Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 18, 2008

Vitamins and Minerals for Diabetes

VITAMINS AND MINERALS THAT LOWERS BLOOD SUGAR

Minerals are the vital constituents for the formation of body structures such as bones and tissues. They are also involved in major physiological processes such as proper metabolism and energy production. There are various minerals that are helpful in treating diabetes and slowing down diabetic complications.

The most important mineral is Chromium. It is also known as Diabetic Mineral. It is because the main function of chromium in is body is to turn carbohydrates into glucose. Chromium also helps in the regulation and production of hormone insulin. It has been observed that due to chromium only the

Insulin works effectively in the body and without it, insulin simply would not function. Good sources of chromium are nuts, cheese, whole, grains, oysters, mushrooms, brewer’s yeast, etc. Long time researches have shown that the symptoms of diabetes completely reverses particularly of Type –2 Diabetes mellitus.

It is because insulin regulates and normalize blood sugar and it also improves body’s ability to transport blood glucose into cells. It has also been seen that the chromium supplements improves glucose tolerance and thus brings it to normal. It reduces fasting glucose and insulin levels in

gestational diabetes. It encourages the loss of body fat. It enhances insulin secretion and decreases trighlycerides Chromium also promotes muscular gains.

Vanadium: It is also associated with proper glucose regulation. It acts like insulin in the body and also enhances its effects. That is why this mineral is extensively known for its role in the management of diabetes. Food sources of vanadium include skin milk, lobster, vegetables, butter and cheese. Vanadium is named after the Scandinavian goddess of beauty and youth. Vanadium is also a building material of bones and teeth. Although, researchers have know vanadium for more than forty

years but the mineral is not yet considered as a essential constituent for humans. It is essential for plants and animals. But Vanadium must be needed to be as an essential nutrient in our diet. Vanadium in case of diabetics- improves fasting glucose levels. It also increases insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. It lowers the insulin requirements in type –1 diabetes.

Manganese: Manganese maintains the blood glucose level in normal range and hence is useful in treating diabetes and hypoghlycaemia. Manganese is also used in our body for fat and protein metabolism and the production of energy. It is needed for growth, maintenance of connective tissue, bone, cartilage and

also helps in fatty acid synthesis. Manganese is also useful in the treatment of epilepsy, anosexia and iron deficiency. Moreover, the absorption of vitamin C, B and E depends upon the sufficient amount of manganese so the person’s multi-vitamin supplement should contain sufficient amount of manganese in it. Dietary sources of manganese include whole green cereals, leafy vegetables, nuts and tea.

Magnesium: Magnesium is mainly important for hypoglycaemics because it helps in the digestion of sugar, starches and fats and also helps in stabilizing blood sugar levels. It has been known from many years that the secretion and action of insulin require magnesium. Hence for diabetic patient and for persons

in whom intake of refined carbohydrates is too much, in them the supplement of magnesium is very much necessary. It is a person crave for chocolate, it may be an indication that he is low in magnesium. The dietary sources of magnesium are whole grains, nuts, seeds, cocoa milk, green vegetables, sea food,

brown rice. Magnesium is also involved in thyroid hormone production. Magnesium along with calcium helps in muscle contraction and helps in producing energy especially in muscle cells. Magnesium is also involved in producing stomach acid and digestive enzymes.

Zinc: Zinc is needed for proper release of insulin and many hypoglycaemics may be deficient. Zinc supplements are beneficial for patients with chronic diseases like diabetes. Some of the other Zinc’s functions include cholesterol, protein and energy metabolism growth, healing and immune functions. Dietary sources of Zinc include meat, eggs, sunflower seeds, milk, wholegrains, spinach etc. But a person should keep in mind that Zinc is destroyed when food is processed so they should eat the Zinc containing food in their natural form as much as possible. Moreover, Zinc absorption is reduced in alcoholics and diuretics. Stress also causes Zinc levels to drop rapidly.

Vitamins are an essential part of human body. The vitamin helps in improving digestion and therefore, increases the body’s ability to tolerate low glucose levels. They also know as Anti-Stress vitamins because of their good effects on the brain and nervous system. The B-complex vitamins are a group of eight vitamins, which include Thiamine (B1), Riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), Pyridoxina (B6), Folic Acid (B9), Cyanocobalmin (B12), Pantothenic acid and bioten. A particular potential benefit of vitamin B supplements for diabetics is mainly its ability to lower blood levels of homocysteine (a suphur-containing amino acid). Hence, the vitamins B are also essential for breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, which provides energy for the body. It also helps in breakdown of fats and proteins, which helps in normal functioning of the nervous system.

Vitamin B-6 is helpful in the women reporting with gestational diabetes and for protection against metabolic imbalances associated with the use of some oral contraceptive. Vitamin B6 is also useful in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. It help in reducing homocysteine. It maintains fluid balance and is essential for cellular energy production. It is somewhat beneficial to prevent skin eruptions also. Therefore, the amaging family of vitamin B is very helpful. Vitamin B6 levels are even lower in people with diabetes who have nerve damage i.e. neuropathy. So, the administration of bath Vitamin B1 (25 mg per day) and vitamin B6 (50 mg per day) shows significant improvement of symptoms of diabetic neuropathy after four weeks, because Vitamin B1 is also found to be low in people with type 1 diabetes.

