Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for September 05, 2007

Woke up with the vibration…

I’m not sure how that’s possible because I’m literally swimming in niacin these past few days. That can only mean one thing: I may be low in niacin, but it’s not the cause of the vibration.

My two main symptoms are Candida and the vibration/anxiety.

So using candida as a starting point, I come across the following article:

Glutathione

As Candida albicans spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract and colonizes in other areas of the body, it produces various toxins. These toxins can impair health by reducing the body’s supply of white blood cells, which are needed by the immune system to properly fend off infectious bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other pathogens. Candida albicans toxins also inhibit the body’s ability to manufacture antioxidants, including glutathione, an enzyme that is important for liver detoxification and cellular respiration. As a result of these negative effects caused by the unchecked spread of Candida albicans, symptoms of candida can manifest in many different ways, mimicking other disease conditions and negatively impacting many areas of your body.

Glutathione, an amino acid is low in people with candida. Okay, I’ve tried amino acids before but maybe I’ll have a different result now that I’ve taken care of the mineral deficiencies.

Here’s some more information about how a Glutathione deficiency can effect the nervous system:

“A deficiency of Glutathione first affects the nervous system, causing such symptoms as lack of coordination, mental disorders, tremors, and difficulty maintaining balance. These problems are believed to be due to development of lesions in the brain.”

Glutathione can be depleted by a host of agents working alone or together. Environmental pollutants, tobacco smoke, alcohol abuse, acetaminophen, mercury from dental fillings, and a sustained immune response against persistent toxins, can all rob you of this most important health asset. Mercury can impair your body’s ability to synthesize Glutathione by normal means.

The liver produces glutathione from the amino acids cysteine, glutamic acid and glycine. Glutathione deficiency results in early aging and in the loss of coordination, balance, tremors, and mental disorders.

Glutathione levels decline with age and if not corrected will accelerate the aging process; so supplementation is important. But the assimilation of supplemental oral glutathione is questionable. Instead it is best to supplement with cysteine, glutamic acid and glycine and have the body use those raw materials to manufacture needed glutathione.

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September 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 03, 2007

This morning was the fourth day in a row that I haven’t had a vibration in the morning and it’s probably the extra niacin. One thing I’ve noticed this time? Since taking the niacin, my skin feels really smooth. It’s very subtle but there is a difference and I know that there’s a link with niacin and healthy skin.

Niacin Summary

B3 or niacin plays a key role in over 100 functions necessary for health and is especially important for energy production and, as a vasodilator, blood circulation. It’s also needed for red blood cell formation; the health of skin and the digestive tract; healthy nervous system functioning and brain activity; and for the synthesis of the sex hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone.

September 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 31, 2007

Today was different. I got my cold hands during the morning commute into work so I had 1.5 mg of copper and it went away.

During the morning the cold hands returned again and I took another 1.5 mg of copper but this time it didn’t work. All day I struggled with the cold hands and I wasn’t really sure of the cause. By the end of the afternoon, my candida was really bad so this weekend I’ve decided not to get any fruit to see if I can get better by avoiding the fruit sugar.

I’ve started taking a higher dosage of niacin. 1000 mg of niacinamide and 200-300 mg of niacin along with calcium/magnesium.

September 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 30, 2007

After taking 500 mg of niacinamide and 200 mg of niacin before going to bed, this morning, I can’t feel the canker sore anymore.

Would it have gone away on it’s own?? Who knows… but I don’t think so.

August 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 29, 2007

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Woke up with a vibration…

A week with the high doses of insitol and choline and although there was a huge difference in the beginning, I haven’t noticed any more improvements lately. Originally I thought it had an effect on the vibration. Now I’m not so sure?

Today the cold hands returned around lunchtime and it would come and go without any effect from my supplements. By late afternoon there was something that I did notice…

I can feel something like a pimple in the roof of mouth. The canker sores have returned and this time I’m glad because I know exactly what the problem is and why it is happening.

