrosensitivity, including fatigue and headaches, but decided that there was no proven link between them and exposure to electromagnetic radiation.

The World Health Organisation came to the same conclusion: “It has been suggested that symptoms experienced by some individuals might arise from environmental factors unrelated to electromagnetic fields.

“Examples may include “flicker” from fluorescent lights, glare from VDUs and poor ergonomic design of computer workstations.

“Other factors that may play a role include poor indoor air quality or stress in the workplace.

“There are also indications that these symptoms may be due to pre-existing psychiatric conditions as well as stress reactions as a result of worrying about electromagnetic health effects, rather than the exposure itself.”

“With most diseases, sufferers have roughly the same symptoms, but people who have this condition show a variety of responses,” says Professor Lawrie Challis, chairman of the Mobile Telecommunications and Health Research Programme, which, though funded by the Government and the mobile phone industry, is independent of both.

“The symptoms are real but we do not know what they are caused by.”

For the past five years, the research organisation has been investigating the short-term effects of mobile phones and masts and is due to publish the summary of this work in May.

“We have looked at a range of possible effects on memory, blood pressure and inner ear function,” says Professor Challis.

“We have taken blood samples and measured hormones. These are high-quality studies and the signs are that they do not show any short-term effects from exposure to mobile phones.

“What we have found is that when extra-sensitive people are placed in conditions where they do not know whether a mobile phone is on or off, they are unable to tell more often than you would expect.”

Brian Stein believes the Government is reluctant to acknowledge the danger posed by mobile phones because the industry generates around £13 billion a year and brings large amounts into the state coffers through taxes and the granting of licences.

Those who, like him, are convinced that electromagnetic radiation is detrimental to health have suggested various theories as to why this should be the case.

Some believe an allergic reaction is at work. Others argue that pulsed radiation from mobiles or laptops using wi-fiinterferes with the body’s internal electro-chemical signalling systems.

The Reflex study, funded by the European Union, reported in 2004 that electromagnetic radiation caused DNA damage to cells in the laboratory, but it said that this did not prove that mobile phones could cause cancer.

Recently, however, more serious concerns about mobile phones have begun to surface.

Some studies, including one published in the International Journal of Cancer last month, suggest that there may be a correlation between using mobile phones for ten years or more and an increased risk of brain tumours, though the authors stress the link could be due to chance or to bias in the research.

“This needs further investigation,” says Professor Challis. “Cancer takes more than ten years to appear: we have seen that with cigarettes, asbestos and the atomic bomb.

“We have no evidence so far of harm coming from mobile phones, but that does not mean that there is no harm. We cannot sit around and do nothing for the next ten years. Short-term experiments do not tell us much about long-term effects. The only sure way of finding out whether there are long-term effects is to study people’s health over a long period.”

Brian disputes that there is no evidence of harm from mobile phones so far. He has received sheaves of letters from other sufferers through his involvement with EM Radiation Research and the electro-sensitivity support group ES-UK, and says there is plenty of research to back up his belief.

“I don’t doubt my sanity, but I am concerned about the sanity of the rest of the world,” he says. “Scientists used to say the earth was flat. I have no doubt that I will eventually be proved right.”

February 25, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | 2 Comments

Entry for December 28, 2006

The nutritionist from last week left me a follow up voice mail. She wanted to know if I had made a decision regarding the treatment and I’ve been thinking a lot about it lately. I think a nutritionist would be a really great thing for me but I would want a condition.

I’ll contact her on the weekend and tell her that I will start the treatment with the condition that I have the option to quit if I am not happy with the food testing analysis from the naturopath. I don’t want the same results as the last naturopath telling me that I didn’t have a magnesium deficiency from the hair analysis.

And this time I will mark the questionaires with stars to indicate the symptoms that are being hidden by my current intake of vitamins and minerals. I will also document my entire history before I meet with anyone to ensure that nothing gets missed, including my issues with the EMF exposure.

Those are my conditions.

I’ll also tell her that I am still waiting for my B6 test result from my own doctor and will persue the injection through him if I am able to.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 22, 2006

I had a really interesting experience today. I was running out of my supply of vitamin B6 so I head to the local health food store. As I was looking at the vitamins, the lady asked me if I needed any help. Usually I tell them that I’m okay and brush them aside. Today I decided to ask her about the absorption of B6. She questioned why I thought I had a B6 deficiency because she said it’s unusual for men and more common among women. I asked her about B complex in the liquid form and she agreed that it had a better absorption rate so I decided to purchase some to give it a try.

She said from looking at my appearance she suspected I had a mineral deficiency rather than vitamins and commented on my pale skin and dark circles under my eyes. I somehow mentioned about my problem with magnesium and she started telling me about how vitamin deficiencies can be caused by exposure to electromagnetic fields.

WOW! I couldn’t believe my ears. I almost never mention my stories with EMF exposure for fear that people would really think I was a raving lunatic. But not this time… it was mentioned to me so I opened up and explained some of my discoveries and she appeared quite interested. I continued by telling her the success I’ve had using Google for my symptoms instead of the doctors and she said I should see a real doctor and stop using the internet and recommended an in-store homeopathic doctor.

