Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for February 28, 2008

I added the licorice root back for my cough yesterday and boy what a difference. It can really suppress the deep kind of cough that irriates the throat.

In fact, there’s a woman at work who also has a really bad cough and we work together so either I gave it to her or vice versa. Anyway, she was coughing constantly from the moment she came into work. I kind of wondered why she came in at all… I don’t like pushing things on people but I told her about licorice root and how fast it worked for coughing. She was willing to give it a try and she stopped coughing within minutes. She was amazed and another co-worker asked me what I gave her because she couldn’t believe how fast it worked!

Two days of 1000-1200 mg of calcium/magnesium in a 2/1 ratio and I feel much better.

Advertisements

August 22, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 26, 2008

I’ve had a really bad cold with a cough for about five days now and it doesn’t really seem to be improving. In fact, my cough is a lot worse today. The only thing I’ve done differently is stopped taking the licorice root. Dr. Google?

Licorice is a perennial herb native to southern Europe, Asia and the Mediterranean. It is extensively cultivated in Russia, Spain, Iran and India, and is one of the most popular and widely consumed herbs in the world.

Although known for its flavoring in candy, it contains many health benefits. Ancient cultures on every continent have used it, the first recorded use by the Egyptians in the 3rd century BC. The Egyptians and the Greeks recognized the benefits in treating coughs and lung disease. It is the second most prescribed herb in China followed by ginseng, and is used for treatment of the spleen, liver and kidney. The Japanese use a licorice preparation to treat hepatitis.

The most common medical use is for treating upper respiratory ailments including coughs, hoarseness, sore throat, and bronchitis.

The main constituent found in the root is glycyrrhizin. The plant also contains various sugars (to 14%), starches (30%), flavonoids, saponoids, sterols, amino acids, gums, and essential oil. Glycyrrhizin, stimulates the secretion of the adrenal cortex hormone aldosterone.

It can be as effective as codeine, and safer, when used as a cough suppressant. Rhizomes in the plant have a high mucilage content which, when mixed with water or used in cough drops, sooths irritated mucous membranes. The drug also has an expectorant effect which increases the secretion of the bronchial glands. It is an effective remedy for throat irritations, lung congestion, and bronchitis.

I’ll be adding licorice root back as soon as I get home…

August 22, 2009 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 25, 2008

In my book of nutritional healing is says not to use licorice root for more than seven days in a row because it can cause high blood pressure, water retention and low potassium levels. I’ve been taking it here and there for two weeks now so I’ll stop taking it and see what effect it has. A couple of web sites suggest 4-6 weeks and then a break. One week and 4-6 weeks is a huge difference!

When licorice root is taken daily, it is recommended that the dose does not exceed 3 grams. Use for 4-6 weeks, and have 1-2 weeks break. If taking licorice in large doses be sensitive to any of the following adverse reactions and symptoms: puffy ankles, facial swelling, shortness of breath, headaches, and general weakness. Be aware some people can be quite sensitive with any herb or drug and may have adverse reactions.

August 22, 2009 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 25, 2008

Tightness in my chest again today after lunch disappeared with magnesium and not calcium. Fighting with cold hands all day which is weird because I’m still talking the lecithin. Weird.

I’m now beginning to think that the recent issues have been caused by magnesium loss because of the licorice root getting rid of the potassium. Ended up taking 1000 mg of magnesium today which is way more than I’ve taken in a long, long time.

August 21, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 13, 2008

Licorice Root is an excellent alternative to St. John’s Wort? My Doctor’s alternative was Paxil.

Licorice Root

Licorice root contains many anti-depressant compounds and is an excellent alternative to St. John’s Wort. As a herbal medicine it has an impressive list of well documented uses and is probably one of the most over-looked of all herbal wonders. Licorice is useful for many ailments including asthma, athlete’s foot, baldness, body odor, bursitis, canker sores, chronic fatigue, depression, colds and flu, coughs, dandruff, emphysema, gingivitis and tooth decay, gout, heartburn, HIV, viral infections, fungal infections, ulcers, liver problems, Lyme disease, menopause, psoriasis, shingles, sore throat, tendinitis, tuberculosis, ulcers, yeast infections, prostate enlargement and arthritis.

Hundreds of potentially healing substances have been identified in licorice as well, including compounds called flavonoids and various plant estrogens (phytoestrogens). The herb’s key therapeutic compound, glycyrrhizin (which is 50 times sweeter than sugar) exerts numerous beneficial effects on the body, making licorice a valuable herb for treating a host of ailments. It seems to prevent the breakdown of adrenal hormones such as cortisol (the body’s primary stress-fighting adrenal hormone), making these hormones more available to the body.

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 11, 2008

I have a feeling that my potassium is still very high and here’s something that would certainly suggest that they are.