I don’t recall that I’ve ever mentioned the canker sores in my blog in the past because it was happening before I started to document everything and at the time, I didn’t realize it was a symptom of a vitamin deficiency. There was so many other things going on that I didn’t mention it.

It really makes sense that I would still have a niacin deficiency because I was taking it for months and then stopped thinking I’d taken it long enough and didn’t need it anymore. The low level of phosphorus was the reason for the deficiency in the first place and I needed to address that first.

I’ve taken niacin on and off since I started taking the phosphorus on Aug 1st and didn’t notice a difference but this time, I’ll try it for longer.

August 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 17, 2007

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Because the watery itching eyes started after taking calcium/magnesium for a few days, and this morning it seemed to improve when I took some B complex vitamins, I decide to look at the interrelationships and there is one between calcium and riboflavin that I never noticed before. Never really thought about it.

I’ve got to look at phosphorus and niacin again…when I have some time…

August 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 08, 2007

Woke up this morning with a slight vibration but I’m very happy with the new found results and I think it’s from the extra calcium/magnesium. Because of the vibration, I’m going to add niacin back into the rotation. 100 mg dosage, three times a day and I’m also going to reduce the amount of phosphorus by half.

Daily Supplement Summary:

900 mg Calcium/Magnesium (300 mg 1/1 ratio)
300 mg Niacin (100 mg)
300 mg Phosphorus (100 mg)
600 mg Vitamin D (200 mg)
90 mg Zinc (30 mg)
25 mg Manganese

August 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

Today I’m back at work so my routine is a bit more stable. I’ve decided to take three doses of 300mg calcium/magnesium in the 1/1 ratio along with the phosphorus and vitamin D. No reason for the change just want to keep trying something different until I find something that works.

I also changed the zinc dosage from two doses of 50 mg to three doses of 30 mg. I didn’t take any niacin today as I’m still not convinced that it’s the cause of the vibration although I didn’t have any all weekend.

By the end of the work day the eyes aren’t as itchy and the stuffiness in my nose feels better than usual. I’ll keep doing this combination of minerals for sure!

The million dollar question….Will it have any effect on the vibration?

I’ve always been very confused as to why taking extra calcium would make the vibration stronger and today I still don’t have an answer. I’m wondering if the magnesium deficiency caused a high calcium ratio? What are the effects of low magnesium and the effect on calcium?

Calcium

Elevated calcium levels are associated with arthritic / joint and vascular degeneration, calcification of soft tissue, hypertension and stroke, an increase in VLDL triglycerides, gastrointestinal disturbances, mood and depressive disorders, chronic fatigue, increased alkalinity, and general mineral imbalances.

If magnesium is insufficient potassium and calcium will be lost in the urine and calcium will be deposited in the soft tissues (kidneys, arteries, joints, brain, etc.).

Calcium Synergists

Copper is required to fix calcium in the bones and helps raise the tissue calcium level. Many people have biologically unavailable copper which causes their calcium problems. In fast oxidizers, copper deficiency contributes to a calcium deficiency. Adequate adrenal hormone levels are also essential for proper calcium metabolism.

Calcium Antagonists

Sugar upsets the calcium/phosphorus ratio in the blood more than any other single factor, according to researcher Dr. Melvin Page. It also stresses the adrenal glands and upsets the hormone balance which affects calcium metabolism.

Copper Bio-Unavailability A Major Cause of Candida Infection

The most commonly observed mineral imbalance we find in many patients with Candida infection is termed bio-unavailable copper. Bio-unavailable copper is indicated on a tissue mineral test. Other mineral indicators of a candida overgrowth are an elevated calcium level, elevated calcium/magnesium ratio, or a low sodium/potassium ratio.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 03, 2007

Went to bed last night and I was fine. Then my wife did something that scared me for whatever reason and I started vibrating right away. It’s weird and I don’t really remember what she did because I was so tired. That kind of thing hasn’t happened in a while so I’m not sure what happened?

