Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for October 04, 2007

After doing some research on the amino acids, I came across some interesting fact about one called “L-Theanine”. It plays a role in the formation of GABA and neurotransmitters for a calming effect which is exactly what I am looking for. Here’s what it says:

Theanine functions, uses, and health benefits

L-theanine is involved in the formation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma amino butyric acid (GABA). GABA influences the levels of two other neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, producing a relaxation effect. GABA serves a sedative function that brings balance to excitability that can lead to restlessness, insomnia, and other disruptive conditions. Theanine also appears to increase levels of dopamine, another brain chemical with mood-enhancing effects, which can reduce blood pressure.

L-theanine is an amino acid that helps promote a mild, restful, relaxed state without diminishing daytime alertness. Stress impairs the immune system, leaving us vulnerable to opportunistic infections, and can cause depression. People under stress can mitigate many of the harmful effects of stress with l-theanine. L-theanine reduces stress and anxiety without the tranquilizing effects found in many other calming supplements.

Theanine has a reputation for promoting mental and physical relaxation, and decreasing stress and anxiety without inducing drowsiness, as measured by increased generation of alpha-waves. L-theanine directly stimulates the production of alpha brain waves. By increasing the brain’s output of alpha waves, theanine may control anxiety, increase mental focus, improve concentration, and promote creativity.

Also found this:

THEANINE (Non-Essential)

L-Theanine is a derivative of Glutamic Acid. It is the active agent found in green tea. It readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, increasing levels of GABA and dopamine. It has been shown to lower blood pressure and reduce the effects of PMS. Theanine acts as a non-sedating relaxant to help increase the brain’s production of alpha-waves (those associated with “relaxed alertness”). This makes Theanine extremely effective for combating tension, stress, and anxiety, sharpening mental focus, improving concentration and promoting creativity without inducing drowsiness.

I went to a number of different health food stores and I always have a hard time looking for amino acids as there is never a standard. Each store will carry a few but never all. When I finally came across a store that had it, I decided to pick up another “hard to find” amino acid that I’ve done some reading about called Acetyl-Carnitine so I’ll pick up that too!

October 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 10, 2007

No vibration again!

Since taking GABA seems to have an effect on the vibration, I start looking up the function of amino acids and there are several things that are a precursor to GABA. Using some logic, it would only make sense that something must be low to cause a GABA deficiency. Glutamine is one of them and is used to treat anxiety.

Glutamine

* Provides about 80% of the body’s pool of free nitrogen.
* Reduces craving for sugar, alcohol and other drugs.
* Improves nutrient absorption.
* Important with inability to gain weight (cachexia).
* Useful with impotence, allergies, senility, fatigue, peptic ulcers.
* Converted in the brain to the neurotransmitters glutamic acid and GABA.

Glutamine easily passes through the blood-brain barrier, a protective barrier formed by the red blood cells and the glia of the brain that protects the brain from any toxins, bacteria, and viruses, etc., that are circulating through the bloodstream. Inside the brain glutamine may be converted into glutamic acid, another amino acid that helps sustain proper brain function; it also increases levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an amino acid that acts as a neurotransmitter in the body.

L-glutamine supplements may improve mental function and have been used to treat epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, and senility. Glutamine is also an important source of energy for the nervous system. If the brain is not receiving enough glucose, it compensates by increasing glutamine metabolism for energy. Glutamine users often report more energy, less fatigue and better mood.

Glutamine Deficiency Seen In:

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Alcoholism
Anxiety and Panic Disorders

September 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 05, 2007

So with these new idea swirling around in my head, I pick up some taurine and glutathione on my way home. Back to google for some more research…

Neurotransmitter Amino Acids

Abnormalities in this group are widespread in their implications, and are seen in virtually all mental/emotional problems, primary brain problems (stroke, Alzheimer’s Disease, epilepsy), depression, anxiety, insomnia, poor concentration, memory problems, and mental exhaustion.

Aspartic Acid
Asparagine
Gamma Amino Butyric Acid (GABA) (minor amino acid)
Glutamic Acid
Glutamine
Glycine
Phenylalanine
Taurine
Tryptophan
Tyrosine

After some brief reading, I focus in on something called GABA. I know I’ve come across that in the health food stores but what is it exactly?

GABA

Neurons in the brain’s temporal lobes produce the biochemical GABA and their resulting theta brain waves. GABA is the brain’s natural valium providing calmness and aiding in the production of endorphins. When in balance the GABA dominant person is characterized by stability and reliability. These people are team players who thrive on organization and long-term relationships. Homemakers, administrators, technicians, nurses, security officers, accountants, bus drivers are all ideal occupations for GABA natured people. GABA natured people are nurturers and are tend to be very traditional. 50% of the world’s population is GABA dominant so it is very important to understand how to balance this vital brain neurotransmitter.

An excess of GABA can result in a person not taking care of their own needs at the expense of nurturing others.

Early signs that you are may be GABA deficient include: feeling anxious, nervous or irritable. You may start to feel overwhelmed and stressed out. Other symptoms include: allergies, light-headedness, muscle aches. This is just the beginning of what could become serious health problems.

As with all the brain’s neurotransmitters GABA deficiencies affect all four major domains of brain function. Physical, personality, memory and attention issues can present themselves as GABA deficiencies become more prominent.

Factors which reduce GABA levels:

  • Glutamaine (precursor) deficiency
  • B1, B6, zinc, manganese & iron deficiency
  • Chronic stress
  • Chronic pain
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Progesterone deficiency
  • Mercury and lead exposure
  • Alcohol withdrawal
  • Caffeine excess
  • Excessive electromagnetic radiation
  • Excessive loud noise exposure

Two things really stands out from this list:

1) Zinc, manganese and iron deficiencies.