Adrenals and high Potassium

When the adrenals become fatigued and unable to release adequate amounts of aldosterone or cortisol, potassium levels rise, sodium and blood sugar levels fall, body fluid volume decreases and hypotension and dehydration can result.

In theory, because of the known effects of licorice, there may be some benefits of licorice for high potassium levels caused by a condition called hypoaldosteronism. There is early evidence in humans in support of this use. However, research is preliminary and a qualified health care provider should supervise treatment.

I’ll add calcium and licorice root and see if that makes any difference.

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 25, 2007

Licorice acts as an adrenal stimulant and antacid. It contains glycyrrhizin, a compound that raises the body’s levels of the adrenal hormone cortisol. This occurs because licorice slows the breakdown of cortisol produced by the body. As adrenal function is often sub optimal in CFIDS/FMS, licorice can be helpful. Licorice also protects against stomach ulcers, whether in its ordinary form or in the form of deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), a type of licorice extract from which the glycyrrhizin has been removed. In several head-on studies against pharmaceutical antacids and acid inhibitors such as cimetidine (Tagamet), DGL was found to be at least as effective against stomach and duodenal ulcers.

Take 2 to 3 grams (2,000 to 3,000 milligrams) of licorice root (not deglycyrrhizinated licorice [DGL]) twice a day for six to eight weeks. The patient may then taper off over a period of ten to fourteen days. Licorice can raise blood pressure or cause an overly high cortisol level if taken on an ongoing basis. It is best used short-term as a “jump-start” in raising cortisol levels. It also has antiviral properties, which can be very helpful in CFS.

After four to six weeks on licorice root, add 100-200+milligrams of Asian ginseng twice a day. This is safer than licorice. If it helps, it can be taken for an extended period (one to two years) in cycles of six weeks on and one to two weeks off.

Echinacea- 325 to 650 milligrams of encapsulated freeze-dried Echinacea plant or 1,000 to 2,000 milligrams of dried Echinacea root three times a day. Take it in cycles of six weeks on and two weeks off–if taken continuously, it stops working.

May 25, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for May 24, 2007

1180060601-sc-1059

Last night I went to bed really late and I thought I would be tried when I woke up. Nope, in fact, I felt I had a bit more energy than usual for going to bed so late.

So today I decide to add two new supplements. The effects of taking the extra selenium seemed to have stopped and my weak knees are still the same. I added MSM back which I’ve tried before but I’ll try it again. I also added Licorice Root and iron.

I’m trying the Licorice Root for the link with candida and the adrenals. I’m trying iron because it’s known cause for hair loss and I read today that low iron can be caused by low levels of magnesium and zinc.

Iron Deficiency

Blood loss, or malabsorption are considered to be the main causes for low iron after ruling out any of a number of blood disorders, however low iron can very easily result from manganese levels having been low for a long period of time, or from other elements such as calcium, zinc, or magnesium reducing normal iron values.

Iron is interesting because I’ve never taken it before except for a very low dosage in my multivitamin. So it’s linked to hair loss, fatigue and weakness.

The other very interesting thing is the fact that I do eat ice chips. I don’t go around eating ice chips every day but I do if I’m in a restaurant and it’s something I’ve always done for years. Something to think about so I’ll try taking iron for a couple of weeks to see what happens.

Iron Antagonists:

Zinc, calcium, magnesium, tin, cobalt, Vitamin B2,Vitamin B5, Vitamin B12, Vitamin E, caffeine, insoluble fiber, rice (phytates), tea (tannic acid), soy protein, dairy (casein), oxalic acid, [folate]

Since I’m taking zinc and magnesium, I’ll stop the zinc altogether and reduce the magnesium just to see what happens. Today, I start taking Iron Chelate in a low dosage of 25 mg.

May 24, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 19, 2007

Reading further about Licorice root, it can also be effective on nervousness and candida.

Licorice root helps prevent adrenal failure by maintaining electrolyte balance. Research shows benefits for Addison’s disease sufferers. Rather than contributing to adrenal atrophy, as synthetics do, licorice helps to preserve adrenal integrity. Licorice is a herb that can have marked effect upon the endocrine system. The glycosides in the plant have a structure that is similar to the natural steroids of the body. Overworked adrenals in hypoglycaemic cases with nervousness, irritability, stress, fatigue, and depression can be helped with licorice. Many who have taken licorice to support the adrenals find stress, worry and negative attitudes fall away, and that they have strength and energy to cope with daily life, and without the doped out sensations caused by tranquilizers and drugs.

Licorice Formula

“Over the last decade or so we have seen only four people with healthy adrenals and only four people who tested negatively for Candida overgrowth (based on kiniesiology testing), and yes, they were indeed the same four people. This reminds us that the adrenals are an integral part of the immune system. Also, candida can produce adrenal insufficiency symptoms because the candida yeast can bind adrenal steroids, rendering them ineffective.”

