Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for July 18, 2007

I’m really starting to get annoyed because I can’t figure out what the problem is. I know it’s deficiency…but what?

Back to googling “nervousness” + “deficiency”. I’m looking through all the regular vitamins and minerals and I feel like I’ve tried them all but then I notice one that maybe of interest. I don’t think I’ve done any in depth research on it. It goes on to mention how a reaction requires selenium and that a deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects. I can say without a doubt that I had a deficiency with all of the above vitamins and minerals so I really need to look at this very closely. It also has a link to candida.

Nutrient Interactions: Iodine

How do other nutrients interact with iodine?

The conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodthyronine (T3) requires the removal of an iodine molecule from T4. This reaction requires the mineral selenium. The iodine molecule that is removed gets returned to the body’s pool of iodine and can be reused to make additional thyroid hormones.

If your body is deficient in selenium, the conversion of T4 to T3 is slowed, and less iodine is available for the thryoid to use in making new hormones.

Animal studies have shown that arsenic interferes with the uptake of iodine by the thyroid, leading to goiter. In addition, dietary deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects of iodine deficiency.

Iodine deficiency causing defective free radical generation

Most people who do not regularly eat seafood (either fish or kelp) or use iodized salt have some degree of iodine deficiency; this can also occur as a result of a low-salt diet. These individuals may become hypothyroid and hypometabolic, because iodine is an essential ingredient in thyroid hormone. At the same time they may become more sensitive to yeast infections, due to inactivity of the myeloperoxidase enzyme, which uses iodine in cell mediated immune function.

The iodine is used by this enzyme to product iodine-free radicals which are part of the cellular anti-yeast “free radical artillery”. Previous to the use of nystatin as an antifungal drug, iodine therapy was successfully used to treat yeast infections; however, one must be very careful with the dosage. People who are sensitive to various foods and chemicals are frequently intolerant to iodine and should only use it in very low dosages.

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July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 12, 2007

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I found this mineral relationship chart but now I have even more questions than before. Just this week I read that phosphorus is required for the activation of riboflavin and niacin and yet, there is no apparent relationship between them. Same thing for magnesium. A magnesium group I belonged told me that low levels of zinc can cause magnesium loss and that’s exactly what I discovered when I started taking zinc. But again, there is no direct relationship.

But there are some new relationships that I’ve never come across before. Copper and Niacin (B3)! Riboflavin (B2) with Selenium. How interesting…

July 12, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 16, 2007

I’ve been at this now for over two years and in the last few months, I’ve discovered deficiencies in selenium, iron and zinc. And based on the changes that happened when I took them individually, I’d say they all three were a strong deficiency.

One person I’ll give credit to? The women in the Oshawa health food store suggested I had mineral deficiencies when I suspected B6 was my main problem. I was so convinced at the time I had a B6 deficiency because of the relationship with magnesium that I forgot about it and I wasn’t sure I believed her anyway.

So I have to question why did I find these deficiencies after taking a very powerful multivitamin for so long? I don’t believe that you can correct a mineral deficiency with a multivitamin because it just doesn’t make sense when you understand mineral ratios and how they interact with each other. A multivitamin can provide the body with the extra nutrients but it will not correct a deficiency. Here’s what I found:

Biochemical Individuality and Nutrition
by Bill Walsh, Ph.D.

Introduction

Each of us has innate biochemical factors which influence personality, behavior, mental health, immune function, allergic tendencies, etc. Scientists tell us that the number of different genetic combinations possible in a child from the same two parents exceeds 42 million. It’s interesting to note that we do not possess a combination of characteristics from our parents, but instead have a diverse collection of characteristics from many ancestors on both sides of the family.

Except for identical twins, each human being has unique biochemistry resulting in quite diverse nutritional needs. Shakespeare was correct when he wrote “One man’s meat is another man’s poison.” For example, some of us are genetically suited for a vegetable-based diet and others are not. Some persons can satisfy their nutritional needs by diet alone and others must have nutritional supplements to overcome genetic aberrations.