Here’s a comment about the relationship between Niacin and Riboflavin that suggest a niacin deficiency can cause a riboflavin deficiency. Interesting because that was the order of my symptoms. The vibration, upset stomach, then the nerve tingling in my head. So if the vibration is being caused by phosphorus this would make sense but I’m still not sure about that…

CONSEQUENCES OF A NIACIN DEFICIENCY

There are many symptoms of niacin deficiency. Initially, muscular weakness, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions occur, with severe deficiencies of niacin commonly leading to pellagra. Symptoms of pellagra include dermatitis, senile dementia, and diarrhea. Tremors and a sore tongue are also symptomatic. With pellagra, the skin becomes cracked and pigmented in the parts exposed to sunlight. Lesions can appear in the central nervous system, producing confusion, disorientation and neuritis.

Inflammation of the mucous membranes of the mouth and the gastrointestinal tract can result from digestive abnormalities developed in niacin deficiency. Symptoms of severe riboflavin deficiency appear; many of the niacin deficiencies are similar due to the close interrelationship of riboflavin and niacin in cell metabolism.

I added niacin back today but I didn’t take any chromium to see what the effect is. If phosphorus is responsible for niacin absorption, then I suppose it’s possible that even though I’d taken it for months, it wasn’t being absorbed in enough quantity to reverse a deficiency.

August 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

I don’t think it’s niacin anymore…

I took one 100 mg niacin in the morning and nothing else. I lasted until lunch and then I got the cold hands. It lasted much longer than I expected without taking anything other than niacin. I took one half of the calcium and one niacin. I was good for the rest of the afternoon but then I got the nerve feeling in my head around 6:30 PM and I also got my mild magnesium chest pain around the same time so I took one 250 mg of magnesium and was fine for the rest of the evening.

So what is it? Phosphorus?

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

Woke up with no vibration. Perfect!

I went back through the blog reading my entries on niacin and when I took it, it seemed to have an effect on the vibration at night but I would always be vibrating in the morning.

I think the low phosphorus may have played a role and the niacin wasn’t absorbed properly.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 17, 2007

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Taking another look at the interrelationships I noticed that niacin (Vitamin B3) has a relationship with copper. Now that I think I’ve somewhat balanced the zinc/copper ratio, I’m curious to know if there is a difference now when I add niacin.

(Note to self: Reached 40,000 page views today!)

July 17, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 17, 2007

Okay…about the new theory.

If I stop for a second and review my “case” from the very beginning, the very first symptom was the internal vibration followed by gastric upset and then the nerve endings in my head started tingling.

I discovered that the gastric upset was caused by a niacin deficiency and the nerve endings was a riboflavin B vitamin deficiency. I always thought having a deficiency in these two particular vitamins was unusual to say the least. With the niacin, I would take 300 mg a day for months and no matter how much riboflavin I took, it never seemed to make a difference until I started the B vitamin injections.

The niacin fixed the gastric upset and although it did stop the vibration, it would never stop it completely and that lead me in other directions.

One of the things I’ve been thinking about lately is that I still have candida so whatever is causing the vibration is causing an imbalance that will cause candida and I know that niacin is anti fungal. My candida is the best it’s ever been but it’s not perfect but I feel it’s very close.

My New Theory:

I’m beginning to think that the vibration is caused by niacin but the reason it never fixed the problem was because I was low in phosphorus and it wasn’t activated. Riboflavin worked because of the mega-dosage injection. I’d be willing to bet that if I didn’t discover the low phosphorus, the riboflavin symptoms would return.

The B vitamins are essential for the nerves and the current nerve ending feelings in my head are different but they are somewhat similar to the riboflavin nerve symptoms.