2) Exposure to excessive electromagnetic radiation

There is no doubt whatsoever that I was low with all three of those minerals and I had exposure to electromagnetic radiation for a year before I discovered the intercom system. So these two things can cause a GABA deficiency and can cause anxiety…

I’ll try the glutathione, taurine for a couple of days to see what effect it has. If I still have the vibration, then I’ll try the GABA.

September 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for September 05, 2007

Woke up with the vibration…

I’m not sure how that’s possible because I’m literally swimming in niacin these past few days. That can only mean one thing: I may be low in niacin, but it’s not the cause of the vibration.

My two main symptoms are Candida and the vibration/anxiety.

So using candida as a starting point, I come across the following article:

Glutathione

As Candida albicans spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract and colonizes in other areas of the body, it produces various toxins. These toxins can impair health by reducing the body’s supply of white blood cells, which are needed by the immune system to properly fend off infectious bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other pathogens. Candida albicans toxins also inhibit the body’s ability to manufacture antioxidants, including glutathione, an enzyme that is important for liver detoxification and cellular respiration. As a result of these negative effects caused by the unchecked spread of Candida albicans, symptoms of candida can manifest in many different ways, mimicking other disease conditions and negatively impacting many areas of your body.

Glutathione, an amino acid is low in people with candida. Okay, I’ve tried amino acids before but maybe I’ll have a different result now that I’ve taken care of the mineral deficiencies.

Here’s some more information about how a Glutathione deficiency can effect the nervous system:

“A deficiency of Glutathione first affects the nervous system, causing such symptoms as lack of coordination, mental disorders, tremors, and difficulty maintaining balance. These problems are believed to be due to development of lesions in the brain.”

Glutathione can be depleted by a host of agents working alone or together. Environmental pollutants, tobacco smoke, alcohol abuse, acetaminophen, mercury from dental fillings, and a sustained immune response against persistent toxins, can all rob you of this most important health asset. Mercury can impair your body’s ability to synthesize Glutathione by normal means.

The liver produces glutathione from the amino acids cysteine, glutamic acid and glycine. Glutathione deficiency results in early aging and in the loss of coordination, balance, tremors, and mental disorders.

Glutathione levels decline with age and if not corrected will accelerate the aging process; so supplementation is important. But the assimilation of supplemental oral glutathione is questionable. Instead it is best to supplement with cysteine, glutamic acid and glycine and have the body use those raw materials to manufacture needed glutathione.

September 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 27, 2007

Woke up this morning with no vibration and there was none last night. So was it the switch to magnesium gluconate? I’ll try the same thing again today with vitamin A and vitamin E along with the 100 mg of zinc. I’ll also add pantothenic acid. The lower dosage of magnesium didn’t seem to be as troublesome as I thought it would be. Recently with the fatigue my legs feel really heavy, I’m wondering if it has to do with my blood circulation as I stopped taking niacin a while back. I’ll add that too.

Progress? I was briefly looking through the symptom time line diary and I was looking at the changes I made after the iridology appointment. That’s when I started eating more fruit, discovered active B vitamins and started multivitamins and taking a higher dosage of magnesium in a form that is better absorbed. I think there will be a lot of change since the last reading. The adrenals is the one thing that I can’t seem to improve along with the anxiety. I’m sure the anxiety is related to the magnesium loss or the zinc/copper imbalance and I’ve just discovered those.

March 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 15, 2007

What else do I discover? A zinc deficiency due to copper toxicity can also result in anxiety. I wonder if the zinc deficiency is the cause of my mystery vibration? I came across the Cleveland clinic website of neurological symptoms and there are a number of people with a similar internal vibration feeling and all of them are saying that their doctors have discovered nothing wrong in their blood tests. This leads me to believe that my problem is shared with other people and not some rare disease. My vibration is stronger when I take high doses of zinc which would cause copper toxicity symptoms.

I’ve asked for one week vacation starting March 26th and I’ll attempt the copper detoxification when I’m not at work. That will give me some time to prepare for it.

I alter my vitamins slightly for the evening dosage as I’d like to change them to help with the excess copper. I switch to a multivitamin that contains no copper and has iron instead. My other multi didn’t have iron. I also replace one magnesium with calcium/magnesium in a 1/1 ratio for added calcium. I’ve picked up manganese recently so I’ll take one of those as well. Taurine is recommended and I still have some left over so I’ll start that tomorrow.

March 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for February 06, 2007

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The other day I came across a web site that suggested a magnesium deficiency could cause something called Hypermobile joints. I’ve never heard about this so I do some googling…

Anxiety and Psychiatric Disorders

Magnesium deficiency causes increased levels of adrenaline, which can lead to a feeling of anxiety. Rats who become magnesium deficient have an increased level of urinary catecholamine excretion (a by-product of adrenaline).

People who have mitral valve prolapse have also been found to have an increased state of anxiety and have an increased level of urinary catecholamine excretion, the exact same condition found in rats who are Mg deficient.

It is not surprising then, to find that people with mitral valve prolapse are usually low in magnesium, and that magnesium supplementation alleviates the symptoms of mitral valve prolapse and reduces the level of urinary catecholamine excretion, i.e. it also reduces the anxiety symptoms.

Researchers in Spain found a correlation between anxiety disorders and hypermobility. In fact, they found that patients with anxiety disorder were over 16 times more likely than control subjects to have joint laxity. If you put the study results together, then there’s a link between anxiety and hypermobility, a link between anxiety and mitral valve prolapse, and a link between mitral valve prolapse and hypermobility.

These studies tell us that anxiety disorders occur in many people who simply have mitral valve prolapse and/or joint hypermobility, meaning anxiety disorders are not specific to EDS or any particular connective tissue disorder.

Joint Hypermobility

Introduction

If you have joint hypermobility, this booklet will help you, your family and friends. It explains what joint hypermobility is, what causes it, the usual symptoms, and what can be done to treat it. It also explains what you can do to help yourself – such as avoiding certain sports which will make your symptoms worse.