Because of genetic differences in the way our bodies process foods, most of us are quite deficient in certain nutrients and overloaded in others. Even with an ideal diet, most of us have certain nutrients that are at very low levels with many times the RDA required to achieve a healthy balance. The nutrients in overload must be carefully avoided in vitamin supplements or serious health problems can develop. After studying the biochemistry of 10,000 persons, I’ve learned that the greatest mischief is usually caused by nutrients that are stored in excessive amounts, rather than those at depleted levels. The most common nutrients in overload include copper, iron, folic acid, calcium, methionine, manganese, choline, and omega-6 fatty acids. Of course, these same nutrients may be in deficiency in other persons.

I am amused by supplement manufacturers who attempt to develop the ideal combination of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids for the general population. This is a bit like trying to determine the ideal shoe size for the population. The truth is that multiple vitamins and minerals are too indiscriminate, and may do as much harm as good.

Each of us should ask the question, “Who am I nutritionally?”

June 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 29, 2007

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Now that I’ve discovered the iron deficiency, I thought I would look back at the hair analysis from the naturopath. Yup, exactly what I thought…my iron level is within the normal range. Same with selenium and zinc.

What a joke…

May 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 24, 2007

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Last night I went to bed really late and I thought I would be tried when I woke up. Nope, in fact, I felt I had a bit more energy than usual for going to bed so late.

So today I decide to add two new supplements. The effects of taking the extra selenium seemed to have stopped and my weak knees are still the same. I added MSM back which I’ve tried before but I’ll try it again. I also added Licorice Root and iron.

I’m trying the Licorice Root for the link with candida and the adrenals. I’m trying iron because it’s known cause for hair loss and I read today that low iron can be caused by low levels of magnesium and zinc.

Iron Deficiency

Blood loss, or malabsorption are considered to be the main causes for low iron after ruling out any of a number of blood disorders, however low iron can very easily result from manganese levels having been low for a long period of time, or from other elements such as calcium, zinc, or magnesium reducing normal iron values.

Iron is interesting because I’ve never taken it before except for a very low dosage in my multivitamin. So it’s linked to hair loss, fatigue and weakness.

The other very interesting thing is the fact that I do eat ice chips. I don’t go around eating ice chips every day but I do if I’m in a restaurant and it’s something I’ve always done for years. Something to think about so I’ll try taking iron for a couple of weeks to see what happens.

Iron Antagonists:

Zinc, calcium, magnesium, tin, cobalt, Vitamin B2,Vitamin B5, Vitamin B12, Vitamin E, caffeine, insoluble fiber, rice (phytates), tea (tannic acid), soy protein, dairy (casein), oxalic acid, [folate]

Since I’m taking zinc and magnesium, I’ll stop the zinc altogether and reduce the magnesium just to see what happens. Today, I start taking Iron Chelate in a low dosage of 25 mg.

May 24, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 21, 2007

Three days of Brazil nuts and I can notice the difference. It’s very subtle but the first thing I noticed was my skin. I can’t really explain it but it feels “tougher” and stronger. Then I noticed my hair starting to grow. Another thing I’ve noticed was the candida. I don’t want to get ahead of myself, but I can feel it slowly going away too.

Selenium deficiencies limit cellular immunity against yeast.

Phagocytes (cells active in cell-mediated immunity) require selenium for the enzyme glutathione peroxidase function. Peroxidase activity in phagocytes is higher than in most other tissues (approximately twice that in red blood cells), and this is reflected in a higher need for selenium. The glutathione peroxidase system is an antioxidant enzyme system and is especially critical for phagocytic cell function. It has been experimentally demonstrated that selenium deficiency selectively causes a predisposition to yeast infection

All the supplements I’ve tried for candida and the one thing that works is Brazil nuts. Where did I read that? Nowhere. I was googling selenium and a site said that they contained the highest concentration and because they are so high in Selenium, I only eat three – four a day. That’s it and it’s natural.

