Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for December 31, 2006

Found some 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) at the healthfood store. 1 capsule three times a day. Dosage: 200 mg (5-HTP) with 250 mg of L-Tyrosine and 3 mg of B6.

And my New Year Resolution? To get these health issues resolved once and for all and to reduce my sugar intake. No more chocolate bars, donuts or candy of any kind.

This will not be easy…for either resolution.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!! (Still vibrating…)

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December 31, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

Here’s another thought. I’ve come to the realization that I do have a candida overgrowth. Although I’ve had success with my allergies from avoiding microwaved food, I do still have stuffiness in my nose. So if candida is a fungus, and and fungus can cause sinusitis…

Here’s part of my blog from May 10th, 2006 and although I found it very interesting at the time, I never pursued it and didn’t make the connection to candida until now:

“Sinusitis can be caused by both bacteria and fungus. A bacterial infection usually occurs after a cold or virus when the congestion in the nose stops drainage from the sinuses. This fluid buildup in the sinuses breeds bacteria and may cause sinusitis. However, it has recently been proven that sinusitis can also be an immune response to a fungus.

In fact, the Mayo Clinic recently published a study which found that over 90% of sinus infections are fungal rather than bacterial. Thus, antibiotics (which are the most commonly prescribed treatment) are completely ineffective (not to mention damaging to the immune system) over 90% of the time.”

 I get so annoyed when I read things like this. The most commonly prescribed treatment for sinusitis is completely ineffective over 90% of the time. This is so unbelievable!! With today’s knowledge and technology… this is totally unacceptable. Am I the only who thinks like this?

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

And some more…it gets more and more interesting as I do more searches:

Tryptophan
Dietary Supplement

HTML version Author: Kimberly Dick

Tryptophan has often been hyped as “nature’s prozac” or “nature’s serotonin solution.” While certainly an exaggeration, these extravagant claims have some basis in fact.

Serotonin deficiency is often a major factor in depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and weight gain, to name a few. Simply supplementing serotonin when there is a deficiency would appear to be the easiest solution; however, since serotonin cannot pass through the blood-brain barrier, direct supplementation with serontonin is in fact ineffective.

Most antidepressant drugs available today fall into the category of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil. These drugs work by preventing the excessive uptake of serotonin in the brain, leaving more available in the synapses between neurons. However, many of these drugs have considerable side effects, in addition to being fairly expensive.

Unlike serotonin, tryptophan (or more accurately, its breakdown product 5-hydroxytryptophan) can pass through the blood-brain barrier. Thus supplementation of tryptophan would appear to be a simple and natural alternative to SSRI drugs. Since tryptophan can be cheaply produced and is not regulated as a drug, it is a much cheaper alternative. As well, it does not have the side effects of many drugs as it is naturally occurring in the body.

Tryptophan on its own works best in depression cases where psychobiologic arousal is high, and serotonin production is inadequate to balance the effects of dopamine and norepinephrine – resulting in a anxious, agitated state. For more apathetic, vegetative depressive cases, tryptophan supplementation is more effective when combined with supplementation of tyrosine, a precursor to dopamine/norepinephrine.

Serotonin deficiency has been implicated in cases of obesity, as it is associated with the brain’s perception of hunger and satiety. Excessive intake of sugars and other carbohydrates is known to increase brain serotonin levels. By increasing serotonin levels, tryptophan can function as an appetite suppressant at low doses, and is sometimes very effective for weight loss.

As well, tryptophan has been successfully used as a sleep aid. Serotonin does play a role in sleep regulation, but more importantly, serotonin is the precursor to melatonin, a hormone crucial to the sleep cycle. On its own, melatonin supplementation has been shown to be an effective treatment for insomnia; however, combining melatonin with tryptophan may prove even more effective.

5-HTP: The New Tryptophan Alternative

The compound 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) is the intermediate product in the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin. It was first offered as an over-the-counter supplement in 1994, and is marketed as a natural antidepressant. Since tryptophan is still banned by the FDA and is available in the United States only by prescription, 5-HTP has been offered as an alternative.

Since it is a direct precursor to serotonin, 5-HTP is considerably more active than tryptophan. It is thought to have effectiveness comparable to many prescription antidepressant drugs.

Unlike tryptophan, which was and still is produced in large quantities in vats of bacteria, 5-HTP is generally extracted from the Griffonia seed. It can be and sometimes is produced synthetically from tryptophan, but it is generally cheaper to extract it naturally. This allows 5-HTP to be offered at a more reasonable price, although still considerably higher than tryptophan was when it was offered as a nutritional supplement.