One thing that vibrantly well people always have in common is healthy adrenal glands. Conversely, chronically unwell people always have low adrenal function regardless of whatever other issues need treating. As Dr Eldred Taylor notes “effective treatment of the adrenal glands leads to optimal functioning of the entire endocrine (hormonal) and immune system. The adrenal gland has a profound effect on sex and thyroid hormones, glucose relations and the immune system”.

The adrenal glands are chiefly responsible for regulating our bodies response to stress. They are also involved with immune response, regulation of inflammation, and carbohydrate metabolism. Suffice it to say the adrenal glands are important! They produce anti inflammatory steroids (corticosteroids) and the stress hormones, cortisol and adrenaline.

Stress, a diet high in refined carbohydrates, excessive caffeine intake, and nutrient deficiencies conspire to ensure that hypoadrenia (depleted or exhausted adrenals) is endemic.

Apart from high stress levels and sugar / carbohydrate cravings, other signs of hypoadrenia include early-morning headache, fatigue, allergies, arthritis, low blood-pressure, thyroid deficiency, hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar), and candida.

May 19, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | 1 Comment

Entry for May 19, 2007

I’ve heard of Licorice Root as I’m familiar with a lot of the herbs now but I never knew it could be used for adrenal exhaustion.

Licorice Root

We know this herb for its wide use as a candy flavoring, but its value goes far beyond that. The dietary use of licorice goes back several thousand years. Licorice root has been used by traditional herbalists as a general tonic and for respiratory support. It also supports the liver.

Licorice is included in most Chinese herb combinations to balance the other herbs and to promote vitality. It has a reputation for helping the entire body maintain balance (particularly helpful to women who menstruate) and promoting well-being.

Licorice contains triterpenoid saponins, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, magnesium, silicon, sodium and other beneficial constituents.

Adrenal Support

“The adrenal glands often suffer from dietary and social abuses. They are constantly whipsawed by junk food, coffee, alcohol,overwork, insomnia, lack of exercise, anger, and anxiety. This is what is known as ‘adrenal exhaustion’. The most evident signs are fatigue, irritability, muscle weakness, inability to concentrate, indigestion, poor food assimilation, and periodic bouts of depression. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, manifests just about all of these symptoms, as does Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Unless the adrenals are looked after, conditions can worsen and lead to serious illness such as Addison’s Disease,which is life-threatening. Besides the more obvious changes (diet) there is also herbal help. Licorice Root is to the adrenals what a nice soaking in a tub of hot water followed up with a hand Swedish massage is to tired, aching muscles and joints. Licorice quickly tones the adrenals by relaxing and strengthening them to continue pumping out adrenalin but in more measured amounts.

Of the 150-plus chemical compounds in this medicinal root, glycyrrhizin ( or glycyrrhizinic acid) is the most active principle. Glycyrrhizin is 50 times sweeter than sucrose.” Source: Healing Power Of Herbs, Dr. John Heinerman

“An herb that feeds the adrenal glands and helps the body adapt is called an “adaptogen.” Adaptogen herbs offer the materials needed to make the hormones and secretions so crucial to balance. Licorice Root is a long-favored adaptogen herb for building strength. Licorice’s nature and properties so closely match the needs of the gland’s hormone composition that hormones are then produced by the body quickly and with little effort.” Source: Herbal Health Newsletter,Vol. 6. No. 2

“Licorice contains glycyrrhizinic acid, starch and sugars in this herb contribute toward the strength and energy of the body and helps to build up the entire system. Experiments have shown that Licorice has cortisone-like properties. It has been found to have a very beneficial and nourishing effect on the adrenal glands if some portion of the gland is healthy. Addison’s disease, which decreases adrenal cortex secretions, has been treated with success with licorice extracts. Licorice is known to stimulate the production of the cortin hormone which is useful when the body is under mental and emotional stress and helps with the coping process.” Source: Today’s Herbs, Vol.XII Number 10

“Rapidly failing blood sugar level can affect both the mind an the body. The brain, which uses glucose as fuel. may be affected. The lack of sugar delivered to the brain and to the body provides one mechanism whereby low blood sugar causes symptoms. But there is another mechanism. When the sugar level falls, the body can quickly compensate, raising it again by pouring out adrenalin from the adrenal glands. The response is seen in a sudden fright or in a typical anxiety reaction. Think of the phrase: “My adrenalin was flowing” and you’ll know what it means.

Adrenalin is a very rapid acting hormone that can change the physiology of the body in less than a minute. In fact, the reaction is so fast that commonly during a glucose tolerance test, the doctor does not even have time to collect a blood specimen before the blood sugar has shot up much higher than it was just a moment earlier, before the adrenaline release took place.

May 19, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

   

%d bloggers like this: