Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 29, 2007

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Woke up with a vibration…

A week with the high doses of insitol and choline and although there was a huge difference in the beginning, I haven’t noticed any more improvements lately. Originally I thought it had an effect on the vibration. Now I’m not so sure?

Today the cold hands returned around lunchtime and it would come and go without any effect from my supplements. By late afternoon there was something that I did notice…

I can feel something like a pimple in the roof of mouth. The canker sores have returned and this time I’m glad because I know exactly what the problem is and why it is happening.

I don’t recall that I’ve ever mentioned the canker sores in my blog in the past because it was happening before I started to document everything and at the time, I didn’t realize it was a symptom of a vitamin deficiency. There was so many other things going on that I didn’t mention it.

It really makes sense that I would still have a niacin deficiency because I was taking it for months and then stopped thinking I’d taken it long enough and didn’t need it anymore. The low level of phosphorus was the reason for the deficiency in the first place and I needed to address that first.

I’ve taken niacin on and off since I started taking the phosphorus on Aug 1st and didn’t notice a difference but this time, I’ll try it for longer.

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August 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 22, 2007

No vibration this morning.

Today I’ll split things up a little differently. Here’s today’s dosage:

300 mg Calcium/Magnesium 3x
50 mg Zinc 2x
250 mg Inositol 3x
250 mg Choline 3x
100 mg Phosphorus 2x
Caprylic Acid 3x

August 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 20, 2007

Today I decided to take a break from the vitamins and minerals just to see what would happen. My eyes are still itchy so maybe I’m taking too much of something. Possibly the phosphorus?

I got to around mid-morning and I could feel the mild nerve feeling in my head. I’m still low in something but I have no idea what it could be. I figure it could be the chromium so I take one capsule with my lunch. I also took 1 50 mg of zinc and left it at that. By mid afternoon, the nerve feeling returned so I took a calcium/magnesium and it never returned.

By the evening my eyes are feeling much better so I take another zinc and another calcium/magnesium with my dinner. I also wanted to try something different.

With the addition of the calcium/magnesium in the 2/1 ratio, my candida has mildly improved. It’s nothing significant, it just feels a little better than usual since I made the change. So tonight I thought I’d add some caprylic acid and a grapefruit seed extract. Two things known for candida and I’ve tried them both before without any success.

About an hour after dinner…I notice a difference. I think it’s working this time. I’ll add these two to my supplements tomorrow.

August 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 17, 2007

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Because the watery itching eyes started after taking calcium/magnesium for a few days, and this morning it seemed to improve when I took some B complex vitamins, I decide to look at the interrelationships and there is one between calcium and riboflavin that I never noticed before. Never really thought about it.

I’ve got to look at phosphorus and niacin again…when I have some time…

August 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 08, 2007

Woke up this morning with a slight vibration but I’m very happy with the new found results and I think it’s from the extra calcium/magnesium. Because of the vibration, I’m going to add niacin back into the rotation. 100 mg dosage, three times a day and I’m also going to reduce the amount of phosphorus by half.

Daily Supplement Summary:

900 mg Calcium/Magnesium (300 mg 1/1 ratio)
300 mg Niacin (100 mg)
300 mg Phosphorus (100 mg)
600 mg Vitamin D (200 mg)
90 mg Zinc (30 mg)
25 mg Manganese

August 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

Today I’m back at work so my routine is a bit more stable. I’ve decided to take three doses of 300mg calcium/magnesium in the 1/1 ratio along with the phosphorus and vitamin D. No reason for the change just want to keep trying something different until I find something that works.

I also changed the zinc dosage from two doses of 50 mg to three doses of 30 mg. I didn’t take any niacin today as I’m still not convinced that it’s the cause of the vibration although I didn’t have any all weekend.

By the end of the work day the eyes aren’t as itchy and the stuffiness in my nose feels better than usual. I’ll keep doing this combination of minerals for sure!

The million dollar question….Will it have any effect on the vibration?

