Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 18, 2008

Vitamins and Minerals for Diabetes

VITAMINS AND MINERALS THAT LOWERS BLOOD SUGAR

Minerals are the vital constituents for the formation of body structures such as bones and tissues. They are also involved in major physiological processes such as proper metabolism and energy production. There are various minerals that are helpful in treating diabetes and slowing down diabetic complications.

The most important mineral is Chromium. It is also known as Diabetic Mineral. It is because the main function of chromium in is body is to turn carbohydrates into glucose. Chromium also helps in the regulation and production of hormone insulin. It has been observed that due to chromium only the

Insulin works effectively in the body and without it, insulin simply would not function. Good sources of chromium are nuts, cheese, whole, grains, oysters, mushrooms, brewer’s yeast, etc. Long time researches have shown that the symptoms of diabetes completely reverses particularly of Type –2 Diabetes mellitus.

It is because insulin regulates and normalize blood sugar and it also improves body’s ability to transport blood glucose into cells. It has also been seen that the chromium supplements improves glucose tolerance and thus brings it to normal. It reduces fasting glucose and insulin levels in

gestational diabetes. It encourages the loss of body fat. It enhances insulin secretion and decreases trighlycerides Chromium also promotes muscular gains.

Vanadium: It is also associated with proper glucose regulation. It acts like insulin in the body and also enhances its effects. That is why this mineral is extensively known for its role in the management of diabetes. Food sources of vanadium include skin milk, lobster, vegetables, butter and cheese. Vanadium is named after the Scandinavian goddess of beauty and youth. Vanadium is also a building material of bones and teeth. Although, researchers have know vanadium for more than forty

years but the mineral is not yet considered as a essential constituent for humans. It is essential for plants and animals. But Vanadium must be needed to be as an essential nutrient in our diet. Vanadium in case of diabetics- improves fasting glucose levels. It also increases insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. It lowers the insulin requirements in type –1 diabetes.

Manganese: Manganese maintains the blood glucose level in normal range and hence is useful in treating diabetes and hypoghlycaemia. Manganese is also used in our body for fat and protein metabolism and the production of energy. It is needed for growth, maintenance of connective tissue, bone, cartilage and

also helps in fatty acid synthesis. Manganese is also useful in the treatment of epilepsy, anosexia and iron deficiency. Moreover, the absorption of vitamin C, B and E depends upon the sufficient amount of manganese so the person’s multi-vitamin supplement should contain sufficient amount of manganese in it. Dietary sources of manganese include whole green cereals, leafy vegetables, nuts and tea.

Magnesium: Magnesium is mainly important for hypoglycaemics because it helps in the digestion of sugar, starches and fats and also helps in stabilizing blood sugar levels. It has been known from many years that the secretion and action of insulin require magnesium. Hence for diabetic patient and for persons

in whom intake of refined carbohydrates is too much, in them the supplement of magnesium is very much necessary. It is a person crave for chocolate, it may be an indication that he is low in magnesium. The dietary sources of magnesium are whole grains, nuts, seeds, cocoa milk, green vegetables, sea food,

brown rice. Magnesium is also involved in thyroid hormone production. Magnesium along with calcium helps in muscle contraction and helps in producing energy especially in muscle cells. Magnesium is also involved in producing stomach acid and digestive enzymes.

Zinc: Zinc is needed for proper release of insulin and many hypoglycaemics may be deficient. Zinc supplements are beneficial for patients with chronic diseases like diabetes. Some of the other Zinc’s functions include cholesterol, protein and energy metabolism growth, healing and immune functions. Dietary sources of Zinc include meat, eggs, sunflower seeds, milk, wholegrains, spinach etc. But a person should keep in mind that Zinc is destroyed when food is processed so they should eat the Zinc containing food in their natural form as much as possible. Moreover, Zinc absorption is reduced in alcoholics and diuretics. Stress also causes Zinc levels to drop rapidly.

Vitamins are an essential part of human body. The vitamin helps in improving digestion and therefore, increases the body’s ability to tolerate low glucose levels. They also know as Anti-Stress vitamins because of their good effects on the brain and nervous system. The B-complex vitamins are a group of eight vitamins, which include Thiamine (B1), Riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), Pyridoxina (B6), Folic Acid (B9), Cyanocobalmin (B12), Pantothenic acid and bioten. A particular potential benefit of vitamin B supplements for diabetics is mainly its ability to lower blood levels of homocysteine (a suphur-containing amino acid). Hence, the vitamins B are also essential for breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, which provides energy for the body. It also helps in breakdown of fats and proteins, which helps in normal functioning of the nervous system.