Joint hypermobility is not a type of arthritis (it just means that you can move some or all your body joints in a way that most people cannot) and it only affects a small number of people. It can be very mild with few symptoms and not need treatment, or it can be more severe in which case the joints may be easily dislocated. It can also help some people, for example dancers and musicians, who need flexibility in their joints in order to perform.

What is joint hypermobility?

If you have joint hypermobility, some or all of your joints will have an unusually large range of movement. You may have known that your joints were very ‘supple’ even from an early age. You may have been ‘double-jointed’, or able to twist your limbs into unusual positions. Athletes sometimes train to achieve what they call ‘flexibility’. Some doctors call it ‘joint hyperlaxity’.

How is hypermobility measured?

Variations between one person and another make it difficult to measure hypermobility. For many years the most popular system was that devised by Carter and Wilkinson and modified by Professor Peter Beighton. This system is often referred to as the ‘Beighton score’ and is still in use.

If you think you may have hypermobility, you can check your own ‘Beighton score’ using the tests shown in Figure 1.

Give yourself 1 point for each of the five simple tests you can do. Do the tests on the arm and leg on both sides of your body, so the maximum score is 9 points. Most people score less than 2, and only about three or four in a hundred healthy people score 4 or more points. If you score 4 or more in the tests and have had joint pains (arthralgia) in four or more joints for longer than 3 months then it is likely that you have hypermobility, but you should still consult your doctor to determine whether hypermobility is the cause of the symptoms in your joints, or whether something else is causing the pain.

Although the Beighton score is a useful guide, doctors will now consider other factors and symptoms in order to confirm a diagnosis of hypermobility. The ‘1998 Brighton Criteria’, as they are known, allow for the fact that some people have hypermobility in fewer than four joints, and that hypermobility may also affect parts of the body besides the joints.

February 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 03, 2007

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Went to the library today and decided to pick up some books on nutrition and good health. Reading material for the GO train. I’ve skimmed through a few of them since I’ve been home and already I have some interesting things to consider.

One of the books I picked up is called “Dr. Jensen’s Guide to Body Chemistry and Nutrition”. Dr. Jensen is the same author who wrote the book on iridology called “Beyond Basic Health”.

I firmly believe that optimal health can’t be obtained from a standard type of doctor. The body’s chemistry has very important relationships and ratios that are essential to maintaining the functions of the human body.

Here’s what I found interesting so far:

Dr. Jensen’s Guide to Body Chemistry and Nutrition

Page 02: Chemical Needs of Body Organs: Adrenals/Zinc

Page 22: The following diseases and conditions indicate amino acid deficiency:

– Anxiety, Candida Albicans, Magnesium deficiency

I have three things that indicate an amino acid deficiency and from the research from earlier this week, I’ve decided to try the amino supplements again. I’ve don’t recall reading about the suggestion of zinc for the adrenals so I’ll add that as well. Zinc is in my multivitamin but I want a higher dosage. My Nutritional Healing book mentions that pantothenic acid is very important and stressed adrenals can cause the depletion of potassium in the body. And Potassium is a key factor with….magnesium.

I managed to find a super strength formula made by Swiss. The suggested dosage is six capsules per day but I’ll start slow and go with three. Here’s what it says:

Some Amino Acids act as neurotransmitters or precursors of neurotransmitters (chemicals that carry information from one nerve cell to another.) Therefore, certain amino acids are necessary for the brain to receive and send messages. Amino Acids also enable vitamins and minerals to perform their tasks effectively. Although vitamins and minerals are absorbed and assimilated by the body, they remain ineffective unless the necessary Amino Acids are present.

Ingredients: Glutamic Acid (1563.03 mg), Serine (470.94 mg), Aspartic Acid (937.27 mg), Phenylalanine (284.77 mg), Tryptophan (173.26 mg), Isoleucine (499.51 mg), Methionine (18.43 mg), Arginine (232.24 mg), Valine (508.72 mg), Alanine (419.33 mg), Lysine (786.12 mg), Proline (517.02 mg), Glycine (147.46 mg), Histidine (162.20 mg), Tyrosine (272.79 mg), Leucine (936.35 mg), Cysteine (174.18 ), Threonine (658.02 mg)

I went back through the blog to find out when I first started taking amino acids. It was at the suggestion of my chiropractor on July 29, 2006. He suggested taking Lysine but I decided to get the amino complex instead. I started taking the SISU B complex vitamins around the same time and a week later, I noticed a difference with the vibration.

So was it the B vitamins or was it the amino acids? I’m thinking it was the B vitamins but maybe it was the combination of both?

February 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 28, 2007

Here’s the article:

TCM Acupuncture for Anxiety and Mood Disorders
By Dr. James Pascual, Dac, DC

The increased stresses of the world, whether personal, occupational, or societal, can have a detrimental effect on one’s health. When one is not able to deal with stress, anxiety can develop and the symptoms of anxiety can overwhelm them. Acupuncture remains an effective treatment for anxiety. Research has shown acupuncture’s effectiveness and offers explanations on how this natural therapy can biochemically help control anxiety.

Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health problem in Canada. They are defined as a persistent state of fear that may or may not be associated with a specific object or situation, often accompanied by physiological changes such as a fast heartbeat and rapid breathing. In 2001, it was estimated that 2.9 million Canadians suffer from some type of anxiety disorder.

Published lifetime prevalence rates for anxiety disorders suggest that somewhere between ten percent to one-quarter of the population is affected. Anxiety patients are more frequent users of the health care system than the general population with those sufferers having visited a general practitioner six or more times in a year. According to an American Study, Anxiety Disorders were found to be the most costly, accounting for nearly one-third of the total economic burden, higher than any other mental disorder or condition. Although there have been no formal studies concerning the costs of anxiety disorders to the Canadian health system, the American study indicates that the annual cost of anxiety disorders are $42 billion US.

