Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 18, 2008

Vitamins and Minerals for Diabetes

VITAMINS AND MINERALS THAT LOWERS BLOOD SUGAR

Minerals are the vital constituents for the formation of body structures such as bones and tissues. They are also involved in major physiological processes such as proper metabolism and energy production. There are various minerals that are helpful in treating diabetes and slowing down diabetic complications.

The most important mineral is Chromium. It is also known as Diabetic Mineral. It is because the main function of chromium in is body is to turn carbohydrates into glucose. Chromium also helps in the regulation and production of hormone insulin. It has been observed that due to chromium only the

Insulin works effectively in the body and without it, insulin simply would not function. Good sources of chromium are nuts, cheese, whole, grains, oysters, mushrooms, brewer’s yeast, etc. Long time researches have shown that the symptoms of diabetes completely reverses particularly of Type –2 Diabetes mellitus.

It is because insulin regulates and normalize blood sugar and it also improves body’s ability to transport blood glucose into cells. It has also been seen that the chromium supplements improves glucose tolerance and thus brings it to normal. It reduces fasting glucose and insulin levels in

gestational diabetes. It encourages the loss of body fat. It enhances insulin secretion and decreases trighlycerides Chromium also promotes muscular gains.

Vanadium: It is also associated with proper glucose regulation. It acts like insulin in the body and also enhances its effects. That is why this mineral is extensively known for its role in the management of diabetes. Food sources of vanadium include skin milk, lobster, vegetables, butter and cheese. Vanadium is named after the Scandinavian goddess of beauty and youth. Vanadium is also a building material of bones and teeth. Although, researchers have know vanadium for more than forty

years but the mineral is not yet considered as a essential constituent for humans. It is essential for plants and animals. But Vanadium must be needed to be as an essential nutrient in our diet. Vanadium in case of diabetics- improves fasting glucose levels. It also increases insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. It lowers the insulin requirements in type –1 diabetes.

Manganese: Manganese maintains the blood glucose level in normal range and hence is useful in treating diabetes and hypoghlycaemia. Manganese is also used in our body for fat and protein metabolism and the production of energy. It is needed for growth, maintenance of connective tissue, bone, cartilage and

also helps in fatty acid synthesis. Manganese is also useful in the treatment of epilepsy, anosexia and iron deficiency. Moreover, the absorption of vitamin C, B and E depends upon the sufficient amount of manganese so the person’s multi-vitamin supplement should contain sufficient amount of manganese in it. Dietary sources of manganese include whole green cereals, leafy vegetables, nuts and tea.

Magnesium: Magnesium is mainly important for hypoglycaemics because it helps in the digestion of sugar, starches and fats and also helps in stabilizing blood sugar levels. It has been known from many years that the secretion and action of insulin require magnesium. Hence for diabetic patient and for persons

in whom intake of refined carbohydrates is too much, in them the supplement of magnesium is very much necessary. It is a person crave for chocolate, it may be an indication that he is low in magnesium. The dietary sources of magnesium are whole grains, nuts, seeds, cocoa milk, green vegetables, sea food,

brown rice. Magnesium is also involved in thyroid hormone production. Magnesium along with calcium helps in muscle contraction and helps in producing energy especially in muscle cells. Magnesium is also involved in producing stomach acid and digestive enzymes.

Zinc: Zinc is needed for proper release of insulin and many hypoglycaemics may be deficient. Zinc supplements are beneficial for patients with chronic diseases like diabetes. Some of the other Zinc’s functions include cholesterol, protein and energy metabolism growth, healing and immune functions. Dietary sources of Zinc include meat, eggs, sunflower seeds, milk, wholegrains, spinach etc. But a person should keep in mind that Zinc is destroyed when food is processed so they should eat the Zinc containing food in their natural form as much as possible. Moreover, Zinc absorption is reduced in alcoholics and diuretics. Stress also causes Zinc levels to drop rapidly.

Vitamins are an essential part of human body. The vitamin helps in improving digestion and therefore, increases the body’s ability to tolerate low glucose levels. They also know as Anti-Stress vitamins because of their good effects on the brain and nervous system. The B-complex vitamins are a group of eight vitamins, which include Thiamine (B1), Riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), Pyridoxina (B6), Folic Acid (B9), Cyanocobalmin (B12), Pantothenic acid and bioten. A particular potential benefit of vitamin B supplements for diabetics is mainly its ability to lower blood levels of homocysteine (a suphur-containing amino acid). Hence, the vitamins B are also essential for breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, which provides energy for the body. It also helps in breakdown of fats and proteins, which helps in normal functioning of the nervous system.

Vitamin B-6 is helpful in the women reporting with gestational diabetes and for protection against metabolic imbalances associated with the use of some oral contraceptive. Vitamin B6 is also useful in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. It help in reducing homocysteine. It maintains fluid balance and is essential for cellular energy production. It is somewhat beneficial to prevent skin eruptions also. Therefore, the amaging family of vitamin B is very helpful. Vitamin B6 levels are even lower in people with diabetes who have nerve damage i.e. neuropathy. So, the administration of bath Vitamin B1 (25 mg per day) and vitamin B6 (50 mg per day) shows significant improvement of symptoms of diabetic neuropathy after four weeks, because Vitamin B1 is also found to be low in people with type 1 diabetes.

Biotin (The Vitamin B) is needed to process of glucose. Patient with Type-1 of diabetes showed fasting glucose level dropped by 50% on administration of 16 mg of biotin per day for one week. Biotin may also reduce pain from diabetic nerve damage.

Vitamin C: Diabetic people also have low vitamin C levels. Vitamin C may reduce glycosylation. Vitamin C also lowers sorbital in people with diabetes. Sorbital is a sugar that can accumulate and damage the nerves eyes and kidney of people with diabetes. Vitamin C may improve glucose tolerance in patients with Type-2 diabetes. Vitamin C significantly reduces urinary protein loss in people with diabetes. Diabetic people should have 1-3 grams per day of vitamin C.

Vitamin B-12: Vitamin B-12 is needed for normal functioning of nerve cells. Vitamin B12 taken orally, intravenously or by injection reduces the nerve damage caused by diabetes in most of the people. The intake of large amounts of niacin (a form of the vitamin B 3), such as 2-3 grams per day, may impair glucose tolerance and shall be used by diabetic people only under doctor’s advice.

Vitamin D: It is needed to maintain adequate blood levels of insulin. Vitamin D receptors have been found in the pancreas where insulin is produced hence the supplements of vitamin D, increases insulin level in people suffering form diabetes. But it should be given in accurate dose as high dose of vitamin D can be toxic.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E prevents the destructive vascular damage that may occur in diabetes. Vitamin E supplements prevents the arterial degeneration in patients suffering from diabetes. Vitamin E decreases the requirement of insulin by diabetic people. Vitamin E is available naturally in whole grain products, wheat products, fruits, green leafy vegetables milk, whole raw or sprouted seeds.

October 24, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for September 21 2007

A couple of days with the liquid amino and I can’t say I feel a difference. Once again, I’m impatient for results and probably need to take it a while longer. I will say one thing through… I’ve felt the positive effect that Arginine has on my candida. Another deficiency. So here’s my theory on Candida and all the web sites and supplements that suggest they work.

If someone has Candida, there is an underling deficiency. The worse the candida, the more deficiencies exist. This includes all Vitamins, all Minerals and all Amino Acids.

I’m of the opinion now that the amino complex might be the same as a multivitamin whereas you can’t solve a deficiency unless you focus on a single amino acid.

October 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 14, 2007

WHY IS SUPPLEMENTATION WITH MINERALS IMPORTANT?