The vibration comes and goes but for the most part, I’m not vibrating anymore.

This is the road to recovery. The beginning of the end? God I hope so. It’s only taken me two years to figure this all out. Or have I?

May 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 20, 2007

Brazil nuts’ selenium storing secrets revealed?

19 October 2006

Brazil nuts are a rich source of selenium, an essential trace element, and now scientists have identified 15 selenium-containing peptides in the tasty treats.

The discovery should help them to understand why Brazil nuts are so good at accumulating selenium.

Selenium is believed to offer protection against heart disease and to help prevent cancer particularly of the prostrate. It is also a powerful antioxidant – meaning that it can protect cells from free radical damage. Brazil nuts are one of the best sources of selenium containing about 2500 times as much as any other nut.

The selenium peptides were by identified by Ryszard Lobinski and colleagues from the University of Pau and the Adour, France, who have detected, fragmented and sequenced 15 new selenium peptides from Brazil nuts.

Lobinski started by breaking down the Brazil nut proteins using the digestive enzyme trypsin. He then used two stages of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ICP (inductively coupled plasma) mass spectrometry (MS) to purify and concentrate the selenium-containing compounds.

In the next step, the researchers used two mass spectrometry techniques in parallel. The first – based on ICP – allowed the researchers to work out how long it took the peptide to pass through a chromatography column. Using this information, the team then used a second technique – electrospray ionisation – to pick out characteristic selenium isotope patterns of the peptides. They could then fragment and sequence these peptides to identify them.

Sam Houk from the Iowa State University, Ames, US, said, ‘this is an excellent example of the value of element-specific information from ICP-MS combined with molecular information from ESI-MS in studies of proteins or peptides with heteroatoms. Neither technique alone could identify these seleno proteins.’

May 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 20, 2007

Brazil nuts: an effective way to improve selenium status

From the Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Background: Brazil nuts provide a rich natural source of selenium, yet no studies have investigated the bioavailability of selenium in humans.

Objective: We investigated the efficacy of Brazil nuts in increasing selenium status in comparison with selenomethionine.

Design: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 59 New Zealand adults. Participants consumed 2 Brazil nuts thought to provide 100 µg Se, 100 µg Se as selenomethionine, or placebo daily for 12 wk. Actual intake from nuts averaged 53 µg Se/d (possible range: 20–84 µg Se). Plasma selenium and plasma and whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 wk, and effects of treatments were compared.

Results: Plasma selenium increased by 64.2%, 61.0%, and 7.6%; plasma GPx by 8.3%, 3.4%, and –1.2%; and whole blood GPx by 13.2%, 5.3%, and 1.9% in the Brazil nut, selenomethionine, and placebo groups, respectively. Change over time at 12 wk in plasma selenium (P < 0.0001 for both groups) and plasma GPx activity in the Brazil nut (P < 0.001) and selenomethionine (P = 0.014) groups differed significantly from the placebo group but not from each other. The change in whole blood GPx activity was greater in the Brazil nut group than in the placebo (P = 0.002) and selenomethionine (P = 0.032) groups.

Conclusion: Consumption of 2 Brazil nuts daily is as effective for increasing selenium status and enhancing GPx activity as 100 µg Se as selenomethionine. Inclusion of this high-selenium food in the diet could avoid the need for fortification or supplements to improve selenium status.

May 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 18, 2007

I’ve been taking a high dosage of zinc since the end of February and although I’ve found great success, I’m still waiting patiently for more results. Maybe it’s time to look at something else?

I still have candida but it has improved since taking zinc. My knees are still very weak, my adrenals are stressed and I suspect my thyroid is effected. I keep checking my head for the hair loss but the effects from the zinc seem to have stopped. Back to Doctor Google and I come across a reference to hair loss.