I take one 100 mg of niacin with dinner and another one just before going to bed. Tomorrow, I’ll try another experiment. I’m going to add niacin of course but I’ll delay taking the other supplements and see if I get any of my regular symptoms…

July 17, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 12, 2007

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I found this mineral relationship chart but now I have even more questions than before. Just this week I read that phosphorus is required for the activation of riboflavin and niacin and yet, there is no apparent relationship between them. Same thing for magnesium. A magnesium group I belonged told me that low levels of zinc can cause magnesium loss and that’s exactly what I discovered when I started taking zinc. But again, there is no direct relationship.

But there are some new relationships that I’ve never come across before. Copper and Niacin (B3)! Riboflavin (B2) with Selenium. How interesting…

July 12, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 02, 2007

I’ve been at this now for a long time. I would consider myself with advanced knowledge of nutritional deficiencies and yet today, I’m still learning.

A quick google search and although I’ve looked at phosphorus before, I stumble upon some very interesting clues. Two of the first vitamin deficiencies I discovered were B2 Riboflavin and B3 Niacin and I had very obvious symptoms for both. I always thought it was odd that I had deficiencies of those two specific vitamins when the most popular was always B6 or B12.

Phosphorus is necessary for the conversion of niacin and riboflavin to their active coenzyme forms. Niacin and riboflavin cannot be digested properly by the body unless phosphorus is present. Could this be the reason I was taking B vitamins for such a long time without any success? This is becoming painfully obvious…

It’s also required for healthy nerves and one of the symptoms is something called “Tremulousness”. I have never come across a term like that for a vitamin or mineral symptom so I look up the definition. If that doesn’t describe what I have, then I don’t know what does. Nervousness and a vibratory sensation.

Two other things that interests me? Phosphorus can be destroyed by sugar and just like iron, a symptom is hair loss and eating ice. I thought the iron would make a difference with the hair loss but it didn’t…maybe it’s phosphorus? I’ve also had paresthesia (pins and needles) here and there. Nothing serious but it does happen from time to time and I’ve always thought it was just a sign of poor circulation caused by magnesium. Maybe not?

I’m also interested in one other thing. It plays a role in the heart muscle contraction and with mitral valve prolapse and the relationship with magnesium, it’s time to look at this more seriously. Is it possible to convince a doctor that I have a deficiency in phosphorus? No way, they’d lock me up for sure! Now only if I can actually find it. Off to doctor google:

trem·u·lous·ness

1. (of persons, the body, etc.) characterized by trembling, as from fear, nervousness, or weakness.
2. timid; timorous; fearful.
3. (of things) vibratory, shaking, or quivering.
4. (of writing) done with a trembling hand.

Phosphorus (P)

Phosphorus is the second most abundant mineral in the body and is found in every cell. The balance of calcium and phosphorus is needed for them to be effectively used by the body. Phosphorus plays a part in almost every chemical reaction within the body because it is present in every cell. It is important in the utilization of carbohydrates, fats and protein for growth, maintenance and repair and mediation, both within and without the cells, and for the production of energy. It stimulates muscle contractions, including the regular contractions of the heart muscle. Niacin and riboflavin cannot be digested unless phosphorus is present.

Phosphorus is an essential part of nucleoproteins, which are responsible for cell division and reproduction. Phosphorus helps prevent the accumulation of too much acid or too much alkali in the blood, assist in the passage of substances through the cell walls and promote the secretion of glandular hormones. It’s also needed for healthy nerves and efficient mental activity. B-Complex Vitamins and many enzymes require phosphorus to function.

Phosphorus deficiency has been associated with the following symptoms or illnesses:

Alopecia (Hair Loss)
Anemia
Aneurysms
Bone Pain
Dyspnea
Fatigue
Irritability
Numbess
Parathesias (Pins and Needles)
Pica (Eating ice, etc)
Tremulousness
Weakness
Weight Loss

IMPORTANCE:

Needed for blood clotting, bone and teeth formation, cell growth, contraction of the heart muscle, normal heart rhythm, and kidney function; assists the body in the utilization of vitamins and the conversion of food into energy; is involved in virtually all physiological chemical reactions.