I’ve always been very confused as to why taking extra calcium would make the vibration stronger and today I still don’t have an answer. I’m wondering if the magnesium deficiency caused a high calcium ratio? What are the effects of low magnesium and the effect on calcium?

Calcium

Elevated calcium levels are associated with arthritic / joint and vascular degeneration, calcification of soft tissue, hypertension and stroke, an increase in VLDL triglycerides, gastrointestinal disturbances, mood and depressive disorders, chronic fatigue, increased alkalinity, and general mineral imbalances.

If magnesium is insufficient potassium and calcium will be lost in the urine and calcium will be deposited in the soft tissues (kidneys, arteries, joints, brain, etc.).

Calcium Synergists

Copper is required to fix calcium in the bones and helps raise the tissue calcium level. Many people have biologically unavailable copper which causes their calcium problems. In fast oxidizers, copper deficiency contributes to a calcium deficiency. Adequate adrenal hormone levels are also essential for proper calcium metabolism.

Calcium Antagonists

Sugar upsets the calcium/phosphorus ratio in the blood more than any other single factor, according to researcher Dr. Melvin Page. It also stresses the adrenal glands and upsets the hormone balance which affects calcium metabolism.

Copper Bio-Unavailability A Major Cause of Candida Infection

The most commonly observed mineral imbalance we find in many patients with Candida infection is termed bio-unavailable copper. Bio-unavailable copper is indicated on a tissue mineral test. Other mineral indicators of a candida overgrowth are an elevated calcium level, elevated calcium/magnesium ratio, or a low sodium/potassium ratio.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 06, 2007

All day long I’ve had really itchy dry eyes but I’m not sure if I caused it myself by rubbing them or if it’s something else. I stopped taking phosphorus thinking that might be causing the problem and I tried a bunch of different vitamins and minerals at different times today but nothing seemed to make a difference.

Hopefully it’s only because I’m very, very tired…

All throughout the long holiday weekend I didn’t get cold hands once. Let’s see what happens tomorrow when I return to work.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 03, 2007

Went to bed last night and I was fine. Then my wife did something that scared me for whatever reason and I started vibrating right away. It’s weird and I don’t really remember what she did because I was so tired. That kind of thing hasn’t happened in a while so I’m not sure what happened?

Here’s a comment about the relationship between Niacin and Riboflavin that suggest a niacin deficiency can cause a riboflavin deficiency. Interesting because that was the order of my symptoms. The vibration, upset stomach, then the nerve tingling in my head. So if the vibration is being caused by phosphorus this would make sense but I’m still not sure about that…

CONSEQUENCES OF A NIACIN DEFICIENCY

There are many symptoms of niacin deficiency. Initially, muscular weakness, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions occur, with severe deficiencies of niacin commonly leading to pellagra. Symptoms of pellagra include dermatitis, senile dementia, and diarrhea. Tremors and a sore tongue are also symptomatic. With pellagra, the skin becomes cracked and pigmented in the parts exposed to sunlight. Lesions can appear in the central nervous system, producing confusion, disorientation and neuritis.

Inflammation of the mucous membranes of the mouth and the gastrointestinal tract can result from digestive abnormalities developed in niacin deficiency. Symptoms of severe riboflavin deficiency appear; many of the niacin deficiencies are similar due to the close interrelationship of riboflavin and niacin in cell metabolism.

I added niacin back today but I didn’t take any chromium to see what the effect is. If phosphorus is responsible for niacin absorption, then I suppose it’s possible that even though I’d taken it for months, it wasn’t being absorbed in enough quantity to reverse a deficiency.

August 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 02, 2007

Start the day with 400 mg of phosphorus…I still get my cold hands around lunch but it didn’t seem as bad as usual. Progress? Let’s hope so.

I noticed some very subtle changes this morning with taking the phosphorus. I felt a change in my skin that was really barely noticeable but I felt the biggest difference in my eyes. They don’t feel as dry. Let’s find out why?