It is true we live in a wealthy nation that should be able to afford the best nutrition for its inhabitants. However, it is perplexing that people still use this fact to support the theory that vitamin or mineral deficiencies are rare…especially when one of the most common diseases linked to Westernization, osteoporosis, comes from Calcium deficiency!! Additionally, there are many more illnesses that are common in the Western world that have nutritional links supported by solid science. One example of a mineral deficiency that affects our health is Zinc deficiency. It has been well documented, and recently publicized, that even a minor deficiency in Zinc inhibits healthy immune function. It is clear that we should be radically changing our diets to provide all the necessary vitamins and minerals. At the very least, we should supplement with forms that are bioavailable.

Deficiencies or imbalances in certain minerals can affect the following body systems:

Immune System: Cu, Zn, Fe, Se
Energy Production: Mg, P, Mn
Hormone System: Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Mg, K
Vitamin Production: Co
Blood Production: Cu, Fe
Enzyme Systems: Zn, Cu, K, Mn, Mg, Fe, Ca, Mo
Skeletal System: Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, B, P
Reproduction: P, Cu, K, Mn, Zn, Mg

September 26, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 11, 2007

WOW! The garlic works this time. You are supposed to change up the anti-fungals ever few weeks so this is fantastic. Another thing that seems to work better this time? Taking acidophilus after the antifungals. I’ve always read that you should replace your intestinal flora as you kill off the candida. I never noticed any difference…until today.

These all have to be clues that my minerals are somewhat balanced…but the candida still exists.

September 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 30, 2007

Another day fighting with cold hands again and by early afternoon I finally discover why. After a quick scan through the blog, July 11, 2007 was the first entry where I mentioned this “new” symptom.

Again I spent the day taking my vitamins one at a time to see if it would have any effect. Nope, not one. I’m not sure what made me realize it but I guess I was thinking about the recent magnesium loss and how I’ve pushed the copper too low. That’s it! My copper is too low. I’ve been taking a high dosage of zinc for too long.

So I take some homeopathic copper and my cold hands disappear almost instantly. I was always waiting for something to indicate that the zinc/copper ratio was balanced and it never happened in an obvious kind of way. I think the cold hands were an indication that the copper was getting too low. I also think my recent problem with the itchy eyes was a sign that the copper was going too low.

Here’s another person’s story:

Why do most candida sufferers have cold hands and feet?

The only reason that candida infections occur is because the host suffers from lowered immunity. It is impossible to have a candida infection if your immune system is working properly. A healthy immune system constantly destroys yeast and fungi cells in the intestinal tract. A candida infection is a symptom of lowered immunity. So why do most people with candida infections suffer from extremely cold hands and feet?

If you do not have HIV, cancer or some other disease that is taxing your immune system, your immune system is depressed for some other reason. The interesting thing about the cold hands/feet symptom is that this symptom is most commonly seen in people with thyroid problems.

As Jon from iThyroid describes in detail on his site, thyroid problems occur as a result of mineral imbalances. These mineral imbalances will in turn cause other problems such as lowered blood cell levels (both red and white) leaving the host with an impaired ability to destroy pathogens such as yeast cells. So commonly candida infections have been connected to thyroid problems and this is a MISTAKE. Instead, both candida infections and thyroid problems are connected to the same thing – mineral imbalances. Particularly, copper is imbalanced as this critical mineral is needed for the formation of white and red blood cells.

If I was to suggest only one thing to anyone suffering from a candida infection today, it would be to get a hair mineral analysis done. This analysis would let you know for sure which minerals you need to supplement and which you need to cut back on. However, even if the test indicates a high amount of a particular mineral, it is important to never completely stop taking that mineral. Stopping the intake of even small amounts of a mineral can cause further imbalance.

I just want to include briefly my personal problems with mineral imbalancing. My problem was with copper levels. Mine were too low, causing things such as cold hands/feet, incredible brain fog, fatigue, muscle aches, sttringy buildups in my mouth, etc. When I started supplementing copper, I felt TERRIBLE. My brain fog symptoms got so severe I could not work. But this only lasted a few days and with time, I was able to increase my intake to the RDA and then a bit above. And as I continued to take supplemental copper, my condition continued to improve. My brain fogginess slowly went away as did the embarassing body odour. I no longer woke up in night sweats, nor did I have that stringy buildup in my mouth after eating carbohydrates.

I hope my story and website have helped at least one person out there – get a mineral test done!

August 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Nutritional Deficiency

Symptoms & Recommendations For 24 Common Nutritional Deficiencies
By: B. SixWise

When the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion compiled their Healthy Eating Index for 1999-2000, they found only a slight reason to smile. Ten percent of the population had a good diet.

This was based on 10 aspects including how many servings of fruits, vegetables and meat were being consumed, along with how much sodium and cholesterol, and variety in a person’s diet.

The rest of their findings left something to be desired:

16 percent of the population had a “poor” diet

The rest of the population (74 percent) had a diet that “needed improvement”

As the USDA pointed out, poor or inadequate diets are linked to four of the top 10 causes of death — heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. And as it turns out, most of us have less-than-ideal diets that essentially leave our bodies starving for more nutrients.

Along with poor diets, studies have found that key nutrients in foods have declined from 1909 to 1994, likely because the soil is not as nutrient-dense as it once was and processing of foods degrades nutrients that do exist. So not only are we eating fewer healthy foods, but those we do eat contain fewer nutrients than they once did.

As a result, many Americans — even those who think they are eating relatively healthy — may be suffering from a nutritional deficiency. Some of the more common ones in the United States include: Zinc Iron B vitamins Magnesium Calcium Vitamins E and C Phosphorus Vitamin D Fiber Folic Acid Essential Fatty Acids Chromium

If you are experiencing any unusual health symptoms, a nutrient deficiency could be to blame. Below is a list of common and not-so-common nutrients, along with deficiency symptoms and foods you should eat if you think you need more.

Biotin

Deficiency: Uncommon

Symptoms: Dermatitis, eye inflammation, hair loss, loss of muscle control, insomnia, muscle weakness

Recommended Foods: Swiss chard, cauliflower, liver, salmon, carrots, bananas, cereals, yeast

Calcium

Deficiency: Average diet contains 40 to 50% of RDA

Symptoms: Brittle nails, cramps, delusions, depression, insomnia, irritability, osteoporosis, palpitations, peridontal disease, rickets, tooth decay

Recommended Foods: Spinach, turnip greens, mustard greens, collard greens, yogurt, milk, mozzarella cheese

Chromium

Deficiency: 90% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Anxiety, fatigue, glucose intolerance, adult-onset diabetes

Recommended Foods: Romaine lettuce, onions, tomatoes, brewer’s yeast, oysters, liver, whole grains, bran cereals, potatoes

Copper

Deficiency: 75% of diets deficient; average diet contains 50% of RDA

Anemia, arterial damage, depression, diarrhea, fatigue, fragile bones, hair loss, hyperthyroidism, weakness

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, crimini mushrooms, turnip greens, blackstrap molasses, raw cashew nuts, sunflower seeds, spinach, asparagus

Essential fatty acids

Deficiency: Very common

Symptoms: Diarrhea, dry skin and hair, hair loss, immune impairment, infertility, poor wound healing, premenstrual syndrome, acne, eczema, gall stones, liver degeneration

Recommended Foods: Wild-caught salmon (avoid farm-raised salmon because of pollutants), flax seeds, walnuts

Folic Acid

Deficiency: Average diet contains 60% of RDA; deficient in 100% of elderly in one study; deficient in 48% of adolescent girls; requirement doubles in pregnancy

Symptoms: Anemia, apathy, diarrhea, fatigue, headaches, insomnia, loss of appetite, neural tube defects in fetus, paranoia, shortness of breath, weakness

Recommended Foods: Romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, mustard greens, calf’s liver, parsley, collard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, beets, lentils

Iodine

Deficiency: Uncommon since the supplementation of salt with iodine

Symptoms: Cretinism, fatigue, hypothyroidism, weight gain

Recommended Foods: Sea vegetables, yogurt, cow’s milk, eggs, strawberries, mozzarella cheese