Vitamin B-6 is helpful in the women reporting with gestational diabetes and for protection against metabolic imbalances associated with the use of some oral contraceptive. Vitamin B6 is also useful in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. It help in reducing homocysteine. It maintains fluid balance and is essential for cellular energy production. It is somewhat beneficial to prevent skin eruptions also. Therefore, the amaging family of vitamin B is very helpful. Vitamin B6 levels are even lower in people with diabetes who have nerve damage i.e. neuropathy. So, the administration of bath Vitamin B1 (25 mg per day) and vitamin B6 (50 mg per day) shows significant improvement of symptoms of diabetic neuropathy after four weeks, because Vitamin B1 is also found to be low in people with type 1 diabetes.

Biotin (The Vitamin B) is needed to process of glucose. Patient with Type-1 of diabetes showed fasting glucose level dropped by 50% on administration of 16 mg of biotin per day for one week. Biotin may also reduce pain from diabetic nerve damage.

Vitamin C: Diabetic people also have low vitamin C levels. Vitamin C may reduce glycosylation. Vitamin C also lowers sorbital in people with diabetes. Sorbital is a sugar that can accumulate and damage the nerves eyes and kidney of people with diabetes. Vitamin C may improve glucose tolerance in patients with Type-2 diabetes. Vitamin C significantly reduces urinary protein loss in people with diabetes. Diabetic people should have 1-3 grams per day of vitamin C.

Vitamin B-12: Vitamin B-12 is needed for normal functioning of nerve cells. Vitamin B12 taken orally, intravenously or by injection reduces the nerve damage caused by diabetes in most of the people. The intake of large amounts of niacin (a form of the vitamin B 3), such as 2-3 grams per day, may impair glucose tolerance and shall be used by diabetic people only under doctor’s advice.

Vitamin D: It is needed to maintain adequate blood levels of insulin. Vitamin D receptors have been found in the pancreas where insulin is produced hence the supplements of vitamin D, increases insulin level in people suffering form diabetes. But it should be given in accurate dose as high dose of vitamin D can be toxic.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E prevents the destructive vascular damage that may occur in diabetes. Vitamin E supplements prevents the arterial degeneration in patients suffering from diabetes. Vitamin E decreases the requirement of insulin by diabetic people. Vitamin E is available naturally in whole grain products, wheat products, fruits, green leafy vegetables milk, whole raw or sprouted seeds.

October 24, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for April 24, 2008

 

Zinc-Sulfur-1

Chart: High dosage of Zinc (Zn) can lower Sulfur (S).

Another supplement and another home run. I starting taking MSM yesterday and I notice a big improvement with my candida. I looked up the mineral relationships chart and the answer hit me like a ton of bricks. The obvious answer is Zinc (Zn). From February 2007 until August 2007 I took high dosages of zinc and went too far and pushed my copper level too low. I think the high intake of zinc also lowered the level of sulfur (S) and based on the interrelationships, high zinc could’ve also lowered my potassium and iron.

I’m just glad I found another deficiency except this one may have been caused by me…

September 5, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 15, 2007

Follow up appointment with the Naturopath and she hands me the amino acid kit and explains the process. I’ve been playing around with these amino acids for a while now and it will be fantastic if I can get a simple report with the current levels within the body.

She does another physical examination and this time she says she is unable to hear the mitral valve prolapse. WHAT? Something I’ve had for almost twenty years, something every doctor mentions is now gone? Something a cardiologist said was a normal variation and that a lot of people have it…is gone.

I know why it is gone. Because it’s an indication of a low level of magnesium. Did taking magnesium help? Of course but it didn’t fix the problem. You need to look for the root cause because there are a number of different things that can cause magnesium loss. In my case, it was a low level of zinc. Once I made that discovery and fixed the zinc deficiency to bring the minerals back into balance, I was able to stop the magnesium loss.

Tomorrow I’ll get started with the amino acid test.

