Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for July 23, 2007

No vibration last night and none again this morning.

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July 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Two days with chromium supplementation and no cold hands. No other kind of weird symptoms either.

Great! Just in time for my vacation. Although I’m taking everything with me just in case…

oh, and one more thing. I went to the library yesterday and signed out two books on chromium. In one of the books it mentions that chromium is very, very difficult to get enough of the daily intake through food. And that’s from a healthy eater! Imagine all of the people who don’t eat properly? Anyway, in the back of the book it gives a listing of all kinds of food and how much chromium it contains.

It’s a very interesting read because there are very little foods high in chromium. But what makes it even more interesting is as I was scanning through the list, a certain kind of fruit stood out.

Yup, it was pears. Pears have 30% of daily chromium per 200 g.

Nutrition Information

Pears are a good source of Vitamin C and copper, and an excellent source of chromium and dietary fiber.

Nutrition Facts
Serving size 1 pear with skin (200 g)
Amount Per Serving & % Daily Value*

Calories 120
Fat Cal 0
Total Fat 1g 2%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 30g 10%
Dietary Fiber 5g 21%
Protein 1g 2%
Chromium 30%
Copper 11%
Vitamin A 1%
Vitamin C 13%
Calcium 2%
Iron 3%

Pears have a whopping 30% of chromium but on a regular nutritional web site that I use, chromium is not provided in the list of minerals. I contacted the web site and here is the reply:

“Chromium is not one of the nutrients that the USDA currently test for. As such, we can’t provide information on it.”

Last year I noticed that eating one pear wouldn’t always work and sometimes I would have to eat three of them to actually stop the vibration. Of course I mentioned the pears to anyone who would listen but nobody had a clue. My regular doctor, the naturopath, the nutritionist and the iridoligst were all very, very confused.

Does this solve the mystery of the pears? See you in a week!

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Nutritional Deficiency

Symptoms & Recommendations For 24 Common Nutritional Deficiencies
By: B. SixWise

When the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion compiled their Healthy Eating Index for 1999-2000, they found only a slight reason to smile. Ten percent of the population had a good diet.

This was based on 10 aspects including how many servings of fruits, vegetables and meat were being consumed, along with how much sodium and cholesterol, and variety in a person’s diet.

The rest of their findings left something to be desired:

16 percent of the population had a “poor” diet

The rest of the population (74 percent) had a diet that “needed improvement”

As the USDA pointed out, poor or inadequate diets are linked to four of the top 10 causes of death — heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. And as it turns out, most of us have less-than-ideal diets that essentially leave our bodies starving for more nutrients.

Along with poor diets, studies have found that key nutrients in foods have declined from 1909 to 1994, likely because the soil is not as nutrient-dense as it once was and processing of foods degrades nutrients that do exist. So not only are we eating fewer healthy foods, but those we do eat contain fewer nutrients than they once did.

As a result, many Americans — even those who think they are eating relatively healthy — may be suffering from a nutritional deficiency. Some of the more common ones in the United States include: Zinc Iron B vitamins Magnesium Calcium Vitamins E and C Phosphorus Vitamin D Fiber Folic Acid Essential Fatty Acids Chromium

If you are experiencing any unusual health symptoms, a nutrient deficiency could be to blame. Below is a list of common and not-so-common nutrients, along with deficiency symptoms and foods you should eat if you think you need more.

Biotin

Deficiency: Uncommon

Symptoms: Dermatitis, eye inflammation, hair loss, loss of muscle control, insomnia, muscle weakness

Recommended Foods: Swiss chard, cauliflower, liver, salmon, carrots, bananas, cereals, yeast

Calcium

Deficiency: Average diet contains 40 to 50% of RDA

Symptoms: Brittle nails, cramps, delusions, depression, insomnia, irritability, osteoporosis, palpitations, peridontal disease, rickets, tooth decay

Recommended Foods: Spinach, turnip greens, mustard greens, collard greens, yogurt, milk, mozzarella cheese

Chromium

Deficiency: 90% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Anxiety, fatigue, glucose intolerance, adult-onset diabetes