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I just did a search based on the previous post suggesting that anxiety improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan. It goes on to say that a marginal B6 deficiency causing a serotonin depletion, may have produced the increased anxiety.

So here’s what I found:

Serotonin

Monoamine neurotransmitter that provides a chemical link between the neurons of the brain. Natural serotonin is produced by the body during the digestion of healthy foods that contain the amino acid L-Tryptophan.

Serotonin is one of the chemicals which regulates emotion, and it is thought to play a large role in the biology of depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, migraine, sexuality and appetite.

People who are suffering from problems in these health areas might have a serotonin deficiency. This deficiency may be caused by poor eating habits.

As well as being found in the brain, serotonin is found in abundance in the digestive system as well as the blood stream. When the proper foods are digested, the body creates natural serotonin.

For example, whey protein milkshakes contain the amino acid L-Tryptophan. When the protein is digested, the body converts the amino acid into natural serotonin as needed. This is the way nature intended for you to get your natural serotonin, from the digestion of various healthy foods.

Ask your doctor if natural serotonin may be an alternative to drugs or a complimentary treatment. In the treatment of depression and anxiety, SSRI pills (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) are often taken in hopes of increasing the brain’s serotonin levels by increasing the amount of time that it stays in the brain.

However if the body has a shortage of natural serotonin, due to a poor diet, the drugs are simply trying to make the most out of the little bit of supply there is in the body.

The question is, why not also increase the supply, instead of only trying to make the little bit there is linger for a longer time? This is not to say drugs don’t have their place, consult your doctor.

But think about this. If someone has a shortage of Vitamin C and it was causing the symptoms of scurvy, would they take a drug to make the little bit of vitamin they did have last longer in their body? They might, but why not also just drink some orange juice and naturally get some more of the vitamin into the body? Hello, hello? Is health food a big mystery?

The human body is designed to produce natural serotonin from foods that contain amino acids. If someone is very low on serotonin it might be because the food they eat is junk and does not have the nutrients the body needs to support proper health.

Here is what can happen:

1. You eat a junk diet of processed and packaged foods.

2. You find yourself with a serotonin deficiency because your body can’t make any from the junk food you eat.

3. You either make the effort to eat whey protein and similar health foods that your body can use to create natural serotonin … or you don’t.

Most people don’t. Sad but true. They end up at the doctor and buy expensive pills because they wouldn’t make an effort to eat some health foods.

Here are three ways to get more natural serotonin into your body.

1. Health Foods: Drink a whey protein milkshake every day. We do. We put a scoop of chocolate flavor in a blender with a half a banana and some skim milk. It tastes delicious and helps keep your tummy flat too.

If using a blender is too much work you can get these milkshakes in ready to drink packages. Put some in the refrigerator and enjoy one a day.

2. L-Tryptophan Supplements: These were off the market for a long time due to one bad batch made by a foreign company. Now they are back and have passed the regulatory requirements for purity. One company that makes these is Doctor’s Best.

3. These super high quality brain and mood formulas are made by a company we have great respect for. The editors of this website have used many of their products with great results. Their pure fish oil is also recommended for support of brain health.

I’m trying so many things right now for candida but this does make a lot of sense. I’ve seen the supplement called 5-HTP but I never knew what it was: L-Tryptophan!

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I’ve been telling my doctor for sometime now that I have some really low vitamin B deficiencies and luckily convinced him to give me a riboflavin injection. I noticed several improvements but he seems hung up on the anxiety diagnosis from the neurologist. Any research on B vitamins suggest that they all work together so if you have one deficiency, you’ll have several and my doctor didn’t seem interested in pursuing it any further.

Found this tonight from who else? Doctor Google:

Anxiety and the Vitamin B complex

Deficiencies of members of the vitamin B complex appear to be common in patients with agoraphobia (fear of open spaces). (1) The same is likely to be true for other anxiety-related conditions. We will review the evidence suggesting that individual members of this family may affect the experience of anxiety.

Inositol Supplementation

Inositol is a key intermediate of the phosphatidyl-inositol cycle, a second-messenger system used by several noradrenergic, serotonergic and cholinergic receptors. Since ingestion has been shown to raise inositol levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, this nutrient could potentially serve as an anti-anxiety agent.

Indeed, when a group of 21 patients with panic disorder either with or without agoraphobia received 12 grams daily of inositol or placebo in random order for 4 weeks each, the inositol supplement was associated with a significantly greater reduction in the frequency and severity of panic attacks and of agoraphobia than the placebo. Moreover, while the efficacy of the nutrient was judged to be comparable to that of imipramine, its side effects were minimal.