May 31, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 09, 2007

I’ve written about Alzheimer’s in this blog in the past and it’s my belief that it can be caused by low levels of zinc. Low zinc levels can cause low magnesium and this will create other reactions in a weakened body that could eventually lead to Alzheimer’s. This guy talks about an enzyme called “MMP-9” that has the natural ability to attack the plaque found in Alzheimer’s. Turns out that they think this specific enzyme requires zinc to work properly. Thus a zinc deficiency would cause the buildup of plaque. Here’s an article that seems to support my theory.

Plaque and the Brain

Dr. Jin-Moo Lee, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown that another enzyme called matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) also degrades beta amyloid. Dr. Lee found that MMP-9 is able to break down the fibrils that make up the plaques found in Alzheimer’s. MMP-9 and other enzymes break down a free-floating kind of beta amyloid that hasn’t formed into plaques. But in Dr. Lee’s lab, the other enzymes didn’t seem to degrade fibrils the way MMP-9 did. These results suggest that MMP-9, already found in the body, may be helpful in clearing plaques from the brain.
 
It’s also not clear whether drugs designed to increase or decrease levels of MMP-9 could stop brain degeneration and dementia, or what any side effects would be. One possibility for therapy stems from the fact that MMP-9, like many other enzymes, requires the presence of zinc to work. So in theory, reducing the amount of zinc in the body via chelation therapy might inactivate MMP-9 and reduce damage to blood vessel walls. It’s unclear what this might do to the beta amyloid plaques in other areas of the brain, though, and there could be severe side effects. “Removing zinc would likely be detrimental to other systems,” says Dr. Lee.
 
The connection of MMP-9 to both Alzheimer’s and CAA is intriguing, but still murky. More research is needed before any treatments can be developed. “I think we are far from therapies at this point,” Dr. Lee says. “One must remember that at this level of research, we are trying to understand molecular mechanisms, and we are somewhat removed from therapies. However, our goal is to identify potential targets for the development of therapies. It’s too early to say whether MMP-9 will provide us with viable targets, but therapies to ameliorate disease are always on our minds.”

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for November 25, 2007

Came across this article today about how high dosages of zinc can interfere with chromium absorption. Uh oh…

High dosage zinc interferes with Chromium

CHROMIUM BIOAVAILABILITY: Inorganic Chromium may be used therapeutically but organic forms of Chromium, e.g. GTF complexes, have higher biological activity.  This may partly explain some of the variance in the results of trials.  Phytate-rich diets possibly decrease Chromium absorption.  Chromium is required to metabolise sugar but sugar may increases the excretion of Chromium.  High dosage zinc supplementation possibly interfere with Chromium absorption.

Then I came across another article that suggested chromium will effect the amino acids.

Chromium and Amino Acid Metabolism

As part of Glucose Tolerance Factor (GTF), it works with insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Diseases caused by a chromium deficiency include low blood sugar, diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hyperactivity, learning disabilities, ADD/ADHD, hyperirratability, depression, bi-polar disease, impaired personality traits (bad seed), impaired growth, peripheral neuropathy, negative nitrogen balance (protein loss), elevated blood triglycerides, elevated blood cholesterol, coronary blood vessel disease, aortic cholesterol plaque, infertility and decreased sperm count and a shortened life span.
Chromium (GTF): Found in apples, black pepper, calves liver, cheese, meat and whole grains, grapes, cheese, chicken, corn and corn oil, dairy products, mushrooms, potatoes, beer, oysters, brown rice and dried beans.

BODY PARTS AFFECTED:
Adrenal glands, brain, blood, circulatory system, heart, immune system, liver and white blood cells.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Disturbed amino acid metabolism, increased serum cholesterol, impaired glucose tolerance, lack of energy, myopia, protein/calorie malnutrition, susceptibility to infection; Lowered or escalated blood sugar levels, coronary artery disease. It is essential to the metabolism of glucose and is needed for energy and the synthesis of cholesterol, fats and protein.

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 19, 2007

Today I was taking to friend at work about how great books are for learning and he mentioned that Indigo and Chapters are now his favorite stores. I agreed but I suggested going to the library instead making it much more cost effective. I also suggested that some books are available online through ebooks. He had never heard of this so I logged into my account and the only book I knew for sure on ebooks was Dr. Jensen’s book on body chemistry and nutrition. I pulled up the book and was showing him how it worked just like a regular book and he was impressed.

Our conversation ended there and I continued to flip through the book. I came across a chart that explained the chemical needs of each body tissue and the minerals required for optimum health. I remember seeing it the first time because I was very interested when I saw that zinc was required for the adrenals.