BENEFITS

Phosphorus has more functions than any other mineral in your body. Eighty to eighty five percent of all the phosphorus in your body is in your bones and teeth in the form of calcium phosphate. The 1 1/2 – 2 pounds of phosphorus in your body helps to keep your bones and teeth strong. Phosphorus is important to your bones for another reason.

Phosphorus is vital to collagen production and bone is 3/4 collagen. Tendons, ligaments, cartilage, skin, and eyes, are composed greatly of collagen. Without phosphorus, your body could not make any of the above vital connective tissues and organs.

I wonder if taking phosphorus will help my weak knees because of the collagen? Seems like every mineral has some kind of relationship with collagen or the myelin sheaths.

Phosphorus improves bone density and nutrition of nervous system tissue. When supplied in proper quantity phosphorus enhances the reproductive organs, autonomic nervous system, ganglia, brain and other nerve networks. In conjunction with other elements it can strengthen tissue integrity, function and metabolism.

So I’ll focus on phosphorus for a while and see how it goes with the vibration…

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 01, 2007

Today I found a web site that sells a phosphorus supplement and it offered a link to find store locations. Entered in Toronto and to my total surprise, I found a health store very near by to my work that has their brand of vitamins and minerals. I’ve never heard of this company before but it’s worth a shot since it’s so close by…about a 10 minute walk.

I get to the store and it’s very small in the underground pathway. From a quick look around this guy has everything. Homeopathic, aromatherapy oils and a lot of different manufactures which is always a bonus. As I’m looking around he asks me if I need any help so I tell him point blank that I’m looking for phosphorus. He seemed puzzled and questioned why I would need it. So I just explained that it was for a deficiency and left it at that.

He showed me some liquid supplements that contained phosphorus but that’s not what I am looking for. I took an information brochure and told him I would look around some more. I asked him if he could order it for me but he seemed reluctant. As I turn around I notice a section with the “unknown” brand of vitamins I found on the Internet and staring me right in front of my face was a phosphorus complex with lysine. THAT’S IT!

I was so happy to actually find it, I was doing a dance as I left the store. I remember the guy in the health food store last month who said I wouldn’t find phosphorus as a supplement and that I would only have a chance with Bone Meal. Ironically, his store is across the street. I wish I was kidding…

This is Fantastic!

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 01, 2007

All this week I’ve had the cold hands around lunch time and nothing seems to fix it. It doesn’t seem to matter what I take or what I eat, it always happens around lunch and it doesn’t return. Sometimes I skip my evening vitamins just to see what happens…nothing!

I go back to researching phosphorus again and I’ve been into a few health food stores lately looking for phosphorus and everyone seems to think it’s weird that I am asking for such a thing. I came across some info with a theory as to what can cause a phosphorus deficiency and it makes perfect sence to me.

DEFICIENCY

Fructose: A recent study of 11 adult men found that a diet high in fructose (20% of total calories) resulted in increased urinary loss of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance (i.e., daily loss of phosphorus was higher than daily intake). This effect was more pronounced if the diet was also low in magnesium. A potential mechanism for this effect is the lack of feed back inhibition of the conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate in the liver. In other words, increased accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate in the cell does not inhibit the enzyme that phosphorylates fructose, using up large amounts of phosphate. This phenomenon is known as phosphate trapping. This finding is relevant because fructose consumption in the U.S. has been increasing rapidly since the introduction of high fructose corn syrup in 1970, while magnesium intake has decreased over the past century.

I did manage to find a web site that sells liquid phosphorus but I’ll wait a bit longer before I do something like that.

In my phosphorus reserach, I come across a bit of information that suggests that phosphorus plays a role with glucose. Could this be why chromium has an effect?

Not getting enough phosphorus can contribute to the following health problems: anxiety, bone problems, fatigue, irregular breathing, irritability, numbness, skin sensitivity, stress, teeth weakness, tremors, weakness, worry, and weight changes. You can also get malaise, stiff joints, and bone pain. It may also cause glucose intolerance, irregular heartbeat and difficulty breathing. Phosphorus deficiency results in bone loss just as calcium deficiency does. Phosphorus toxicity can result in twitching, jerking, and convulsions.

A diet consisting of junk food can have too much phosphorus and this effects the body’s processing of calcium. It has also been found that vitamin D boosts the effectiveness of phosphorus. Magnesium helps in the absorption of phosphorus. Phosphorus speeds up healing, helps to prevent and treat osteoporosis, helps treat bone diseases such as rickets and prevents stunted or slow growth in children.

Phosphorus is needed for healthy nerve impulses, normal kidney functioning, and the utilization of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and for energy production. Phosphorus is a component of DNA and RNA and serves in the preparation of glucose for energy formation.

With the link between riboflavin and niacin, I really need to see if I can find some phosphorus…

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

I don’t think it’s niacin anymore…

I took one 100 mg niacin in the morning and nothing else. I lasted until lunch and then I got the cold hands. It lasted much longer than I expected without taking anything other than niacin. I took one half of the calcium and one niacin. I was good for the rest of the afternoon but then I got the nerve feeling in my head around 6:30 PM and I also got my mild magnesium chest pain around the same time so I took one 250 mg of magnesium and was fine for the rest of the evening.

So what is it? Phosphorus?

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

Woke up with no vibration. Perfect!

I went back through the blog reading my entries on niacin and when I took it, it seemed to have an effect on the vibration at night but I would always be vibrating in the morning.

I think the low phosphorus may have played a role and the niacin wasn’t absorbed properly.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 17, 2007

Okay…about the new theory.

If I stop for a second and review my “case” from the very beginning, the very first symptom was the internal vibration followed by gastric upset and then the nerve endings in my head started tingling.

I discovered that the gastric upset was caused by a niacin deficiency and the nerve endings was a riboflavin B vitamin deficiency. I always thought having a deficiency in these two particular vitamins was unusual to say the least. With the niacin, I would take 300 mg a day for months and no matter how much riboflavin I took, it never seemed to make a difference until I started the B vitamin injections.

The niacin fixed the gastric upset and although it did stop the vibration, it would never stop it completely and that lead me in other directions.

One of the things I’ve been thinking about lately is that I still have candida so whatever is causing the vibration is causing an imbalance that will cause candida and I know that niacin is anti fungal. My candida is the best it’s ever been but it’s not perfect but I feel it’s very close.

My New Theory:

I’m beginning to think that the vibration is caused by niacin but the reason it never fixed the problem was because I was low in phosphorus and it wasn’t activated. Riboflavin worked because of the mega-dosage injection. I’d be willing to bet that if I didn’t discover the low phosphorus, the riboflavin symptoms would return.

The B vitamins are essential for the nerves and the current nerve ending feelings in my head are different but they are somewhat similar to the riboflavin nerve symptoms.

I take one 100 mg of niacin with dinner and another one just before going to bed. Tomorrow, I’ll try another experiment. I’m going to add niacin of course but I’ll delay taking the other supplements and see if I get any of my regular symptoms…

July 17, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 16, 2007

It’s Monday back to work so I took my supplements early in the morning. Because I was busy at work, I took a late lunch around 12:30 PM and I noticed that hands were starting to get cold. Took my supplements with my lunch and it went away. Was it the supplements or was it my lunch?

For the first time ever, I decided to try Lentil soup as I know from my research that it was high in phosphorus and low in calcium. I was fine for the rest of the day and by the evening I was expecting the cold hands but it didn’t happen. So I skipped my evening dosage.

It’s almost 11:00 pm and I still don’t have any ill effects from the lower dosage. So let’s see if it will have an effect on the vibration? And maybe I’ll do the same thing tomorrow…including the lentil soup!

July 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 16, 2007

I love this article because it talks about how calcium supplements are a waste of time if they don’t have phosphorus…and most of them don’t. And some don’t have magnesium either. Just imagine all of the women who have been told to take calcium for osteoporosis, may actually be causing it.