As I was standing there talking to her, a customer came in and purchased a bar of soap. The lady behind the counter seemed to know her quite well and mentioned my B6 deficiency to her. She asked me if would mind trying a test and I agreed. She asked me to hold my arm out and push against it when she pushes on it.

She asked me how old I was and being that my birthday was in two days, I answered 36 just as she pushed on my arm. She told me that my age was incorrect. I gave her my correct age and my arm didn’t go down as far. Okay so I’ve seen this before with the Iridologist…it’s applied kinesiology.

She gave me a bottle from the shelf and asked me to hold it across my chest. She pressed on my arm and it fell down low and she commented on that I didn’t need it. We did the same thing with my liquid B complex and my arm stayed up high when she pushed on it.

Interesting but was it realistic? Who doesn’t need B complex?

November 1, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 22, 2006

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A new study has linked children who watch TV to Autism. Although the study is vague to the actual cause, I think the link could be related to EMF exposure. My EMF meter shows very high when taking a reading in front of the TV Children tend to watch TV too close and it’s one of the things I’ve noticed with our daughter. I like to turn the TV off whenever she is near it. These days everyone has a plasma screen tv and from what I understand, the EMF is even stronger than the normal televisions.

Here’s the Autism link to EMF:

A Possible Association Between Fetal/neonatal Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Radiation and the Increased Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Robert C. Kane, Ph.D. – February, 2004
 
Summary: Recently disclosed epidemiological data indicate a dramatic increase in the incidence of autism spectrum disorders. Previously, the incidence of autism has been reported as 4-5 per 10,000 children. The most recent evidence indicates an increased incidence of about 1 per 500 children. However, the etiology of autism is yet to be determined. The recently disclosed data suggest a possible correlation between autism incidence and a previously unconsidered environmental toxin. It is generally accepted in the scientific community that radiofrequency radiation is a biologically active substance. It is also readily acknowledged that human exposures to radiofrequency radiation have become pervasive during the past twenty years, whereas such exposures were uncommon prior to that time. It is suggested that fetal or neo-natal exposures to radiofrequency radiation may be associated with an increased incidence of autism.

The article was published in the journal “Medical Hypotheses”, Volume 62, Issue 2 , February 2004, Pages 195-197

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And here’s the Autism link to TV exposure:

A Bizarre Study Suggests That Watching TV Causes Autism

Posted Friday, Oct. 20, 2006

Viewpoint: Childhood vaccines, toxins, genes and now television watching? The alarming rise in autism rates is one of the biggest mysteries of modern medicine, but it’s irresponsible to blame one factor without hard scientific proof

Strange things happen when you apply the statistical methods of economics to medical science. You might say you get dismal science, but that’s a bit glib. You certainly get some strange claims like the contention of three economists that autism may be caused by watching too much television at a tender age. It gets stranger still when you look at the data upon which this argument is based. The as yet unpublished Cornell University study, which will be presented Friday at a health economics conference in Cambridge, Mass., is constructed from an analysis of reported autism cases, cable TV subscription data and weather reports. Yes, weather reports. And yet, it all makes some kind of sense in the realm of statistics. And it makes sense to author Gregg Easterbrook, who stirred the blogosphere this week with an article about the study on Slate, provocatively (and perhaps irresponsibly) titled “TV Really Might Cause Autism.”

The alarming rise in autism rates in the U.S. and some other developed nations is one of the most anguishing mysteries of modern medicine and the source of much desperate speculation by parents. In 1970, its incidence was thought to be just 1 in 2,500; today about 1 in 170 kids born in the U.S. fall somewhere on the autism spectrum (which includes Asperger’s Syndrome), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some of the spike can be reasonably attributed to a new, broader definition of the disorder, better detection, mandatory reporting by schools and greater awareness of autism among doctors, parents and educators. Still, there’s a nagging sense among many experts that some mysterious X-factor or factors in the environment tip genetically susceptible kids into autism, though efforts to pin it on childhood vaccines, mercury or other toxins haven’t panned out. Genes alone can’t explain it; the identical twin of a child with autism has only a 70% to 90% chance of being similarly afflicted.

Enter Michael Waldman, of Cornell’s Johnson Graduate School of Management. He got to thinking that TV watching already vaguely associated with ADHD  just might be factor X. That there was no medical research to support the idea didn’t faze him. “I decided the only way it will get done is if I do it” he says. Waldman and fellow economists Sean Nicholson of Cornell and Nodir Adilov of Indiana University-Purdue were also undeterred by the fact that there are no reliable large-scale data on the viewing habits of kids ages 1 to 3 the period when symptoms of autism are typically identified. They turned instead to what most scientists would consider wildly indirect measures: cable subscription data (reasoning that as more houses were wired for cable, more young kids were watching) and rainfall patterns (other research has correlated TV viewing with rainy weather).

Lo and behold, Waldman and colleagues found that reported autism cases within certain counties in California and Pennsylvania rose at rates that closely tracked cable subscriptions, rising fastest in counties with fastest-growing cable. The same was true of autism and rainfall patterns in California, Pennsylvania and Washington State. Their oddly definitive conclusions: “Approximately 17% of the growth in autism in California and Pennsylvania during the 1970s and 1980s was due to the growth of cable television” and “just under 40% of autism diagnoses in the three states studied is the result of television watching due to precipitation.”