This time, I happened to notice that the mineral required for the spleen was COPPER!! Wow, I couldn’t believe it. I did go too far with the high dosage of zinc. So if the weird cracks on my tongue was because the copper was too low then this time, I will have an indication as to when my copper has balanced.

This is great and totally unexpected! So I do have an issue with my spleen…

October 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 05, 2007

So with these new idea swirling around in my head, I pick up some taurine and glutathione on my way home. Back to google for some more research…

Neurotransmitter Amino Acids

Abnormalities in this group are widespread in their implications, and are seen in virtually all mental/emotional problems, primary brain problems (stroke, Alzheimer’s Disease, epilepsy), depression, anxiety, insomnia, poor concentration, memory problems, and mental exhaustion.

Aspartic Acid
Asparagine
Gamma Amino Butyric Acid (GABA) (minor amino acid)
Glutamic Acid
Glutamine
Glycine
Phenylalanine
Taurine
Tryptophan
Tyrosine

After some brief reading, I focus in on something called GABA. I know I’ve come across that in the health food stores but what is it exactly?

GABA

Neurons in the brain’s temporal lobes produce the biochemical GABA and their resulting theta brain waves. GABA is the brain’s natural valium providing calmness and aiding in the production of endorphins. When in balance the GABA dominant person is characterized by stability and reliability. These people are team players who thrive on organization and long-term relationships. Homemakers, administrators, technicians, nurses, security officers, accountants, bus drivers are all ideal occupations for GABA natured people. GABA natured people are nurturers and are tend to be very traditional. 50% of the world’s population is GABA dominant so it is very important to understand how to balance this vital brain neurotransmitter.

An excess of GABA can result in a person not taking care of their own needs at the expense of nurturing others.

Early signs that you are may be GABA deficient include: feeling anxious, nervous or irritable. You may start to feel overwhelmed and stressed out. Other symptoms include: allergies, light-headedness, muscle aches. This is just the beginning of what could become serious health problems.

As with all the brain’s neurotransmitters GABA deficiencies affect all four major domains of brain function. Physical, personality, memory and attention issues can present themselves as GABA deficiencies become more prominent.

Factors which reduce GABA levels:

  • Glutamaine (precursor) deficiency
  • B1, B6, zinc, manganese & iron deficiency
  • Chronic stress
  • Chronic pain
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Progesterone deficiency
  • Mercury and lead exposure
  • Alcohol withdrawal
  • Caffeine excess
  • Excessive electromagnetic radiation
  • Excessive loud noise exposure

Two things really stands out from this list:

1) Zinc, manganese and iron deficiencies.

2) Exposure to excessive electromagnetic radiation

There is no doubt whatsoever that I was low with all three of those minerals and I had exposure to electromagnetic radiation for a year before I discovered the intercom system. So these two things can cause a GABA deficiency and can cause anxiety…

I’ll try the glutathione, taurine for a couple of days to see what effect it has. If I still have the vibration, then I’ll try the GABA.

September 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for September 05, 2007

More research and I discover that Taurine is usually low in people who have candida. Not only that, but it’s low in people who have a zinc deficiency and can cause anxiety.

Taurine Deficiency – Possible Causes

There are many reasons your body could be low in taurine. Your body does not make enough taurine due to a deficiency in one or more of the following:

  • Cysteine and methionine (amino acids that make taurine in your body).
  • Pyridoxal-5-phosphate (the active form of vitamin B6).
  • Zinc (deficiency in zinc is common with elevated mercury levels).
  • Vitamin A.
  • Candida. If you have this systemic fungal infection, it produces an amino acid, beta-alanine, which competes with taurine for reabsorption in the kidney.

WHAT IS TAURINE?

Taurine is an amino acid which plays a major role in the brain as an “inhibitory” neurotransmitter & neuromodulator. It is similiar in structure to the amino acids GABA & L-Glycine, which are also neuroinhibitory. This means it helps to calm or stabilize an excited brain.

Taurine stabilizes nerve cell membranes thus depressing the firing of brain cells & dampening the nerve cell action of the excitatory amino acids, glutamate, aspartate, & quinolinate.

Taurine acts by regulating the sodium & potassium concentration in the cells & the magnesium level between the cells. This has everything to do with the electrical activity of the cells & subsequent communication between cells.