Zinc and Selenium for better Hair Loss Treatment

The root of many hair loss problems is due to mineral and vitamin deficiency as clearly pointed out by Elizabeth Wotton, N.D. who is a naturopathic doctor at Compass Family Health Center in Plymouth, Massachusetts.She recommends that in order to remedy this situation ,it is of utmost importance to correct such deficiency by absorbing the proper vitamins and minerals and also if necessary to correct any improper indigestion problem In fact ,there are two minerals that are responsible for possible loss of hair, namely selenium and zinc.

A deficiency of both these minerals can ,eventually,affect the healthy growth of your hair, as both these minerals, as observed by researchers,aid in the in the utilization of protein that your body needs to help produce hair.

Your skin and scalp will thus become more supple and elastic and dandruff will be under control thanks to its anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties. As a result of which, your hair will develop and grow normally. Zinc on the other hand is required for the maintenance of normal connective tissue structures and also for the synthesis of normal collagen. As with Selenium, Zinc may promote healthy hair growth and slow hair loss.

We can conclude that deficiencies in selenium and zinc can contribute to hair loss.It is one of the main cause of baldness in people.Knowing the cause of your hair loss is very important to determine the nature of treatment best for you.

I’ve taken Selenium now and again in the past but maybe it’s time to look at the other things that are effected by a Selenium deficiency. Selenium is linked with hair loss, candida, thyroid function and joint pain.

Selenium deficiencies limit cellular immunity against yeast.

Phagocytes (cells active in cell-mediated immunity) require selenium for the enzyme glutathione peroxidase function. Peroxidase activity in phagocytes is higher than in most other tissues (approximately twice that in red blood cells), and this is reflected in a higher need for selenium. The glutathione peroxidase system is an antioxidant enzyme system and is especially critical for phagocytic cell function. It has been experimentally demonstrated that selenium deficiency selectively causes a predisposition to yeast infection.

Support of the thyroid gland

In addition to iodine, selenium is a critical mineral for maintaining proper function of the thyroid gland. In order for the thyroid to produce the most active form of its hormone (a version of thyroid hormone that is called T3), selenium is not only essential, but also helps regulate the amount of hormone that is produced.

Joint Pain

Joints benefit from an adequate intake of selenium. Mucopolysaccharides need selenium to be produced. These molecules lubricate joints and keep them working longer. Without lubrication, the bones in your joints would grind on each other and possibly cause rheumatoid arthritis.

Brazil Nuts

Brazil nuts are one of the most concentrated food sources of selenium, featuring about 70-90 micrograms per nut. Brazil nuts may contain as much as 544 micrograms of selenium per ounce. It is wise to eat Brazil nuts only occasionally because of their unusually high intake of selenium.

Although supplemental selenium by itself has not been shown to cause improvement in RA, selenium taken together with vitamin E appears to have measurable positive results.

Supplements

With regard to dietary supplements, there is some evidence that vitamin C inactivates selenium within the digestive tract. Persons who are concerned about their selenium intake may prefer to take supplemental selenium in the absence of vitamin C.

Some naturopaths recommend taking selenium together with vitamin E on the grounds that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects.

All this is very interesting. I’ve taken Selenium without any effect in the past and now I find out that vitamin C inactivates selenium within the digestive tract. Since I’ve been taking vitamin C everyday in dosages ranging from 500-2500 mg. Could that be why I had no progress in the past?

I’ll try taking selenium again but this time, I’ll eat a few Brazil nuts a day and I pick some up on my lunch hour.

May 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 31, 2007

Found some interesting stuff today on the relationship between the thyroid and a zinc deficiency. Also found a connection taking Selenium and Niacin supplements having an effect on thyroid function.

Zinc deficiency and thyroid function

Laboratory animals with severe, experimentally induced zinc deficiency developed hypothyroidism, whereas moderate zinc deficiency did not affect thyroid function. In a small study of healthy people, thyroid hormone (thyroxine) levels tended to be lower in those with lower blood levels of zinc. In people with low zinc, supplementing with zinc increased thyroxine levels. One case has been reported of a woman with severe zinc deficiency (caused by the combination of alcoholism and malabsorption) who developed hypothyroidism that was corrected by supplementing with zinc. Although the typical Western diet is marginally low in zinc, additional research is needed to determine whether zinc supplementation would be effective for preventing or correcting hypothyroidism.

