Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 19, 2008

Back in February I ordered a bunch of amino acids from a health food company in the states because I wasn’t able to find them anywhere here in Canada. I tried them here and there in different doses without the any real results. I thought there would be a noticable difference because I had followed the results of the amino acid test. When I didn’t get the results I was looking for, it was off in another direction and I tried something else.

Today I decided to try them again. There are a number of other amino acids that depend on aspartic acid so it seemed like a logical place to start and interestingly, the amino acid test indicated that I had low levels of five of the six. I always feel like a detective when I find stuff like this. Find the needle in a hay stack that leads to the breakthough…I can only hope!

Aspartic Acid

Aspartic acid plays an important role in the citric acid cycle, or Krebs cycle, during which other amino acids and biochemicals, such as asparagine, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, isoleucine, and several nucleotides are synthesized.

Low aspartic acid can also be associated with low calcium and magnesium levels.

December 3, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for April 22, 2008

For the past couple of weeks I’ve been busy at work and busy at home so I’ve just been taking calcium/magnesium everyday and hoping for the best. I’ve felt really good of late with none of the weird symptoms.

Every once and a while I’ll do a bit of research and get something in my head that sounds like a good idea. Today I found an article that talked about taking sulfur (MSM) for allergies.

SULFUR AND ALLERGIES

Over 40 million people are affected by allergies with reactions ranging from somewhat bothersome to potentially fatal. An allergic response occurs when the body’s immune system reacts to otherwise harmless substances we call allergens. Your body produces antibodies to fight the allergens. Once our immune system decides that a particular type of pollen, for example, is a hostile invader, it becomes “sensitized” to it, and reacts by producing antibodies that give us allergy symptoms. This can last for years, and perhaps a lifetime.

Dr. Earl L. Mindell, R.Ph., Ph.D., recommends allergy sufferers begin taking at least 6,000mg of MSM per day for three weeks and reduce to 3,000mg per day thereafter. Additionally, he recommends people drink more water and increase their intake of Vitamin C to lower histamine levels. Allergy sufferers who use MSM swear by it.

6,000mg of MSM per day for three weeks?? Wow that sounds like a lot. Here’s an article that suggests a relationship with amino acids.

Sulfur – The Protein Building Block

Sulfur has a vital relationship with protein, since sulfur is found in the amino acids methionine, cystine, and cysteine. Thus, these amino acids are known as the sulfur bearing amino acids which are considered the building blocks of protein.

The sulfur-bearing amino acid methionine is absolutely essential to health! This means it must be supplied by live food, or the food supplement MSM. My oral chelation formula, of course, contains both cysteine and methionine. When you are deficient in these amino acids, your muscles and body will weaken. If you take “enough” you get a strong body. If you take “too much,” the extra cysteine, for instance, will be used to get rid of toxic metals in the body. So, it’s rather hard to take “too much” of these sulfur amino acids.

The MSM won’t do the same thing as cysteine, but your body can manufacture cysteine for cell building out of the MSM that you give it. So, MSM is a vital nutrient that you should have in your daily dietary intake.

A lack of proper protein in our diet, therefore means a lack of the vital organic sulfur necessary for good health. Proteins contain sulfur, while carbohydrates and fats do not.

Sulfur is necessary for collagen synthesis. Collagen is an insoluble fibrous protein found in vertebrates. It is the dominant component of connective tissue and bones. Sulfur operates as a synthesizer and activator with the B vitamins, thiamin, vitamin C, biotin, and pantothenic acid, all of which are needed for metabolism and healthy nerves.

Sulfur plays an important part in tissue breathing, the process whereby oxygen and other substances are used to build cells and release energy.

August 28, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 19, 2008

After doing a bit of research on the three new amino acids, I decide to start with threonine.

Threonine: Required for formation of collagen. Needed by the gastrointestinal tract for normal functioning. Threonine is an important component in the formation of protein, collagen, elastin and tooth enamel. It is also important for production of neurotransmitters and health of the nervous system. Threonine is one of the immune-stimulating nutrients (cysteine, lysine, alanine, and aspartic acid are others), Threonine is found in most meats and fish, dairy foods, eggs, wheatgerm, bananas, carrots, nuts, beans and seeds. Rich sources of threonine include meats, dairy foods and eggs. Wheat germ, many nuts, beans, and seeds, and vegetables contains some small level of threonine.