Result of? Due to? How can these researchers suggest causality when no actual TV watching was ever measured? “The standard interpretation of this type of analysis is that this is cause and effect” Waldman insists, adding that the 67-page study has been read by “half a dozen topnotch health economists.”

Could there be something to this strange piece of statistical derring-do? It’s not impossible, but it would take a lot more research to tease out its true significance. Meanwhile, it’s hard to say just what these correlations measure. “You have to be very definitive about what you are looking at” says Vanderbilt University geneticist Pat Levitt. “How do you know, for instance, that it’s not mold or mildew in the counties that have a lot of rain? “How do you know, for that matter, that as counties get more cable access, they don’t also get more pediatricians scanning for autism? Easterbrook, though intrigued by the study, concedes that it could be indoor air quality rather than television that has a bearing on the development of autism. On a more biological level there’s this problem, says Drexel Univeristy epidemiologist Craig Newschaffer: “They ignore the reasonable body of evidence that suggest that the pathologic process behind autism probably starts in utero” i.e., long before a baby is born.

The week also brought a more definitive, though less splashy finding on the causes of autism, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. A team led by Levitt found that a fairly common gene variation one that’s present in 47% of the population is associated with an increased risk of autism. People with two copies of the gene have twice the average risk of autism; those with one copy face a slightly increased risk. The gene is intriguing because it codes for a protein that’s active not only in the brain the organ most affected by autism but also in the immune system and the gastrointestinal tract, two systems that function poorly in many people with autism. Levitt estimates that anywhere from five to 20 genes may underlie the vulnerability to autism. There are probably many routes to the disorder, involving diverse combinations of genes and noxious environmental influences. Could Teletubbies be one of them? Conceivably, but more likely the trouble starts way before TV watching begins.

With reporting by Alice Park/New York

October 22, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 21, 2006

The dangers of owning a laptop…

Risky business

Threat to fertility? Poor ergonomics? Possibility of fire?
Laptop usage isn’t without its potential hazards.

Sep. 8, 2006. 06:12 AM
DAVID BRUSER
BUSINESS REPORTER

If your neck hurts, or pecs feel particularly flabby today or if your crotch feels warm, turn off your laptop and put it aside for a moment.

As hundreds of students head back to school and the ever-shrinking devices — now de rigueur for post-secondary and many secondary students — pop up in classroom and dorms, few people seem worried about the health hazards that intense use could bring.

With 7 million laptops in use throughout the country, according to IDC Canada, which tracks technology trends, many Canadians, especially travelling businesspeople or those who use laptops as their main computer, are potentially doing their bodies harm.

Most men might psychosomatically shudder to hear that a laptop, used in its most literal and seemingly innocuous way, balanced atop thighs in an airport lounge or bohemian coffeehouse, could affect their fertility.

If high-profile companies announcing recalls of laptop batteries — amid concerns of their potential to get too hot or even combust — doesn’t raise alarms about the possible health risks associated with portable computers, Dr. Yefim Sheynkin’s research might strike closer to home.

In 2004, the urology professor from State University of New York in Stony Brook set out to answer a burning question: Since high scrotal temperature has been identified as a risk to male fertility, does using a notebook computer while it sits on your lap cause that temperature to rise?

For 29 male volunteers, ages 21 to 35, “two cutaneous thermocouples were attached to the unshaved scrotal skin … using thin transparent tape to cover the sensor end of the thermocouple.”

(The doctor seems gentle: His practice specializes in no-scalpel vasectomies, a procedure, according to his website, that “is conveniently performed on Friday, which allows a smooth recovery over the weekend.”)

The results of the experiment might make Jerry Lee Lewis sit up and sing. But more on that later.

There are other health risks associated with laptops, however remote the possibility.

Earlier this year, a UPS cargo plane en route to Philadelphia International Airport caught fire and the three flight-crew members suffered minor injuries while the blaze caused major damage to the plane and cargo containers.

The fire invited the attention of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board and its investigation into the “potential risks of transporting cargo such as (lithium-ion) batteries.”

The lithium-ion format is popular, powering millions of laptops and other devices around the world, and appears behind several recent and highly publicized recalls.

Last month, Dell Inc. recalled 4.1 million Sony-made, lithium-ion computer batteries. Lithium-ion batteries are commonly found in laptops, cellphones and MP3 players.

Ten days later, Apple Computer Inc. recalled 1.8 million Sony-built notebook batteries, citing nine reports of overheating lithium-ion packs, including two cases where users suffered minor burns.

Then, Virgin Blue Airlines banned the use of Dell laptops aboard its planes, a move that quickly followed Qantas Airways’ decision to allow passengers to use their Dell laptops with a battery only or plugged into the plane’s power system without battery, according to media reports.

The problem, some experts say, is that the batteries are often not being used under ideal circumstances, as the devices they power are becoming smaller, faster and, with more options, placing greater demand on the battery. And the smaller the device, the more difficult it could be to allow air in to cool the battery.