The human body has developed an ingenious way to deal with the stresses that we encounter. With stress, the body is programmed to turn on the necessary systems and shut off secondary ones. The body’s “fight or flight” mechanism (also known as the sympathetic system) turns on when stress is presented. Blood and energy is diverted to the systems that are required to fight or flee – such as the muscles of the body, the heart, and the cardiovascular systems. There are increases to the heart rate, energy is released from fat, and muscles become ready for quick action. In addition, secondary systems such as the digestive and reproductive are shut off because they are determined not to be necessary in this stressful situation.

In today’s fast paced world, stressors can become constant in our lives. The problem with stress is that it can cause the sympathetic system to be constantly functioning. Blood pressure remains high, there is a heightened sense of nervousness, and these symptoms can manifest into the anxiety disorders that are prevalent in our society today. In addition, psychosomatic disorders such as gastrointestinal ulcers and headaches can be due to this phenomenon.

Research has shown that when an animal is placed into a situation in which it cannot achieve an adaptive reflex, an abnormal biological reaction takes place involving visceral-endocrine functioning. These maladaptations may lead to the development of psychopathology, i.e. anxiety/phobias or physical illness (headaches, hypertension).

Acupuncture remains an effective, natural, and safe treatment for people suffering from anxiety conditions because it is able to calm the sympathetic system by allowing the body to release neurotransmitters that can control a person’s stress level.

Acupuncture was developed about 2500 years ago and is centered around the development of Chinese society and Traditional Chinese Medicine which states that there are pathways or meridians in the body where energy or chi travels. Any disease, pain, or dysfunction is due to a blockage in these meridians. In the case of anxiety, when emotions are held over long periods of time, or when they result from a traumatic event, they can become the cause of illness. This will block the flow of chi. Fine needles are placed into specific acupoints which remove the blockage and allow the energy to flow again. With proper energy flow, the person’s health returns.

Since ancient times, acupuncture has been known as an effective treatment for stress and its disorders. There have been numerous references to the effects of the emotions on the body and psychosomatic illness, a relatively new concept in the West, but one that was recognized and written about 200 years B.C. Based on these references, acupuncture was found to be the treatment of choice.

Acupuncture Research

Various scientists have researched the effects of acupuncture on anxiety. Two researchers from the Yale University School of Medicine assembled a group of patients for a blind, randomized controlled trial. The patients were undergoing surgery which created an acute anxiety condition. The study found that while treatment did not produce any significant physiological changes, subjects who received acupuncture did experience a profound change in their behavioural anxiety levels. In addition, they added that “the results of the study suggest that acupuncture may be an effective treatment for individuals experiencing intense levels of daily stress and anxiety.”
A German trial using a double blind design examined the effects of acupuncture on patients with minor depression and generalized anxiety disorders. One group was given acupuncture at the sites of true acupuncture points while the other received acupuncture at the sites of sham acupuncture points (needles were placed in points on the body that did not represent any particular acupuncture point). After 10 treatments, those receiving true acupuncture were experiencing a remarkable reduction in anxiety symptoms.

A Beijing Medical University trial compared the use of traditional acupuncture techniques against the use of the drug amitriptyline in the treatment of depression and anxiety. Amitriptyline is an antidepressant drug and may help alleviate the anxiety component of depression because of its sedative nature. Progress was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The results showed that acupuncture treatment is as effective as amitriptyline in the treatment of depression and even more effective for anxiety symptoms.

Another study from China looked into the effects of acupuncture on reducing anxiety and depression in patients with chronic physical illness, where the psychological state of the patient was exacerbating their physical condition, contributing to a “vicious circle” of deteriorating health. Patients were administered acupuncture using standard points diagnosed through Traditional Chinese Medicine. Anxiety and depression rating scales were used before and after treatment. After one month of treatment, anxiety had decreased to normal levels in 70% of the patients and depression in 90%.

An investigation was made to determine the effect of acupuncture on neurotransmitters commonly implicated in anxiety and depression – focusing on serotonin and norepinephrine. Electroacupuncture enhances the effect of the acupuncture needles by adding a current. Using electroacupuncture on specific acupuncture points, the study found that it accelerates the synthesis and release of serotonin and norepinephrine on the central nervous system. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter released by neurons in the central nervous system and is believed to play an important role in the regulation of mood and sleep. Abnormal levels of serotonin have been thought to play a part in many disorders, notably as part of the biochemistry of depression, migraine, bipolar disorder, and anxiety. Norepinephrine is also a stress hormone and along with epinephrine affects the fight or flight response affecting the sympathetic system. This confirmed findings in an earlier study which found that needling specific acupuncture points affected change in the amounts of particular neurotransmitters found in a subject’s blood and urine. Acupuncture mimics the mechanism used by various anti-anxiety and anti-depressive drugs by increasing amounts of
serotonin and norepinephrine available to postsynaptic cells in the brain thereby decreasing anxiety symptoms.

Acupuncture remains an effective treatment for those suffering from anxiety, without the side effects seen with various drugs. With it’s effect on decreasing anxiety, acupuncture can help secondarily with the treatment of psychosomatic disorders. Research shows that there is a positive response of anxiety to acupuncture and that it should be considered a treatment for those suffering from this debilitating disorder.

January 28, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | 1 Comment

Entry for January 28, 2007

DRUGLESS METHODS TO HELP GET RID OF ANXIETY

NIACIN – vitamin B-3 is so effective against actual psychoses that half of all mental ward inmates in the South were able to be released once a depression-era deficiency of this vitamin was corrected. Niacin in appropriate doses acts as a natural tranquilizer and induces relaxation or sleep. It is non-addictive, cheap, and safer than any pharmaceutical product. Dosage varies with condition. The best author on the subject is Abram Hoffer, M.D., whose experience dates back to the early 1950’s. He routinely gave at least as much VITAMIN C as he did niacin.

