Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 29, 2007

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Woke up with a vibration…

A week with the high doses of insitol and choline and although there was a huge difference in the beginning, I haven’t noticed any more improvements lately. Originally I thought it had an effect on the vibration. Now I’m not so sure?

Today the cold hands returned around lunchtime and it would come and go without any effect from my supplements. By late afternoon there was something that I did notice…

I can feel something like a pimple in the roof of mouth. The canker sores have returned and this time I’m glad because I know exactly what the problem is and why it is happening.

I don’t recall that I’ve ever mentioned the canker sores in my blog in the past because it was happening before I started to document everything and at the time, I didn’t realize it was a symptom of a vitamin deficiency. There was so many other things going on that I didn’t mention it.

It really makes sense that I would still have a niacin deficiency because I was taking it for months and then stopped thinking I’d taken it long enough and didn’t need it anymore. The low level of phosphorus was the reason for the deficiency in the first place and I needed to address that first.

I’ve taken niacin on and off since I started taking the phosphorus on Aug 1st and didn’t notice a difference but this time, I’ll try it for longer.

August 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 27, 2007

Just before going to bed, I wanted to review my blog to read the entries regarding the zinc. I came across an entry I did when I suspected high sugar intake was the cause of my problems. I couldn’t believe it. Right there in front of my eyes were Choline and Inositol. I’m not sure how I missed that? Maybe because I didn’t know what they were? God I can’t believe I missed that! I feel like I’m so thorough at everything I do.

Entry for January 07, 2007

Vitamin/Minerals (Factors that inhibit absorption) : Excessive Sugar

Vitamin B (complex), Vitamin B-2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B-5 (Pantothenic Acid), Niacin (nicotinic acid), Chromium, Choline, Copper, Inositol, Phosphorus, Potassium and Magnesium.

August 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 24, 2007

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Every morning for the longest time, whenever I woke up, I’d have tired, itchy eyes and usually it went away slowly throughout the morning. I always thought it was because I was tired and I was tired all the time. For the past two days since taking choline and inositol, my eyes feel like new in the mornings. It’s such a big obvious difference.

I don’t think it was riboflavin causing the dry itchy eyes of late that disappeared when I took B vitamins. Turns out that choline and inositol are included in my B complex supplement.

So now with the idea of a potassium deficiency, I grab three bananas on the way into work.

August 25, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 23, 2007

Yesterday was another great day and I can really feel a difference with these new vitamins. Especially with my eyes so I think it’s the inositol that is responsible for that.

Inositol plays an important part in the health of cell membranes especially the specialized cells in the brain, bone marrow, eyes and intestines.

No vibration and no cold hands during the day either… so I think that’s the choline working.

Choline assists in controlling your weight as well as cholesterol levels, keeping cell membranes healthy and in preventing gallstones. It is also most useful in the maintenance of the nervous system, assisting memory and learning, and may help to fight infections, including hepatitis and AIDS.

Because the candida supplements are working this time round my assumption is that the minerals that I’ve been fighting with for the past months are now getting somewhat balanced.

For breakfast I had Raisin Bran, tuna sandwich for lunch, one apple and two pears for snacks. The success against the candida and the recent improvements, I’m started to feel like I’m really making some progress.

I meet by wife at her parents house and we pick up my daughter and head home. The same routine it’s been for almost a year now. We get home around 7:00 PM and as I enter the house I feel a weird pain in my upper left chest. It’s a pain I’ve had before but not since I discovered magnesium. I was panicked because I’ve been doing so well lately. I don’t go anywhere without my homeopathic magnesium so luckily I took some right away. And because I was home, I could take one 250 mg of magnesium. The pain disappeared and I was somewhat confused as to what had happened. I sat down for a bit and had a glass of water.

When I was settled, I wanted to check my iris in the mirror to see if I could see anything in the area of the heart and it looked normal. Checking my iris in the mirror is actually something I do now almost on a weekly basis. I bought a little flashlight and carry it around with me.

So why the chest pain? I’m not really sure…

August 24, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 22, 2007

No vibration this morning.