The Benefits of Phosphorus
By: Dr. George Obikoya

Phosphorus is required by the body for bone and teeth formation. Calcium alone can’t build strong bones and tissues. New research shows calcium needs phosphorus to maximize its bone-strengthening benefits, and taking a lot of calcium supplements without enough phosphorus could be a waste of money.

Phosphorus allows proper digestion of riboflavin and niacin, aids in transmission of nerve impulses, helps your kidneys effectively excreting wastes, gives you stable and plentiful energy, forms the proteins that aid in reproduction, and may help block cancer. Researchers say it’s the first time the two elements have been shown to be co-dependent for bone health. Both calcium and phosphorus are found naturally in dairy products, but most calcium supplements and calcium-fortified foods and beverages don’t contain phosphorus.

More than half of all bone is made from phosphate, and small amounts are also used in the body to maintain tissues and fluids. Taking large amounts of calcium from supplements can interfere with phosphorus absorption. Women trying to prevent or treat osteoporosis typically take 1,000-1,500 mg of calcium a day in the form of supplements. Researchers found this amount of calcium can bind up to 500 mg of phosphorus, making it unavailable to the body.

Although this would present no serious problem for many people, it could impact women over 60 years of age who have diets that contain less than the National Academy of Sciences recommended daily allowance of 700 mg of phosphorus.

For these women, the usual calcium supplement, calcium carbonate, may block most of the absorption of phosphorus. If this happens, the calcium won’t do much good because bone material consists of both calcium and phosphorus.

Researchers say their study shows both calcium and phosphorus are needed to support any increase in bone mass, and a calcium supplement that contains phosphorus would be preferable to one that provides calcium alone.

Phosphorus is the body’s source of phosphate, which helps create and manage energy, synthesize protein, fat and carbohydrates, contract muscles, and maintain the body’s fluid and electrolyte balance. It is also essential for stimulating hormone production and helping the body utilize the B vitamins. It combines with calcium to help form the latticework for strong bones and teeth. Over 80% of the body’s phosphorus is located in bone. A proper balance of magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus should be maintained at all times.

Not getting enough phosphorus can contribute to the following health problems: anxiety, bone problems, fatigue, irregular breathing, irritability, numbness, skin sensitivity, stress, teeth weakness, tremors, weakness, worry, and weight changes. You can also get malaise, stiff joints, and bone pain. It may also cause glucose intolerance, irregular heartbeat and difficulty breathing. Phosphorus deficiency results in bone loss just as calcium deficiency does. Phosphorus toxicity can result in twitching, jerking, and convulsions.

A diet consisting of junk food can have too much phosphorus and this effects the body’s processing of calcium. It has also been found that vitamin D boosts the effectiveness of phosphorus. Magnesium helps in the absorption of phosphorus. Phosphorus speeds up healing, helps to prevent and treat osteoporosis, helps treat bone diseases such as rickets and prevents stunted or slow growth in children.

Phosphorus also helps to keep your mind alert and active, helps stimulate your glands to secrete hormones, and keeps your muscles and heart contracting regularly and smoothly. The recommended daily dietary intake of phosphorus set by the FDA is 1000-mg. The Food and Nutrition Board set the official scientific US RDA at 800-mg to 1200-mg. The phosphorus RDA is intended to equal the calcium RDA for any given individual. There are between 500,000- and 650,000-mg (500–650 g) of phosphorus in the healthy adult human body.

In “normal life”, there is only a very small possibility of a phosphorus deficiency because phosphorus is both abundant and widely distributed in most foods. The various food additives in processed foods are also major sources and may contribute up to 30% of total phosphorus in a diet based heavily on convenience foods. However, on a diet, there is a greater chance of phosphorus deficiency because less total food is eaten and very little of it is the usual type of “processed” food.

Phosphorus (as phosphate) is more efficiently absorbed in the small intestine than most other minerals. Between 50% and 90% is absorbed depending on the need. This is much higher absorption percentage than for either calcium or magnesium and further reduces the likelihood of phosphorus deficiency under normal conditions.

The kidneys easily control the blood phosphorus level and efficiently excrete any excess phosphorus. Therefore, under normal circumstances, phosphorus toxicity is also unlikely.