Recommended Foods: Romaine lettuce, onions, tomatoes, brewer’s yeast, oysters, liver, whole grains, bran cereals, potatoes

Copper

Deficiency: 75% of diets deficient; average diet contains 50% of RDA

Anemia, arterial damage, depression, diarrhea, fatigue, fragile bones, hair loss, hyperthyroidism, weakness

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, crimini mushrooms, turnip greens, blackstrap molasses, raw cashew nuts, sunflower seeds, spinach, asparagus

Essential fatty acids

Deficiency: Very common

Symptoms: Diarrhea, dry skin and hair, hair loss, immune impairment, infertility, poor wound healing, premenstrual syndrome, acne, eczema, gall stones, liver degeneration

Recommended Foods: Wild-caught salmon (avoid farm-raised salmon because of pollutants), flax seeds, walnuts

Folic Acid

Deficiency: Average diet contains 60% of RDA; deficient in 100% of elderly in one study; deficient in 48% of adolescent girls; requirement doubles in pregnancy

Symptoms: Anemia, apathy, diarrhea, fatigue, headaches, insomnia, loss of appetite, neural tube defects in fetus, paranoia, shortness of breath, weakness

Recommended Foods: Romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, mustard greens, calf’s liver, parsley, collard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, beets, lentils

Iodine

Deficiency: Uncommon since the supplementation of salt with iodine

Symptoms: Cretinism, fatigue, hypothyroidism, weight gain

Recommended Foods: Sea vegetables, yogurt, cow’s milk, eggs, strawberries, mozzarella cheese

Iron

Deficiency: Most common mineral deficiency

Symptoms: Anemia, brittle nails, confusion, constipation, depression, dizziness, fatigue, headaches, inflamed tongue, mouth lesions

Recommended Foods: Chard, spinach, turmeric, thyme, shitake mushrooms, green beans

Magnesium

Deficiency: 75 to 85% of diets deficient: average diet contains 50 to 60% of RDA

Symptoms: Anxiety, confusion, heart attack, hyperactivity, insomnia, nervousness, muscular irritability, restlessness, weakness

Recommended Foods: Swiss chard, spinach, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, black beans, navy beans

Manganese

Deficiency: Unknown, may be common in women

Symptoms: Atherosclerosis, dizziness, elevated cholesterol, glucose intolerance, hearing loss, loss of muscle control, ringing in ears

Recommended Foods: Mustard greens, kale, chard, raspberries, pineapple, romaine lettuce, collard greens, maple syrup Niacin (B3)

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Bad breath, canker sores, confusion, depression, dermatitis, diarrhea, emotional instability, fatigue, irritability, loss of appetite, memory impairment, muscle weakness, nausea, skin eruptions, inflammation

Recommended Foods: Crimini mushrooms, tuna (be cautious of mercury and other pollutants that can be found in fish), wild-caught salmon, chicken breast, asparagus

Pantothenic acid (B5)

Deficiency: Average elderly diet contains 60% of RDA

Symptoms: Abdominal pains, burning feet, depression, eczema, fatigue, hair loss, immune impairment, insomnia, irritability, low blood pressure, muscle spasms, nausea, poor coordination

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, mushrooms, cauliflower, broccoli, turnip greens, sunflower seeds

Potassium

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Acne, constipation, depression, edema, excessive water consumption, fatigue, glucose intolerance, high cholesterol levels, insomnia, mental impairment, muscle weakness, nervousness, poor reflexes

Recommended Foods: Chard, button mushrooms, spinach, avocado, papaya, lima beans, lentil beans

Pyridoxine (B6)

Deficiency: 71% of male and 90% of female diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, anemia, arthritis, eye inflammation, depression, dizziness, facial oiliness, fatigue, impaired wound healing, irritability, loss of appetite, loss of hair, mouth lesions, nausea

Recommended Foods: Bell peppers, turnip greens, spinach, tuna, banana, chicken breast, turkey breast

Riboflavin

Deficiency: Deficient in 30% of elderly Britons

Symptoms: Blurred vision, cataracts, depression, dermatitis, dizziness, hair loss, inflamed eyes, mouth lesions, nervousness, neurological symptoms (numbness, loss of sensation, “electric shock” sensations), seizures, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, weakness