Nevertheless, as industry watchers point out, the number of incidents of laptops overheating or bursting into flames is a tiny fraction of the number of lithium-ion battery-powered devices in use without incident.

But the health risk likely to affect the most laptop users doesn’t involve hot crotches or smoking batteries.

The problem, according to one chiropractor and two ergonomics experts, is a laptop, due to its design, is either at eye level, forcing the user to strain his arms to type, or in the lap, causing the user to bend his neck down to see the screen.

“Laptops are very bad because when you lean forward you change the dynamic in the neck,” says Toronto chiropractor Dr. Blair Lewis.

“Your back is not against the back of your chair. The whole neck moves forward, which causes over time a lot of degenerative changes in the neck. (Frequent laptop use) rounds everything. Everything is shifted forward. That’s not the way the spine is designed.”

And, Lewis, adds, frequent use of the small laptop keyboard can cause “shortening of the pectoral muscles.”

Ergonomics expert Marnie Downey notes that the human head accounts for about 8 to 10 per cent of body weight. “Your neck muscles are having to hold up your head,” she says. “Our neck is not meant to be bent down.”

Connecting an external keyboard — perhaps on an adjustable keyboard tray if the laptop is on a desk — could allow an upright posture with eyes level with the top of the screen and elbows at 90 degrees, which is the ideal posture, the experts say.

The trend toward smaller devices won’t help, says certified kinesiologist Tania Lillak.

“The smaller it is, the worse it is, generally,” says Lillak, who runs Elemental Ergonomics in Toronto. “Everything’s just too small. The writing’s too small. The buttons are too small. You’re always hunched over a BlackBerry.”

Lewis figures laptops are here to stay, sees more and more kids using them and says it’s important to educate young users about how to avoid injury.

Meanwhile, combining a laptop’s internal operating temperatures — which can exceed 70 degrees Celsius, according to the 2004 study — with the body position required to balance the laptop, Sheynkin’s experiment found a median scrotal temperature increase of more than 2.5 degrees Celsius.

“Our study demonstrates statistically significant elevation of scrotal temperature in laptop computer users,” says Sheynkin’s article in the journal Human Reproduction, but he adds that further research is needed to clearly establish whether laptop heat can directly lead to infertility.

October 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 31, 2006

Was just reading about ways to protect yourself against cell phone radiation. Here are some supplements that help protect the body. No one has ever mentioned any of this despite my story about EMF exposure.

Microwave radiation has been shown to decrease levels of anti-oxidants in the body. These are substances the body produces to protect itself, and their levels are sensitive indicators in stress, aging, infections and various other disease states.

Take nutritional supplements, particularly anti-oxidants Superoxide Dismutase (SOD),  Catalase, Glutathione, and Coq10.

Other supplements you may need are:

Melatonin: a powerful anti-oxidant noted to prevent DNA breaks in brain cells. Also effective in preventing kidney damage from cell phones;

Zinc: protects the eye from oxidative damage and helps preserve the levels of anti-oxidants in the blood;

Gingko Biloba: an herb considered a powerful anti-oxidant which prevents oxidative damage in the brain, eye and kidney. Also helps support the production of SOD, catalase and glutathione;

Bilberry extract: preserves vision and reduces oxidative damage to the eyes.

Microwave radiation has been shown to decrease levels of anti-oxidants in the body and I had extremely high level of free radicals in my system. Another interesting connection? Riboflavin deficiency can cause high level of free radicals in the body.

In addition to producing energy for the body, riboflavin also works as an antioxidant by scavenging damaging particles in the body known as free radicals. These particles occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes, interact with genetic material, and possibly contribute to the aging process as well as the development of a number of health conditions such as heart disease and cancer. Antioxidants such as riboflavin can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause.

July 31, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 24, 2006

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Saw this new sign recently at the Exhibition GO station. WiFi access is here!! Oh great…

One of these days, I’d like to take my EMF meter just to see if I get any kind of reading.

July 24, 2006 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

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On my way up to Orangeville yesterday, I was driving on highway nine and someone was building their dream home right beside high voltage transmission lines.

Hope they have a good doctor…

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 27, 2006

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Study: Cell phone signals excite brain

Monday, June 26, 2006; Posted: 11:26 a.m. EDT (15:26 GMT)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Cell phone emissions excite the part of the brain cortex nearest to the phone, but it is not clear if these effects are harmful, Italian researchers reported on Monday.

Their study, published in the Annals of Neurology, adds to a growing body of research about mobile phones, their possible effects on the brain, and whether there is any link to cancer.

About 730 million cell phones are expected to be sold this year, according to industry estimates, and nearly 2 billion people around the world already use them.

Of these, more than 500 million use a type that emits electromagnetic fields known as Global System for Mobile communications or GSM radio phones. Their possible effects on the brain are controversial and not well understood.

Dr. Paolo Rossini of Fatebenefratelli hospital in Milan and colleagues used Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or TMS to check brain function while people used these phones.

They had 15 young male volunteers use a GSM 900 cell phone for 45 minutes. In 12 of the 15, the cells in the motor cortex adjacent to the cell phone showed excitability during phone use but returned to normal within an hour.

The cortex is the outside layer of the brain and the motor cortex is known as the “excitable area” because magnetic stimulation has been shown to cause a muscle twitch.

The researchers stressed that they had not shown that using a cell phone is bad for the brain in any way, but people with conditions such as epilepsy, linked with brain cell excitability, could potentially be affected.

“It should be argued that long-lasting and repeated exposure to EMFs (electromagnetic frequencies) linked with intense use of cellular phones in daily life might be harmful or beneficial in brain-diseased subjects,” they wrote.

“Further studies are needed to better circumstantiate these conditions and to provide safe rules for the use of this increasingly more widespread device.”

Medical studies on cell phone use have provided mixed results. Swedish researchers found last year that using cell phones over time can raise the risk of brain tumors. But a study by Japan’s four mobile telephone operators found no evidence that radio waves from the phones harmed cells or DNA.

The Dutch Health Council analyzed several studies and found no evidence that radiation from mobile phones was harmful.

June 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 26, 2006

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Keep That Laptop Off Your Lap
At Least Until a New Generation of Researchers Give Us Some Answers
August 13, 2005

The inside back cover of the August issue of Wired has an ad with a picture of a model who has a laptop on her belly. She’s got a big grin on her face apparently because her computer is protected with Symantec’s anti-spyware and anti-virus software.

Putting a laptop on your body may be okay for a photo shoot, but it’s probably not such a good idea to leave the computer there for a long time. In addition to delivering heat to sensitive organs, there can be significant exposure to EMFs. In fact, it’s probably not a good idea to keep any electronic or electric appliance flush to your body on a regular basis.

Let me be clear: We don’t know whether EMFs from appliances are a health hazard. What we do know is that some appliances give off strong localized fields with complex waveforms. While they diminish very quickly with distance, up close they can pack a wallop.

We also know that a discomfortingly large number of epidemiological studies show that long-term exposure to low-level EMFs is linked to childhood leukemia —the implicated levels are 250 times lower than the current limit for exposing children 24/7 and more than a 1,000 times lower than the occupational guidelines. (The U.S. has never adopted an EMF exposure standard.)

In addition, we know that the use of certain appliances has been associated with cancer. For instance, a 1998 National Cancer Institute (NCI) study showed that children exposed to electric blankets, hair dryers or video games had significant higher rates of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A number of other appliances, including curling irons, were also linked to cancer.

But there were inconsistencies. The risk associated with years of use was often similar to that from short-term use —that is, there was no dose-response relationship. But that said, looking at all the NCI appliance data, you will see a large number of statistically significant elevated risks of childhood leukemia and it’s hard to escape the conclusion that something is going on.

The NCI team, however, focused on the inconsistencies, threw up their hands and concluded there was nothing to worry about.

Earlier this year, the NCI published another study which linked the use of electric hair dryers and shavers with brain tumors. (Men who used electric shavers had ten times more meningiomas!) Once again, the NCI decided that it was “unlikely” that there was a true association.

One major problem with both NCI studies is that the EMFs from the appliances were not measured. The NCI team assumed that the magnetic fields from a hair dryer are identical to those from a fan or a microwave oven, except in terms of the intensity of the field. This is a primitive, though not uncommon, approach among EMF researchers. But it’s like studying particulate air pollutants without specifying the size or the chemical composition of the particles. You might get an idea about effects, but it would be a very rough estimate.

By neglecting the differences among the different types of EMFs, the NCI team assumes that all appliances are sources of simple sinusoidal 60 Hz magnetic fields. No allowance is made for fields whose frequency and intensity fluctuate over time, whether other frequency components and transient are present, or
whether the resulting exposures are intermittent. (In the more recent paper, the NCI team does acknowledge that hair dryers and shavers give off high-frequency transients). Another ignored variable is the polarization of the field.

Elizabeth Ainsbury, an English doctoral student of Denis Henshaw’s at Bristol University, illustrates the variation in polarization of the magnetic fields associated with appliances in a paper published recently in Physics in Medicine and Biology. She reports, for example, that microwave and electric ovens have
the most elliptically polarized fields, while alarm clocks have the least ellipticity.

(As the field becomes more circularly polarized —that is, as it become more elliptical— the greater the potential for depositing its energy into those exposed, see MWN, M/A00.)

Ainsbury concludes that her measurements demonstrate that domestic magnetic fields are extremely complex and cannot simply be characterized by traditional measurements such as time-weighted average or peak exposure levels.”

Could polarization be the missing variable that, if taken into account, would clarify the existing epidemiological and experimental data? It’s far too soon to tell, but it is a tantalizing possibility.

For a long time, many have speculated that EMF epidemiological studies are cloudy because some characteristic of the field has been left out. It is as if we are looking through a distorted prism. But with the right set of filters, we could see the EMF risk more clearly.

Five years ago, Jim Burch showed that workers exposed to circularly or elliptically polarized fields were more likely to have lower melatonin levels. And years before that Masamichi Kato in Japan reported a similar finding in animals (see MWN, M/A00).

Back in 2000, Burch told us his results “definitely need to be followed up.” They weren’t. (Burch has recently moved to the University of South Carolina.)