July 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 15, 2007

Discovered this today about choline and phosphatidylserine. When I went into a health food store back in January looking for Phosphorus I was given something called Phosphatidylserine or “Ps-100” for short. I was miffed at the time because it wasn’t phosphorus so I googled and read about how it used for the brain and I wasn’t really interested. Now I discover that phosphatidylserine is very linked to choline and Lecithin so this time round…I’m very interested!

So although it wasn’t phosphorus, it was a very important link to choline which of course is linked to phosphorus.

How Do You Improve Your Memory?

Wouldn’t it be nice if our brain was like a computer? Just load the programs in and all the information would be there whenever it was needed. The fact is that our brain is a computer much better than any you can buy in stores.

Dr. Wilder Penfield, a well known Canadian neurosurgeon, discovered that all of our memories are recorded by the brain; our problem is that we don’t practise retrieving this information and the memories are lost. We have to work on memory retrieval because it takes no effort to forget things. Another difference is that the brain is a living computer which requires optimal nutrition if we want it to work its best. One of the first computer phrases I remember learning was “garbage in, garbage out.” This means that if you program your computer with garbage programs, then you should expect the information coming out to be garbage. Well, the same applies to your brain; if you feed it garbage, then you can expect the memory information to be garbage.

The brain also needs physical exercise and mental exercise if we wish to increase the power of memory. Many research studies have shown that mental activity keeps the brain healthy and increases the strength of your memory. These activities include learning new things, keeping active in social interaction, and doing puzzles or other games which stimulate thought.

As we age, it is normal to have changes in memory but, just as with every other organ of the body, the brain can have its capacity to function rapidly diminished through poor nutrition. We do have the option of adopting good health habits as outlined in this article and actually improving brain function and memory.

Two major physiological changes seen in the brain with age and associated memory loss are the following: first, there is a decrease in the ability of the nerves to exchange information between each other because of a decrease in neural synapse. A neural synapse is like a tiny spark which occurs between nerves when information is transferred. If the nutritional material is not present, then the spark will not occur or will be diminished. The second sign of an aging brain is a decrease in blood going to the brain and circulating through it, which is an action known as cerebrovascular disease.

The brain requires a large amount of energy to work properly as well as a good circulatory system to provide glucose, oxygen and nutrients. The brain also has a protective membrane called the blood-brain barrier which is designed to deny access to substances which may be harmful to the brain. If this blood-brain barrier and the arteries which supply the brain are blocked by a buildup of cholesterol and triglycerides, then the brain suffers. A good example of how sensitive the brain is to nutritional changes can be seen by looking at the symptoms of hypoglycemia, which is defined as a decreased amount of glucose available to the brain. The symptoms are as follows: fatigue, light headedness, headache, irritability, depression, anxiety, confusion, mental disturbance, and insomnia.

Ginkgo Biloba
One of the most studied herbal remedies, Ginkgo Biloba has been through 40 double-blind studies on its effectiveness. Ginkgo Biloba is a registered drug in Germany and France for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease which causes the restriction of blood flow which in turn leads to cerebral deterioration and memory loss. These medical studies showed that Ginkgo Biloba was specifically indicated for increasing cerebrovascular circulation and that it caused a reversal in brain deterioration. Studies show that increased vascular flow occurred within 6 to 8 weeks and that improvement continued for up to 24 weeks. With increased vascular flow, previous problems of short term memory loss, lack of concentration and headaches improved.

Lecithin
Lecithin is the best known of the phosphatides and is essential for normal brain function. Lecithin also contains choline which is used by the body to produce the neurotransmitter acetylcholine – one of the chemicals which allow for the neural synapse to communicate information. Failure to produce these chemicals results in poor memory. Another function of choline is to increase the strength of the neural cell membrane and thus the health of the brain and nerve cells. Lecithin is also known as a lipotropic factor; this means that it is used for the transport of fatty material through the blood stream and liver. Without lipotropic factors, the blood vessels and liver become clogged with fat which prevents the formation of choline while decreasing circulation to the brain.