By this mechanism, it has anti-anxiety & anti-convulsant activity. It has also been found useful in some cases of migraine, insomnia, agitation, restlessness, irritability, alcoholism, obsessions, depression, hypomania/mania.

Dosage is from 500 mg twice daily to a total of 5000 mg daily in 3-4 divided doses, though I rarely recommend that high a dose. The total ideal body pool of taurine for adults is 12,000- 18,000 mg.

Since taurine also affects the hypothalamus to help regulate body temperature, a higher dose can decrease your temperature & give chilliness, so be aware of that.

Taurine also plays a role in memory & increases the level of a memory neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, in the brain (in animal studies).

September 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 30, 2007

Another day fighting with cold hands again and by early afternoon I finally discover why. After a quick scan through the blog, July 11, 2007 was the first entry where I mentioned this “new” symptom.

Again I spent the day taking my vitamins one at a time to see if it would have any effect. Nope, not one. I’m not sure what made me realize it but I guess I was thinking about the recent magnesium loss and how I’ve pushed the copper too low. That’s it! My copper is too low. I’ve been taking a high dosage of zinc for too long.

So I take some homeopathic copper and my cold hands disappear almost instantly. I was always waiting for something to indicate that the zinc/copper ratio was balanced and it never happened in an obvious kind of way. I think the cold hands were an indication that the copper was getting too low. I also think my recent problem with the itchy eyes was a sign that the copper was going too low.

Here’s another person’s story:

Why do most candida sufferers have cold hands and feet?

The only reason that candida infections occur is because the host suffers from lowered immunity. It is impossible to have a candida infection if your immune system is working properly. A healthy immune system constantly destroys yeast and fungi cells in the intestinal tract. A candida infection is a symptom of lowered immunity. So why do most people with candida infections suffer from extremely cold hands and feet?

If you do not have HIV, cancer or some other disease that is taxing your immune system, your immune system is depressed for some other reason. The interesting thing about the cold hands/feet symptom is that this symptom is most commonly seen in people with thyroid problems.

As Jon from iThyroid describes in detail on his site, thyroid problems occur as a result of mineral imbalances. These mineral imbalances will in turn cause other problems such as lowered blood cell levels (both red and white) leaving the host with an impaired ability to destroy pathogens such as yeast cells. So commonly candida infections have been connected to thyroid problems and this is a MISTAKE. Instead, both candida infections and thyroid problems are connected to the same thing – mineral imbalances. Particularly, copper is imbalanced as this critical mineral is needed for the formation of white and red blood cells.

If I was to suggest only one thing to anyone suffering from a candida infection today, it would be to get a hair mineral analysis done. This analysis would let you know for sure which minerals you need to supplement and which you need to cut back on. However, even if the test indicates a high amount of a particular mineral, it is important to never completely stop taking that mineral. Stopping the intake of even small amounts of a mineral can cause further imbalance.

I just want to include briefly my personal problems with mineral imbalancing. My problem was with copper levels. Mine were too low, causing things such as cold hands/feet, incredible brain fog, fatigue, muscle aches, sttringy buildups in my mouth, etc. When I started supplementing copper, I felt TERRIBLE. My brain fog symptoms got so severe I could not work. But this only lasted a few days and with time, I was able to increase my intake to the RDA and then a bit above. And as I continued to take supplemental copper, my condition continued to improve. My brain fogginess slowly went away as did the embarassing body odour. I no longer woke up in night sweats, nor did I have that stringy buildup in my mouth after eating carbohydrates.

I hope my story and website have helped at least one person out there – get a mineral test done!

August 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 27, 2007

Just before going to bed, I wanted to review my blog to read the entries regarding the zinc. I came across an entry I did when I suspected high sugar intake was the cause of my problems. I couldn’t believe it. Right there in front of my eyes were Choline and Inositol. I’m not sure how I missed that? Maybe because I didn’t know what they were? God I can’t believe I missed that! I feel like I’m so thorough at everything I do.

Entry for January 07, 2007

Vitamin/Minerals (Factors that inhibit absorption) : Excessive Sugar

Vitamin B (complex), Vitamin B-2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B-5 (Pantothenic Acid), Niacin (nicotinic acid), Chromium, Choline, Copper, Inositol, Phosphorus, Potassium and Magnesium.

August 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 27, 2007

Woke up with the vibration…

This morning it’s back to work so I added some extra magnesium just in case. I sat down at my desk and started my daily routine and it hit me like a tonne of bricks. The magnesium loss must be because my copper is low. This is fantastic!!!!