Iron

Deficiency: Most common mineral deficiency

Symptoms: Anemia, brittle nails, confusion, constipation, depression, dizziness, fatigue, headaches, inflamed tongue, mouth lesions

Recommended Foods: Chard, spinach, turmeric, thyme, shitake mushrooms, green beans

Magnesium

Deficiency: 75 to 85% of diets deficient: average diet contains 50 to 60% of RDA

Symptoms: Anxiety, confusion, heart attack, hyperactivity, insomnia, nervousness, muscular irritability, restlessness, weakness

Recommended Foods: Swiss chard, spinach, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, black beans, navy beans

Manganese

Deficiency: Unknown, may be common in women

Symptoms: Atherosclerosis, dizziness, elevated cholesterol, glucose intolerance, hearing loss, loss of muscle control, ringing in ears

Recommended Foods: Mustard greens, kale, chard, raspberries, pineapple, romaine lettuce, collard greens, maple syrup Niacin (B3)

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Bad breath, canker sores, confusion, depression, dermatitis, diarrhea, emotional instability, fatigue, irritability, loss of appetite, memory impairment, muscle weakness, nausea, skin eruptions, inflammation

Recommended Foods: Crimini mushrooms, tuna (be cautious of mercury and other pollutants that can be found in fish), wild-caught salmon, chicken breast, asparagus

Pantothenic acid (B5)

Deficiency: Average elderly diet contains 60% of RDA

Symptoms: Abdominal pains, burning feet, depression, eczema, fatigue, hair loss, immune impairment, insomnia, irritability, low blood pressure, muscle spasms, nausea, poor coordination

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, mushrooms, cauliflower, broccoli, turnip greens, sunflower seeds

Potassium

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Acne, constipation, depression, edema, excessive water consumption, fatigue, glucose intolerance, high cholesterol levels, insomnia, mental impairment, muscle weakness, nervousness, poor reflexes

Recommended Foods: Chard, button mushrooms, spinach, avocado, papaya, lima beans, lentil beans

Pyridoxine (B6)

Deficiency: 71% of male and 90% of female diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, anemia, arthritis, eye inflammation, depression, dizziness, facial oiliness, fatigue, impaired wound healing, irritability, loss of appetite, loss of hair, mouth lesions, nausea

Recommended Foods: Bell peppers, turnip greens, spinach, tuna, banana, chicken breast, turkey breast

Riboflavin

Deficiency: Deficient in 30% of elderly Britons

Symptoms: Blurred vision, cataracts, depression, dermatitis, dizziness, hair loss, inflamed eyes, mouth lesions, nervousness, neurological symptoms (numbness, loss of sensation, “electric shock” sensations), seizures, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, weakness

Recommended Foods: Mushrooms, calf’s liver, spinach, spelt

Selenium

Deficiency: Average diet contains 50% of RDA

Symptoms: Growth impairment, high cholesterol levels, increased incidence of cancer, pancreatic insufficiency (inability to secrete adequate amounts of digestive enzymes), immune impairment, liver impairment, male sterility

Recommended Foods: Button mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, cod, shrimp, snapper, tuna, halibut, calf’s liver, wild-caught salmon (again, be wary of pollutants like mercury and PCBs in seafood)

Thiamine

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Confusion, constipation, digestive problems, irritability, loss of appetite, memory loss, nervousness, numbness of hands and feet, pain sensitivity, poor coordination, weakness

Recommended Foods: Asparagus, romaine lettuce, mushrooms, spinach, sunflower seeds, tuna, green peas, tomatoes, eggplant, Brussels sprouts

Vitamin A

Deficiency: 20% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, dry hair, fatigue, growth impairment, insomnia, hyperkeratosis (thickening and roughness of skin), immune impairment, night blindness, weight loss

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, milk, eggs, carrots, spinach, sweet potato, kale, collard greens, chard, red bell peppers

Vitamin B-12

Deficiency: Serum levels low in 25% of hospital patients

Symptoms: Anemia, constipation, depression, dizziness, fatigue, intestinal disturbances, headaches, irritability, loss of vibration sensation, low stomach acid, mental disturbances, moodiness, mouth lesions, numbness, spinal cord degeneration

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, snapper, venison, salmon, beef tenderloin, lamb, scallops

Vitamin C

Deficiency: 20 to 50% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Bleeding gums, depression, easy bruising, impaired wound healing, irritability, joint pains, loose teeth, malaise, tiredness

Recommended Foods: Parsley, broccoli, bell pepper, strawberries, oranges, lemon juice, papaya, cauliflower, kale, mustard greens, Brussels sprouts

Vitamin D

Deficiency: 62% of elderly women’s diets deficient

Symptoms: Burning sensation in mouth, diarrhea, insomnia, myopia, nervousness, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, rickets, scalp sweating

Recommended Foods: Shrimp, milk, cod liver oil, eggs (you can also get vitamin D from sensible sun exposure)

Vitamin E

Deficiency: 23% of male and 15% of female diets deficient

Symptoms: Gait disturbances, poor reflexes, loss of position sense, loss of vibration sense, shortened red blood cell life

Recommended Foods: Mustard greens, chard, sunflower seeds, turnip greens, almonds, spinach

Vitamin K

Deficiency: Deficiency in pregnant women and newborns common

Symptoms: Bleeding disorders

Recommended Foods: Spinach, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, carrots, green string beans, asparagus, red bell peppers, strawberries, eggs, tomatoes, green peas

Zinc

Deficiency: 68% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, amnesia, apathy, brittle nails, delayed sexual maturity, depression, diarrhea, eczema, fatigue, growth impairment, hair loss, high cholesterol levels, immune impairment, impotence, irritability, lethargy, loss of appetite, loss of sense of taste, low stomach acid, male infertility, memory impairment, night blindness, paranoia, white spots on nails, wound healing impairment

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, mushrooms, spinach, beef tenderloin, pumpkin seeds, green peas.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Chromium is closely associated with the pancreas, and therefore helps to alleviate symptoms of a hypoglycemic and/or diabetic condition by balancing the blood sugar. Chromium helps us to burn fat, build muscle mass, and properly metabolize calories.

Chromium is zapped out of our bodies in our youth as a result of eating starchy demineralized foods and refined sugar. Most chromium deficiencies are chronic. It is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium.

Chromium is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium. Seems like an obvious place to look? But then again, I’ve tried chomium before without the same success but I’ll bet it was because I had to fix the imbalance with copper first. And here’s a site that says that exact thing.

“The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance.”

So it’s not only copper, it was the other minerals as well…

CHROMIUM

Chromium deficiency is a major factor in the development of heart disease (heart attacks, hardening of the arteries). Chromium is stored principally in the kidneys, spleen and testes, with trace amounts found in the heart, lungs, pancreas and brain. The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance as well.

Chromium helps the body regulate metabolism, and regulate insulin and blood sugar levels. Chromium helps the body lose weight by stimulating enzymes that metabolize glucose for energy. It plays an important role in the liver synthesis of fatty acids (burns fat). When the body is deficient in chromium, twice the amount of time is needed for insulin to remove glucose from the blood. Chromium enhances insulin performance and glucose utilization and helps carry proteins. Chromium works best if taken before meals. Refined sugar causes the body to deplete chromium more rapidly. Strenuous exercise can also deplete chromium levels. The elderly are unable to store as much chromium in the body as are younger people. The refining of starches and carbohydrates robs foods of chromium. If you are American you have less chromium in the soil compared to European soil.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Minerals involved in the keratin synthesis can cause hair loss and I’ve a imblance with almost all of them. Copper, zinc, calcium, chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, nickel and selenium.