Today I’ll split things up a little differently. Here’s today’s dosage:

300 mg Calcium/Magnesium 3x
50 mg Zinc 2x
250 mg Inositol 3x
250 mg Choline 3x
100 mg Phosphorus 2x
Caprylic Acid 3x

August 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 21, 2007

Woke up with the vibration but today was a great day and it felt like I had more energy than usual. The stuff I’m taking for the candida is working this time around. When I think back, it’s almost hard to believe how bad it actually was a year ago.

I managed to pick up 250 mg of inositol and 500 mg of choline at the health food store. I take one each with my lunch and my the early afternoon, I can feel the effects. Hard to explain..it just feels different but in a nice way…and no cold hands all day.

Found some suggestions for dosage:

Inositol

Description: 500 mg/2x/day. Improves nerve function; taken with choline and biotin, some have found improvements in HIV-induced neuropathy at doses of 1000-4000 mg/day;

Choline

Description: 1000 mg/2x/day choline citrate. Improves nerve and immune function. May help reverse neuropathy, both peripheral and autonomic; higher doses may be needed, up to 1000-3000 mg of phosphatidylcholine, 3 times per day;

Biotin

Description: 10-15 mg/day. Normally produced by intestinal bacteria which are destroyed in anyone on antibiotics. Not much in food so supplementation necessary. Helps prevent candida problems. Helps metabolize fatty acids, and thus is critical for fat digestion; also necessary for amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency can cause dementia; shown in kidney dialysis patients on biotin-free restricted diets; such neurological problems reversed with a couple of months of biotin supps. May also help reverse neuropathy, both peripheral (cause of numbness and pain in feet, legs, hands, arms) and autonomic (contributor or cause of impotency and digestive problems). For neuropathy, works best when used in doses of 15-20 mg/day (15,000-20,000 mcg) and in combination with choline, inositol, B6, B12, and thiamine.

August 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 20, 2007

While doing some researching tonight I stumbled upon an article that makes a lot of sense for me and it’s something I’ve missed although I know I’ve reviewed it in the past. It plays a role in hair loss and calming the nervous system. Can also be helpful in cases high copper. I’ve also noticed that I can’t remember things as clearly as I used to. Recalling what I did yesterday is sometimes a problem for me. I’m not forgetful, I just can’t remember things with any detail.

I like what I’m reading!!

Inositol: A Necessary Nutrient

Inositol is recognized as part of the B-Complex vitamins. It works closely with Choline as one of the primary components of the cell membrane. The human body contains more inositol than any other vitamin except Niacin. It is found in large quantities in the spinal cord nerves, the brain, and the cerebral spinal fluid. It is also needed for growth and survival of cells in bone marrow, eye membranes, and the intestines. It also encourages hair growth and can help prevent baldness.

Like Choline, Inositol helps to move fat out of the liver, and helps prevent serious liver disorders, as well as disorder involving high cholesterol. Serotonin and acetylcholine, two neurotransmitters, both depend upon Inositol, and it supplementation therefore can assist in the reduction of depression and panic attacks. Loss of Inositol from nerve cells is the primary reason for Diabetic neuropathy, so Inositol supplementation can assist in improving this condition. Phytic acid, the plant source of Inositol, has been shown to have anticancer properties, which may be one reason why a high-fiber diet protects against many cancers.

Inositol also has a prominent calming effect on the central nervous system, so it is sometimes helpful to those with insomnia. Studies on brain waves have shown that it has an effect similar to that of Librium or Valium. It can gradually lower blood pressure, and can be helpful in cases of schizophrenia, hypoglycemia, and those with high serum copper and low serum zinc levels.

Because it stimulates muscles of the alimentary canal, Inositol is helpful in cases of constipation. It can also induce labor contractions in pregnant women.

Most sources state that Inositol is not essential in the human diet. If it is a fundamental ingredient of cell membranes and is necessary for proper nerve, brain, and muscle function, how can it NOT be essential? Cell function is impaired when inositol is not present. Perhaps it is seen as not necessary in the diet because it can be synthesized by the intestinal flora. The action of the intestinal bacteria liberates inositol from phytic acid, which is found in citrus fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and legumes. The same kind of statement is made in reference to the amino acids. The ones which the body manufactures are considered “non-essential” amino acids. But I believe this is incorrect terminology. All the amino acids ARE essential to bodily functions, it’s just that some are made by the body, so we don’t have to concentrate on how much we eat. That doesn’t mean they aren’t essential to the body’s functioning, and so the same is true of inositol.

However, just because the body can manufacture a certain nutrient doesn’t mean that it necessarily provides all that is needed in every circumstance. In certain disease states, certain nutrients may be required in greater quantities than the body can produce, which is why it is also found in foods. My belief is, if it’s found in food, then we need to consume it, otherwise why would it be there?

Daily dosages include:

As a general rule, if you have none of the specific problems listed in this article, it is generally thought that the dosage of Inositol should be the same as that of Choline daily.

For liver support – 100 to 500 milligrams daily
For depression or panic attacks – 12 grams
For diabetes, 1,000 to 2,000 milligrams
For blood pressure – one gram in the morning and one gram at night.

August 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

Something to keep in mind if I use high copper level as a starting point. What other vitamins and minerals can be effected? Copper, in excess, tends to lower potassium levels? I’ve tried potassium before and didn’t notice any difference. But I do know that it can cause nervousness and has a link with the adrenals.

Effects Of Copper On Other Minerals

Copper, in excess, tends to lower manganese, zinc and potassium levels. Copper toxicity can also result in deficiency of vitamin C and B6, inositol, folic acid and rutin.
Copper tends to increase tissue levels of calcium and sodium.
Copper can displace iron from the liver.

Effects Of Other Minerals And Vitamins On Copper

Mercury, cadmium and zinc – compete for absorption.
Molybdenum and sulfur – bind copper in the intestine.
Iron and manganese – remove copper from the liver.
Zinc – lowers copper levels in the blood.
Vitamin C – chelates copper in the blood.
Vitamin B6, folic acid and niacin are also copper antagonists.
Cobalt is synergetic with copper.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2007

Just had a quick look regarding vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by sugar intake. and I was not too familiar with Choline and Inositol. Choline seems to be really important for the nerves and a deficiency can cause nerve degeneration.

Here’s what I found:

What it does in the body: Fat metabolism. Choline is involved in fat metabolism and in the transport of fats from the liver.

Cell membranes: Choline is a component of cell membranes and plays a role in the transmission of signals inside cells. Myelin, the insulating sheath around the nerves, and platelet activating factor contain choline.

Neurotransmitters: Choline accelerates the synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is involved in many nerve and brain functions. Dietary intake of choline seems to affect body levels of acetylcholine.

Absorption: Choline may be absorbed better in the form of lecithin.

Deficiency: Choline deficiency symptoms in humans include fatty liver and liver damage. These symptoms have been demonstrated only recently in humans fed choline- deficient diets. This means that choline fulfills one of the criteria for being an essential nutrient. Patients on long-term parenteral nutrition who are not given choline develop fatty infiltration of the liver and other signs of dysfunction. This condition can be improved, and possibly prevented, with choline supplementation.

Choline deficiency in animals also leads to nerve degeneration, senile dementia, high blood cholesterol, and liver cancer – possibly by affecting cell signaling or by generating free radicals and DNA alterations.

Nervous system disorders: Uptake of circulating choline into the brain decreases with age. Choline is important for nerve structure and function; and this change may contribute to the type of dementia in which cholinergic nerves are lost.

Sources: Good sources of choline in the form of lecithin include eggs, organ meats, lean meat, brewer’s yeast, legumes such as soybeans, grains, and nuts. It is found in green leafy vegetables as free choline.

I was taking lecithin a while back but I didn’t find any difference or improvement. Looks like I’ll be adding it again.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I’ve been telling my doctor for sometime now that I have some really low vitamin B deficiencies and luckily convinced him to give me a riboflavin injection. I noticed several improvements but he seems hung up on the anxiety diagnosis from the neurologist. Any research on B vitamins suggest that they all work together so if you have one deficiency, you’ll have several and my doctor didn’t seem interested in pursuing it any further.

Found this tonight from who else? Doctor Google:

Anxiety and the Vitamin B complex

Deficiencies of members of the vitamin B complex appear to be common in patients with agoraphobia (fear of open spaces). (1) The same is likely to be true for other anxiety-related conditions. We will review the evidence suggesting that individual members of this family may affect the experience of anxiety.

Inositol Supplementation

Inositol is a key intermediate of the phosphatidyl-inositol cycle, a second-messenger system used by several noradrenergic, serotonergic and cholinergic receptors. Since ingestion has been shown to raise inositol levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, this nutrient could potentially serve as an anti-anxiety agent.

Indeed, when a group of 21 patients with panic disorder either with or without agoraphobia received 12 grams daily of inositol or placebo in random order for 4 weeks each, the inositol supplement was associated with a significantly greater reduction in the frequency and severity of panic attacks and of agoraphobia than the placebo. Moreover, while the efficacy of the nutrient was judged to be comparable to that of imipramine, its side effects were minimal.

Niacinamide Supplementation

Niacinamide has been shown in an animal study to have benzodiazepine-like actions including anti-conflict, anti-aggressive, muscle relaxant and hypnotic effects. In contrast to niacin, it passes readily from the plasma to the cerebrospinal fluid where it is taken up into brain cells by a high-affinity accumulation system, suggesting it is the preferred form of vitamin B3 for the treatment of anxiety.

Lactate (which is associated with anxiety) reacts with niacinamide-adenine dinucleotide [NA[D.sub.+]] to form pyruvic acid and reduced NAD (NADH + [H.sup.+]). The equilibrium of this reaction favors lactate and NA[D.sup.+]), but it can be driven by adding excess NA[D.sup.+]. It may be that supplementation with niacinamide helps to drive the reaction, thus reducing lactate concentrations.

Anecdotal reports suggest that niacinamide has anxiolytic effects comparable to the benzodiazepines, and it may be particularly effective for patients whose anxiety is secondary to reactive hypoglycemia. Typical dosages are between 500 mg twice daily and 1,000 mg 3 times daily. Hoffer believes that the optimal daily dosage is just below the amount that produces nausea.

Thiamine Deficiency

Elevated lactate may also be caused by inadequate pyruvate dehydrogenase activity resulting from a thiamine deficiency or dependency. In that case, the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA is inhibited, fostering its conversion to lactic acid. Symptoms of a prolonged moderate thiamine deficiency may include fearfulness progressing to agitation as well as emotional instability and psychosomatic complaints.

When more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline thiamine-deficient were currently feeling significantly more anxiety–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. There are no published studies on the repletion of a borderline thiamine deficiency to treat anxiety.

Vitamin B6 Deficiency

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter which is involved in the regulation of anxiety, requires vitamin B6 for its synthesis; thus a deficiency of this vitamin may theoretically result in heightened anxiety. Vitamin B6 is also required for the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin, a neurotransmitter suspected of being involved in anxiety.

When over 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those found to be chronically deficient in vitamin B6 had a significantly greater tendency to become anxious, although they were not significantly more anxious at the time of the study. Also, in an open trial, patients with hyperventilation syndrome who also had abnormal xanthurenic acid excretion (an indicator of vitamin B6 deficiency) improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan, suggesting that a marginal B6 deficiency, by causing serotonin depletion, may have produced the syndrome.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Anxiety may be part of the neuropsychiatric syndrome seen in advanced cases of pernicious anemia which is well-known to be caused by B12 deficiency. When cobalamin levels of more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline vitamin B12-deficient were significantly more anxious at the time of the study–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. Whether B12 supplementation reduces anxiety when the vitamin is borderline deficient remains to be investigated.

References

1. Abbey LC. Agoraphobia. J Orthomol Psychiatry 11:243-59, 1982

2. Benjamin J et al. Inositol treatment in psychiatry. Psychopharmacol Bull 31(1):167-75, 1995a

3. Levine J et al. Inositol treatment raises CSF inositol levels. Brain Res 627(1):168-70, 1993

4. Benjamin J et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of inositol treatment for panic disorder. Am J Psychiatry 15(7):1084-6, 1995b

So I’ve had a blood test for vitamin B12 and Thiamine and both were normal. Still waiting on the results from the vitamin B6 test. I’ve long discovered the Niacin deficiency with some great results but not for anxiety and Inositol I don’t know much about. I believe it’s included in B complex.

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

   

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