Selenium deficiency and thyroid function

The essential trace mineral selenium works as a co-factor for various enzymes in the body. One of these is an enzyme that converts thyroxine (T4) into T3. A low dietary selenium intake may create a hypothyroid-like condition due to impaired conversion of T4 to T3. Low levels of selenium may accelerate the depletion of iodine from the thyroid gland. Selenium deficiency may worsen some of the problems caused by a lack of iodine. Selenium deficiency may also be involved in the occurrence and development of some iodine deficiency disorders.

People who are deficient in both iodine and selenium should not take selenium alone, as selenium may activate an enzyme that breaks down thyroxine. Taking selenium without iodine could make hypothyroidism worse for these individuals. If you think you may have low thyroid, have you doctor test for iodine deficiency before taking a selenium supplement.

Niacin supplementation and thyroid function

Preliminary data indicate that vitamin B3 (niacin) supplementation may decrease thyroid hormone levels. In one small study, 2.6 grams of niacin per day helped lower blood fat levels. After a year or more, thyroid hormone levels had fallen significantly in each person, although none experienced symptoms of hypothyroidism. In another case report, thyroid hormone levels decreased in two people who were taking niacin for high cholesterol and triglycerides; one of these two was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. When the niacin was discontinued for one month, thyroid hormone levels returned to normal.

Magnesium is also typically deficient in hypothyroidism.

March 31, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 20, 2007

Switched back to eating cucumbers and celery today. I had a few sunflower seeds in the morning but I’ve since decided to get rid of those too just in case. I’m mad at myself for straying from the strict diet but by the end of the day, my thrush is actually quite better. More improvement than I expected and I can feel the improvement in my nose.

Found this article talking about the different vitamins and mineral deficiencies that can effect candida.

CANDIDA

Selenium deficiency and anemia appear to be the biggest factors in promoting candida growth. Years ago when I had hypoT I also had a severe candida infection. I found a book titled “Candida: Silver (Mercury) Fillings and the Immune System” which eventually led me to getting my mercury fillings removed. Following this and supplementation with zinc and selenium, my candida and hypoT both ended.

Experiments with animals show that candida growth can be increased by selenium deprivation and reduced by selenium supplementation. Since mercury depletes selenium, it makes sense that candida is higher when there are mercury fillings in the teeth.

Other studies show that anemia and iron deficiency increase candida growth. There are some studies suggesting that B12 and folic acid deficiencies may be involved in candida, since deficiencies of these lead to anemia. In anemia and iron deficiency friendly bacteria cannot grow well in the body. A lack of these bacteria probably is a key factor which promotes candida growth, since candida is a fungal growth rather than a bacteria growth.

Another study showed that women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis are deficient in zinc compared to normals and that only a mild zinc deficiency is necessary for this recurring problem.

Basically it seems that the deficiencies associated with candidiasis correlate very well with the deficiencies associated with hypothyroidism. The key nutrient deficiencies are probably selenium, zinc, iron, B12, and folic acid.

Probably the best indicator of the level of candida growth in the body is the coating on the tongue. The more white coating there is, the more candida there probably is throughout the body. We want to get to the point where our tongues are clear, pink, and not sore.

The following study shows that candida albicans has a higher resistance to elevated concentrations of copper than baker’s yeast. This may mean that in hypothyroidism, when zinc is low and copper is high, candida growth will not be suppressed by copper, which is normally toxic to fungal infections.

February 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 22, 2006

Since I started eating healthier I’ve been eating tuna at least once a week. I’ve always known that it’s one of the things that I eat that always makes me feel better but I’ve always had different reasons for thinking it had an effect on me.

First, I thought it was niacin. Secondly, I suspected magnesium and now, I discover that tuna is high in vitamin B6. So it was probably the comination of all three. We’ve all heard about the dangers of mercury in tuna so…Dr. Google?