I actually have some homeopathic copper on me so I take that with 1 magnesium and I could feel the difference. I should’ve known it because of the candida supplements were working, the minerals were balanced afterall. It makes sense because I’m been taking a high dosage of zinc everyday since the beginning of February. Hard to believe but it’s been over six months of treatment so maybe I did go too far? I had no real sign that the zinc had been corrected.

Starting tomorrow, I’ll take the candida supplements along with my multivitamin and a calcium/magnesium.

This is great news! Magnesium is my friend again.

August 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 26, 2007

I took my regular vitamins in the morning and about two hours later, I felt so sick. It felt like my stomach was upset from too much zinc. I’ve taken a high dosage of zinc on an empty stomach in the past so I know exactly what it feels like.

I had to lie down for about an hour and it passed. I decided to skip the rest of the vitamins for the rest of the day but I’m sure the cause was the zinc.

Just before going to bed, I start getting that “feeling” in my chest again. It’s only a mild feeling but I’ve had it so many times before. I take 1 250 mg of magnesium and I feel a lot better. So what the heck is causing this extra magnesium loss? At least this time I know what the symptoms are and I have the best form of magnesium along with the homeopathic form.

August 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 22, 2007

No vibration this morning.

Today I’ll split things up a little differently. Here’s today’s dosage:

300 mg Calcium/Magnesium 3x
50 mg Zinc 2x
250 mg Inositol 3x
250 mg Choline 3x
100 mg Phosphorus 2x
Caprylic Acid 3x

August 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 20, 2007

Today I decided to take a break from the vitamins and minerals just to see what would happen. My eyes are still itchy so maybe I’m taking too much of something. Possibly the phosphorus?

I got to around mid-morning and I could feel the mild nerve feeling in my head. I’m still low in something but I have no idea what it could be. I figure it could be the chromium so I take one capsule with my lunch. I also took 1 50 mg of zinc and left it at that. By mid afternoon, the nerve feeling returned so I took a calcium/magnesium and it never returned.

By the evening my eyes are feeling much better so I take another zinc and another calcium/magnesium with my dinner. I also wanted to try something different.

With the addition of the calcium/magnesium in the 2/1 ratio, my candida has mildly improved. It’s nothing significant, it just feels a little better than usual since I made the change. So tonight I thought I’d add some caprylic acid and a grapefruit seed extract. Two things known for candida and I’ve tried them both before without any success.

About an hour after dinner…I notice a difference. I think it’s working this time. I’ll add these two to my supplements tomorrow.

August 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2007

Another thing about Alzheimer’s disease is you always hear about the high levels of aluminum in Alzheimer patients but scientists don’t know why. I think it’s simple. Low level of zinc causes magnesium loss which causes the rising level of aluminum. 

This is from the Alzheimer’s Society website:

Aluminum

At the present time Aluminum is one of several factors scientists are investigating in the search for a cause of Alzheimer’s disease. The role of aluminum in the body and the brain is not well understood. Scientists disagree as to whether or not there is a connection between aluminum and Alzheimer’s disease.

And here is an article regarding magnesium’s role with aluminum.

The Aluminum – Magnesium Link

Research have suggested that aluminum may be more likely to accumulate in the brains of persons whose diets are magnesium-deficient — which, unfortunately, includes 90% of Americans! Several studies have shown that animals fed diets low in magnesium accumulate high concentrations of aluminum in the Central Nervous System. One of magnesium’s many functions is to activate the enzyme tubulin involved in the maintenance of nerve tissue cells. It has been suggested that when there is not enough Magnesium in the body to plug into the appropriate receptor site on the tubulin enzyme, aluminum takes its place instead. This leads to the inactivation of tubulin and, consequently, inadequate nerve function. Malic acid can pull aluminum away from this enzyme, making a place for magnesium. This may be a protection against Alzheimer’s disease.

Malic Acid is found abundantly in fruits such as apples. Malic Acid is also produced in the human body. It is a metabolite of the Krebs cycle the set of biochemical reactions used to produce 90% of all energy in the cells of the body. Malic Acid readily crosses the Blood-Brain-Barrier and has been shown to bind to aluminum. It functions in the body by drawing aluminum away from the tubulin enzyme, so that Magnesium can plug into the receptor sites instead. Malic Acid’s unique ability to bind with aluminum means it can be flushed out of the body, preventing unwanted build-up.