Phosphatidyl Serine
This substance is another very important nutrient for maintaining healthy brain cells because it also helps to produce choline. Decreased blood serum levels of Phosphatidyl Serine in elderly patients have been linked to impaired memory function and depression. The body can produce choline from Phosphatidyl Serine which is then transformed by the body into acetylcholine which is a very important neurotransmitter and improves communication between the nerves. Very good results have been shown in scientific research when Phosphatidyl Serine was used to treat depression, impaired memory and your mood. As previously discussed, Phosphatidyl Serine is also responsible for maintaining healthy brain and nerve cells, and the chemicals that maintain neural synapse. Antioxidants are also essential for helping the body protect itself from free radical damage which will lead to neural degeneration.

Closing Thoughts
Adopting the above recommendations to improve the brain and thus memory is an important step, but there are certain things that you should avoid. The first is heavy use of alcohol because brain deterioration is well documented in alcoholics. Secondly, avoid contact with aluminum and lead such as can be found in, respectively, aluminum cookware and paint. Lead has a long history of causing neural deterioration. Although the cause of Alzheimer’s Disease is not yet known, a common link in Alzheimer patients is a high level of aluminum found in the brain. Thirdly, low blood sugar levels such as those found in hypoglycemia cause starvation of the brain because it requires large amounts of energy from glucose in order to work. This starvation of the brain will lead to poor memory. The use of barbiturates and psychotropic drugs will also cause brain deterioration. People who suffer from either Diabetes Mellitus or Hypothyroidism should also take steps to prevent deterioration of memory through proper nutrition.

By Dr. Daryl Robert Bourke, DC ND

July 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 15, 2007

Day one: The treatment with phosphorus was a success. The cold hands that I’ve had all week didn’t happen once today. Didn’t get the weird nerve feelings in my head either.

With the added research from this weekend, I’ve discovered that phosphorus plays a role in the creation of lecithin and I found my bottle half full from the last time I tried it. Lecithin contains a B vitamin called Choline. Here’s what I found:

Choline

Although choline is not by strict definition a vitamin, it is an essential nutrient. Despite the fact that humans can synthesize it in small amounts, choline must be consumed in the diet to maintain health. The majority of the body’s choline is found in specialized fat molecules known as phospholipids, the most common of which is called phosphatidylcholine or lecithin.

Support of Nervous System Activity

Choline is a key component of acetylcholine, a messenger molecule found in the nervous system. Acetylcholine, also called a neurotrasmitter since it carries messages from and to nerves, is the body’s primary chemical means of sending messages between nerves and muscles. Because of its role in nerve-muscle function, choline (supplemented in the form of lecithin, or phosphatidylcholine), has been used experimentally to help improve neuromuscular function in Alzheimer’s disease.

July 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 15, 2007

And yet another amazing clue regarding phosphorus… a zinc deficiency is associated with a low level of phosphorus!!

Functions Of Phosphorus

Zinc is required for protein synthesis. Often a low phosphorus level is associated with a zinc deficiency, cadmium toxicity, or zinc loss. When these imbalances are corrected, the phosphorus level improves.

Digestive – regulates absorption of calcium and a variety of trace elements. Phosphorus in excess has a laxative action
Nervous – source of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), component of the myelin sheath
Endocrine – interacts with vitamin D
Blood – red blood cell (RBC) metabolism
Muscular – adenosine triphosphate (ATP) needed for muscle contraction
Skeletal – component of bone and teeth
Immune – adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for leukocytes
Metabolic – energy production via phosphorylation reactions
Detoxification – in liver – via adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

Sources Of Phosphorus

Seafood – tuna, mackerel, pike, red snapper, salmon, sardines, whitefish, scallops, shad, smelt, anchovies, bass, bluefish, carp, caviar, eel, halibut, herring, trout

Meats – liver (beef, chicken, hog, lamb), rabbit, sweetbreads, turkey, beef brains, chicken, eggs, egg yolk, lamb heart, kidney