Minerals and Hair Loss

Minerals in trace amounts are essential to the health of the human body, including the hair. Minerals are inorganic and are found in rocks and soil as well as in all living organisms. Iron is the mineral necessary to transport oxygen throughout the body, but is often deficient in the average persons diet. A severe shortage of iron or the inability to assimilate iron will result in anemia, which will cause a slowing of hair growth. Sulphur is involved in the chemical bonding of the hair and gives the hair protein its strength. Inadequate amounts of sulphur will weaken the hair strands. Copper compounds aid in forming keratin which gives the hair its texture. Copper also helps to manufacture pigments which produce color in the hair. Zinc is necessary for keratin synthesis, as are calcium, chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, nickel and selenium.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

Another weird day. Today I have a bunch of vitamins and minerals with me and I’ll take them as I need them. Because I’m having such a hard time trying to figure it which supplements are actually helping, I take one at a time to see if it has any effect.

Around lunchtime, I start getting the cold hands so I take the magnesium, then manganese and a few more but nothing seems to have an effect. I don’t start lunch until around 1:30 PM and my hands are still very cold and I’m not sure what to do? Nothing seems to work like it used to.

About 15 minutes into my lasagna my hands go warm. Huh? Okay, now I’m really confused…

On my way back to the office, I start to realize that for most of this week my cold hands disappear after lunch and I would skip the night time vitamins because I felt so good. But for every day this week, I’d take my daily routine of supplements with my lunch…except for today.

What does this mean? Having symptoms disappear after eating food. Isn’t that diabetes?

I do a quick google search and discover this:

Pantothenic Acid Deficiency

Excessive copper levels have been associated with low levels of pantothenic acid

Hypoglycemia

Functional hypoglycemia is frequently associated with elevated tissue copper levels. An excess of tissue copper reduces manganese and zinc, thereby interfering with normal glucose metabolism.

Well, there’s no doubt in my mind that high copper can reduce manganese and zinc. I do another search on hypoglycemia and start reading about the link with the mineral chromium. Destroyed by sugar intake the symptoms are anxiety, elevated blood triglycerides and peripheral neuropathy. I still remember a doctor at the walk in clinic making the comment about how high my triglycerides were but stopped short of telling me what I should do about it.

Chromium is already extremely hard to get within a healthy diet. Everybody must be low in chromium.

Great. Something new to research…

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

Something to keep in mind if I use high copper level as a starting point. What other vitamins and minerals can be effected? Copper, in excess, tends to lower potassium levels? I’ve tried potassium before and didn’t notice any difference. But I do know that it can cause nervousness and has a link with the adrenals.

Effects Of Copper On Other Minerals

Copper, in excess, tends to lower manganese, zinc and potassium levels. Copper toxicity can also result in deficiency of vitamin C and B6, inositol, folic acid and rutin.
Copper tends to increase tissue levels of calcium and sodium.
Copper can displace iron from the liver.

Effects Of Other Minerals And Vitamins On Copper

Mercury, cadmium and zinc – compete for absorption.
Molybdenum and sulfur – bind copper in the intestine.
Iron and manganese – remove copper from the liver.
Zinc – lowers copper levels in the blood.
Vitamin C – chelates copper in the blood.
Vitamin B6, folic acid and niacin are also copper antagonists.
Cobalt is synergetic with copper.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 29, 2007

Spent the last couple of days doing research on minerals and candida. I came across an interesting article that suggested taking Molybdenum.

The Candida/Aldehyde detox pathway and the Molybdenum Connection
written by Janice Weiss

As it relates to Candida, those of you who have read the work of Dr. Orion Truss, or who have seen quotes by others from his work, will already have been alerted to his assertion that much of the harm done by Candida results from its waste product, acetaldehyde, which in turn can affect the metabolic, neurological, endocrine, and immune systems. Further, that few chemicals can create so much havoc in the body as acetaldehyde can. It may interfere with the receptors for acetylcholine which is supposedly the major neurotransmitter in the corpus callosum.

Formaldehyde, obviously then, is related to acetaldehyde in the aldehyde chain of chemicals.

Dr. Stephen Rochlitz worked with cross-crawl brain integration exercises with dyslexic patients with formaldehyde taped to these patients right brain hemisphere, and sometimes the left.

Acetaldehyde is a fungal waste product.

Dr. Stephen Cooter, in his book “Beating Chronic Disease”, states that “Candida is responsible for flooding the system with an accumulation of toxic acetaldehydes. Acetaldehydes are known to poison tissues — accumulating in the brain, spinal cord, joints, muscles and tissues.”

Dr. Cooter then goes on to describe how he learned from a chiropractor, Dr. Carol Cooper that molybdenum — a mineral — not a medication, but a nutrient, had a blanket reputation for breaking down yeast by-products into forms that the body could excrete. Coincidentally, Dr. Cooter read the monogram by Dr. Walter Schmitt “Molybdenum for Candida Albicans Patients and Other Problems” through Dr. Cooper.

“Molybdenum is chemically responsible for breaking down acetaldehyde into acetic acid. Acetaldehyde cannot be excreted from the body; it accumulates. Acetic acid can be, though, and the body naturally removes it or changes it into acetyl coenzyme A, a major player in the body’s energy system…. Acetaldhyde accumulations in tissue are responsible for weakness in muscles, irritation, and PAIN.”

Directly quoted from Dr. Walter Schmitt:

“Chemical aldehydess are best known as fragrances…. Ethanol, or drinking alcohol, is also precessed to acetaldehyde. …the body has an enzyme which breaks down the aldehydes to less toxic substances. This enzyme is aldehyde oxidase, or sometimes, aldehyde dehydrogenase. Aldehydes encountered dietarily or environmentally or produced in the body must be handled by aldehyde oxidase metabolic pathways.

Acetaldehyde is a paraticularly toxic substance which, in addition to being produced by threonine and ethanol, is a product of the metabolism (i.e. fermentation) of carbohydrate in yeast — hence the Candida connection. Acetaldehyde is thought to be the major source of tissue damage in alcoholics rather than ethanol itself. The conversion of acetaldehyde into acetic acid” for this reaction to occur, threonine to acetaldehyde to acetic acid to acetyl coenzyme A, NAD (niacine amide) is required, and aldehyde oxidase is dependent of riboflavin, iron, and molybdenum. These forgoing nutrients could be helpful to Candida albicans patients, and others who are sensitive to various fragrances and airborne odors. Those patients with aldehyde sensitivity are incredibly sensitive to any type of fragrance.

June 30, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 16, 2007

I’ve been at this now for over two years and in the last few months, I’ve discovered deficiencies in selenium, iron and zinc. And based on the changes that happened when I took them individually, I’d say they all three were a strong deficiency.

One person I’ll give credit to? The women in the Oshawa health food store suggested I had mineral deficiencies when I suspected B6 was my main problem. I was so convinced at the time I had a B6 deficiency because of the relationship with magnesium that I forgot about it and I wasn’t sure I believed her anyway.

So I have to question why did I find these deficiencies after taking a very powerful multivitamin for so long? I don’t believe that you can correct a mineral deficiency with a multivitamin because it just doesn’t make sense when you understand mineral ratios and how they interact with each other. A multivitamin can provide the body with the extra nutrients but it will not correct a deficiency. Here’s what I found:

Biochemical Individuality and Nutrition
by Bill Walsh, Ph.D.

Introduction

Each of us has innate biochemical factors which influence personality, behavior, mental health, immune function, allergic tendencies, etc. Scientists tell us that the number of different genetic combinations possible in a child from the same two parents exceeds 42 million. It’s interesting to note that we do not possess a combination of characteristics from our parents, but instead have a diverse collection of characteristics from many ancestors on both sides of the family.

Except for identical twins, each human being has unique biochemistry resulting in quite diverse nutritional needs. Shakespeare was correct when he wrote “One man’s meat is another man’s poison.” For example, some of us are genetically suited for a vegetable-based diet and others are not. Some persons can satisfy their nutritional needs by diet alone and others must have nutritional supplements to overcome genetic aberrations.