Niacinamide Supplementation

Niacinamide has been shown in an animal study to have benzodiazepine-like actions including anti-conflict, anti-aggressive, muscle relaxant and hypnotic effects. In contrast to niacin, it passes readily from the plasma to the cerebrospinal fluid where it is taken up into brain cells by a high-affinity accumulation system, suggesting it is the preferred form of vitamin B3 for the treatment of anxiety.

Lactate (which is associated with anxiety) reacts with niacinamide-adenine dinucleotide [NA[D.sub.+]] to form pyruvic acid and reduced NAD (NADH + [H.sup.+]). The equilibrium of this reaction favors lactate and NA[D.sup.+]), but it can be driven by adding excess NA[D.sup.+]. It may be that supplementation with niacinamide helps to drive the reaction, thus reducing lactate concentrations.

Anecdotal reports suggest that niacinamide has anxiolytic effects comparable to the benzodiazepines, and it may be particularly effective for patients whose anxiety is secondary to reactive hypoglycemia. Typical dosages are between 500 mg twice daily and 1,000 mg 3 times daily. Hoffer believes that the optimal daily dosage is just below the amount that produces nausea.

Thiamine Deficiency

Elevated lactate may also be caused by inadequate pyruvate dehydrogenase activity resulting from a thiamine deficiency or dependency. In that case, the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA is inhibited, fostering its conversion to lactic acid. Symptoms of a prolonged moderate thiamine deficiency may include fearfulness progressing to agitation as well as emotional instability and psychosomatic complaints.

When more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline thiamine-deficient were currently feeling significantly more anxiety–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. There are no published studies on the repletion of a borderline thiamine deficiency to treat anxiety.

Vitamin B6 Deficiency

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter which is involved in the regulation of anxiety, requires vitamin B6 for its synthesis; thus a deficiency of this vitamin may theoretically result in heightened anxiety. Vitamin B6 is also required for the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin, a neurotransmitter suspected of being involved in anxiety.

When over 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those found to be chronically deficient in vitamin B6 had a significantly greater tendency to become anxious, although they were not significantly more anxious at the time of the study. Also, in an open trial, patients with hyperventilation syndrome who also had abnormal xanthurenic acid excretion (an indicator of vitamin B6 deficiency) improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan, suggesting that a marginal B6 deficiency, by causing serotonin depletion, may have produced the syndrome.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Anxiety may be part of the neuropsychiatric syndrome seen in advanced cases of pernicious anemia which is well-known to be caused by B12 deficiency. When cobalamin levels of more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline vitamin B12-deficient were significantly more anxious at the time of the study–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. Whether B12 supplementation reduces anxiety when the vitamin is borderline deficient remains to be investigated.

References

1. Abbey LC. Agoraphobia. J Orthomol Psychiatry 11:243-59, 1982

2. Benjamin J et al. Inositol treatment in psychiatry. Psychopharmacol Bull 31(1):167-75, 1995a

3. Levine J et al. Inositol treatment raises CSF inositol levels. Brain Res 627(1):168-70, 1993

4. Benjamin J et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of inositol treatment for panic disorder. Am J Psychiatry 15(7):1084-6, 1995b

So I’ve had a blood test for vitamin B12 and Thiamine and both were normal. Still waiting on the results from the vitamin B6 test. I’ve long discovered the Niacin deficiency with some great results but not for anxiety and Inositol I don’t know much about. I believe it’s included in B complex.

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for December 29, 2006

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I came across a web site yesterday that includes tools to track your health. So out of curiosity, I thought it was be interesting to track by blood pressure results taken around the time I was getting the acupuncture treatments. I entered in every reading starting March 8th to May 9th over my ten appointments. At the time, I knew it was slightly on the high side but I maybe didn’t pay close enough attention as I should have.

After entering the information, it produced a nice looking chart. My Systolic reading took an obvious downward trend after I started taking Niacin.

I’ve only taken one reading since I starting taking my daily routine of vitamins and it was at the suggestion of the chiropractor on June 10th, 2006. My reading was 122/87.

I never told the iridoligst about my high blood pressure readings and she was able to indentify that I had prevented a heart attack based on what she saw in my iris. She said there were healing lines around the area of the heart and that whatever I was doing was helping.

The interesting thing? By complete coinidence, I added five supplements that are well known to prevent heart attacks before I went to her. Niacin, Omega three, Vitamin E, B Complex and magnesium.