Albacore:

According to FDA health standards, you can safely eat 5.7 ounces of Albacore tuna per week (assuming that every can of tuna has an average amount of mercury*). That’s almost a full can of tuna. Albacore tuna has three times as much mercury as light tuna.

Light Tuna:

According to FDA health standards, you can safely eat 16.6 ounces of Light tuna tuna per week (assuming that every can of tuna has an average amount of mercury*). That’s 2 and three quarters cans of tuna.

FDA scientists have established a daily limit for mercury and have tested hundreds of cans of tuna for the metal, but they have not told women of childbearing age how much tuna they can eat and not endanger their children.

FDA’s safe dose is measured in grams of mercury per kilogram of person per day. All we need is your weight and it is a simple math problem to determine how much tuna you can eat safely.

The calculations presented here assume that you eat no other seafood at all. The FDA recommends up to 12 ounces a week of a variety of fish. If you eat other seafood, the amount of tuna that you can eat safely will be less than calculated here.

*EWG recommends that women of childbearing age and children under 5 not eat albacore tuna at all, because a significant portion of albacore tuna has very high mercury levels. People eating this tuna will exceed safe exposure levels by a wide margin.

So is there anything I can do about the mercury?

Mineral Replacement

It is important to have a generally healthy mineral base. The body works better with toxic metals than no metals at all. Enzymes have certain binding sites that require a metal for them to perform their function as a catalyst. When you are deficient in magnesium, sodium, zinc and other minerals, the body does not let go of the toxic metals very easily.

Selenium and zinc are particularly important trace mineral in mercury detoxification and should be used for most people.

October 22, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 27, 2006

Previous Night Vibration Status: Weak
Morning Vibration Status: Weak

I was quite surpised to have a vibration last night and this morning since I took 300 mg of magnesium citrate right before going to bed. I didn’t have any calcium so I’m not sure what happened.

My new friend David got back to me again:

Some people get good results with magnesium citrate which is a form of chelated magnesium. Don’t buy it in combination with calcium. I take chelated calcium, but I take it separately. Theoretically, people need twice as much calcium as magnesium and, therefore, most calcium/magnesium supplements have twice as much calcium as magnesium. But most Americans are far more deficient in magnesium than in calcium, so they need more supplemental magnesium than calcium.

At your weight you should take 800 mg of chelated magnesium daily and, if severly deficient, 1,000 mg daily. Magnesium and CoQ10 have separate functions, but they do beneficially interact somewhat.

This may be enough but, at your weight, you may need 200 mg of CoQ10 daily. I suggest that you see how you feel after taking 100 mg of CoQ10 and 800 mg of chelated magnesium before deciding if you need more. I also take more than 1,000 mg of chelated magnesium daily because of my weight.

Riboflavin 5 phosphate is more effective than plain riboflavin. How do you know that you have a riboflavin deficiency? You may be deficient in other B-complex vitamins as well — especially B12. B12 deficiency is more common than is generally recognized because many people don’t absorb B12 well through the stomach. I take sublingual B12 which I let dissolve under my tongue. The tissue under the tongue often absorbs B12 better than the stomach does.

The ability of selenium to cut cancer deaths in half was discovered in a large placebo-controlled double-blind clinical study and the results were published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association, yet they have largely been ignored. Also often ignored is the need for vitamin C. Most people should take at least 1,000 mg of vitamin twice a day.

Best wishes, David

August 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 12, 2006

Today I’ve decided to reduce the amount of vitamins. I start the day with acidophilus and the new powerful Omega 3. I’ll add selenium, niacinamide and B complex for lunch and the same again for dinner minus the selenium.

Encourged by the meeting yesterday, I gather up my health files and go back to his store. Only problem now? He closes at two o’clock on Saturdays and he’s not open now until Monday.

I’m sure we would’ve had an interesting conversation!