Because of genetic differences in the way our bodies process foods, most of us are quite deficient in certain nutrients and overloaded in others. Even with an ideal diet, most of us have certain nutrients that are at very low levels with many times the RDA required to achieve a healthy balance. The nutrients in overload must be carefully avoided in vitamin supplements or serious health problems can develop. After studying the biochemistry of 10,000 persons, I’ve learned that the greatest mischief is usually caused by nutrients that are stored in excessive amounts, rather than those at depleted levels. The most common nutrients in overload include copper, iron, folic acid, calcium, methionine, manganese, choline, and omega-6 fatty acids. Of course, these same nutrients may be in deficiency in other persons.

I am amused by supplement manufacturers who attempt to develop the ideal combination of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids for the general population. This is a bit like trying to determine the ideal shoe size for the population. The truth is that multiple vitamins and minerals are too indiscriminate, and may do as much harm as good.

Each of us should ask the question, “Who am I nutritionally?”

June 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 15, 2007

This is one amazing article on mineral ratios and I got some new facts that I didn’t know before. Apparently you should take vitamin B6 with zinc because they work far more effectively together. It also recommends that you take manganese if you are taking zinc so that the extra zinc does not overwhelm manganese causing deficiency.

Minerals
Boo Armstrong

Note: The information on this website is presented for educational purposes and
is not a substitute for the advice of and treatment by a qualified professional.

This document was provided by Continuum Magazine VOL. 4 No. 6

Immune suppression is caused by cumulative onslaughts and any diseases which result have deep-seated causes, so in order to protect yourself from disease it is essential that you address the real factors of your health. A main contributor to your underlying and deep-seated health is the levels of minerals which you have in your blood and those stored in different parts of your body.

All life, including our bodies, is made up of two fundamentally different groups of substances: organic and inorganic. Organic substances are produced by the chemical reactions of life. They are made, broken down and remade according to what we eat, breathe and soak in from our environment. They form the proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates and fats which are the basis of everything we need in order to live – muscles, nerves, skin and organs. These organic substances exist in a state of flux, participating in a series of chemical reactions out of which new substances are formed – some which we use and some which we remove as waste.

Inorganic substances are responsible for the reactions which cause this state of flux and constant rebuilding and removal of new and old cells. They cannot be created or broken down in our bodies so we only need a small amount of them and can use them again and again. These inorganic substances are minerals and they have been around far longer than any organic life forms.

We know that without them there would be no life at all because without them the reactions necessary to create life would never get around to happening. A cell that lacks proper mineral balance will fail to perform at its optimum level and the work that is cut out for individual cells is quite astonishing. As we understand more about the roles and inter-relationships between the minerals and organic life it is becoming clear that many of today’s problems, from general fatigue to the common cold or cancer may be related to mineral deficiencies or imbalances.

The human body can survive longer without all the essential vitamins than it can without the essential minerals – in fact we could not even begin to use vitamins if we had no minerals. Like the vitamins, minerals are generally consumed in minute quantities – even so the main categorization between minerals is that of major minerals and trace minerals. The major minerals have a structural role to play as well as causing reactions – for example calcium and phosphorus form a large part of the bones. The trace minerals are found in tiny quantities and just a bit too much or not enough can cause problems.

To actually get the minerals into your blood and your body you need to absorb them. Just taking a food substance into your mouth does not necessarily mean that you will derive all the potential benefits from it. You have to actually break the substance down and then get it across any barriers which are in the way, ensuring that your body does not think it is either waste or poison.

Some minerals are antagonistic towards each other, for example calcium and magnesium. They are very similar in structure and compete for spaces to jump into. This can cause problems if you have too much of one because it will prevent the absorption of the other. Many minerals are absorbed better in one chemical context than in another – for example your body may find it easier to absorb calcium from green leaves and seeds rather than milk and dairy produce. So what you eat is important both for that reason and also because it will affect the internal environment of your body, most importantly your intestines, through whose walls absorption takes place. If food passes through you quickly, as it does when you are suffering from diarrhoea, then absorption is diminished. Bacterial or fungal over-growth causes the surface area of the intestines to be reduced which results in absorption being further diminished.

You need to be able to move minerals to where you will use them once they are inside your body . We have special arrangements for transporting them around the body and for storing them in organs, like keeping iron in the liver. Both transportation and storage for minerals usually involve a protein dedicated for the task

Minerals work together in different ways – some are synergistic and help each other, while some are antagonistic. For example you should take vitamin B6 when you take zinc because they work far more effectively together, whereas zinc and manganese are antagonistic so you should take manganese if you are taking zinc supplements so that the extra zinc does not overwhelm the manganese causing deficiency. Some minerals play more significant roles in immunity than others – for example zinc is a necessary ingredient for T-cell immunity. Low levels have been associated with reduced antibody response, abnormal proportions of antibodies and defective cell-mediated immunity. You must have enough vitamin B6 to be able to use zinc properly and best food sources are pumpkin and sunflower seeds, whole grains, sea vegetables, watercress, lentils, parsley, okra and carrots. You lose lots of zinc every time you ejaculate (if you are a man) so future safer sex campaigns should involve keeping a bowl of almonds (also high in zinc) next to your bed to replace the lost zinc. Incidentally, one way of noticing zinc deficiencies is the white marks you may find in your finger nails.

Zinc is an antioxidant, as are selenium and germanium – two other trace minerals. Antioxidants are important for house keeping and getting rid of unwanted free radicals. Sodium and potassium are crucial for cell health because they are responsible (amongst other things) for water balance within your cells – too much sodium will cause flooding and all the cellular reactions will slow down. Now is a good time to get rid of the table salt and eat more vegetables and bananas which are renowned for their high potassium content. There are lots of accessible details in all libraries and bookshops about the roles of minerals and it is worth finding out some more.

Some minerals are bad for our health – these are known as heavy metals and include lead, aluminum and cadmium. The potential for receiving toxic minerals is all around us – cadmium for example is found in tobacco, oysters, some instant teas and coffees, some canned foods and the kidneys of pigs given cadmium as a worm killer, and can cause your kidneys and liver to malfunction.

Most of the minerals, especially the trace elements, are highly toxic to the body in excess. One example is iron, which is most concentrated in red meats, but also exists in more balanced proportions in dark leafy greens and sea vegetables. Iron-overload causes the sequestration of T-cells from the blood into bone marrow which makes them unavailable for cellular immunity (and lowers your T-cell count – good news for your doctor and the drug companies) – not so good for an embattled immune system. Add to this the fact that iron excess inhibits the absorption and utilization of zinc and you will begin to realize that mineral balances are fundamentally important.

Our health is largely dependent on the conditions of the soil in which our food is grown and the type and amount of fertilizers used. As we tend to focus on calories rather than the nutritional status of our plants, huge sums of agricultural money are spent on developing bigger plants which grow in less time in the smaller spaces. This drains the soil of its nutrients, so future plants which grow there will have less minerals available as will any creatures that eat them. Bearing in mind that there are not many minerals left in some soils, some types of fertilizers inhibit the uptake of certain minerals like nitrates causing crops to be deficient in magnesium. Many of our food crops are now generally deficient in magnesium, iron, zinc, selenium, manganese and copper. In order to improve our health and that of future generations we must re-mineralize our soils. In the meantime it is good to know that sea vegetables have not yet become so distorted.

Different parts of plants contain varying amounts of minerals – for example, white flour has only 6% of the magnesium that wheat germ contains, but within the agribusiness it is unprofitable to store wheat germ because it contains fat and goes off faster than white flour. It is therefore up to us, the consumers, to make informed decisions about the food we eat, and which parts of any plant, if any, we choose to call waste.

The time scale of mineral uptake and loss is long, it can be many months or even years before exposure or lack of exposure to certain elements is noted with respect to a person’s state of health and that usually takes the help of a trained nutritionist. If someone is deficient in a vitamin the problem can be treated instantaneously with vitamin supplements. With minerals, however the path to recovery is much longer.