Because a Magnesium-deficient diet may increase the amount of aluminum taken up and stored by the body, it is vitally important that we take in sufficient amounts.

August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2007

In the beginning when I discovered vitamin and mineral deficiencies I read so much about magnesium and getting to understand the role it plays within the body. One of the things I kept running into was about is how magnesium loss played a role in Alzheimer’s disease.

There are a number of different factors for magnesium loss but from a first hand account I know now that a zinc deficiency can cause magnesium loss. When I came across this article I was mildly amused because zinc plays a role in the sense of smell. Made me wonder if warts are linked with Alzheimer’s? If they’re not, they should be…

Alzheimer’s linked to poor sense of smell

Study finds those who do poorly on odour tests more likely to show mental decline over time

Jul 03, 2007 04:30 AM
Associated Press

CHICAGO–Difficulty identifying common smells such as lemon, banana and cinnamon may be the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study that could lead to scratch-and-sniff tests to determine a person’s risk for the progressive brain disorder.

Such tests could be important if scientists find ways to slow or stop Alzheimer’s and the memory loss associated with it. For now, there’s no cure for the more than 5 million Americans and estimated 300,000 Canadians over 65 with the disease.

Researchers have long known that microscopic lesions considered the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s first appear in a brain region important to the sense of smell. “Strictly on the basis of anatomy, yeah, this makes sense,” said Robert Franks, an expert on odour perception and the brain at the University of Cincinnati. Franks was not involved in the study, appearing in yesterday’s Archives of General Psychiatry.

Other studies have linked loss of smell to Alzheimer’s, Franks said, but this is the first one to measure healthy people’s olfactory powers and follow them for five years, testing for signs of mental decline.

In the study, 600 people between the ages of 54 and 100 were asked to identify a dozen familiar smells: onion, lemon, cinnamon, black pepper, chocolate, rose, banana, pineapple, soap, paint thinner, gasoline and smoke. For each mystery scent, they were given a choice of four answers. A quarter of the people correctly identified all the odours or missed only one. Half of them knew at least nine of the 12. The lowest-scoring quarter correctly identified eight or fewer of the odours.

The subjects took 21 cognitive tests annually over the next five years. Those who made at least four errors on the odour test were 50 per cent more likely to develop memory problems than people who made no more than one error. Difficulty identifying odours also was associated with a higher risk of progressing from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s.

August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 08, 2007

Woke up this morning with a slight vibration but I’m very happy with the new found results and I think it’s from the extra calcium/magnesium. Because of the vibration, I’m going to add niacin back into the rotation. 100 mg dosage, three times a day and I’m also going to reduce the amount of phosphorus by half.

Daily Supplement Summary:

900 mg Calcium/Magnesium (300 mg 1/1 ratio)
300 mg Niacin (100 mg)
300 mg Phosphorus (100 mg)
600 mg Vitamin D (200 mg)
90 mg Zinc (30 mg)
25 mg Manganese

August 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

Zinc, potassium and the adrenals…

ZINC RAISES POTASSIUM

Zinc helps lower the level of sodium and tends to raise the hair tissue level of potassium, especially in slow oxidizers. The reason for low hair potassium is underactive adrenal glands, and usually not a potassium deficiency. Potassium is found in many natural foods. Low aldosterone and other adrenal hormones, however, causes greater elimination of potassium in the urine.

When the hair potassium level is low, taking zinc is far more effective in helping to raise it than taking potassium. Potassium is a sympathetic or excitatory mineral which is not as helpful to restore the adrenal glands, providing one eats sufficient potassium, which most people do. Zinc is calming and has a more powerful effect in assisting the adrenals to rest and rebuild. This in turn raises the potassium level.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

When I first discovered my magnesium deficiency, I thought all I needed to do was take magnesium and fix the problem. It wasn’t until later that I discovered how important a mineral balance can be. At the time, I never really thought to do any research on calcium because it was in the opposite direction. I find it really interesting reading about it now.

Zinc, along with calcium and magnesium, are called the sedative elements. All three help inhibit excessive sympathetic nervous system dominance.

More info on calcium:

The Calcium and Magnesium Relationship

In addition to all of its enzyme functions, magnesium is an important component of cell membranes. As a result, it is vitally important in regulating what goes into, and what comes out of, all the body’s cells. This makes magnesium crucial to mineral balance.