August 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 11, 2006

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His store is called “The Medicine Shoppe” and inside is a small pharmacy on one side and a bunch of supplements and vitamins on the other. I mention to the pharmacist that the osteopath from next door recommended I speak to the owner about a health issue. I wait about ten minutes for him as he was one the phone. He has a slight look of the mad scientist in Back to the Future movies but more reserved.

He comes out to talk to me and I start by mentioning that I have a vitamin deficiency. He says he could talk for hours on vitamin deficiencies so I go into more detail with riboflavin. He asked if my urine turns yellow when I take B2 and of course it does. He said that if I am seeing yellow then the body is taking what it needs and the rest is being discarded by the body. I explain further that I’ve been taking B complex for months without any results.

He asks me if I’ve had a hormone test and yes, I’ve had one done recently and the results were normal. He said he was interested in seeing what the results were. Then he asks me if I had my thyroid checked and yes that was my doctor’s first suspicion and that too was normal. He asked me what the results were and other than normal, I’m not quite sure what the actual readig was.

He said most doctors don’t know how to check the thyroid and they only check for the level of T4. He said my actual level of T4 could be fine but that my level of T3 is needed to activate T4 and he went into more detail about thyroid function. A quick google search turns up exactly what he is talking about minus the cold body temperature:

CLINICAL MEASUREMENT:  Broda Barnes, M.D. recognized that one of the primary effects of thyroid is to raise body temperature.  A fat, hypothyroid child will be one degree Fahrenheit cooler than a thin, active child.  The measurements of thyroid function include TSH, T3 (free), T4 (free).  But normal blood tests do not tell the complete picture of thyroid disease.

The control of the thyroid gland is TRH, thyroid releasing hormone, in the hypothalamus, deep within the brain.  With age, the hypothalamus fails to release adequate stimulation: it acts like it is asleep. This is called \’down-regulation.\’  Under normal conditions, the TRH triggers the pituitary in the midbrain to release TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone. TSH causes the thyroid to produce T3 and T4 from precursors: iodine, tryptophan and T2 (di-iodothyronine).

Doctors have been taught to look for elevated levels of TSH.  This implies that the pituitary cannot recognize adequate blood levels of either T3 or T4.  A TSH over 100 means the individual is severely hypothyroid.  A TSH less than 1 (when not on thyroid replacement) implies that the individual is on thyroid replacement or that the thyroid overactive and out-of-control.

But, those of us researching thyroid disease have learned that these thyroid tests are just \’tests at best.\’  If the patient complains of a low body temperature on awakening (basal body temperature) then there is inadequate thyroid hormone no matter what the blood tests show.  If there is fatigue, dry skin, brittle hair and weight gain on a low calorie diet, then there is insufficient thyroid hormone. This is one of the thyroid resistant syndromes or thyroid insensitive syndrome. The pituitary does not respond properly and produce enough TSH.

He asks me a few questions:

Do have have any energy in the mornings? NO
Do I feel refreshed after a night’s sleep? NO
How do my muscles feel? WEAK

He suggests taking Selenium at 200 mg a day and comments how it is really lacking in today’s diet. He asks me if I am taking Omega 3 supplement. I was until the iridologst told me I didn’t need it so he asked if it contained EPA or DHA and I have no idea.

He gave me a sample package of NutraSea Omega-3 to try and said he takes it everyday. I thank him for all of the information and his time and he again mentioned that he would like to see the results of the hormone test.

I do some reading when I get home and as it turns out, on the back of the NutraSea package there is an endorsment from the homopathic doctor that the chiropractor mentioned! I want to start the day with this new omega 3 so I take a look at the one I have. The EPA or DHA is much lower in mine so I take three capsules at dinner.

So I mention all of this to my wife and we both start googling thyroid again and she mentions the simple test that the naturopath told me to do and how your morning body temperature indicates your thyroid. Back then, my body tempurature was really low. I did mention the readings to my naturopath at the time and I guess we got side tracked by other things as it was never mentioned again.

August 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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