Improving your mineral status by eating a whole food diet will ensure that you get the right minerals in the correct, purpose-built proportions and supplementing can improve the levels of some long-term imbalances with truly life-changing results. You can in fact heal yourself, if you make the necessary commitment to yourself and your lifestyle by correcting imbalances and deficiencies, introducing fewer toxins and getting rid of the ones you already have whilst increasing your life force. If you an antibody-positive diagnosis thank your lucky stars for the pause to think – if you don’t already, now is the time to start looking after yourself.

June 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 15, 2007

Do you know where in the digestive system vitamins and minerals enter the bloodstream?

While different vitamins and minerals are absorbed as they pass through different areas of the digestive tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine), they technically never enter the blood stream directly from the digestive system. This is because these nutrients are first absorbed from the digestive tract into the epithelial cells that line the digestive tract before they enter the blood stream. Once they have been absorbed into the epithelial cells they are no longer considered to part of the digestive system.

As noted above, nutrients undergo absorption in different areas of the digestive tract. For example, some nutrients can even undergo absorption at the very beginning of the digestive tract – inside the mouth! We know that vitamins B6, B12, folate and C can be absorbed in this way, and so can the mineral zinc. (You’ll find “sublingual” or “under-the-tongue” supplements in most health food stores for exactly this reason). Exactly how much vitamin and mineral absorption takes place in your mouth, however, depends on the form in which these vitamins and minerals are found in your food, how long you chew the food in question, the enzyme contents of your saliva, and other factors. In general, we get relatively little vitamin and mineral absorption in the mouth, but what we do get may be very important. There is good research in this area for supplements, and we need better research in this area for foods.

After the mouth, the next potential absorption site in our digestive tract is the stomach. While some vitamin and mineral absorption may also take place directly through the wall of your stomach, this amount appears to be minor and has not traditionally been considered to be part of our vitamin and mineral absorption process. Exceptions here would be the minerals copper, iodine, fluoride, and molybdenum, which may be significantly absorbed directly from the stomach.

The small intestine is by far the most important site in our digestive tract for both vitamin and mineral absorption. The small intestine is quite long (many feet in length) and virtually all vitamins and minerals can be absorbed from different areas of its surface. The part of the intestine closest to the stomach (called the duodenum) and the middle part of the small intestine (called the jejunum) specialized in absorption of most minerals. The vitamins are also spotlighted in these areas, with the exception of vitamin B12, whose primary absorption site is the very last segment of the small intestine, called the ileum. Literally hundreds of nutritive substances are absorbed from the small intestine.

The last part of the digestive tract – the large intestine – is particularly important for vitamin K absorption, biotin absorption, and the electrolyte minerals (sodium, chloride, and potassium).

Here is some further information from our website about the mechanisms involved with digestion and absorption of vitamins and minerals:

“Vitamins and minerals are quite varied in structure and amount in the foods you eat. They can be found in food in a free form, chemically bound to a larger molecule, or tightly encased inside a food aggregate. In most cases, they are liberated during eating by the mechanical process of grinding. They may also be liberated during the breakdown of the large molecules like proteins and starch, in which they may be encased.

Since your body requires specific amounts of these key nutrients, most vitamins and some minerals have active transports in place for absorption and are taken into the body in very specific ways. These active transport protein molecules act as shuttles, picking up the vitamin or mineral and taking it through the intestinal cell wall into the body, where it may be directly released or transferred to another transport molecule. Since vitamins and minerals are small and are usually found in much lower levels than amino acids, carbohydrate, and fats, these active transport protein molecules must select and pull these important molecules out of the food and take them into your body. Active transports require energy to function properly.

Calcium and iron are examples of minerals that are taken into the body by active transport. Most of the water-soluble vitamins have an active transport in place as well, and these active transports are primarily found in the middle section of the small intestine, the jejunum. Some minerals, like iron and calcium, are absorbed in the first part of the small intestine as well as the jejunum. The fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, K, and E), as discussed above, are absorbed with fat micelles, and therefore require fat to be present for their full absorption.

Magnesium is a mineral of tremendous importance for bone health, energy production, and overall healthy functioning throughout the body since it activates more than 300 cellular enzymes. Like calcium, magnesium must be constantly supplied to maintain optimal function. Magnesium doesn’t have an active transport, but depends entirely on dietary intake and a healthy intestinal lining for its absorption, and can be absorbed throughout the entire small intestine and even in the colon. Low intakes of magnesium, or loss of ability of the intestinal tract to absorb magnesium due to intestinal inflammation or disease, can result in a variety of problems such as muscle twitching or tremors, weakness, irritability and restlessness, depression, and weak bones. Magnesium is found at highest levels in whole foods such as grains but is often removed during processing. Whole grain bread and cereals will have a much higher amount of magnesium than white bread, which is made from refined flour.

Vitamin B12 is also absorbed differently from the other vitamins and minerals. First, it is most commonly found attached to proteins, and therefore requires protein breakdown to be liberated. Then, it requires a protein made in the stomach, called intrinsic factor, for its absorption, but is not absorbed until the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex reaches the final part of the small intestine, the ileum. Optimal digestion of vitamin B12 is dependent on your ability to make a healthy amount of stomach acid, since protein breakdown requires stomach acid and research has shown that intrinsic factor is also not secreted in adequate levels when stomach acid is low.”

June 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 10, 2007

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Mineral relationships

Minerals are classified into two primary groups: major and minor (or trace). The major minerals consist of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), sodium (Na), and potassium (K). The trace minerals consist of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), selenium (Se), and iodine (I).

Mineral ratios are important because minerals interact and they compete with one another for absorption. Too much of one interferes with the absorption of other minerals. The figure below illustrates the diverse and complex nature of the interactions amongst minerals.

If a mineral has an arrow pointing to another mineral, it means a deficiency of that mineral or interference with its metabolism may be caused by excesses of the mineral from whence the arrow originates.

June 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 10, 2007

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Did some googling today about mineral relationships and here’s what I found.

Minerals

Every living cell on this planet depends on minerals for its structure and ability to function. Minerals are critical to every living thing. Formation of bones , formation of blood, proper composition of body fluids, muscle tone, the cardiovascular system, growth, healing, and energy production all require minerals. All enzyme activities in the body involve minerals, so minerals are essential for the body to utilize all vitamins and other nutrients.

The key word to remember when discussing minerals is–balance. The human body must maintain a proper chemical balance. This balance depends on the levels of different minerals in the body and the ratios of each mineral level to every other mineral. The level of each mineral has an effect on every other mineral level in the body. If one mineral level is out of balance, all mineral levels are affected. If this imbalance is not corrected, it starts a chain reaction that can lead to a wide range of illnesses. To illustrate this complex relationship, the following chart shows how each mineral reacts with other minerals:

  • Ca (Calcium) depresses Manganese, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Zinc
  • Mn (Manganese) depresses Iron, Phosphorus, Potassium, Magnesium
  • Fe (Iron) depresses Potassium, Phosphorus, Copper
  • Zn (Zinc) depresses Iron, Copper, Phosphorus, Cadmium
  • K (Potassium) depresses Na, Iron, Manganese
  • P (Phosphorus) depresses Zinc, Iron, Calcium, Magnesium
  • Cu (Copper) depresses Iron, Zinc, Phosphorus

It is difficult, if not impossible, to get the proper amounts of each mineral needed for a healthy lifestyle through diet alone. Continuous high yield farming has lowered the amount of minerals in the soil available to plants. Due to these depleted soils, vital minerals, especially the important trace minerals, have practically disappeared in the entire food chain. Most of the foods we eat are heavily processed before canning, freezing, or curing. These commercial processes lowers the amount of minerals in your food even more.

Today’s lifestyles also deplete our bodies of minerals. Stress, for example, will deplete your body of Potassium. Symptoms of Potassium deficiency may include: dry skin, edema, increased cholesterol levels, insomnia, muscle and general weakness, weak reflexes, acne, and continuous thirst. Even everyday items such as coffee, antacids, oral contraceptives, alcohol, antibiotics, and saturated fats will depress critical mineral levels in your body.