One two gram scoop in the morning and by the end of the day I didn’t notice any subtle changes so I added another two gram scoop in the evening. I also throught I would add asparagine as well.

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 18, 2008

I received my package from UPS today. The amino acids made it across the border okay!! Each one is in a small glass jar and I can’t say I’ve seen anything like this before. I’m just glad I have them. Now let’s see if they have an effect.

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 06, 2008

I’ve looked EVERYWHERE for those amino acids threonine, aspartic acid (aspartate) and asparagine. Nobody seems to have them but I’m not sure why? They are part of the standard amino acids!

After a bit of googling tonight, I have found them. A company in the US sells each amino acid individually and will ship to Canada. I select the three that I am looking for and place the order. A couple of clicks and they are on the way.

I don’t understand why health foods stores in Canada don’t carry them? I just hope they won’t be a problem at the border!

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 24, 2008

Today I thought I’d make a short list of the amino acids that had very low levels in the test so I can focus on these one at a time:

1-Threonine
2-Aspartic acid (Aspartate)
3-Methionine
4-Glycine
5-Asparagine (Made from 2-Aspartic acid)
6-Isoleucine

Below is a quick overview of each amino acid and the best source of food to eat.

Asparagine: Asparagine is needed to maintain a balance, preventing over nervousness. Aspartic Acid and Asparagine have high concentrations in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. The hippocampus is a part of the brain that plays the main role in short-term memory, while the hypothalamus is involved in the biology of emotion, and serves as a neurological gate between the brain and the rest of the nervous system. Asparagine deficiency could be a contributing cause of fatigue and immune system stress including autoimmune disorders, infections and severe allergies. Asparagine is most commonly found in poultry, dairy, eggs, fish, lactalbumin, legumes, meat, nuts, seafood, seeds, soy, whey, whole grains, and beef.

Aspartic Acid: Aspartic Acid is a non-essential amino acid, existing mainly in the form of its amide, asparagine. It also performs an important role in the urea cycle and helping to transport minerals. Aspartic acid is a nonessential amino acid which is made from glutamic acid by enzymes using vitamin B6. The amino acid has important roles in the urea cycle and DNA metabolism.

Aspartic acid may also be a significant immunostimulant of the thymus and can protect against some of the damaging effects of radiation. Involved in immune system function by enhancing immunoglobulin production and anti- body formation. Calcium and magnesium deficiencies. Because of this association, low aspartic acid levels should lead the clinician to test for calcium and/or magnesium deficiencies. Aspartic Acid can be easily converted to glucose when demand for glucose exceeds supply. Aspartic acid plays an important role in the citric acid cycle, or Krebs cycle, during which other amino acids and biochemicals, such as asparagine, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, and isoleucine, are synthesized. Aspartic acid is found in high levels throughout the human body, especially in the brain, sprouting seeds, oat flakes, luncheon meats, sausage meat, wild game, avocado, asparagus.

Glycine: Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, especially in the spinal cord. High concentrations of glycine are found not only in the muscles, but in the skin and other connective tissues as well. Almost 1/3 of collagen, which keeps the skin and connective tissue firm and flexible, is composed of glycine. (High amounts of Glycine are also found in gelatin, which is a form of denatured collagen). Without glycine the body would not be able to repair damaged tissues; the skin would become slack as it succumbed to UV rays, oxidation, and free radical damage, and wounds would never heal. Sources of glycine: High protein food contains good amounts of glycine and is present in fish, meat, beans, and dairy products.

Isoleucine: Nitrogen balance in adults. L-Isoleucine is a branched chain amino acid found in high concentrations in muscle tissues. Food sources include almonds, cashews, chicken, chickpeas, eggs, fish, lentils, liver, meat, rye, seeds, and soy protein.

Methionine: Methionine is a precursor for the other sulfur amino acids, cystine, taurine, and glutathione. Methionine plays a role in cysteine, carnitine and taurine synthesis by the transsulfuration pathway, lecithin production, the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and other phospholipids. Methionine helps reduce histamine levels, which are amino acids that control dilation of blood vessels and influence brain function. Methionine is essential for the formation of healthy collagen used to form skin, nails, and connective tissue, and helps reduce the level of inflammatory histamines in the body. People with conditions linked to excessive histamine production, such as arthritis and chronic allergies, may benefit from methionine supplementation. Food sources include beans, eggs, fish, garlic, lentils, meat, onions, soybeans, seeds, yogurt.

Threonine: Required for formation of collagen. Needed by the gastrointestinal tract for normal functioning. Threonine is an important component in the formation of protein, collagen, elastin and tooth enamel. It is also important for production of neurotransmitters and health of the nervous system. Threonine is one of the immune-stimulating nutrients (cysteine, lysine, alanine, and aspartic acid are others), Threonine is found in most meats and fish, dairy foods, eggs, wheatgerm, bananas, carrots, nuts, beans and seeds. Rich sources of threonine include meats, dairy foods and eggs. Wheat germ, many nuts, beans, and seeds, and vegetables contains some small level of threonine.

June 14, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 23, 2008

And here’s someone who has suggested a revision to the Budwig Diet. Fascinating reading…

The Budwig Diet Revision

Germany’s Dr. Joanna Budwig is widely credited for discovering that 2 simple food items, cold-pressed flax seed oil and low-fat cottage cheese, will cure or prevent many forms of cancer and a long list of other degenerative diseases including cardiovascular diseases and skin diseases. But the 50-year old “Budwig Diet” is long in the tooth and newer data has emerged that shows where we can improve on it.

Sulfur-rich protein and calcium in the “Budwig protocol” is provided by cottage cheese. Because many people can not take “dairy”, lets look more closely at the cottage cheese. Human milk is higher in whey and much lower in casein than cow milk or goat milk; casein is the main protein in cheese and cottage cheese. Caseins differ somewhat; cow milk contains a lot of alpha-casein, which because of its different properties is the main cause of milk and “dairy” indigestion in humans. Beta lactoglobulins in cow milk can also be problematic as allergens, and cow milk also contains more alpha s1-casein than goat milk. All of this explains why many people find goat milk less problematic than cow milk.

Cottage Cheese vs Whey Protein

The Budwig Diet revision uses undenatured whey instead of cottage cheese. Undenatured whey contains the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cysteine compounds including cystine. Methionine is transformed into cysteine by the liver. Cellular cysteine is the rate-limiting factor in production of glutathione, the body’s master antioxidant and detoxifier. Glutathione is crucial to life; it’s involved in ATP energy generation, immune system support, liver and other organ support, reducing toxin load and oxidative stress, and importantly, it shrinks tumors when levels are maintained. Cottage cheese doesn’t boast those benefits; in fact it’s only a sulfur amino acid source.

June 8, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 11, 2008

I’m going through the results one amino acid at a time. I start with methionine and here’s a perfect reason why I love using Dr. Google for research.

Lipoic Acid

Features & Benefits

  • Water and lipid-soluble antioxidant
  • Promotes normal nerve function
  • Promotes healthy pancreatic function
  • Helps maintain healthy eyes

Gets its two sulfur atoms primarily from the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine. For this reason, a methionine deficiency can reduce the body’s ability to make lipoic acid.

Nerves: Protection of neurons (nerve cells) appears to be a major role of lipoic acid. In humans, amounts of 400-800 mg of ALA daily have been shown to promote healthy nerve function. The first study (known by its German initials DEKAN) involved 39 people given 800 mg lipoic acid orally and 34 people given placebo for four months. The people taking lipoic acid showed a significant improvement in heart rate variability, an objective measure of the autonomic nerves serving the heart. This improvement was significant compared to the control group. There were no notable changes in adverse symptoms between the two groups. Oral doses under 600 mg daily have not been effective for nerve health in several studies.

Eyes: Lipoic acid may also help maintain normal pressure of the fluid in the eye, according to one human study. A group of 19 people given 150 mg of lipoic acid orally for one month were shown to have a significant improvement in visual function compared to a control group treated with placebo. A dose of 75 mg daily was not effective in this study. Oxidation within the lens of the eye may contribute to declining clarity of vision with age. Lipoic acid has been shown to protect animal lenses from such damage. Human studies have not yet been performed confirming this benefit.

Nowhere in the eight page report is there any mention of something called Lipoic acid and the Naturopathic didn’t mention it either. If it helps with healthy nerve function and healthy eyes then this is something I have needed for a very long time. More research needed…

June 3, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 10, 2008

 

I raced home from work today to get to the Naturopath on time. I’ve been wondering about these results for weeks now. I have my own theories on what my deficiencies are but I’ve wasted enough time and money guessing. I’m really hoping that I can sit down, read this report and get on with it.

She hands me the report and she reviews it page by page. The first page has the essential and non-essential amino acids and my level of each one. I have five amino acids on the low end of the scale: Methionine, Threonine, Aspartate, Asparagine and Glycine.

After the first page of amino acids, it groups them together to create different markers based on their role in the body.

Gastrointestinal Markers, Magnesium Dependant Markers, B6, B12 and Folate Dependant Markers, Detoxification Markers, Neurological Markers and Urea Cycle Metabolites.

After that, it has a page that provides a supplimentation schedule and another section called presumptive needs / implied conditions. The last three pages go into detail for each identified deficiency and explains the possible causes.

Very details and a little overwhelming. I’m a little disappointed that the Naturopath doesn’t offer anything more than just reading the report. I suppose it’s a no brainer to start supplementing the ones that I am low in but she doesn’t mention it. In a way I’m glad because I’d like to do some research on what all this means and review what I’ve already tried and come to my own conclusions. How do I know it’s accurate? I looks just like the hair analysis and that was a complete waste of time.

As we finish up the report, she mentions that my level of Phosphoethanolamine is lower than normal and suggests trying Lecithin. I’ve never come across it in my research although they consider it to be a nonessential amino acid. Here’s the summary from the report and I’m beginning to think this test is very accurate:

Phophoethanolamine, a nonessential phosphorous bearing amino acid, is low in this urine specimen. Phosphoethanolamine is derived from dietary sources and is also formed endogenously from serine via phosphorylation of ethanolamine. When ethanolamine is high or normal and phosphoethanolamine is low there is a presumptive need for magnesium (magnesium dependent kinase). Phosphoethanolamine is a precursor of phosphotidyl choline, choline and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. If low phosphoethanolamine results in low acetylcholine, and there is insufficient choline from dietary lecithin, there may be depressed activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (eg. decreased peristalsis, ability to sweat), and poor memory and cognitive function. Low phosphoethanolamine is usually the result of magnesium deficiency or protein malnutrition.

Wow! That last line really hit a home run with me. I need to take all this information back to Dr. Google to see what I can find.

June 2, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2008

Received an email from my Naturopath tonight and the results from the amino acid test are in!! I arrange for an appointment on Thursday evening.

CAN”T WAIT!

May 31, 2009 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for December 15, 2007

Follow up appointment with the Naturopath and she hands me the amino acid kit and explains the process. I’ve been playing around with these amino acids for a while now and it will be fantastic if I can get a simple report with the current levels within the body.

She does another physical examination and this time she says she is unable to hear the mitral valve prolapse. WHAT? Something I’ve had for almost twenty years, something every doctor mentions is now gone? Something a cardiologist said was a normal variation and that a lot of people have it…is gone.

I know why it is gone. Because it’s an indication of a low level of magnesium. Did taking magnesium help? Of course but it didn’t fix the problem. You need to look for the root cause because there are a number of different things that can cause magnesium loss. In my case, it was a low level of zinc. Once I made that discovery and fixed the zinc deficiency to bring the minerals back into balance, I was able to stop the magnesium loss.

Tomorrow I’ll get started with the amino acid test.

May 31, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 05, 2007

Found this interesting article about mosquitoes and amino acids.

“Why Do Mosquitoes Bite People?

Actually, only the female mosquitoes bite people. They are searching for isoleucine. Isoleucine is one of the basic building blocks of life called an amino acid. Amino acids are what make up proteins, and female mosquitoes need these proteins to make eggs. If they find isoleucine then they may lay as many as 100 eggs. But if they do not find isoleucine then they may only lay at most ten eggs.

So how do the mosquitoes find isoleucine? Isoleucine is part of our blood. The female mosquito punctures our skin with a part of her mouth known as her feeding stylets. Then she searches for blood vessels within our skin. A female mosquito usually finds a blood vessel in less than a minute. Next she sucks our blood through one mouthpiece. She can swallow up to four times her weight in blood, and when she is full she looks like a tiny red light bulb. She can do this because while she is sucking our blood, she is also injecting us with her saliva. There are special chemicals in her saliva which keep our blood from clotting.

Actually, human blood is not the best source for isoleucine. Blood from buffaloes and rats contains more isoleucine, but since people outnumber rats and buffaloes in many places the mosquitoes bite us instead.”

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 01, 2007

The Naturopath returns my email:
Sorry for the delayed response. We can go ahead and do the amino acid test. I have the kits at the clinic, so during your next visit, we can go through it and you can start it right after the visit. You should stop all supplements 48 hours prior to starting the test and eat what you normally eat (ie protein, etc).
 
There is just one concern – we have to freeze the sample for a minimum of 6 hours after collecting the urine for 24 hours before they come to pick it up. Could you put it in your freezer afterwards, and then I can arrange it to be picked up from the clinic.
Perfect! I’ll pick up the testing kit on my next appointment and get started! I book the next appointment for December 15th.

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for November 27, 2007

The Naturopath got back to me today:

I have attached 3 files for you to review about the amino acid testing. The 24-hour urine amino acid collection is more accurate and detects an earlier change than the plasma amino acid test.

Attached is:
1. Description of the test
2. Collection instructions
3. Sample report/results so you can get an idea of what they test for.

The cost is approximately $230 + tax. Let me know if you are interested.

The first attachment:

Which type of analysis: urine or plasma?

The 24-hour urine amino acid analysis has the highest probability of detecting abnormalities if renal function is normal. The 24-hour test indicates what is high and low over the course of a day, reflects blood and tissue amino acid pools, and is not affected by circadian rhythm. Healthy kidneys efficiently conserve essential amino acids. Therefore, urine levels of amino acids decrease first and tend to give an earlier indication of inadequacy than do plasma levels.

A first morning void urine amino acid analysis, with results normalized per gram creatinine, provides an alternative when a complete 24-hour collection is not a viable option. The first morning void analysis is excellent for identification of marked abnormalities, particularly with respect to gastrointestinal health, inherited disorders in amino acid metabolism, and renal function, and can be used for protein challenge testing.

Plasma amino acid analysis measures what is being transported at the time of sampling. Abnormalities are deduced by comparison of measured levels with an established reference range. (The specimen should be collected after an overnight fast to reduce the influence of dietary protein). Plasma analysis is an excellent compromise if urine collection is difficult.

Looks like I’ll do the 24-hour urine test for the best results. If I am paying that much money, I want it to be as accurate as possible! The sample report looks interesting and contains NINE PAGES!!!

When do I start?!!! I’ve got to say it’s so much easier having a doctor I can have email correspondence with. I’ll send her an email to get the process started.

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for November 24, 2007

Off to the Naturopath with my notes in hand. I’m expecting a lot and hoping for a miracle but I’m doubtful at the same time. I just want to put an end to this once and for all.

I explained my main reason for the appointment and that my hunch is that my potassium has gone too high because of multiple doses of arginine. Then, we spend a long time reviewing the notes on an item by item basis. I give her a date and a comment description and she’ll ask the occasional question and take her own notes. Understandably, this took a bit of time and we went through everything. I ended the summary by indicating my interest in amino acids and the possibility of a deficiency test. I also told her about a book I was reading called “The Edge Effect” by Dr.  Eric Braverman. Such a brilliant book but sadly, she had never heard of it.

The second part of the appointment was a medical exam. She had me sit down on the examination chair and she did a number of standard things and was very, very professional and even did the Chinese pulse diagnosis! She was very thorough when listening to my heart. I was very interested to know if she could hear the mitral valve prolapse (Also called Right Branch Bundle Block.) She said she could hear it but it was very faint.

She would do some research regarding the treatment of high potassium levels and get me with a price for the amino acid test. I like her. She seems to listen and is okay following my direction. I’m very interested in the amino acid test, if it’s accurate.

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 29, 2007

Yesterday I reduced my potassium to half a capsule (49.5 mg) and I’ll so the same thing today.

On my way into work I was sitting on the train and I had the chest pain again so I took the homeopathic magnesium and it had no effect. Luckily in my little vitamin pack I carry around I have my other magnesium (250 mg) and again it had no effect. Now I’m starting to get a little worried, if magnesium doesn’t help what will?

I looked through my vitamin pack again and I have a Calcium/Magnesium with me and I’m not really comfortable that the problem is over so I take one of those too. I managed to make it to work without any more problem so why did the calcium have an effect when the magnesium did not? It doesn’t make any sense. I unlock my computer and start quickly googling away…

Within minutes I find exactly what I am looking for. Hyperkalemia….and one of the listed causes is high dosages of Arginine and one of the listed treatments? Calcium.

Calcium

Calcium is one of the first treatment options for a high potassium level. If you are suffering from irregular heart beats, the doctor will give you intravenous calcium to help protect your heart and muscles. Calcium will only be effective for an hour, so other treatments will begin immediately.

And something else I found:

Arginine and lysine amino acids enter the muscle cell in exchange for potassium, thereby leading to an increase in extracellular potassium.

Potassium & Arginine side effects and warnings

Arginine has been well tolerated by most people in studies lasting for up to six months, although there is a possibility of serious side effects in some people. Stomach discomfort, including nausea, stomach cramps, or an increased number of stools, may occur. People with asthma may experience a worsening of symptoms, which may be related to allergy, if arginine is inhaled.

Other potential side effects include low blood pressure and changes in numerous chemicals and electrolytes in the blood.

Examples include high potassium, high chloride, low sodium, low phosphate, high blood urea nitrogen, and high creatinine levels.

People with liver or kidney diseases may be especially sensitive to these complications and should avoid using arginine except under medical supervision. After injections of arginine, low back pain, flushing, headache, numbness, restless legs, venous irritation, and death of surrounding tissues have been reported.

And other thing that is starting to make sense… A while ago I was researching the cracks on my tongue and it was either the spleen or the stomach as they are both in the same area. (Entry for September 18, 2007) I figured it to be the spleen because the mineral required by that organ is copper.

However, on the other hand, the mineral that effects the stomach is sodium which would indicate high potassium would it not? WOW! So now I’ve got to switch gears here for a while and stop taking these Amino Acids, stop taking the potassium and load up on Calcium until I can get this right. Here’s another reason why my potassium could’ve been higher than I thought: Stressed adrenals.

Adrenals and High Potassium

When the adrenals become fatigued and unable to release adequate amounts of aldosterone or cortisol, potassium levels rise, sodium and blood sugar levels fall, body fluid volume decreases and hypotension and dehydration can result.

This is very serious stuff. So maybe my potassium level wasn’t low afterall…

May 22, 2008 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 25, 2007

For a couple of weeks now I’ve been reading Braverman’s book “The Edge Effect”. I think it’s brilliant and it makes a lot of sense but I’m still trying to really understand it. From his self test, I appear to be low in Dopamine. One of the things I came across lately was the factors that can cause a Dopamine deficiency. Okay, now we are getting somewhere…

There are a lot of different things that can have an effect and I know for absolute certain that I had problems with seven of them. Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Niacin, Vitamin D, excess Copper and adrenal insufficiency.

Dopamine deficiency

Dopamine levels may be low due to a combination of genetic and acquired reasons. Dopamine can be raised effectively using either nutrient based therapies or medications. Dopamine is synthesized form the amino acid tyrosine.

Factors which reduce dopamine levels:

  • Magnesium deficiency
  • Iron deficiency
  • Zinc deficiency
  • Vitamin B3 deficiency
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Excess copper levels
  • Adrenal insufficiency
  • Vitamin B6 deficiency
  • Vitamin C deficiency
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Glutathione deficiency
  • Chronic stress
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Lead, arsenic and cadmium exposure
  • Tyrosine (precursor) deficiency
  • Genetic dopamine receptor abnormalities
  • Chronic opioid, alcohol & marijuana use
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Influenza
  • Estrogen deficiency
  • Human growth hormone deficiency
  • Under-methylation

The only item on the list that I didn’t understand was the term “Under-methylation”. Here’s what I found:

Under-methylation/HISTADELIA

Individuals with high-histamine levels may be due to a metabolic imbalance that results from under-methylation. As a consequence, these individuals overproduce and retain excessive levels of histamine. Histamine is a substance in the body that has wide ranging effects. There are receptors for histamine in the brain, stomach, skin, lungs, mucus membranes, blood vessels, etc. For some individuals, high levels of blood histamine (called histadelia) have psychological, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms.

Many patients with obsessive-compulsive tendencies, “oppositional-defiant disorder,” or seasonal depression are under-methylated, which is associated with low serotonin levels. Often with inhalant allergies, frequent headaches, perfectionism, competitiveness and other distinctive symptoms and traits. Tend to be very low in calcium, magnesium, methionine, and vitamin B-6 with excessive levels of folic acid. People with histadelics have a positive effect from SSRIs and other serotonin-enhancing medications (Paxil, Zoloft, Prozac, Celexa, Effexor, etc.) because methylation is a step in the manufacture of mood stabilizing neurotransmitters. Unfortunately, histadelics often have nasty side effects with these medications.

Histamine excess can be manifest as asthma, vasomotor rhinitis, allergic skin disorders with pruritis, excess stomach acid production (acts as a gastric hormone to stimulate flow of HCl), saliva, tears, and thin nasal and bronchial secretions, and certain types of vascular headaches. This is the basis of anti-histamine medications. Excessive histamine results because of the inadequate methylation in liver detoxification. Histamine opposes adrenalin in its effects and as expected fatigue occurs just as it occurs in adrenal exhaustion.

Biochemical treatment revolves around antifolates, especially calcium and methionine. Certain forms of buffered vitamin C can help by providing calcium and ascorbic acid. Three to six months of nutrient therapy are usually needed to correct this chemical imbalance. As in most biochemical therapies, the symptoms usually return if treatment is stopped.

Methylation is involved in DNA synthesis, masking and unmasking of DNA, detoxification, heavy mental detoxification, nerve myelination, carnitine and coenzyme Q 10 synthesis. The relationship of mood and behavior to Histadelia is due to the fact that methylation is involved in neurotransmitter synthesis.

This is sounding too familiar… High-histamine levels. Something to look into further when I have more time.

May 22, 2008 Posted by | Health | , , , , | 3 Comments

Entry for October 18, 2007

I’ve been doing so much reading about the different functions of amino acids that I’m going to try Arginine again for the immune system. I took it for the first time last month and took it until I ran out. It had a good effect on the candida so I’m going to get it again. Maybe I didn’t do it long enough.

I’m convinced that amino acids are so much more important than vitamins or minerals. They all work together of course but I find it all fascinating how each one provides a different role in the body but you never really hear anything about them.

A multivitamin doesn’t contain amino acids and yet they are so important. I can still hear my doctor telling me that all I needed was a good multivitamin and suggested Centrum. EEEK!

ARGININE (Non-Essential) L-Arginine is essential in muscle metabolism and tissue generation and regeneration. In the body it creates nitric oxide, which is an important catalyst for healthy dilation of blood vessels, circulation and blood flow. Studies have shown that Arginine improves immune responses to bacteria, viruses and tumor cells, promotes wound healing and regeneration of the liver and the release of growth hormones. Arginine is highly concentrated in the skin and connective tissue and helps keep blood-vessel tissue elastic. Arginine also helps to remove ammonia from the body as part of the urea cycle.

Arginine is gaining popularity as a treatment for high cholesterol. Studies with animals and humans suggest that it may improve coronary blood flow and lower cholesterol levels through its antioxidant properties. Arginine Pyroglutamate moves easily across the blood/brain barrier where it releases Arginine, acts as a slow release Glutamine, and increases acetylcholine.

Another amino acid that I’m interested in is Glycine. In fact Glycine is as much as one third of the amino acid content of collagen. WOW! Again, I’ve taken this before and I knew about the collagen link but 1/3?? That’s significant.

Glycine is one – third of total amino acid content of collagen followed by hydroxyproline and proline account for another one-third of amino acid content of collagen. Hydroxyproline is exclusive to collagen and due to this reason to estimate collagen normally hydroxyproline is estimation is done.

January 17, 2008 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 04, 2007

After doing some research on the amino acids, I came across some interesting fact about one called “L-Theanine”. It plays a role in the formation of GABA and neurotransmitters for a calming effect which is exactly what I am looking for. Here’s what it says:

Theanine functions, uses, and health benefits

L-theanine is involved in the formation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma amino butyric acid (GABA). GABA influences the levels of two other neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, producing a relaxation effect. GABA serves a sedative function that brings balance to excitability that can lead to restlessness, insomnia, and other disruptive conditions. Theanine also appears to increase levels of dopamine, another brain chemical with mood-enhancing effects, which can reduce blood pressure.

L-theanine is an amino acid that helps promote a mild, restful, relaxed state without diminishing daytime alertness. Stress impairs the immune system, leaving us vulnerable to opportunistic infections, and can cause depression. People under stress can mitigate many of the harmful effects of stress with l-theanine. L-theanine reduces stress and anxiety without the tranquilizing effects found in many other calming supplements.

Theanine has a reputation for promoting mental and physical relaxation, and decreasing stress and anxiety without inducing drowsiness, as measured by increased generation of alpha-waves. L-theanine directly stimulates the production of alpha brain waves. By increasing the brain’s output of alpha waves, theanine may control anxiety, increase mental focus, improve concentration, and promote creativity.

Also found this:

THEANINE (Non-Essential)

L-Theanine is a derivative of Glutamic Acid. It is the active agent found in green tea. It readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, increasing levels of GABA and dopamine. It has been shown to lower blood pressure and reduce the effects of PMS. Theanine acts as a non-sedating relaxant to help increase the brain’s production of alpha-waves (those associated with “relaxed alertness”). This makes Theanine extremely effective for combating tension, stress, and anxiety, sharpening mental focus, improving concentration and promoting creativity without inducing drowsiness.

I went to a number of different health food stores and I always have a hard time looking for amino acids as there is never a standard. Each store will carry a few but never all. When I finally came across a store that had it, I decided to pick up another “hard to find” amino acid that I’ve done some reading about called Acetyl-Carnitine so I’ll pick up that too!

October 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 25, 2007

The past couple of days I’ve been doing more research regarding amino acids and although the Arginine did make a difference with the candida, there must be something else. I go out on my lunch to check out a number of health food stores and body building stores along Yonge street during my lunch. Not one had Glycine but one store did say they could order it for me next Friday but I didn’t want to wait that long.

After getting back to the office I make a few phone calls and actually found a store on Bloor street that have it in stock made by AOR. Exactly the one I’ve been looking for. They put it aside with my name on it and I pick it up on my way home.

GLYCINE is a non-essential glucogenic amino acid that can readily convert to serine. It is the simplest of all the amino acids and can be synthesized from acetic acid and Vitamin B. Necessary for optimal growth, glycine is involved in phospholipid and collagen production, and in the release of energy. Glycine received its name because it resembled the sweet taste of glucose and glycogen.

Glycine is an integral part of bile salts and the heme pigment in the RBC’s (red blood cells). It is also a major part of of the amino acid pool available for the synthesis of non-essential amino acids when required.

Glycine is essential for the biosynthesis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), as well as that of bile acids. It is used as a gastric antacid and a dietary supplement, and in the treatment of various myopathies (disease of the eye muscles). It also functions as an inhibitory nerotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glycine retards muscle degeneration by supplying additional creatine. It is necessary for central nervous system function and a healthy prostate. Its inhibitory action helps prevent epilepsy and has been used in the treatment of bipolar depression. It is sometimes utilized in liver detoxification compounds with glutathione.

October 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

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