B Vitamins: Prevent Heart Attacks

A multivitamin each day can reduce your chance of a heart attack by 33 percent. Make sure that the multivitamin contains B6, B12 and Folic acid to decrease your homocysteine levels for a further risk decrease.

Eat a variety of fruit and vegetables to get all the nutrients required for good health. High fiber foods reduce your heart disease risk and hot tea’s flavonoids decrease heart attacks. Nuts contain monounsaturated fat, omega-3s, phytochemicals, magnesium and the antioxidant vitamin E, all of which decrease heart disease risk.

Vitamin E: Cuts the Risk of Heart Attack

By Steve Austin, ND

Healthnotes Newswire (October 12, 2000)—People taking vitamin E supplements have a dramatically reduced risk of suffering heart attacks, according to a report in the current issue of The Lancet.1

In this latest chapter in the on-again, off-again story of the effect of vitamin E on heart-disease prevention, Israeli researchers found that patients given vitamin E supplements suffered 70% fewer heart attacks than did those given placebo.

The researchers studied 196 patients with a history of heart disease and with kidney failure and dependency on kidney dialysis machines. Subjects were given either 800 IU (international units) of natural vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol) per day or placebo for an average of 519 days. Participants were chosen for the trial because the combination of kidney failure and a history of heart disease leads to an extraordinarily high risk of suffering a future heart attack. Also, such patients show evidence of unusually high oxidative damage—the very kind of damage vitamin E is likely to protect against.

Niacin: Treatment reduces risk of heart attack by 70 percent

Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer in most industrialized countries. A new study indicates that combining the use of a statin drug and niacin can reduce the risk of heart attack or hospitalization for chest pain by 70 percent among people likely to suffer heart attacks and/or death from coronary heart disease.

The treatment used in the study combined two well-known ways of improving cardiac health: the use of a statin drug called simvastatin to lower levels of the so-called “bad” cholesterol, LDL, and the use of niacin, also called vitamin B-3, to boost levels of the “good” cholesterol, HDL. Niacin is the best agent known to raise blood levels of HDL, which helps remove cholesterol deposits from the artery walls.

Magnesium: The Heart Connection

Did you know that without sufficient magnesium you would actually die? Your heart will stop beating and the doctors will then call it a “heart attack” (#1 cause of death in America). Never do they say, “He dies from a Magnesium Deficiency.” This is how critical it is to have proper magnesium levels in the body. The early signs of such terminal extinction are racing heart-beats, or any unsual change in heart beats, angina pains, collapsing from echaustion after heavy physical exercise or work such as running a race, playing football or basket ball. Due to lack of magnesium the heart muscle develops a spasm or cramp and stops beating. this is because there is insufficient magnesium to relax the heart ready for the next contraction. Irregular heartbeats are also caused by magnesium deficiency. This may be the answer why so many young athletes are having heart attack for no known reason.

And still to this day, I can feel a difference if I miss taking any of these four vitamins.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 28, 2006

The nutritionist from last week left me a follow up voice mail. She wanted to know if I had made a decision regarding the treatment and I’ve been thinking a lot about it lately. I think a nutritionist would be a really great thing for me but I would want a condition.

I’ll contact her on the weekend and tell her that I will start the treatment with the condition that I have the option to quit if I am not happy with the food testing analysis from the naturopath. I don’t want the same results as the last naturopath telling me that I didn’t have a magnesium deficiency from the hair analysis.

And this time I will mark the questionaires with stars to indicate the symptoms that are being hidden by my current intake of vitamins and minerals. I will also document my entire history before I meet with anyone to ensure that nothing gets missed, including my issues with the EMF exposure.

Those are my conditions.

I’ll also tell her that I am still waiting for my B6 test result from my own doctor and will persue the injection through him if I am able to.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 28, 2006

Recently a friend of mine was diagnosed with a kidney stone and immediately magnesium came to mind. I mentioned this to him and checked google when I got home.

KIDNEY STONES (Renal Calculi) AND THEIR RELATION TO DIET

There are five types of kidney stones:

1. Calcium phosphate stones are common and easily dissolve in urine acidified by Vitamin C.

2. Calcium oxalate stones are also common but they do not dissolve in acid urine.

3. Magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite stones) are much less common, often appearing after an infection. They dissolve in vitamin C acidified urine.

4. Uric acid stones result from a problem metabolizing purines (the chemical base of adenine, xanthine, theobromine [in chocolate] and uric acid). They may form in a condition such as gout.