Recommended Foods: Mushrooms, calf’s liver, spinach, spelt

Selenium

Deficiency: Average diet contains 50% of RDA

Symptoms: Growth impairment, high cholesterol levels, increased incidence of cancer, pancreatic insufficiency (inability to secrete adequate amounts of digestive enzymes), immune impairment, liver impairment, male sterility

Recommended Foods: Button mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, cod, shrimp, snapper, tuna, halibut, calf’s liver, wild-caught salmon (again, be wary of pollutants like mercury and PCBs in seafood)

Thiamine

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Confusion, constipation, digestive problems, irritability, loss of appetite, memory loss, nervousness, numbness of hands and feet, pain sensitivity, poor coordination, weakness

Recommended Foods: Asparagus, romaine lettuce, mushrooms, spinach, sunflower seeds, tuna, green peas, tomatoes, eggplant, Brussels sprouts

Vitamin A

Deficiency: 20% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, dry hair, fatigue, growth impairment, insomnia, hyperkeratosis (thickening and roughness of skin), immune impairment, night blindness, weight loss

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, milk, eggs, carrots, spinach, sweet potato, kale, collard greens, chard, red bell peppers

Vitamin B-12

Deficiency: Serum levels low in 25% of hospital patients

Symptoms: Anemia, constipation, depression, dizziness, fatigue, intestinal disturbances, headaches, irritability, loss of vibration sensation, low stomach acid, mental disturbances, moodiness, mouth lesions, numbness, spinal cord degeneration

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, snapper, venison, salmon, beef tenderloin, lamb, scallops

Vitamin C

Deficiency: 20 to 50% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Bleeding gums, depression, easy bruising, impaired wound healing, irritability, joint pains, loose teeth, malaise, tiredness

Recommended Foods: Parsley, broccoli, bell pepper, strawberries, oranges, lemon juice, papaya, cauliflower, kale, mustard greens, Brussels sprouts

Vitamin D

Deficiency: 62% of elderly women’s diets deficient

Symptoms: Burning sensation in mouth, diarrhea, insomnia, myopia, nervousness, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, rickets, scalp sweating

Recommended Foods: Shrimp, milk, cod liver oil, eggs (you can also get vitamin D from sensible sun exposure)

Vitamin E

Deficiency: 23% of male and 15% of female diets deficient

Symptoms: Gait disturbances, poor reflexes, loss of position sense, loss of vibration sense, shortened red blood cell life

Recommended Foods: Mustard greens, chard, sunflower seeds, turnip greens, almonds, spinach

Vitamin K

Deficiency: Deficiency in pregnant women and newborns common

Symptoms: Bleeding disorders

Recommended Foods: Spinach, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, carrots, green string beans, asparagus, red bell peppers, strawberries, eggs, tomatoes, green peas

Zinc

Deficiency: 68% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, amnesia, apathy, brittle nails, delayed sexual maturity, depression, diarrhea, eczema, fatigue, growth impairment, hair loss, high cholesterol levels, immune impairment, impotence, irritability, lethargy, loss of appetite, loss of sense of taste, low stomach acid, male infertility, memory impairment, night blindness, paranoia, white spots on nails, wound healing impairment

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, mushrooms, spinach, beef tenderloin, pumpkin seeds, green peas.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

What are the Side Effects of Chromium Picolinate?

Chromium is a mineral that humans require in trace amounts. It’s found in small quantities in foods such as brewer’s yeast, calf liver, whole grains, processed meats and cheese. In 1959, chromium was first identified as an element that enables the hormone insulin to function properly. Since then, chromium has been studied for diabetes and has become a popular dietary supplement. It is widely available in health food stores, drug stores and online.

Studies on Chromium

Chromium is also believed to help the body process carbohydrates and fats. It is marketed as a weight loss aid for dieters and an ergogenic (muscle-building) aid for bodybuilders and athletes. One form in particular, chromium picolinate, is popular because it is one of the more easily absorbed forms. In 1995, a study headed by Diane Stearns, PhD, at Dartmouth College generated controversy about the safety of chromium picolinate.