Dietary Source: Legumes, milk & milk products, bone meal, nuts, yellow cheese, eggs, fish, grains, poultry

Importance: Works with calcium to form bones, teeth; cell growth and repair; utilizes carbohydrate-fat-protein; heart muscle contraction; nerve activity

Inhibits Absorption: Excessive intake of magnesium, white sugar, iron

Enhances Absorption: Protein, manganese, iron, calcium, A, F, D.

July 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for April 10, 2007

So for a week now I’ve lowered my zinc and I’m only taking magnesium with 50 mg of B6, 50 mg of niacin and 25 mg of manganese. It’s really strange because for some reason I feel like I’m losing my magnesium and it happens after I take the lunchtime supplements.

Then I realize that it must be the manganese as I’ve had this happen before when I tried it the first time. Forget it, from here on in it’s only magnesium, B3 and B6 with vitamin C and a lower dosage of zinc.

I’ll switch to magnesium glycinate to see if that works any better.

April 17, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 31, 2007

Found some interesting stuff today on the relationship between the thyroid and a zinc deficiency. Also found a connection taking Selenium and Niacin supplements having an effect on thyroid function.

Zinc deficiency and thyroid function

Laboratory animals with severe, experimentally induced zinc deficiency developed hypothyroidism, whereas moderate zinc deficiency did not affect thyroid function. In a small study of healthy people, thyroid hormone (thyroxine) levels tended to be lower in those with lower blood levels of zinc. In people with low zinc, supplementing with zinc increased thyroxine levels. One case has been reported of a woman with severe zinc deficiency (caused by the combination of alcoholism and malabsorption) who developed hypothyroidism that was corrected by supplementing with zinc. Although the typical Western diet is marginally low in zinc, additional research is needed to determine whether zinc supplementation would be effective for preventing or correcting hypothyroidism.

Selenium deficiency and thyroid function

The essential trace mineral selenium works as a co-factor for various enzymes in the body. One of these is an enzyme that converts thyroxine (T4) into T3. A low dietary selenium intake may create a hypothyroid-like condition due to impaired conversion of T4 to T3. Low levels of selenium may accelerate the depletion of iodine from the thyroid gland. Selenium deficiency may worsen some of the problems caused by a lack of iodine. Selenium deficiency may also be involved in the occurrence and development of some iodine deficiency disorders.

People who are deficient in both iodine and selenium should not take selenium alone, as selenium may activate an enzyme that breaks down thyroxine. Taking selenium without iodine could make hypothyroidism worse for these individuals. If you think you may have low thyroid, have you doctor test for iodine deficiency before taking a selenium supplement.

Niacin supplementation and thyroid function

Preliminary data indicate that vitamin B3 (niacin) supplementation may decrease thyroid hormone levels. In one small study, 2.6 grams of niacin per day helped lower blood fat levels. After a year or more, thyroid hormone levels had fallen significantly in each person, although none experienced symptoms of hypothyroidism. In another case report, thyroid hormone levels decreased in two people who were taking niacin for high cholesterol and triglycerides; one of these two was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. When the niacin was discontinued for one month, thyroid hormone levels returned to normal.

Magnesium is also typically deficient in hypothyroidism.

March 31, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 27, 2007

Woke up this morning with no vibration and there was none last night. So was it the switch to magnesium gluconate? I’ll try the same thing again today with vitamin A and vitamin E along with the 100 mg of zinc. I’ll also add pantothenic acid. The lower dosage of magnesium didn’t seem to be as troublesome as I thought it would be. Recently with the fatigue my legs feel really heavy, I’m wondering if it has to do with my blood circulation as I stopped taking niacin a while back. I’ll add that too.