5. Cystine stones result from a hereditary inability to reabsorb cystine. Most children’s stones are this type, and these are rare.

The Role of Vitamin C in Preventing and Dissolving Kidney Stones:

The very common calcium phosphate stone can only exist in a urinary tract that is not acidic. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C’s most common form) acidifies the urine, thereby dissolving phosphate stones and preventing their formation.

Acidic urine will also dissolve magnesium ammonium phosphate stones, which would otherwise require surgical removal. These are the same struvite stones associated with urinary tract infections. Both the infection and the stone are easily cured with vitamin C in large doses. BOTH are virtually 100% preventable with daily consumption of much-greater-than-RDA amounts of ascorbic acid. Think grams, not milligrams! A gorilla gets about 4,000 mg of vitamin C a day in its natural diet. The US RDA for humans is only 60 mg. Someone is wrong, and I don’t think it’s the gorillas.

The common calcium oxalate stone can form in an acidic urine whether one takes vitamin C or not. However, if a person gets adequate quantities of B-complex vitamins and magnesium, this type of stone does not form. Any common B-complex supplement twice daily, plus about 400 milligrams of magnesium, is usually adequate.

Ascorbate (the active ion in vitamin C) does increase the body’s production of oxalate. Yet, in practice, vitamin C does not increase oxalate stone formation. Drs. Emanuel Cheraskin, Marshall Ringsdorf, Jr. and Emily Sisley explain in The Vitamin C Connection (1983) that acidic urine or slightly acidic urine reduces the UNION of calcium and oxalate, reducing the possibility of stones. “Vitamin C in the urine tends to bind calcium and decrease its free form. This means less chance of calcium’s separating out as calcium oxalate (stones).” (page 213) Also, the diuretic effect of vitamin C reduces the static conditions necessary for stone formation in general. Fast moving rivers deposit little silt.

Furthermore, you can avoid excessive oxalates by not eating (much) rhubarb, spinach, or chocolate. If a doctor thinks that a person is especially prone to forming oxalate stones, that person should read the suggestions below before abandoning the benefits of vitamin C.

Ways for ANYONE to reduce the risk of kidney stones:

1. Maximize fluid intake. Especially drink fruit and vegetable juices. Orange, grape and carrot juices are high in citrates which inhibit both a build up of uric acid and also stop calcium salts from forming. (Carper, J. “Orange Juice May Prevent Kidney Stones,” Lancaster Intelligencer-Journal, Jan 5, 1994)

2. Control urine pH: acidic urine helps prevent urinary tract infections, dissolves both phosphate and struvite stones, and will not cause oxalate stones.

3. Eat your veggies: studies have shown that dietary oxalate is generally not a significant factor in stone formation. I would go easy on rhubarb and spinach, however.

4. Most kidney stones are compounds of calcium and most Americans are calcium deficient. Instead of lowering calcium intake, reduce excess dietary phosphorous by avoiding carbonated soft drinks, especially colas. Soft drinks contain excessive quantities of phosphorous as phosphoric acid. This is the same acid that has been used by dentists to etch tooth enamel before applying sealant.

Remember that Americans get only about 500 mg of dietary calcium daily, and the RDA is 800 to 1200 mg/day. Any nutritionist, doctor or text suggesting calcium reduction is in serious error.

5. Take a magnesium supplement of AT LEAST the US RDA of 300-350 mg/day (more may be desirable in order to maintain an ideal 1:2 balance of magnesium to calcium)

6. Be certain to take a good B-complex vitamin supplement daily, which contains pyridoxine (Vitamin B-6). B-6 deficiency produces kidney stones in experimental animals. Remember:

* B-6 deficiency is very common in humans

* B-1 (thiamine) deficiency also is associated with stones (Hagler and Herman, “Oxalate Metabolism, II” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 26:8, 882-889, August, 1973)

7. Additionally, low calcium may itself CAUSE calcium stones (L. H. Smith, et al, “Medical Evaluation of Urolithiasis” Urological Clinics of North America 1:2, 241-260, June 1974)

8. For uric acid/purine stones (gout), STOP EATING MEAT! Nutrition tables and textbooks indicate meats as the major dietary purine source. Naturopathic treatment adds juice fasts and eating sour cherries. Increased Vitamin C consumption helps by improving the urinary excretion of uric acid. (Cheraskin, et al, 1983). Use buffered ascorbate “C”.

9. Persons with cystine stones (only 1% of all kidney stones) should follow a low methionine diet and use buffered C.

10. Kidney stones are associated with high sugar intake, so eat less (or no) added sugar (J. A. Thom, et al “The Influence of Refined Carbohydrate on Urinary Calcium Excretion,” British Journal of Urology, 50:7, 459-464, December, 1978)

11. Infections can cause conditions that favor stone formation, such as overly concentrated urine (from fever sweating, vomiting or diarrhea). Practice good preventive health care, and it will pay you back with interest.

All very interesting research. A magnesium deficiency as well as a B6 deficiency can cause kidney stones. These are both deficiencies that I believe I have but I don’t have any kidney stones. The answer? Vitamin C.

I’m not exactly sure why but I’ve always taken a vitamin C supplement. I’ve known my wife for almost ten years and she said I’ve taken it for as long as she can remember.

And that got me thinking…if vitamin C has the effect of changing the urinary excretion of uric acid wouldn’t that effect a PH test? Like the one I did on May 2nd, 2006 and determined that I had acidic urine? I was taking around 1000-2500 mg a day during that time period.

December 28, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 27, 2006

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Thought it might be time to document my daily intake of vitamins, minerals and herbs for the record. I’ve been taking the core vitamin and minerals for a while now and the herbal remedies where only recently added to fight candida. The magnesium, niacin and the multivitamin are the only ones that I know if I’ve missed taking it. The multivitamin has the active form of B6 and sometimes I take it earlier in the day because I have that “weird” feeling in my head. It goes away everytime I take any form of B6.

———————————————————–

I start every morning with the candida trauma kit:

Pysillium Fibre/Caprilic Oil/Bennonite mix

Nu Life: Magnesium: 500 mg three times a day
Vitamin C: 500 mg three times a day
Niacin: 50-100 mg three times a day
Enzymes: 1 capsule three times a day

Nu Life Multivitamin: Twice a day
Olive Leaf & Black Walnut: Twice a day

Nu Life: Omega Three: Once a day (380 DHA content)
Co-enzyme Q10: Once a day
Garlic 1000 mg Once a day

Acidophilus just before bed.

I also take the Magnesia Phosphorica in between doses of magnesium if I need to. I usually get a very mild pain in my chest and it goes away the instant I take it.

For the past few months I’ve also taken a more serious approach to eating more fruits and vegetables and healthy eating. I try to eat 1-2 Fuji apples and 1-3 bananas a day. I’ll have oatmeal with flax seeds for breakfast and sometimes I’ll eat cucumbers and tomatoes as snack foods.

December 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 26, 2006

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Went shopping to check out the Boxing Day sales. After a couple hours not finding of anything of interest, I head to the only store that wasn’t busy. The health food store! I picked up an extra strength Kyolic garlic supplement at 1000 mg, once per day. Got home and did some more googling about the effects of garlic:

Fungal Infections

Garlic in certain forms is considered a potent antibiotic and can be particularly effective against certain fungal infections. Like viruses, fungal infections are particularly difficult to treat. Traditional medical treatments for fungal infections are usually toxic and can be ineffectual over the long term. To the contrary, garlic has proven itself as an effective anti-fungal agent against candida, aspergillus and cryptococci.

A report from a Chinese medical journal delineates the use of intravenous garlic to treat a potentially fatal and rare fungal infection of the brain called cryptococcal meningitis. In the report, the Chinese compared the effectiveness of the garlic with standard medical treatment which involved a very toxic antibiotic called Amphotericin-B. The study revealed that intravenous garlic was more effective than the drug and was not toxic regardless of its dosage.

One study using liquid garlic extract found that candida colonies were substantially reduced in mice that had been treated with the garlic. This same study also revealed that garlic stimulated phagocytic activity. This implies that infections such as candida may be controlled because garlic stimulates the body’s own defenses. Applied externally, garlic oil can be used to treat ringworm, skin parasites and warts. Lesions that were caused by skin fungi in rabbits and guinea pigs were treated with external applications of garlic extract and began to heal after seven days.

Allicin is primarily a fungistatic substance which can slow or completely stop the proliferation of the microorganisms. As an external treatment, garlic has also been found to effectively treat acne and thrush.

YEAST INFECTIONS AND GARLIC

Garlic has proven over and over that it is an effective antifungal agent. For anyone suffering from recurring yeast infections, garlic should be added to the diet. Its compounds are very active against candida albicans which causes yeast infections. Some studies have shown that garlic is more potent in treating yeast infections than nystatin, gentian violet and six other reputable antifungal agents.

Yeast infections plague millions of Americans and can cause conditions such as thrush, vaginal yeast infections and intestinal yeast disorders. Candida albicans has been linked to a wide variety of symptoms including chronic fatigue, depression, infertility and allergies. Much of the scientific research done on garlic has centered around its antimicrobial activity, especially against infectious fungi like C. albicans which causes yeast infections. Chicks that were inoculated with the C. albicans organism were cured after ten days of ingesting garlic.

A study reported in Mycologia in 1977 concluded that garlic significantly inhibited all isolates of yeast-like fungi that were tested. Once again, it is important that the allicin component of garlic is present in order to receive the antifungal effect.

Some research has suggested that raw garlic was not effective against yeast infections, while aged extracts were very good. An added bonus of using garlic to treat yeast infections is that no clinical stains of C. albicans have been known to become resistant to garlic therapy.

Because high blood sugar is also related to a higher risk of yeast infections, garlic therapy has an additional advantage. Garlic compounds have demonstrated their ability to lower blood glucose levels which would help to decrease one’s risk of developing a yeast infection.

And with such strong evidence against candida, how many people have mentioned this? NONE. Not one person mentioned taking simple garlic for candida although the naturopath and the iridologist suggested a candida infection. It was never mentioned.

So I’ll try it and see what happens…

This Saturday will be nine weeks since the simple B6 vitamin blood test and not a word on the results. This is outrageous. “Our stated turnaround time is 15 days” seemed a little dated now. It has been exactly 60 days today since the blood test was taken.

60 days for a standard vitamin blood test. What a joke. It’s no wonder my doctor wants me on antidepressants…

December 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for December 25, 2006

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The perfect Christmas present.

December 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 22, 2006

Study shows higher levels of potentially toxic chemical in some bottled water

OTTAWA (CP) – A new study into bottled water has found that concentrations of a potentially harmful chemicals increase the longer water is stored in plastic containers.

The research, by a Canadian scientist now working in Germany, involved 132 brands of bottled water from 28 countries produced in containers made from polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. About 20 brands came from Canada.

In a paper to be published early next year, William Shotyk of the University of Heidelberg found that the concentration of certain chemicals, such as antimony, increases the longer the water sits in the plastic bottle. Shotyk’s study measured concentrations for a period of up to six months.

“It’s increasing over time because (the plastic) is leaching chemicals,” said Shotyk in an interview during a recent visit to Ottawa, where he lectured on his findings.

Shotyk was cautious about the implications for human health, saying more research is needed.

Antimony is a white metallic element that in small doses can cause nausea, dizziness and depression. In large doses, it can be fatal.

“Antimony is similar chemically to lead. It is also a potentially toxic trace element,” said Shotyk.

Most of the Canadian bottle samples had initial antimony levels of about 160 parts per trillion, but six months after sitting in plastic the level had doubled.

However, the levels are still well below the drinking-water standard set by Health Canada at 6,000 parts per trillion. The World Health Organization recommends a standard of 20,000 parts per trillion.

Samples from other countries were found to have antimony levels as high as 2,000 parts per trillion or more.

Elizabeth Griswold, executive director of the Canadian Bottled Water Association, said the study should not raise concerns among consumers about harmful chemicals in bottled water.

“The bottled water in Canada is perfectly safe for human consumption and there is no threat to health in regard to antimony,” Griswold said.

Shotyk said more research is needed about how high the level of antimony can go as water is stored even longer than six months.

“If you bottle water in Europe and ship it to Asia, what is the antimony concentration in that water by the time somebody buys that water and drinks it?” he said.

Shotyk said he plans to test the samples again in a year.

The Polaris Institute, an advocacy group that launched a bottled-water awareness campaign last year, says about 20 per cent of Canadians drink bottled water. The Canadian Bottled Water Association says the bottled water industry’s revenue was $652 million in 2005.

December 22, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 20, 2006

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I did some reasearch and found a web site that explained that you should take multiple yeast killers, and alternate combinations every two weeks. They suggest taking at least two fungicides at a time, and alternate with another set of two at least every two weeks. They grouped the fungicides in pairs (Group A, B, C, and D)

GROUP A: Black Walnut and Olive Leaf.

GROUP B: Caprylic Acid and Berberine.

GROUP C: Cat’s Claw and Garlic.

GROUP D: Oil of Oregano and Pau D’Arco.

One of the other suppliments they recommend is garlic. The combination of Garlic, Olive Leaf Extract, and Pau D\’Arco are widely used to treat Candidiasis.

Doctor Google?

Garlic has demonstrated significant antifungal activity against C. albicans in both animal and test tube studies. Greater anti-Candida activity has resulted from exposing Candida to garlic, than to nystatin—the most common prescription drug used to fight Candida. No clinical studies of garlic in the treatment of candidiasis have yet been conducted. However, some doctors suggest an intake equal to approximately one clove (4 grams) of fresh garlic per day; this would equal consumption of a garlic tablet that provides a total allicin potential of 4,000 to 5,000 mcg.

Looks like I’ll be adding Garlic to my every growing list of suppliments!

December 20, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 19, 2006

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I met with the nutritionist tonight and her official title is “Registered Nutritional Consultant Certified Wellness and Lifestyle Coach”. Maybe this will be someone who understands my problem.

She introduced herself and showed me a pile of papers on the desk and explained each one. She wants me to complete a lifestyle assessment form, a questionaire on the different systems of the body and something she called a Nutritional Symptomology Profile where I entered a number value based on the symptom or activity. We didn’t really talk about my symptoms and that was a good thing. We would’ve been there a long time…

She recommended that I see a naturopath in Thornhill who would do a food sensitvity test and the results would be forwarded to her and along with the questionaires, she would put together an action plan over three two hour sessions for $225.00.

She said I can read everything over and take the holidays to decide if I wanted to pursue it.

December 20, 2006 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for December 18, 2006

I have a message on the answering machine and it’s the nutritionist. I return her call and I ask her about the vitamin B injections. She asks about my history and quickly she points out that I have a number of issues that need to be addressed and that a B injection would be a quick fix solution without getting to the root cause.

We talk briefly about candida and asks me if I’ve ever tried Olive Leaf. Nope, never heard of it. She also mentioned a vitamin company called Genestra. They make a supplement called “HMF Replete” that she highly recommened for candida.

She suggests that I visit a naturopath for a food sensitivity test and the results will be provided to her for analysis and she will do three follow up sessions. She agrees to meet with me tomorrow night after work so we’ll see what she has to say.

December 19, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 18, 2006

I’m always looking for ways to eat more fruit and vegetables and I pick up a fruit cup with my lunch. I finish my lunch and in the early afternoon my tongue is feeling itchy. I go into the bathroom to check and it’s candida.

It’s been a week and a half since I started the candida trauma kit and one fruit cup and it’s back so easily. Diet is a big part of candida and with all of the christmas treats being handed out at work it’s next to impossible to avoid any sugar.

I guess I’ve really got to pay attention to the diet.

December 19, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 16, 2006

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Today I saw the sign that I’ve been waiting for. I couldn’t believe my eyes. I had to turn the car around and take a picture to make sure it was real…

I’ve been fighting with the doctors for so long to get a simple vitamin B injection and here it is advertised on a portable street sign! I still can’t believe it. I called the number when I got home and left a message.

December 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 08, 2006

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My follow up with the Doctor. I get weighed on the scale and my weight is 183 lbs. It’s getting better but my ideal weight should be around 170 lbs.

So the B6 test results…nowhere to be found??! He checked over his notes and he doesn’t have everything back yet.

Six weeks and no test results for a vitamin deficiency. This should really be no surprise because of my experience with the Thiamine test. The doctor said that they will follow up with the lab to find out what happened. (Why don’t they do this BEFORE the patient takes a day off work??) He mentions that there are seven other doctors with the same last name as him so usually when ever there is a delay, it’s sent to another doctor.

How reassuring…

He asks me about paxil. I told him that I had started taking it and it had no effect on the vibration. So what does he do? (I’m half expecting him to say let’s wait for the B6 test results.) Nope… instead it my worst fear. He has decided to increase the dosage and write the prescription.

He can write the prescription but this time I’m not going through with it. I’m not doing anything else until I get my B6 test results in my hand.

December 8, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 07, 2006

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Today I decided to tackle this candida on my own terms. So I started the Yeast Buster Kit from the local health food store.

I have a follow up with my doctor tomorrow and I’m really hoping he has my B6 test results. I’ve been taking paxil now for two weeks and guess what? No effect on my vibration whatsoever. I wish to god he’d deal with the root cause. I think deep down he’s pissed because I could be right.

December 8, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 02, 2006

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We’re settling nicely into our new neighborhood and we go to the nearest Home Depot for some supplies. It’s very close to the hydro transmission towers but I decide to go in anyway.

After being inside the store for about 10-15 minutes, I noticed I was feeling a very slight but very heavy pulsing sensation and it wasn’t one of my symptoms. I mention this to my wife and I’m a little freaked out so we leave the store.

The feeling stopped as we left the parking lot and I didn’t feel it again.

December 8, 2006 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

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