In simple solutions, such as salt water, all dissolved minerals are evenly dispersed. This is not so in living cells, where they’re distributed differently, depending on their functions. This specialized distribution requires energy, and it’s absolutely vital to life processes and health.

Calcium and sodium ions, for the most part, are kept outside the cells, while magnesium and potassium are kept inside the cells. These four minerals are the most plentiful in the body, and collectively they are known as electrolytes.

When the level of magnesium within the cells falls below normal, calcium and sodium rush inside, while potassium and magnesium leak out. This can cause big problems.

Calcium excites nerves, whereas magnesium calms them down.

The normal concentration of magnesium ion inside cells is easily 10,000 times more than that of intracellular calcium ions – under healthy conditions. But if the amount of magnesium in a cell falls, for any reason, calcium ions flow into the cell. With this abnormal situation, a couple of things happen:

Higher than normal calcium inside a cell excites a lot of reactions. It puts the cell into hyperactive state. Heart and blood-vessel cells are especially excitable because they need to react rapidly during sudden stress situation. As such, they are truly vulnerable to deficits in magnesium that allow abnormal rises in calcium, with resulting hyperactivity.

Sometimes, a hyperactive state is just what you want. It is the essence of the body’s “fight-or-flight” reaction to danger. Without calcium, there is no muscle contraction, and without muscle contraction there is no fight or flight.

But in normal circumstances, you don’t want excess muscle contractions. The muscles would soon cramp, bringing on severe muscle pain. To relax, the muscles need magnesium. Magnesium, physiologically the opposite of calcium, relaxes muscles. Under normal, healthy cellular conditions, magnesium levels inside muscle cells are high and calcium levels are low, so that the muscles can relax. This is just one way in which calcium enhances and allows the fight-or-flight reaction while magnesium calms it all down.

If calcium levels inside a cell get especially high because of low magnesium, the cell physically changes. High calcium tends to make things stiff and hard. But if soft tissue begins to get hard, it’s a real problem — it’s called “calcification”. In artery and heart cells, the stiffness caused by calcification hampers proper function and can be an important aspect of heart disease.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

Today I’m back at work so my routine is a bit more stable. I’ve decided to take three doses of 300mg calcium/magnesium in the 1/1 ratio along with the phosphorus and vitamin D. No reason for the change just want to keep trying something different until I find something that works.

I also changed the zinc dosage from two doses of 50 mg to three doses of 30 mg. I didn’t take any niacin today as I’m still not convinced that it’s the cause of the vibration although I didn’t have any all weekend.

By the end of the work day the eyes aren’t as itchy and the stuffiness in my nose feels better than usual. I’ll keep doing this combination of minerals for sure!

The million dollar question….Will it have any effect on the vibration?

I’ve always been very confused as to why taking extra calcium would make the vibration stronger and today I still don’t have an answer. I’m wondering if the magnesium deficiency caused a high calcium ratio? What are the effects of low magnesium and the effect on calcium?

Calcium

Elevated calcium levels are associated with arthritic / joint and vascular degeneration, calcification of soft tissue, hypertension and stroke, an increase in VLDL triglycerides, gastrointestinal disturbances, mood and depressive disorders, chronic fatigue, increased alkalinity, and general mineral imbalances.

If magnesium is insufficient potassium and calcium will be lost in the urine and calcium will be deposited in the soft tissues (kidneys, arteries, joints, brain, etc.).

Calcium Synergists

Copper is required to fix calcium in the bones and helps raise the tissue calcium level. Many people have biologically unavailable copper which causes their calcium problems. In fast oxidizers, copper deficiency contributes to a calcium deficiency. Adequate adrenal hormone levels are also essential for proper calcium metabolism.

Calcium Antagonists

Sugar upsets the calcium/phosphorus ratio in the blood more than any other single factor, according to researcher Dr. Melvin Page. It also stresses the adrenal glands and upsets the hormone balance which affects calcium metabolism.

Copper Bio-Unavailability A Major Cause of Candida Infection

The most commonly observed mineral imbalance we find in many patients with Candida infection is termed bio-unavailable copper. Bio-unavailable copper is indicated on a tissue mineral test. Other mineral indicators of a candida overgrowth are an elevated calcium level, elevated calcium/magnesium ratio, or a low sodium/potassium ratio.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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