The researchers added high concentrations of chromium picolinate, chromium chloride or chromium nicotinate to hamster cells in culture and found that only chromium picolinate could damage the genetic material of the hamster cells. Since then, other laboratory studies using cell cultures and animals have suggested chromium picolinate causes oxidative stress and DNA damage. Critics say that the scientists used unrealistically high doses and that administering chromium to cells in test tubes is not the same as taking chromium supplements orally.

No adverse events have been consistently and frequently reported with short-term chromium use in human studies. For this reason, the Institute of Medicine has not set a recommended upper limit for chromium.

Little Information on Safety of Chromium

In 2004, the Institute of Medicine reviewed the safety information on chromium for a prototype monograph and concluded that chromium picolinate is safe when used in a way consistent with published clinical data (up to 1.6 milligrams of chromium picolinate per day or 200 micrograms of chromium per day for three to six months).
There is very little information, however, about the safety of long-term use of chromium. There have been rare clinical case reports of adverse side effects after taking chromium picolinate supplements.

For example, a report published in the journal The Annals of Pharmacotherapy described the case of a 33-year-old woman who developed kidney failure, liver damage, and anemia after taking 1,200 to 2,400 micrograms of chromium picolinate (approximately six to 12 times the recommended daily allowance) for five months for weight loss.

The woman was being actively treated with antipsychotic medication, so it’s difficult to say whether it was the chromium, the combination of chromium with the medication, or another medical problem that predisposed her to such a reaction.

In a separate case report, a 24-year-old man who had been taking a supplement containing chromium picolinate for two weeks during his workout sessions developed acute kidney failure. Although chromium picolinate was the suspected cause, it’s important to note that there were other ingredients in the supplement which may have been responsible.

There are some concerns that chromium picolinate may affect levels of neurotransmitters (substances in the body that transmit nerve impulses). This may potentially be a concern for people with conditions such as depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

Chromium picolinate may have an additive effect if combined with diabetes medication and cause blood glucose levels to dip too low. That’s why it’s important to talk your doctor before taking any form of chromium if you are also taking diabetes medication.

Chromium supplements taken with medications that block the formation of prostaglandins (hormone-like substances), such as ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen, and aspirin, may increase the absorption of chromium in the body.

The safety of chromium picolinate in pregnant or nursing women has not been established. Although there is no human data, chromium picolinate administered to pregnant mice was found to cause skeletal birth defects in the developing fetus.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

So what I find interesting is that in everything that I’ve read, they all seem to say that chromium is a difficult mineral to absorb. So why did it work after one dosage for me? I used a formula called Chromium Picolinate.

Chromium

Chromium is a difficult mineral to absorb. Figures range from 0.5-3 percent absorption for the inorganic chromium salts often found in food. The organic complexes of chromium, such as GTF, are absorbed better, at about 10-20 percent. The kidneys clear any excess from the blood, while much of chromium intake is eliminated through the feces. This mineral is stored in many parts of the body, including the skin, fat, brain, muscles, spleen, kidneys, and testes.

Following yeast in chromium concentration are beef, liver, whole wheat, rye, fresh chilies, oysters, potatoes, wheat germ, green peppers, eggs, chicken, apples, butter, bananas, and spinach. Yeast (44 ppm), black pepper (10 ppm), and molasses (2 ppm) are good sources of chromium, but since they are usually consumed in small quantities, it is best to have other chromium foods in the diet. In general, the whole grains, meats, shellfish, chicken, wheat germ and bran, and many vegetables, especially potato skins, are adequate sources. Beets and mushrooms may contain chromium.

Requirements: There is no specific RDA for chromium. Average daily intake may be about 80-100 mcg. We probably need a minimum of 1-2 mcg. going into the blood to maintain tissue levels; since only around 2 percent of our intake is absorbed, we need at least 100-200 mcg. in the daily diet. A safe dosage range for chromium supplementation is between 200-300 mcg. Children need somewhat less.

Many vitamin or mineral supplements contain about 100-150 mcg. of chromium. Some people take up to 1 mg. (1,000 mcg.) per day for short periods without problems; this is not suggested as a long-term regimen but rather to help replenish chromium stores when deficiency is present. All of the precursors to the active form of GTF are used in some formulas, but usually with chromium in lower doses, such as 50 mcg., since it is thought to be better absorbed with niacin and the amino acids glycine, cysteine and glutamic acid.

The Best Form of Chromium

Chromium picolinate is a unique molecule that combines chromium with picolinic acid, a compound found in breast milk, which helps the body better absorb and process minerals. In 11 clinical trials, chromium picolinate has distinguished itself as more bioactive than other forms in insulin resistant people.

In a sampling of 31 studies using chromium picolinate, chromium polynicotinate and chromium chloride, chromium picolinate had the greatest number of studies supporting its efficacy. More importantly, a greater percentage of the total number of chromium clinical studies show significant positive benefit in blood glucose control in people with diabetes when chromium picolinate is the supplement.

For example, 91 percent of studies with chromium picolinate showed significant benefit while only 38 percent of chromium chloride studies showed any benefit. and only 29 percent of studies using other forms of chromium showed any positive results; conversely, a majority (71 percent) of studies using other forms of chromium showed “no significant benefit.”

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Chromium is closely associated with the pancreas, and therefore helps to alleviate symptoms of a hypoglycemic and/or diabetic condition by balancing the blood sugar. Chromium helps us to burn fat, build muscle mass, and properly metabolize calories.

Chromium is zapped out of our bodies in our youth as a result of eating starchy demineralized foods and refined sugar. Most chromium deficiencies are chronic. It is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium.

Chromium is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium. Seems like an obvious place to look? But then again, I’ve tried chomium before without the same success but I’ll bet it was because I had to fix the imbalance with copper first. And here’s a site that says that exact thing.

“The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance.”

So it’s not only copper, it was the other minerals as well…

CHROMIUM

Chromium deficiency is a major factor in the development of heart disease (heart attacks, hardening of the arteries). Chromium is stored principally in the kidneys, spleen and testes, with trace amounts found in the heart, lungs, pancreas and brain. The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance as well.

Chromium helps the body regulate metabolism, and regulate insulin and blood sugar levels. Chromium helps the body lose weight by stimulating enzymes that metabolize glucose for energy. It plays an important role in the liver synthesis of fatty acids (burns fat). When the body is deficient in chromium, twice the amount of time is needed for insulin to remove glucose from the blood. Chromium enhances insulin performance and glucose utilization and helps carry proteins. Chromium works best if taken before meals. Refined sugar causes the body to deplete chromium more rapidly. Strenuous exercise can also deplete chromium levels. The elderly are unable to store as much chromium in the body as are younger people. The refining of starches and carbohydrates robs foods of chromium. If you are American you have less chromium in the soil compared to European soil.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Minerals involved in the keratin synthesis can cause hair loss and I’ve a imblance with almost all of them. Copper, zinc, calcium, chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, nickel and selenium.

Minerals and Hair Loss

Minerals in trace amounts are essential to the health of the human body, including the hair. Minerals are inorganic and are found in rocks and soil as well as in all living organisms. Iron is the mineral necessary to transport oxygen throughout the body, but is often deficient in the average persons diet. A severe shortage of iron or the inability to assimilate iron will result in anemia, which will cause a slowing of hair growth. Sulphur is involved in the chemical bonding of the hair and gives the hair protein its strength. Inadequate amounts of sulphur will weaken the hair strands. Copper compounds aid in forming keratin which gives the hair its texture. Copper also helps to manufacture pigments which produce color in the hair. Zinc is necessary for keratin synthesis, as are calcium, chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, nickel and selenium.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

No vibration last night and none again this morning.

So was it the chromium or the pantothenic acid? Yesterday I felt really good all day and I think it was the chromium. I barely took any supplements and I had no cold hands for the entire day. I took half a magnesium and one chromium in the morning and pantothenic acid throughout the day. I also took molybdenum and a vitamin C but that’s it.

I’m going on vacation starting tomorrow and I’ll be making sure that I have all my vitamins and minerals with me…especially the chromium.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 21, 2007

No vibration last night and none again this morning.

Chromium & Copper: These two elements are the most important nutrients next to calcium and magnesium for their anti-inflammatory properties. They share left / right-sided cell receptors and are considered essential to human health.

While neither one – with few exceptions – is generally found to be very deficient level-wise, chromium (Cr) is on average always lower than copper (Cu), with virtually no exceptions. Copper, on the other hand is elevated in the majority of patients, which creates a chronic copper / chromium conflict ratio-wise in these individuals.

In fact, of all the patients I have tested since the mid 70’s, nearly 90% exhibited a chemical profile that in addition to their own unique chemistry contained an underlying pattern that reflected the impact of high copper levels on various opposing nutrients, which include chromium, molybdenum, sulfur, nickel, Vitamin C, hesperidin, and others.

Although chromium appears to be normal on the following graph, it is very low in ratio to copper, it’s associated element, so when supplementing chromium, its level will generally not increase at first, but instead it will gradually lower copper, and in the example below, potassium, since they are high in ratio to chromium. Only after copper and potassium have been reduced to normal levels, chromium may at that point start to go up. However, since sufficient amounts of chromium are rarely used, in practice, copper and potassium just come down closer to normal, and chromium levels stay the same.

Magnesium levels frequently go up following long-term supplementation of chromium because of it’s synergism with chromium, and also because of potassium (which is a magnesium antagonist) going down, and thus not exerting an inhibiting effect on magnesium any longer.

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

I go through my vitamins and minerals looking for pantothenic acid and chromium. I’ve tried both before without much luck but this time it maybe different. If they are both linked to high levels of copper, now that I have that somewhat under control, it might make a difference this time.

I managed to find them in my archived section of vitamins and so I take one of each and go to bed. They both have a link to high levels of copper and candida. Pantothenic acid has a link with the adrenals too.

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

Another weird day. Today I have a bunch of vitamins and minerals with me and I’ll take them as I need them. Because I’m having such a hard time trying to figure it which supplements are actually helping, I take one at a time to see if it has any effect.

Around lunchtime, I start getting the cold hands so I take the magnesium, then manganese and a few more but nothing seems to have an effect. I don’t start lunch until around 1:30 PM and my hands are still very cold and I’m not sure what to do? Nothing seems to work like it used to.

About 15 minutes into my lasagna my hands go warm. Huh? Okay, now I’m really confused…

On my way back to the office, I start to realize that for most of this week my cold hands disappear after lunch and I would skip the night time vitamins because I felt so good. But for every day this week, I’d take my daily routine of supplements with my lunch…except for today.

What does this mean? Having symptoms disappear after eating food. Isn’t that diabetes?

I do a quick google search and discover this:

Pantothenic Acid Deficiency

Excessive copper levels have been associated with low levels of pantothenic acid

Hypoglycemia

Functional hypoglycemia is frequently associated with elevated tissue copper levels. An excess of tissue copper reduces manganese and zinc, thereby interfering with normal glucose metabolism.

Well, there’s no doubt in my mind that high copper can reduce manganese and zinc. I do another search on hypoglycemia and start reading about the link with the mineral chromium. Destroyed by sugar intake the symptoms are anxiety, elevated blood triglycerides and peripheral neuropathy. I still remember a doctor at the walk in clinic making the comment about how high my triglycerides were but stopped short of telling me what I should do about it.

Chromium is already extremely hard to get within a healthy diet. Everybody must be low in chromium.

Great. Something new to research…

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

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If copper is a synergist with potassium would that create high levels of potassium? Most everything that I have been taking is potassium antagonists. Manganese, magnesium, chromium, sulfur, phosphorus, niacin, choline and lecithin.

July 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

Very weird. When I first woke up this morning I could feel the vibration. But as I woke up it disappeared. I waited and changed positions a number of times but it didn’t come back.

May be too early yet to claim success but we’ll see.

Took one 99 mg of potassium and it was off to work!

July 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 19, 2007

Today I started off by adding kelp to my vitamins. Similar to yesterday, I took kelp first thing in the morning and then the rest just before lunch when my hands started getting cold.