Progress? I was briefly looking through the symptom time line diary and I was looking at the changes I made after the iridology appointment. That’s when I started eating more fruit, discovered active B vitamins and started multivitamins and taking a higher dosage of magnesium in a form that is better absorbed. I think there will be a lot of change since the last reading. The adrenals is the one thing that I can’t seem to improve along with the anxiety. I’m sure the anxiety is related to the magnesium loss or the zinc/copper imbalance and I’ve just discovered those.

March 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 27, 2007

First day off the diet and I grab a bag of apples and three bananas for my morning routine. It’s great to be back! I know I have candida and I know how to deal with it but it’s the magnesium loss that I’m really struggling with.

It’s almost been three weeks and my follow up with the nutritionist is Thursday night. I haven’t received one phone call or any emails from her. No follow up advice whatsoever. I wonder what happened? Did she meet with her discussion group? Who knows?

Now that I’ve given up the diet, it’s time to rethink the vitamins. I’m going to cut back to only the main ones. Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc, Selenium, Pantothenic Acid, the enzymes and the multivitamin. I’m going to stop taking the niacin just to see what happens. I’ve taken it everyday since I discovered the deficiency.

Still vibrating….

February 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 28, 2007

DRUGLESS METHODS TO HELP GET RID OF ANXIETY

NIACIN – vitamin B-3 is so effective against actual psychoses that half of all mental ward inmates in the South were able to be released once a depression-era deficiency of this vitamin was corrected. Niacin in appropriate doses acts as a natural tranquilizer and induces relaxation or sleep. It is non-addictive, cheap, and safer than any pharmaceutical product. Dosage varies with condition. The best author on the subject is Abram Hoffer, M.D., whose experience dates back to the early 1950’s. He routinely gave at least as much VITAMIN C as he did niacin.

LECITHIN – a food supplement that is high in phosphatidyl choline. The body is able to make acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, out of this. This has a sedating effect. It is interesting to note that one third of your brain, by dry weight, is lecithin. Feeding the organ what it is largely made of might help it to function better. (Don’t worry: lecithin supplements are made from soybeans.) Dosage runs in the tablespoons.

SUGAR – avoid it, to reduce anxiety symptoms. The swings from high to low blood sugar result in corresponding mood swings. Sugar is not your friend. Eat complex carbohydrates instead.

CHROMIUM may help even out the sugar mood-swings and perhaps even sugar craving. Chromium deficiency (daily intake under 50 micrograms) affects 9 out of 10 adults. Somewhere between 50 and 400 mcg of chromium substantially improves your cells ability to use insulin. Don’t gnaw on the bumper of a ’54 Cadillac because that kind of chrome is toxic. Chromium polynicotinate or chromium picolinate are safer and better absorbed.

B-COMPLEX VITAMINS also help even out your blood sugar. In addition, the metabolism of just about everything you digest hinges on one or more of this group of B-vitamins. Taken together, they are especially safe and effective. The body needs proportionally more niacin than the other B’s, so extra niacin as mentioned above is still valid.

EXERCISE reduces anxiety. Is it because you are too pooped to worry? Who cares; it helps. Exercise has many other health benefits, too, so there is no way you can lose by trying it. Start easily and work up.

HOMEOPATHIC REMEDIES such as Aconite, Coffea Cruda and Kali Phos. have been used to treat symptoms of anxiety for nearly 200 years. These very dilute natural remedies are safe and can help significantly. I recommend that you get a copy of The Prescriber, by J.H. Clarke, M.D. This very practical book concisely explains this healing approach and helps you easily select the most appropriate remedy. Homeopathic remedies are non-prescription. Many health food stores carry them. I know people who carry a bottle of Kali Phos 6X tablets in their pocket or purse, just in case.

HERBS such as chamomile and catnip make a soothing tea. There are certainly other useful herbs to consider as well. A good herb store or health food store will have books that will help you learn more.

January 28, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

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