LECITHIN – a food supplement that is high in phosphatidyl choline. The body is able to make acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, out of this. This has a sedating effect. It is interesting to note that one third of your brain, by dry weight, is lecithin. Feeding the organ what it is largely made of might help it to function better. (Don’t worry: lecithin supplements are made from soybeans.) Dosage runs in the tablespoons.

SUGAR – avoid it, to reduce anxiety symptoms. The swings from high to low blood sugar result in corresponding mood swings. Sugar is not your friend. Eat complex carbohydrates instead.

CHROMIUM may help even out the sugar mood-swings and perhaps even sugar craving. Chromium deficiency (daily intake under 50 micrograms) affects 9 out of 10 adults. Somewhere between 50 and 400 mcg of chromium substantially improves your cells ability to use insulin. Don’t gnaw on the bumper of a ’54 Cadillac because that kind of chrome is toxic. Chromium polynicotinate or chromium picolinate are safer and better absorbed.

B-COMPLEX VITAMINS also help even out your blood sugar. In addition, the metabolism of just about everything you digest hinges on one or more of this group of B-vitamins. Taken together, they are especially safe and effective. The body needs proportionally more niacin than the other B’s, so extra niacin as mentioned above is still valid.

EXERCISE reduces anxiety. Is it because you are too pooped to worry? Who cares; it helps. Exercise has many other health benefits, too, so there is no way you can lose by trying it. Start easily and work up.

HOMEOPATHIC REMEDIES such as Aconite, Coffea Cruda and Kali Phos. have been used to treat symptoms of anxiety for nearly 200 years. These very dilute natural remedies are safe and can help significantly. I recommend that you get a copy of The Prescriber, by J.H. Clarke, M.D. This very practical book concisely explains this healing approach and helps you easily select the most appropriate remedy. Homeopathic remedies are non-prescription. Many health food stores carry them. I know people who carry a bottle of Kali Phos 6X tablets in their pocket or purse, just in case.

HERBS such as chamomile and catnip make a soothing tea. There are certainly other useful herbs to consider as well. A good herb store or health food store will have books that will help you learn more.

January 28, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 27, 2007

Picked up some Chromium today. It’s in my multivitamin but I’d like to try it at a higher dosage. On the way out of the store I pick up the free health magazine called Vitality. I was in the car waiting for my wife so I was briefly skimming through it when I came across an article called “Acupuncture for Anxiety and Mood Disorders”. It talks about how Acupuncture has been long proven effective in raising the serotonin and norepinephrine levels naturally to treat anxiety. I’ve had acupuncture before and I know how effective it can be so I’ll really think about going to see this guy. It was an amazing article and it was written by a local doctor here in Markham.

I have an appointment with the nutritionist next Tuesday for my initial consultation.

January 28, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 25, 2007

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Day two and I have another batch of celery and cucumbers. Now we are getting somewhere. I check in the mirror and the thrush is slowly getting better! But why? So I do some googling…

I’ve just started taking St. Johns Wort again so does this have any connection with candida?

St. Johns Wort (Wound-Healing and Antibacterial Actions)

St. John’s wort acts against a wide variety of bacteria. In one study, it was found to be more effective than the antibiotic sulfanilamide against the Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria responsible for many hospital epidemics. The bacterium that causes tuberculosis, the fungus Candida, and the gastrointestinal parasite Shigella have all responded to St. John’s wort. These findings are particularly important because of the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

WOW! I’ve also started eating celery and cucumbers. Let’s see if that has any effect on candida? I looked up cucumbers but they didn’t have anything really significant so what is the main nutrient in celery? Vitamin K. Huh? Not a common vitamin and I can’t say I’ve seen that in any health food store and I’ve been to so many. Here I found a link between candida, mitral valve prolapse and…Vitamin K.

Candida (systemic yeast) infections have been linked to vitamin K deficiencies. An overgrowth of candida albicans or other kinds of yeast can crowd out the helpful bacteria in the digestive tract that make vitamin K. People who eat a lot of sugary foods, an unusually high proportion of alkaline foods and/or take antibiotics tend to be at high risk for Candida infections.

Not consuming enough vitamin K from one’s diet can contribute to a deficiency. Dietary vitamin K is highest in leafy green vegetables such as lettuce, kale, broccoli and collard greens. These are foods that many people don’t eat frequently.

The primary symptoms associated with vitamin K deficiencies are osteoporosis and prolonged bleeding times. Other symptoms that occur frequently in conjunction with osteoporosis and prolonged bleeding times in connective tissue disorders are mitral valve prolapse, scoliosis and hypermobility.

Mitral valve prolapse, scoliosis and hypermobility tend to occur in conjunction with each other whether they occur as an “isolated” conditions or together as features of defined genetic disorders. In fact, most connective tissue disorders have scoliosis, mitral valve prolapse and hypermobility as primary features.

And found this on a site regarding Mitral Valve Prolapse:

Most features of the Mitral Valve Prolapse syndrome can be attributed to direct physiological effects of Magnesium deficiency or to secondary effects produced by blockade of EFA desaturation. These include valvular collagen dissolution, ventricular hyperkinesis, cardiac arrhythmias, occasional thromboembolic phenomena. autonomic dysregulation and association with LT, pelvic fibrosis, autoimmune disease, anxiety disorders, allergy and chronic candidiasis.