Taking mineral supplements may help, but you must remember the key word- BALANCE . For example, if a Calcium supplement is taken, the levels of Manganese, Phosphorus, Magnesium, and Zinc are depressed. It is difficult to determine the exact diet that you would need to add the minerals that the calcium depresses, as it would be difficult to find the exact amount of supplements to take to replace each mineral. Since every mineral level has an effect on the every other mineral level, and each mineral is needed in different amounts, and the ratios must be in balance to be healthy, what can you do?

June 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for April 26, 2007

After reading this article on minerals, I decide to pick up some silica. The health food store only has the silica gel so I get the homeopathic stuff instead.

Minerals have an important role in the promotion of hair growth. When you have a mineral deficiency your hair will suffer as a result. However, overdosing on minerals could cause you severe hair loss.

Ok? So what should I do? You must eat foods that have the minerals you need for healthy hair. By getting your minerals from food sources you make it nearly impossible to overdose on minerals.

1. Trace Mineral Silica

If you are missing a mineral in your diet it’s probably the trace mineral silica. It’s the most important mineral when it comes to healthy hair and probably the one mineral that’s usually absent from most American diets. Supplementing your diet with silica alone will probably help you more than any of the other minerals combined because Silica helps utilize several other nutrients. Boron, copper, manganese, magnesium, fluorine, phosphorus, zinc and strontium all benefit from silica supplementation.
The only problem is that its very hard to get trace minerals because of the way most western civilizations cook and process their food. So How do you supplement Silica in the body? It’s difficult but not impossible.You can get enough trace mineral silica in your diet by eating Oats, millet, barley, whole wheat, and algae.

2. Iodine

Iodine is very important when it comes to combating hair loss. You must have Iodine for healthy hair. However, you need a certain kind of Iodine. Not just any Iodine will do. The kind of Iodine that you would get in your generic table salt isn’t the type of iodine you need for hair growth. That type of iodine could easily cause you to overdose on iodine and actually cause you more hair loss. You don’t want that. So stay away from iodized salt and and start getting your iodine from food sources. These include kelp, yogurt (low fat), cow’s milk, boiled eggs, strawberries and Mozzarella cheese.

3. Zinc

Zinc is another mineral that you could easily overdose on. Too much zinc could actually block the absorption of other minerals. However, that doesn’t mean that you don’t need zinc for healthy hair. Zinc is very important when it comes to tissue growth and hair growth in particular. It helps to secrete the scalp with much needed oil and avoid dandruff that could possibly cause hair loss. It also helps with the absorption of other nutrients that you need. Organic beef, beef liver, lima beans, organic / wild turkey, chickpeas, split peas, raw cashews, pecans, green peas, almonds, ginger root and organic egg are all good food sources of zinc.

4. Iron

Avoid taking iron supplements. You should get all of your Iron from food sources. If you you decide to take an iron supplement anyway then avoid ferrous sulfate which is hard to absorb. Oysters, liver, lean red meat, poultry, tuna, salmon, Iron-fortified cereals, dried beans, whole grains, eggs, dried fruit, dark green leafy vegetables, wheat, millet, oats, brown rice, Lima beans, soy beans, dried beans and peas, kidney beans, almonds, Brazil nuts, prunes, raisins, apricots, broccoli, spinach, kale, collards, asparagus, dandelion greens.

April 26, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 23, 2007

The dangers of messing with mineral ratios. This article basically sums up the past year in a nutshell. It’s scary but what other choice have I been given? Most of the doctors don’t believe in the magnesium deficiency not to mention the zinc and copper…

Each mineral in the body has an effect on all the other minerals. No mineral works alone. There is no way of telling what you are doing without the intelligent use of hair tests and kinesiologic testing. Feeling better is not really a criteria that a supplement is “working.” It is possible to make a person temporarily feel better by making their condition worse. For instance, lets take a fast oxidizer who has a high level of sodium and potassium; this means his adrenals are overactive or overstressed. This person is already overstimulating himself to keep himself going.

Now if he takes supplements like vitamin E and vitamin C, and a high B-complex stress vitamin, he might feel better. Yet he is really making his pattern worse. What happens is that the vitamin C, E, and B-complex raise the sodium and potassium even more. It is a drug-like effect, like taking a cup of coffee. The person notices a pick-up. What he will probably not be aware of is that by raising the sodium and potassium he has pushed himself closer to a heart attack. He will also not be aware that his calcium and magnesium levels are being lowered at the same time. If he keeps doing this, long enough, the calcium and magnesium levels–and the ratios between them–can move into a cancer resonance range.

In fact, if you change or rearrange a mineral pattern by 10-25%–in any direction–you can probably get relief from symptoms. You get short-term benefit by helping some parts of the mineral chart at the expense of others. Unfortunately, the damage you are doing does not show until later. It takes time to develop. So you never realize the harm you have done to yourself.

Believe it or not, many times you have to make a person temporarily feel worse to get him better. Let’s take the example of the fast oxidizer we were using before. The right way to help this person would be to lower his sodium and potassium levels. this would reduce the stress on his adrenal glands. It would slow down the person’s metabolism and prevent him from burning out his mineral reserves and collapsing. You have to slow this kind of person down to save his life. But when you do it, he feels worse. He doesn’t want to slow down. He wants to keep driving himself. A person like this won’t voluntarily go into a healthfood store and buy supplements that will slow him down. No one would ever take supplements that would make him feel worse. If a person took something that made him feel worse, he would stop, and if it made him feel better, he would keep taking it.

Now you can see some of the problems of randomly taking supplements without knowing what you are doing. So far, we’ve only mentioned four minerals, sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium. You can imagine how complicated it can get when you consider the relationship between the other minerals, such as copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, phosphorus, iron, and so forth. The only way you can tell what supplements to take for your specific physical/emotional imbalances is to use the results of hair analysis or kinesiological muscle testing.

March 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 22, 2007

Here is a very interesting article that describes how the adrenals are effected by the level of magnesium. So the naturopath knew I had stressed adrenals because she tested for it. But when I mentioned the magnesium loss, it was rejected. This is such a brilliant article. I just wish I could find a doctor who would understand what they are talking about. Forget it. That’s impossible…

When the ratio of sodium and magnesium becomes unbalanced–even slightly, it can have a major impact on the adrenal gland. Just by looking at the ratio between these two minerals lets you know immediately how well this gland is performing.

Thyroid and Adrenals

The thyroid gland and the adrenal glands are the main energy producing glands in the body, supplying the body with more than 98% of its energy. If you did not have these glands, you would not have enough energy to blink an eyelid. The thyroid gland, located right behind the Adam’s apple in your neck, is about the size of a plum. The adrenal glands are much smaller and are located on top of each of your kidneys. Everyone has one thyroid gland (with two lobes) and two adrenal glands. These glands work very closely together. In non-technical terms, the adrenal glands “release” simple sugars in the body, which serve as the fuel for the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland then takes these sugars and ignites them into energy. The thyroid gland is like the spark plugs of your car in that it ignites the fuel and turns it into power. So it is these glands, working together, which produce the body’s energy. To have maximum amounts of energy, these glands have to be functioning at peak capacity.

These are the glands that determine a person’s rate of metabolism, the “oxidation type.” If both the thyroid gland and the adrenal glands are overactive, a person will be known as a fast-oxidizer. In other words, he will have a very fast metabolism. These are the people who usually abound with energy. Now, if just one of these glands is overactive and one is underactive, a person will be a mixed-oxidizer. And if both of these glands are underactive, a person will be a slow-oxidizer. A slow oxidizer has a very slow rate of metabolism. These are the individuals who are usually lacking in energy. It is the adrenal glands which give a person extra energy when he needs it. Whenever a person faces an emergency, the adrenal glands release adrenalin, which gives the body the extra “boost” it needs.

There are four main minerals in the body, which help to regulate the thyroid and adrenal glands. These minerals are calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and potassium (K). These minerals could be called macro-minerals because they appear in larger proportions in the body than other minerals. If these four minerals are all at normal levels, the thyroid and adrenal glands will function at peak efficiency. However, if any one of these macro-minerals deviates much from normal range, this is when a person is going to have problems. Sometimes, even a relatively minor fluctuation in one of these minerals can cause either one of these glands to become underactive. A simple analogy, which further explains this principle, is to compare the mineral levels of the human body to a battery. Both the human body and a battery derive their energy from mineral electrolytes. When a battery has the perfect balance between certain minerals, it will be capable of producing its maximum energy potential. Likewise, when the human body has the perfect balance between certain minerals, it to will be capable of producing its maximum energy potential. However, when either the body or a battery has an imbalance in the minerals they contain, they lose their potential of carrying a charge. The minerals in your body determine the biochemical environment in which your organs must work. The more optimal is the mineral environment in your body, the better your organs will function, and the more energy you will have.

The real key to understanding health is the ratios between different minerals. The normal levels for each of these minerals are expressed in milligrams/percent. The normal level for calcium is 40, magnesium is 6, sodium is 25, and potassium is 10. If you add one zero to each of the numbers, you will get a figure representing parts per million. So the 40 for calcium represents a certain percentage of calcium which appears in the tissue cells of the body. The real key to understanding minerals and their effect on human health does not lie merely in evaluating individual mineral levels. Mineral levels can certainly help to give a tremendous amount of information about a person’s energy levels. However, looking at individual levels can be deceiving if you look at them just by themselves.

Calcium and potassium ratios are called the thyroid ratio. Calcium and potassium are the two specific minerals that regulate the thyroid gland. Calcium slows down the thyroid and potassium speeds it up. In order for this gland to operate at its maximum capacity, there has to be just the right balance between these two minerals. If a person has too much calcium in his tissues (in proportion to potassium) he will have an underactive thyroid gland. If he has an excess of potassium in his tissues (in proportion to calcium) he will have an overactive thyroid gland. This is why once you know the ratio of calcium to potassium in the body you know immediately if this gland is too fast or too slow. And not only that, but you will know exactly how fast or slow it is. The normal value of the calcium to potassium ratio is 4. You get that by looking at the normal values for calcium and potassium, where calcium is 40 and potassium is 10. 40 divided by 10 is 4. If a person has a ratio of 4 to 1 between these two minerals, the thyroid gland will be functioning at peak capacity, assuming that the levels for these two minerals are also near normal. By comparing a person’s actual ratio with the normal ratio, you can tell if the thyroid gland is underactive or overactive.

And once you know this, you will know approximately how much energy a person has. If a person has a thyroid ration (calcium to potassium ratio) which is greater than 4.7, his thyroid gland is underactive. The greater this ratio is between these two minerals, the weaker this gland will become and the less energy a person will have. It is impossible to have a poor thyroid ratio and still have an efficient thyroid gland. Even a 10% loss of efficiency can cause fatigue. Ten percent doesn’t sound like a big number, but it is. If the average lifespan of 70 or so years were cut 10%, that would be a loss of 7 years. That’s quite significant. If your average body temperature of 98.6 degrees were cut 10%, that would be a temperature of almost 9 degrees lower, which is a big difference. If the temperature went up 10%, that would be a temperature of almost 110 degrees, which for many people would mean death. So you can see that 10% in biological terms can be a pretty significant number. These mineral ratios are amazingly accurate. A person can have normal levels of thyroid hormone in his blood and still have a weak thyroid gland.

 The routine test for thyroid function is not very reliable.

This test basically measures the levels of a number of thyroxin proteins in the blood. But many doctors fail to understand that a person can have normal levels of thyroxin (thyroid hormone) in the blood and still have a weak thyroid gland. Or, because of mineral imbalances the thyroxin may just be circulating around without being fully effective. So, in many cases, the doctor may be drawing false conclusions from the test. A hair analysis gives a more accurate measure of the function of the thyroid.

When you’re talking about the adrenal gland, it is the sodium and magnesium which do the regulating. This could be called the adrenal ratio. When the ratio of these two minerals becomes unbalanced–even slightly, it can have a major impact on the adrenal gland. Too much magnesium, in relation to sodium, will slow down the adrenal gland. Just by looking at the ratio between these two minerals lets you know immediately how well this gland is performing. The normal level for the sodium to magnesium ratio is 4.17 to 1. You get this by dividing the normal levels for sodium (25) by the normal level for magnesium (6). So, if a person has an adrenal ratio of 4.17, the adrenal gland will be functioning at peak capacity, again assuming that the levels for these two minerals are also normal. The adrenal gland is underactive when the adrenal ratio (sodium to magnesium) is less than 3.2. Once you know a person’s mineral ratios and fully understand them, you can determine the efficiency of major organs–without guessing. The normal sodium level in the body is 25. When the sodium level drops much below 20, a person’s adrenal medulla will start to slow down. Many people have sodium levels that are lower than 15 and they usually have diminished levels of energy. Now, if your sodium level is very low, don’t try to compensate by eating a lot of salt (sodium). If you do this, it won’t help at all. It will probably only aggravate the problem.

You wouldn’t expect this to happen, but it does. If you multiply the energy level of the thyroid gland times the energy level of the adrenal gland you get the total energy loss. If a person has a perfect ratio for the thyroid gland (100%), but has a 50% ratio for his adrenal gland, the person would have a total energy loss of approximately 50%. Multiply the energy level of the thyroid gland (100%) times the energy level of the adrenal gland (50%). This would be a bare minimum as far as a loss of energy is concerned. One strong gland will not usually make up for a weak gland. If someone else has a thyroid gland with a 50% energy loss and he also has adrenal glands with a 50% loss, that person would be operating on approximately 25% of his available energy. The main thing you should remember is that you have to take into consideration both glands when figuring a person’s total energy loss. It gets a little more complicated when a person is a mixed oxidizer. Just remember that one strong gland will usually not make up for a weak gland. Most people are more fatigued than they would ever realize. They’re so tired that they can’t comprehend how exhausted they really are.

March 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 21, 2007

Came across an interesting article the other day called “Dietary Supplements That Don’t Work”. I can certainly agree with the comments for magnesium oxide and garlic supplements.

Dietary Supplements That Don’t Work

1. Magnesium oxide – This widely sold, economical form of magnesium is preferred by dietary supplement manufacturers because it is 70% elemental magnesium and only 30% carrier (oxide). But only 4% of magnesium oxide is absorbed.

2. Calcium supplements – Calcium is an essential, but over-promoted, mineral.

3. High-lignan flaxseed oil – So now, if you are convinced calcium supplements are not the sole answer to the problem of age-related bone loss, then what about plant estrogens?

4. Vitamin C – What, vitamin C pills don’t work? Calm down, that false notion was contrived from flawed science conducted by National Institutes of Health researchers who refuse to recant.

5. Garlic supplements – You may have your favorite garlic pill. Larry King, CNN TV commentator, has his. But the problem with garlic pills is that most of the studies involving garlic and its health benefits involve its primary active ingredient, allicin, which most of the garlic pills provide little or none.

6. Ginseng – the list of health benefits associated with this herb are growing, and include blood sugar control, blood pressure normalization and even help for male impotency. But ginseng often fails to meet its promise because dietary supplements often fail to provide ginseng’s primary active ingredient, called ginsenosides.

7. Resveratrol – undoubtedly this herbal extract from grapes or other botanical sources will continue to be widely acclaimed. Its potential health benefits are endless.

8. Red yeast rice – so you’re searching for a more natural alternative to statin drugs to lower your cholesterol. You don’t want to experience the liver-toxic effects of statin molecules. So you begin your search at the local health food store.

Dietary supplements have great promise, serve as economical and safe alternatives to problematic prescription drugs, but often disappoint because they are not properly made or labeled.

March 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

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