With progress coming in five-year intervals it is going to take a long time to sort all this out.� Joe Bowman at NIOSH in Cincinnati is hopeful however. “I’m encouraged to see an EMF health study measuring more than just the time-averaged magnetic field,” he told Microwave News in a recent interview. “Studies like Ainsbury’s will hopefully lead to a new generation of more informative epidemiologic studies.”

Bowman is himself designing an epi study using the Multiwave meter developed by Electric Research, which can measure a number of field parameters including polarization. Ainsbury also used the Multiwave. Clearly, there is much more work to be done.

And until we learn more and can see the EMF problem more clearly, it’s probably a good idea to keep your laptop off your lap —especially if that computer is broadcasting RF radiation through its wireless connection to the Internet.

June 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 26, 2006

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Woke up vibrating… But today is my appointment with the Osteopath.

Because the Oseopath is down the street from where I live, I am working from home today. I have the company laptop with me so I decide to test it for EMF exposure.

I turn on the laptop and use the meter to take a reading and it’s off the scale. Everyday I see people using laptop computers on their lap and it makes you wonder. These people are easily travelling two hours a day. What about the health effects of long term exposure?

June 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 16, 2006

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To the walk in clinic and I explain to the receptionist that I would like to speak to a doctor about nutritional deficiencies. It’s a friday night so it’s not too busy and I’m called in within 5 minutes.

The doctor comes in, reads my file and says “I hear you would like to speak to a doctor…well, I am one.”  I thought that was funny and I like him almost immediately. I give him the coles notes version of my history of symptoms starting with the mysterious internal vibration. I tell him about the various tests and procedures done by my regular doctor that all came up with nothing. I explain about how my research indicates that it could be a nutritional B vitamin deficiency and it’s my hunch that I have Beriberi. I’ve read that there is a blood test and I would like it done.

He says he hasn’t heard the term Beriberi since medical school and admitted that he wouldn’t even know how to treat it. I’d say he’s an older man in his mid-fifties.  I told him that from what I’ve read, it’s very easy to treat with high doses of B1 vitamins and in some cases, vitamin injections. He’s heard of B12 injections but not B1. He mentions about folic acid and I told him about my research regarding the chemical reaction of B1 with folic acid so I would really like to have that tested as well.

He questions why I think I have a nutritional B vitamin deficiency and hesitantly, I mention about how I think electromagnetic radiation had an effect on my stomach and disturbed the normal absorption of vitamins and minerals from my food. I continue my story with the purchase of the wireless intercom system and how when I discovered the symptoms to be EMF, I bought a meter to test around the house. I was probably low with B vitamins to begin with and the EMF exposure created a nutritional deficiency. Then he asks about how I learned about electromagnetic radiation. So I explain the story about the global tv show and Dr. Riina Bray.

At the end of my story I told him how I thought it sounded like something from a science fiction novel and he agreed saying this was the first time he had ever heard a story like mine.

So he writes out the lab requistion form for a blood test.

June 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 14, 2006

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Woke up this morning with the vibration again. Didn’t notice any effect from using the Melatonin….

At the request of a friend, I take my EMF meter to work. He wanted to know the safe range of the microwave radiation. We’re in the lunchroom and we figure out the safe distance with the microwave on. Then we discover that there is still EMF from the microwave even when it’s turned off. HOLY COW! We check the other microwave and it’s the same.

We decide to check our cell phones with the meter. For my phone there is no EMF while it is on and when it rings, it peaks at the safe level of 2. We try my friends phone and it reads very high when the phone rings. As we are doing this, another friend wants to test his cell phone and it measures very high and it’s not even ringing!

Later I ask him if I could get a picture for the blog and he agrees. He comes over to my desk and he places the phone down and I put the meter beside it to get a photo. The meter reads nothing whatsoever. I check the meter and it’s turned on but there is no reading.

He puts it back into the leather case and I try it again in disbelief. This time it reads off the chart. Huh? He takes it out of the case and there is no reading. I put the meter next to the case and it reads high again. It’s reading high on the magnet clip that keeps the phone inside the pouch.

This is very weird…electromagnetic radiation from a magnet? Is this what they call healthy magnetic therapy? Or is this the bad kind of EMF? I have to do some more research when I have time…

June 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 13, 2006

Still bothered by what happened yesterday with the hydro lines, I look up the effects of electromagnetic frequencies on the brain. I come across an article that suggests that EMF exposure reduces the hormone Melatonin. Dr. Google?…

Electromagnetic radiation – A threat to our health

Electromagnetic radiation is the big issue he is involved in at the moment—radio waves from radio and TV towers, microwaves from cell phones, cell sites, mobile phones, cordless phones, and microwave ovens (the last being a minor problem compared with the others). The background radiation has been rising significantly by factors of thousands in the general population since the Second World War. Cancer is partly genetic, but largely environmental. Our food, the toxins in the environment like air pollutants, benzene, toxins in food like saccharine, are shown to be potential carcinogens, all those PCVs and other fairly toxic chemicals, can damage cells, but evidence is very strong that electromagnetic radiation damages cells in a way that is potentially cancer causing.