Mitral Valve Prolapse: Magnesium deficiency and secondary symptoms of anxiety, allergies and chronic candidiasis. I’m a walking text book for all of the above…

January 25, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 13, 2007

A serotonin deficiency can cause nervousness and sugar cravings. And a deficiency can be caused by low magnesium and low niacin levels among aother things. Interesting reading…

Serotonin deficiency signs/symptoms:

Depressed
Nervous/worrier/can’t relax
Fears/phobias
Negative/pessimistic
Irritable/impatient/edgy
Obsessive compulsive tendency
Self destructive or suicidal thoughts/plans
Low self esteem/confidence
Rage/anger/explosive/assaultive
Sleep problems/light sleeper
Feel worse in & dislike dark weather
Crave sugar/carbs/salt/alcohol/marijuana
Chronic pain (e.g. headaches, backaches, fibomyalgia)
PMS
Antidepressants or 5-HTP improve mood

Factors which reduce serotonin levels:

Stress
PCB’s, pesticides and plastic chemicals exposure
Under-methylation
Inadequate sunlight exposure
Tryptophan (precursor) deficiency
Iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, B3, B6, folate & vitamin C deficiency
Inadequate sleep
Glutathione deficiency
Chronic infections
Genetic serotonin receptor abnormalities
Chronic opioid, alcohol, amphetamine & marijuana use
Human growth hormone deficiency
Progesterone deficiency
Impaired blood flow to brain
Insulin resistance or deficiency

January 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 13, 2007

I remember running out of my omega 3 supplement for the first time and I had starting having weird symptoms. I figured at the time it was the omega 3 that was helping me but I could never figure out why. The answer? Low magnesium:

Magnesium has a multitude of different uses in the and is an essential cofactor of the enzyme delta 6 desaturase which converts vegatable derived omega 3 fatty acids to the brain critical omega 3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) which is essential for the rapid release of dopamine. Thus if magnesium levels are low, DHA deficiency is very likely to exist. Low levels of serotonin in the brain are connected with low levels of the Omega-3 fatty acid DHA. This can again lead to increased stress and depression.

So now I’m wondering if my non refreshing sleep is from a serotonin deficiency from years of low magnesium?

There are basically two ways to rectify the Serotonin Deficiency Syndrome. One method is through the natural method of increasing tryptophan intake and the other through the use of anti-depressant medications such as Prozac. This is where the story gets very interesting.

There is a class of pharmaceutical medications called Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) anti-depressants. SSRI anti-depressants include Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft and others. Their method of treatment is to concentrate existing levels of serotonin in the brain so they stay in the synapse between nerves and facilitate communication. They do not create serotonin, as many people believe, but simply collect the existing serotonin so it is used more effectively. Some studies suggest that long term use of SSRI anti-depressants actually reduce serotonin levels. Serotonin levels are often low among people with anxiety disorders.

Our body chemistry is complex; many different hormones, neurotransmitters, and other substances influence how we feel. Serotonin is one chemical that has received a great deal of attention for its contribution to mood. It’s a neurotransmitter (a chemical involved in the transmission of nerve impulses between nerve cells) that’s formed in the brain and primarily found in three parts of the body — the brain, the lining of the digestive tract, and in blood platelets. In the brain, serotonin’s main effects include improving mood and giving you that “satisfied” feeling from food. It’s also thought to help promote sleep and relaxation.

Carbohydrate-rich meals often increase serotonin levels. However, manipulating serotonin levels through food may be very difficult to achieve because serotonin’s properties may have varying effects in different people. Some people may experience a temporary lift in mood after a carbohydrate-rich meal, while others may become relaxed or sleepy. Certain foods that increase serotonin levels aren’t the healthiest choices either. Believe it or not, candy and sweets, which are simple carbohydrates, have the greatest impact, but the effect will only last 1 – 2 hours. Complex carbohydrates (rice, potato, pasta) may increase serotonin levels, but not to the same extent because the protein content of these foods might actually inhibit serotonin production.

The  doctor wants me on Paxil but doesn”t really explain why except that it was recommended by the Neurologist. Probably to raise my level of Serotonin and “fix” the anxiety. Here’s an article that actually suggests that it could make things worse!

January 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2007

Just had a quick look regarding vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by sugar intake. and I was not too familiar with Choline and Inositol. Choline seems to be really important for the nerves and a deficiency can cause nerve degeneration.

Here’s what I found:

What it does in the body: Fat metabolism. Choline is involved in fat metabolism and in the transport of fats from the liver.

Cell membranes: Choline is a component of cell membranes and plays a role in the transmission of signals inside cells. Myelin, the insulating sheath around the nerves, and platelet activating factor contain choline.

Neurotransmitters: Choline accelerates the synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is involved in many nerve and brain functions. Dietary intake of choline seems to affect body levels of acetylcholine.

Absorption: Choline may be absorbed better in the form of lecithin.

Deficiency: Choline deficiency symptoms in humans include fatty liver and liver damage. These symptoms have been demonstrated only recently in humans fed choline- deficient diets. This means that choline fulfills one of the criteria for being an essential nutrient. Patients on long-term parenteral nutrition who are not given choline develop fatty infiltration of the liver and other signs of dysfunction. This condition can be improved, and possibly prevented, with choline supplementation.

Choline deficiency in animals also leads to nerve degeneration, senile dementia, high blood cholesterol, and liver cancer – possibly by affecting cell signaling or by generating free radicals and DNA alterations.

Nervous system disorders: Uptake of circulating choline into the brain decreases with age. Choline is important for nerve structure and function; and this change may contribute to the type of dementia in which cholinergic nerves are lost.

Sources: Good sources of choline in the form of lecithin include eggs, organ meats, lean meat, brewer’s yeast, legumes such as soybeans, grains, and nuts. It is found in green leafy vegetables as free choline.

I was taking lecithin a while back but I didn’t find any difference or improvement. Looks like I’ll be adding it again.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2007

Depression & Anxiety Treatment with Diet

The Links to Magnesium Deficiency

A recent study noted that people with optimistic outlooks were more likely to live longer, and that pessimists were more likely to die from heart disease. The results of the study are often interpreted as optimism helps people live longer. I think that the study results may not have necessarily been interpreted correctly. Association does not equal cause and effect. Just because optimism and better heart function statistically occur together does not prove that either one causes the other.