I took one 250 mg of magnesium and that seemed to work until early afternoon and I got the cold hands again. With the idea of potassium floating around in my head, I decide to purchase two bananas just to see if it had any effect…and it did. I was fine for the rest of the day.

Around dinner time, I start to feel that very mild chest pain pressure that I used to feel when my magnesium was really low. This hasn’t happened in a very long time but it makes sense because I’m taking less magnesium lately. In fact, it hasn’t happened since I discovered the zinc deficiency.

This is the one weird symptom that scares me the most so I take 250 mg of magnesium and I add one 99 mg of potassium for good measure. If this was a sign of low magnesium and I’m sure that it was, could it be a low level of potassium?

Took another 99 mg of potassium before going to bed.

Here’s my latest thesis:

If low magnesium was causing the sodium to go high then the last time I tried to add potassium was before the magnesium loss was corrected. Therefore there would be no way that I could correct the potassium imbalance as long as the magnesium loss still existed.

Magnesium activates a key enzyme in cell membranes that controls the balance of sodium and potassium. This is absolutely essential to the electrical activity of nerve cells, as well as to the very existence of a cell. If it’s sodium-potassium ratio is too far out of balance, the cell would burst.

Oh boy….here we go again…

July 19, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 19, 2007

Potassium…time to take a look at this again.

The Adrenals

The adrenal glands are a pair of triangle shaped organs that rest on top of the kidneys. The glands are made up of two parts, the cortex or outer section, which produces cortisone, and the medulla or center section, which secretes adrenaline.

In addition to producing cortisone, the adrenal cortex also helps to maintain the salt and water balance in the body, and is involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates and the regulation of blood sugar.

The adrenal medulla produces adrenaline, also known as the hormone epinephrine, when the body is under stress. This hormone speeds up the metabolism and produces other changes within the body that assist in coping with danger.

The adrenal help wake us up in the morning by producing cortisol which suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. The adrenal help control our blood sugar. They make hormones, which help raise our blood sugar under times of stress so that we can have energy. The adrenals control sodium, potassium and chlorides in our body, which adjust our fluid balance. They do this by working with the kidneys. The adrenals work closely with our thyroid gland to keep are metabolism high. The adrenals act like the fuel pump and the thyroid like the spark plugs. This keeps the fuel we consume for our food being combusted into energy.

When we have stress, whether physical or emotional, adrenal hormones help provide energy for us to get through the stress. The adrenals need vitamins, minerals and amino acids in order to make the hormones and to repair and keep themselves healthy. Vitamin C, B5, B6, iron, manganese, sodium and potassium act as stimulants to the adrenals. Vitamin B12, B2, Calcium, magnesium, copper, vitamin D can regulate the adrenals by slowing them down if they are going to fast or by suppressing them below normal. It takes more then the RDA or the amounts found common it foods to do this.

—————————————————————————

Adrenal Exhaustion

An all-four-low mineral pattern is usually accompanied by a wide range of distressful symptoms, not the least of which is exhaustion. It is important to realize that individuals who suffer from all-four-low macro-minerals were probably at one time fast oxidizers. However, due to severe stress over a prolonged period of time, their adrenal glands eventually collapsed, as indicated by their current below normal levels of sodium and potassium.

Many of the problems associated with a fast oxidizer who has slipped into adrenal exhaustion, as indicated by all-four-low macro minerals, are directly related to inadequate reserves of calcium, magnesium and zinc.

Correction of the Problem

To correct the multitude of problems associated with four-low macro minerals, it is necessary to give relatively large amounts of calcium, magnesium and zinc as this trio of minerals is effective in alleviating current everyday stress placed upon the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands can be made less responsive to mineral-depleting stress, by supplementing the principal nutrients that are sacrificed during stress, (calcium, magnesium and zinc) rather than allowing the adrenal glands to be further exhausted by stress.

Sodium/Magnesium Ratio

Sodium and magnesium tend to be antagonistic. As one goes up the other goes down. The ratio of the two minerals often gives a better picture of adrenal activity than the sodium level alone.