The official position of those who make their money out of producing and using this technology is that we all know that the only thing that electro magnetic radiation can do is heat and if it doesn’t heat it can’t have any effect.

However, a different view comes from science from reading the people who have researched what happens to cells in laboratories in repeatable experiments. For example, a laboratory took human breast cancer cells, and exposed them to an infusion of melatonin, which is a natural neurohormone which we all have, which helps us sleep at night. Then they applied a very low level of varying electric field, 50 cycles field, and the oncostatic effect of melatonin was totally eliminated.

Every night when we go to sleep our melatonin levels rise and melatonin goes through our blood and cleans our cells up. For example, it scavenges out free radicals which are highly damaging chemicals. If the free radicals persist for very long they damage DNA and cause damaged cells and are shown to be carcinogenic. Melatonin is one of those agents that cleans us up every night to reduce the possibility that cells will become carcinogenic.

That experiment shows that electromagnetic radiation from power lines and appliances can reduce the melatonin cleaning-up effect on human breast cancer cells. The experiment was repeated in three other laboratories. It gave a very reliable and repeatable result. The strength of the signal they used was two to twelve mill gauss – a very low level magnetic field magnitude in that wave.

The European standard for safety for ELF fields is “20,000 mill gauss is safe, whereas this experiment shows that 2 mill gauss causes a significant reduction in the cleansing effect of melatonin on cancer cells.

Common symptoms and signs of melatonin deficiency:

insomnia
difficulty getting to sleep
difficulty falling back to sleep when awaken during the night
light sleeper/easy waking during the night
early morning awakening
un-refreshing sleep
lack of dreaming
family history of insomnia
personal or family history of breast cancer
personal or family history of prostate cancer
prostate enlargement
fatigue
depression
irregular menstrual cycle
unusual menstrual flow (light or heavy)
PMS
scoliosis
poor sleeping prior to menses
anxiety
sensitivity to stress
cataracts
neurodegerative disorder (MS, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, ALS, etc)
elevated cholesterol
high blood pressure
blood clots
heart attack
heart arrhythmias

I do some more reading and it’s available as a suppliment. I read some more about the symptoms of melatonin deficiency and I have a few of the symptoms I decide to get some. Couldn’t hurt to give it a try.

I’ve taken 900 mg of niacin for two days and I’m still vibrating when I wake up. I really thought that it would make a difference. Maybe I need to do it longer. Who knows…

Today I’ll go back to 400 mg of niacin a day and try the melatonin before I go to bed.

June 13, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 12, 2006

Monday is my day for wheatgrass but for some reason, the Jugo Juice store didn’t have any. I went again after work and they still didn’t have any. Not to worry, there is another store in Whitby so I’ll go out tonight and get some unless there’s some weird wheatgrass shortage.

Took the higher dose of Niacin again in the same format as yesterday. 200 mg at breakfast, 200 mg at lunch and the 500 mg after dinner for 900 mg in total. I had a long hot bath about an hour later and this time there was no flush.

I managed to find the Jugo Juice store in Whitby but it also happened to be where large hydro transmisson towers are running through the parking lot. I got my wheatgrass and left. While I was leaving the parking lot and underneath the power lines, a spot on the bottom right side of my head started pulsing. Not painful, just a mild slow pressure/pulse and it stopped when I left the parking lot.

Needless to say I was extremely bothered by this experience and I need to do more research. I’m fairly certain it was because of the power lines but there is no way in hell I’m going back under there to find out!!

June 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 03, 2006

My second appointment of the day was a follow up with my naturopath. I take in my research since my last visit and I have with me my EMF meter and my Miswaak. She pulls my file from her briefcase and mentions how she talks about my file in her current course.

She pulls out an article for me called “Oral Mines Uncovered” written by a homeopathic dentist Dr. Gary Fortinsky. In the article, she points out that exposure to mercury fillings can effect the nervous system. Interesting stuff but I had mine removed about ten years ago. I had them removed when I came across an article in the paper about a women who had experienced a variety of health issues and how she discovered that it was linked to her mercury fillings.

I start by showing her the meter and ask her if I can measure her laptop. She agrees and as I move closer, it raises the needle to the danger range. I offer it to her and she measures the power outlet beside her desk. It measures a low reading and I tell her to measure the power adapter attached to the cable. She does and it give a high reading. She seems really interested and wants to know where I bought it.

She asks about the stomach acid test and I told her I didn’t burp at all when I did the first test, and I did it again a few days later after taking niacin and it returned to normal. She makes a notation in her file. I tell her about the success with niacin and the B complex vitamins. She points out the high aluminum reading for my hair analysis and says I should be adding zinc to my daily vitamins. I ask her about the niacin dosage and if I can increase it. She looks it up in her medical book and gives the okay to increase it to 300 mg.

I review my notes and mention how my plantar fasciitis improved within days of taking niacin. She seemed surprised by this and I continue. I mention my allergies and how I came across a study that showed the effects of microwaving plastic and a possible link to Allergic Rhinitis. She tells me how the plastic can cause a hormone imbalance so I ask her if I can be tested. She provides the form and it will cost $240.00. Expensive but I’m going to do it. It’s a simple saliva test that has to be done within the first hour of waking up. The test is for the four main male hormones: Estradiol, Testosterone, DHEA and Cortisol.