Magnesium deficiency is a known factor in heart disease as well as anxiety. Another possible reason people with more optimistic attitude live longer is that they may be happier and less worried because they have sufficient magnesium levels, which in turn may also have a protective effect on their hearts.

Undoubtedly there are many factors involved in anxiety and depression, and a magnesium deficiency may be just one of many possible factors. However, studies do show that:

In the U.S. and many other industrialized countries, magnesium deficiencies are relatively common in the general population, especially in women.

Anxiety disorders are also highly prevalent among the general population, especially with women.

Multiple studies, readily available on PubMed, have confirmed that magnesium deficiencies can be a cause of anxiety and other nervous disorders.

Anxiety disorders are more common in people with conditions such as migraines, TMJ, hypermobility, irritable bowel syndrome and especially mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Perhaps it is not a coincidence that these conditions have also commonly been linked, either directly or indirectly, to magnesium deficiencies.

A recent report from Britain linked poor diet to rising cases of depression, ” Increasing rates of anxiety, depression and irritability could be due to a poor diet that lacks the essential chemicals to keep the brain healthy, according to a leading mental health charity.”
If you put all of these known facts together, then it would seem highly logical to screen people suffering from nervous disorders, anxiety and depression for magnesium and other nutritional deficiencies before putting them on antidepressant drugs or treating them with counseling type therapy. This would be especially true for people manifesting other symptoms commonly associated with a magnesium (Mg) deficiency such as heart palpitations, mitral vale prolapse, migraines, fibromyalgia and TMJ.

In the U.S. the most common forms of treatment for anxiety seem to be counseling and/or drug therapy. Yet these treatments are illogical and may be counterproductive when nutritional deficiencies or other biochemical anomalies are the main cause of a person’s anxiety and depression. One can spend hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars talking to a therapist, but it seems like a pointless attempt at a solution if a person’s mental health issues stem from a nutritional deficiency effecting his or her nervous system.

Anxiety and Psychiatric Disorders

Magnesium deficiency causes increased levels of adrenaline, which can lead to a feeling of anxiety. Rats who become magnesium deficient have an increased level of urinary catecholamine excretion (a by-product of adrenaline).

People who have mitral valve prolapse have also been found to have an increased state of anxiety and have an increased level of urinary catecholamine excretion, the exact same condition found in rats who are Mg deficient.

It is not surprising then, to find that people with mitral valve prolapse are usually low in magnesium, and that magnesium supplementation alleviates the symptoms of mitral valve prolapse and reduces the level of urinary catecholamine excretion, i.e. it also reduces the anxiety symptoms.

Researchers in Spain found a correlation between anxiety disorders and hypermobility. In fact, they found that patients with anxiety disorder were over 16 times more likely than control subjects to have joint laxity. If you put the study results together, then there’s a link between anxiety and hypermobility, a link between anxiety and mitral valve prolapse, and a link between mitral valve prolapse and hypermobility.

These studies tell us that anxiety disorders occur in many people who simply have mitral valve prolapse and/or joint hypermobility, meaning anxiety disorders are not specific to EDS or any particular connective tissue disorder. Marfans also have mitral valve prolapse and joint hypermobility which would lead one to conjecture that they, too, have anxiety related disorders. As it turns out, a connection between Marfans and anxiety related disorders has been noted.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2007

I’ve made list of vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by high sugar intake. Also made a list of deficiency symptoms that include anxiety and nervousness.

Vitamin/Minerals (Factors that inhibit absorption) : Excessive Sugar

Vitamin B (complex), Vitamin B-2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B-5 (Pantothenic Acid), Niacin (nicotinic acid), Chromium, Choline, Copper, Inositol, Phosphorus, Potassium and Magnesium.

There is one more aspect of health that is effected by excessive sugar: Candida

Vitamin/Mineral deficiencies

Anxiety: Chromium, Niacin, Magnesium, Phosphorus

Nervousness: Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Iodine, Vitamin D, Zinc, Vitamin B-1 (Thiamine), Vitamin B-5 (Pantothenic Acid), Vitamin B-6 (Pyridoxine).

And the common link between sugar and anxiety? B Complex, Niacin, Phosphorus and Potassium. B complex contains the vitamins B-1, B-2, B-5 and B-6. My B-1 and B-6 tested okay and I had three riboflavin (B-2) injections. So that narrows down the list of possibilities.

I’m really not sure about the difference between anxiety and nervousness so I decide to look them up.

Anxiety: distress or uneasiness of mind caused by fear of danger or misfortune: He felt anxiety about the possible loss of his job.

Nervousness: highly excitable; unnaturally or acutely uneasy or apprehensive: to become nervous under stress.

After looking at the definitions, I’d say that my problem is more linked to nervousness than anxiety.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 06, 2007

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I start going through the blog to see if I have missed anything. Looking for anything, any clues that I may have overlooked. I come across an entry on April 29th and this is when I first discovered the Niacin deficiency. It mentions about a how a deficiency can cause anxiety and lower the absorption of the A, D and E vitamins. How interesting. It wasn’t until I saw the iridologst a few months later did I discover that I had anxiety and this was before I tried taking vitamins A, D and E to know I had a deficiency.

Another interesting point? Niacin is usually the only vitamin that is not included in a multivitamin. They normally use Niacinamide instead at a very low dosage. I have been taking 150-300 mg of Niacin everyday since last April. Was I taking enough to correct a deficiency?

Niacin
Niacin (nicotinic acid) is another one of the B-complex vitamins that may be linked to neurological damage. Mild niacin deficiency is associated with weakness, tremor, anxiety, depression and irritability.

Niacin helps increase energy through improving food utilization and has been used beneficially for treating fatigue, irritability, and digestive disorders, such as diarrhea, constipation, and indigestion. It may also stimulate extra hydrochloric acid production.

Nicotinic acid also helps reduce blood pressure and, very importantly, acts as an agent to lower serum cholesterol. Treatment with about 2 grams a day of nicotinic acid has produced significant reductions in both blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

In general, niacin deficiency affects every cell, especially in those systems with rapid turnover, such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system. Other than photosensitivity, the first signs of niacin deficiency are noted as decreased energy production and problems with maintaining healthy functioning of the skin and intestines. These symptoms include weakness and general fatigue, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions. These can progress to other problems, such as a sore, red tongue, canker sores, nausea, vomiting, tender gums, bad breath, and diarrhea. The neurological symptoms may begin with irritability, insomnia, and headaches and then progress to tremors, extreme anxiety and depression. The skin will worsen, as will the diarrhea and inflammation of the mouth and intestinal tract. There will be a lack of stomach acid production (achlorhydria) and a decrease in fat digestion and, thus, lower availability from food absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins, such as A, D, and E.

Found this entry from May 4th, 2006:

Diagnosis and Treatment

Niacin deficiency must be distinguished from other causes of stomatitis, glossitis, diarrhea, and dementia. Diagnosis is easy when the clinical findings include skin and mouth lesions, diarrhea, delirium, and dementia. More often, the condition is less fully developed, and a history of a diet lacking niacin and tryptophan is significant.

Multiple deficiencies of B vitamins and protein often occur together; therefore, a balanced diet is needed. Supplemental niacinamide 300 to 1000 mg/day should be given orally in divided doses. In most cases, 300 to 500 mg is sufficient. Niacinamide is generally used to treat deficiency states, because niacin can cause flushing, itching, burning, or tingling sensations, whereas niacinamide does not; however, niacinamide does not possess hypolipidemic or vasodilating properties as does niacin.

When oral therapy is precluded because of diarrhea or lack of patient cooperation, 100 to 250 mg should be injected sc bid to tid. In encephalopathic states, 1000 mg po plus 100 to 250 mg IM is recommended. Other B-complex vitamins should also be given in therapeutic dosages.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 06, 2007

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I take a quick picture of each iris and take a close look at them. They look exactly the same as last time with no obvious change. How is that possible with all of the vitamins that I’ve been taking? There are still signs obvious signs of anxiety and stressed adrenals. I’ve been taking B vitamins for over a year!

There must be something else and I’m guessing that I’m not taking the right supplements to correct the deficiencies.

January 6, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I just did a search based on the previous post suggesting that anxiety improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan. It goes on to say that a marginal B6 deficiency causing a serotonin depletion, may have produced the increased anxiety.

So here’s what I found:

Serotonin

Monoamine neurotransmitter that provides a chemical link between the neurons of the brain. Natural serotonin is produced by the body during the digestion of healthy foods that contain the amino acid L-Tryptophan.

Serotonin is one of the chemicals which regulates emotion, and it is thought to play a large role in the biology of depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, migraine, sexuality and appetite.

People who are suffering from problems in these health areas might have a serotonin deficiency. This deficiency may be caused by poor eating habits.

As well as being found in the brain, serotonin is found in abundance in the digestive system as well as the blood stream. When the proper foods are digested, the body creates natural serotonin.

For example, whey protein milkshakes contain the amino acid L-Tryptophan. When the protein is digested, the body converts the amino acid into natural serotonin as needed. This is the way nature intended for you to get your natural serotonin, from the digestion of various healthy foods.

Ask your doctor if natural serotonin may be an alternative to drugs or a complimentary treatment. In the treatment of depression and anxiety, SSRI pills (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) are often taken in hopes of increasing the brain’s serotonin levels by increasing the amount of time that it stays in the brain.

However if the body has a shortage of natural serotonin, due to a poor diet, the drugs are simply trying to make the most out of the little bit of supply there is in the body.

The question is, why not also increase the supply, instead of only trying to make the little bit there is linger for a longer time? This is not to say drugs don’t have their place, consult your doctor.

But think about this. If someone has a shortage of Vitamin C and it was causing the symptoms of scurvy, would they take a drug to make the little bit of vitamin they did have last longer in their body? They might, but why not also just drink some orange juice and naturally get some more of the vitamin into the body? Hello, hello? Is health food a big mystery?

The human body is designed to produce natural serotonin from foods that contain amino acids. If someone is very low on serotonin it might be because the food they eat is junk and does not have the nutrients the body needs to support proper health.

Here is what can happen:

1. You eat a junk diet of processed and packaged foods.

2. You find yourself with a serotonin deficiency because your body can’t make any from the junk food you eat.

3. You either make the effort to eat whey protein and similar health foods that your body can use to create natural serotonin … or you don’t.

Most people don’t. Sad but true. They end up at the doctor and buy expensive pills because they wouldn’t make an effort to eat some health foods.

Here are three ways to get more natural serotonin into your body.

1. Health Foods: Drink a whey protein milkshake every day. We do. We put a scoop of chocolate flavor in a blender with a half a banana and some skim milk. It tastes delicious and helps keep your tummy flat too.

If using a blender is too much work you can get these milkshakes in ready to drink packages. Put some in the refrigerator and enjoy one a day.

2. L-Tryptophan Supplements: These were off the market for a long time due to one bad batch made by a foreign company. Now they are back and have passed the regulatory requirements for purity. One company that makes these is Doctor’s Best.

3. These super high quality brain and mood formulas are made by a company we have great respect for. The editors of this website have used many of their products with great results. Their pure fish oil is also recommended for support of brain health.

I’m trying so many things right now for candida but this does make a lot of sense. I’ve seen the supplement called 5-HTP but I never knew what it was: L-Tryptophan!

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

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