I love that last paragraph. Even though the mineral relationships don’t indicate anything between sodium and magnesium, they suggest there is one. Interestingly, as one goes up the other goes down…so if I was extremely low in magnesium wouldn’t the sodium be high enough to cause the potassium to go low?

July 19, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

Something to keep in mind if I use high copper level as a starting point. What other vitamins and minerals can be effected? Copper, in excess, tends to lower potassium levels? I’ve tried potassium before and didn’t notice any difference. But I do know that it can cause nervousness and has a link with the adrenals.

Effects Of Copper On Other Minerals

Copper, in excess, tends to lower manganese, zinc and potassium levels. Copper toxicity can also result in deficiency of vitamin C and B6, inositol, folic acid and rutin.
Copper tends to increase tissue levels of calcium and sodium.
Copper can displace iron from the liver.

Effects Of Other Minerals And Vitamins On Copper

Mercury, cadmium and zinc – compete for absorption.
Molybdenum and sulfur – bind copper in the intestine.
Iron and manganese – remove copper from the liver.
Zinc – lowers copper levels in the blood.
Vitamin C – chelates copper in the blood.
Vitamin B6, folic acid and niacin are also copper antagonists.
Cobalt is synergetic with copper.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

I’m really starting to get annoyed because I can’t figure out what the problem is. I know it’s deficiency…but what?

Back to googling “nervousness” + “deficiency”. I’m looking through all the regular vitamins and minerals and I feel like I’ve tried them all but then I notice one that maybe of interest. I don’t think I’ve done any in depth research on it. It goes on to mention how a reaction requires selenium and that a deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects. I can say without a doubt that I had a deficiency with all of the above vitamins and minerals so I really need to look at this very closely. It also has a link to candida.

Nutrient Interactions: Iodine

How do other nutrients interact with iodine?

The conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodthyronine (T3) requires the removal of an iodine molecule from T4. This reaction requires the mineral selenium. The iodine molecule that is removed gets returned to the body’s pool of iodine and can be reused to make additional thyroid hormones.

If your body is deficient in selenium, the conversion of T4 to T3 is slowed, and less iodine is available for the thryoid to use in making new hormones.

Animal studies have shown that arsenic interferes with the uptake of iodine by the thyroid, leading to goiter. In addition, dietary deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects of iodine deficiency.

Iodine deficiency causing defective free radical generation

Most people who do not regularly eat seafood (either fish or kelp) or use iodized salt have some degree of iodine deficiency; this can also occur as a result of a low-salt diet. These individuals may become hypothyroid and hypometabolic, because iodine is an essential ingredient in thyroid hormone. At the same time they may become more sensitive to yeast infections, due to inactivity of the myeloperoxidase enzyme, which uses iodine in cell mediated immune function.

The iodine is used by this enzyme to product iodine-free radicals which are part of the cellular anti-yeast “free radical artillery”. Previous to the use of nystatin as an antifungal drug, iodine therapy was successfully used to treat yeast infections; however, one must be very careful with the dosage. People who are sensitive to various foods and chemicals are frequently intolerant to iodine and should only use it in very low dosages.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

I don’t think it’s niacin anymore…

I took one 100 mg niacin in the morning and nothing else. I lasted until lunch and then I got the cold hands. It lasted much longer than I expected without taking anything other than niacin. I took one half of the calcium and one niacin. I was good for the rest of the afternoon but then I got the nerve feeling in my head around 6:30 PM and I also got my mild magnesium chest pain around the same time so I took one 250 mg of magnesium and was fine for the rest of the evening.

So what is it? Phosphorus?

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

Woke up with no vibration. Perfect!

I went back through the blog reading my entries on niacin and when I took it, it seemed to have an effect on the vibration at night but I would always be vibrating in the morning.

I think the low phosphorus may have played a role and the niacin wasn’t absorbed properly.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 17, 2007

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Taking another look at the interrelationships I noticed that niacin (Vitamin B3) has a relationship with copper. Now that I think I’ve somewhat balanced the zinc/copper ratio, I’m curious to know if there is a difference now when I add niacin.

(Note to self: Reached 40,000 page views today!)

July 17, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

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