June 4, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 02, 2006

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Still effected by Bill Cameron’s story, I was doing a bit of research reagrding esophageal cancer and I come across the following:

Electromagnetic Fields (EMF)

Extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are emitted by the electrical lines and electric appliances found in most homes in the developed world.  Because of the widespread use of electricity, exposure is rather universal, but levels vary according to the number of appliances in use, the proximity of the individual to the source of the field and the number of hours a person is exposed to the fields. 

For example, sleeping under an electric blanket, or on a waterbed with a heater that has not been redesigned to prevent the emissions, creates a long, nightly exposure. Likewise, there is some evidence that men who use electric razors may suffer negative health effects due to the close proximity of the shaver’s EMF field to the face and central nervous system.

An EMF field from an electric razor? This is crazy! And I use an electric razor of course… I get out my meter and turn on the razor holding it as close to the meter as it would be to the skin. The reading is off the scale. Granted, I only use it for 2-3 minutes but it’s every day use and long term exposure…makes you wonder…

June 2, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 04, 2006

What next? The treatment.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Niacin deficiency must be distinguished from other causes of stomatitis, glossitis, diarrhea, and dementia. Diagnosis is easy when the clinical findings include skin and mouth lesions, diarrhea, delirium, and dementia. More often, the condition is less fully developed, and a history of a diet lacking niacin and tryptophan is significant.

Multiple deficiencies of B vitamins and protein often occur together; therefore, a balanced diet is needed. Supplemental niacinamide 300 to 1000 mg/day should be given orally in divided doses. In most cases, 300 to 500 mg is sufficient. Niacinamide is generally used to treat deficiency states, because niacin can cause flushing, itching, burning, or tingling sensations, whereas niacinamide does not; however, niacinamide does not possess hypolipidemic or vasodilating properties as does niacin. When oral therapy is precluded because of diarrhea or lack of patient cooperation, 100 to 250 mg should be injected sc bid to tid. In encephalopathic states, 1000 mg po plus 100 to 250 mg IM is recommended. Other B-complex vitamins should also be given in therapeutic dosages.

Urinary excretion of N´-methylnicotinamide (NMN) and its pyridone is decreased. NMN excretion of < 0.8 mg/day suggests a niacin deficiency.

Well isn’t this interesting? Niacin deficiency can be checked with a simple urine test and in the past twelve months, I’ve provided three of them. With the western diet being as bad as it is, I really think that a standard urine and/or blood test should be looking for nutritional deficiencies wherever possible. It’s no wonder so many people are sick. They are not being tested for the right things.

“No matter what disease or illness you have , one of, or a combination of, these four things cause it:

  1. Toxins in your body
  2. Nutritional deficiencies
  3. Exposure to electricmagnetic chaos
  4. Mental and/or emotional stress

Kevin Trudeau is right on the money. If my theory turns out to be true, then I have a “Nutritional deficiency” caused by “Exposure to electricmagnetic chaos”. It’s really only a stab at the dark but it seems to fit. Now I just have to get someone to believe me…

May 5, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 02, 2006

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Armed with four pages of my printed research, I head to my eighth acupuncture appointment. I go into her office and she welcomes me in and asks me if I did any research on the Parasympathetic Nervous system. I show her the four pages and we sit down and carefully go through it. I explain each page and we talk about Niacin deficiency. She said this was extremely rare to get from a normal western diet and somehow the EMF had something to do with it.

We both agree that the EMF had an effect on the normal function of my stomach and created an environment where the Niacin conversion process was blocked by EMF intereference. This fits in with the fact that the internal vibration came first with no other symptoms. From that, the hydrochloric acid production was reduced causing the Alkaline base in my stomach and the onset of the other symptoms.

This explains why I needed high amounts of vitamin C. I needed the acid to neutralize the stomach and the chest pain? Probably heartburn. She takes my blood pressure and it’s 138/95 pulse: 76. She tells me that the high blood pressure is probably related to the overactive Parasympathetic Nervous system and not any direct problem with my heart. She suggested taking Apple Cider Vinegar.

She starts the acupuncture with a different approach. She focuses on the normal functions of the stomach and places a few needles in new places. She places something hot in both of my hands and tells me to rest. After 15 minutes she starts the cupping on my back.

She takes my blood pressure again and it’s lowered to 129/76 pulse: 66

She’s very happy about my research and asks me if she can share the information with the other doctor. Of course! I walked out very proud and excited that she agrees with the diagnosis.

May 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 30, 2006

Today I finally received the package from the Environmental Health Clinic at Women’s College. It includes a patient letter explaining about the strict rules for a scent-free environment, a brochure, a map with parking instructions, overnight accommodations, pre-visit questionaire and a physician referral form. The questionaire is extremely thorough but the doctor’s referral will most likely be the toughest thing for me to get. It’s taken over three weeks to send it out.

The questionaire will take a while to complete so I’ll read over more closely over the weekend.

March 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

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