Nuts/seeds – pinon, pistachios, pumpkin, sesame, sunflower, walnuts, almonds, brazil nuts, cashews, filberts, hickory, peanuts, pecans

Vegetables – chickpeas, garlic, lentils, popcorn, soybeans

Dairy – cheeses

Grains – wheat bran and germ, wild rice, buckwheat, millet, oats, oatmeal, brown rice, rice bran, rye, wheat

Miscellaneous – chocolate, kelp, yeast, bone meal

July 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 15, 2007

Here’s an excerpt from Dr. Jenson’s guide to Body Chemistry and Nutrition. I read this book several months ago and it was great. But now I was looking for something on phosphorus and what a gold mine. This guy is incredible!

“sugar upsets the calcium-phosphorus balance.”

Phosphorus

Phosphorus does not occur in a free state but in the form of phosphates and alkaline salts. It is in the bones in the form of calcium and magnesium phosphate (where it does not glow in the dark) and is an important electrolyte as well. Blood concentrations of phosphorus and calcium reveal a teeter-totter effect-if one is up the other is down. The body contains about 800 grams of phosphorus at any particular time. It Buctuates in its interaction with calcium and requires the help of vitanlin D to be assimilated &-om the small intestine. Seventy to 80 percent of this stored phosphorus is in the bones and teeth, 10 percent is in muscle tissue, and the rest is in the blood, the cells, the fluid surrounding the cells, and in the nerves and brain. Phosphorus, like calcium, is needed by every cell in the body.

Phosphorus plays the starring role in many body functions. As a key ingredient of the energy production process in every cell of the body, adenosine triphosphate helps transform glucose into energy and carbon dioxide. Most enzyme reactions involving B-complex vitamins as cofactors can only take place in the presence of phosphorus. As an essential part of the nucleic acids DNA and RNA, it influences cell reproduction and protein formation.

Phosphorus helps transport and break down fats. A chemical called phosphocreatin energizes muscle contractions. Lecithin, which contains phosphorus, helps keep cholesterol in solution so it can’t deposit on arterial walls and cause cardiovascular disease. Male seminal fluid is mostly lecithin. Lecithin helps substances pass through cell membranes and participates in breaking down fats. About 70 percent of the phosphorus in foods is assimilated into our bodies, unlike calcium, of which only 20 to 30 percent is absorbed from food in the small intestine.

Excess phosphorus and magnesium in the blood hinder absorption of calcium from food. (Calcium, in turn, hinders absorption of iron.) If the intake of calcium, phosphorus, or vitamin D is too low, bones don’t grow properly. Phosphorus, in the form of electrically charged phosphate ions, has a significant influence on water balance and osnlotic pressure in the body. Phosphate in the blood helps maintain the acid-alkaline balance. An acid phosphate (monosodium phosphate) works with an alkaline phosphate (disodium phosphate) to stabilize this balance.

Healing of broken bones, rickets, and osteomalacia is speeded up when there is sufficient phosphorus working with calcium and vitamin D.

CAUSES OF PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY

Antacids with aluminum block phosphorus intake, as will an excess of iron. Lack of vitamin D or a high blood level of calcium will block phosphorus assimilation. The hormone calcitonin causes rapid loss of phosphorus, and sugar upsets the calcium-phosphorus balance.

From another web site, I found this:

Fructose: A recent study of 11 adult men found that a diet high in fructose (20% of total calories) resulted in increased urinary loss of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance (i.e., daily loss of phosphorus was higher than daily intake). This effect was more pronounced if the diet was also low in magnesium.

A potential mechanism for this effect is the lack of feed back inhibition of the conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate in the liver. In other words, increased accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate in the cell does not inhibit the enzyme that phosphorylates fructose, using up large amounts of phosphate. This phenomenon is known as phosphate trapping.

This finding is relevant because fructose consumption in the U.S. has been increasing rapidly since the introduction of high fructose corn syrup in 1970, while magnesium intake has decreased over the past century.

July 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

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