Biotin (The Vitamin B) is needed to process of glucose. Patient with Type-1 of diabetes showed fasting glucose level dropped by 50% on administration of 16 mg of biotin per day for one week. Biotin may also reduce pain from diabetic nerve damage.

Vitamin C: Diabetic people also have low vitamin C levels. Vitamin C may reduce glycosylation. Vitamin C also lowers sorbital in people with diabetes. Sorbital is a sugar that can accumulate and damage the nerves eyes and kidney of people with diabetes. Vitamin C may improve glucose tolerance in patients with Type-2 diabetes. Vitamin C significantly reduces urinary protein loss in people with diabetes. Diabetic people should have 1-3 grams per day of vitamin C.

Vitamin B-12: Vitamin B-12 is needed for normal functioning of nerve cells. Vitamin B12 taken orally, intravenously or by injection reduces the nerve damage caused by diabetes in most of the people. The intake of large amounts of niacin (a form of the vitamin B 3), such as 2-3 grams per day, may impair glucose tolerance and shall be used by diabetic people only under doctor’s advice.

Vitamin D: It is needed to maintain adequate blood levels of insulin. Vitamin D receptors have been found in the pancreas where insulin is produced hence the supplements of vitamin D, increases insulin level in people suffering form diabetes. But it should be given in accurate dose as high dose of vitamin D can be toxic.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E prevents the destructive vascular damage that may occur in diabetes. Vitamin E supplements prevents the arterial degeneration in patients suffering from diabetes. Vitamin E decreases the requirement of insulin by diabetic people. Vitamin E is available naturally in whole grain products, wheat products, fruits, green leafy vegetables milk, whole raw or sprouted seeds.

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October 24, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for February 26, 2008

Started the day with a magnesium, lunch switched to calcium/magnesium, another calcium/magnesium before leaving and another calcium/magnesium at dinner. Felt so much better than yesterday. I think my problem is still potassium and yesterday I was fighting it with magnesium which doesn’t have the same relationship as calcium does. Added Chromium after reading that it can lower potassium. I skipped the lecithin today and my cold hands weren’t as bad.

I think I’ll stick to the mineral balancing instead of the herbs…

August 22, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for November 25, 2007

Came across this article today about how high dosages of zinc can interfere with chromium absorption. Uh oh…

High dosage zinc interferes with Chromium

CHROMIUM BIOAVAILABILITY: Inorganic Chromium may be used therapeutically but organic forms of Chromium, e.g. GTF complexes, have higher biological activity.  This may partly explain some of the variance in the results of trials.  Phytate-rich diets possibly decrease Chromium absorption.  Chromium is required to metabolise sugar but sugar may increases the excretion of Chromium.  High dosage zinc supplementation possibly interfere with Chromium absorption.

Then I came across another article that suggested chromium will effect the amino acids.

Chromium and Amino Acid Metabolism

As part of Glucose Tolerance Factor (GTF), it works with insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Diseases caused by a chromium deficiency include low blood sugar, diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hyperactivity, learning disabilities, ADD/ADHD, hyperirratability, depression, bi-polar disease, impaired personality traits (bad seed), impaired growth, peripheral neuropathy, negative nitrogen balance (protein loss), elevated blood triglycerides, elevated blood cholesterol, coronary blood vessel disease, aortic cholesterol plaque, infertility and decreased sperm count and a shortened life span.
Chromium (GTF): Found in apples, black pepper, calves liver, cheese, meat and whole grains, grapes, cheese, chicken, corn and corn oil, dairy products, mushrooms, potatoes, beer, oysters, brown rice and dried beans.

BODY PARTS AFFECTED:
Adrenal glands, brain, blood, circulatory system, heart, immune system, liver and white blood cells.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Disturbed amino acid metabolism, increased serum cholesterol, impaired glucose tolerance, lack of energy, myopia, protein/calorie malnutrition, susceptibility to infection; Lowered or escalated blood sugar levels, coronary artery disease. It is essential to the metabolism of glucose and is needed for energy and the synthesis of cholesterol, fats and protein.

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for November 23, 2007

Three days at the new job and I love it here. People are great and I love the fact that I work in the middle of a forest. No longer troubled with the hassles of the transit commute or the traffic congestion in the downtown core. And now that I’m into my new job, I’d really like to get my symptoms under control. I did a little research about how chromium can reduce potassium and copper levels in the body and I know I have some around so I take some in the morning with breakfast.

Chromium & Potassium

Magnesium levels frequently go up following long-term supplementation of chromium because of its synergism with chromium, and also because of potassium (which is a magnesium antagonist) going down, and thus not exerting an inhibiting effect on magnesium any longer.
 
Chromium is the “Gold Standard” to help normalize elevated copper, since it is its associated trace element. More aches and pains, arthritis, slow-healing fractures, sciatica and other back problems, various infections, etc, can be relieved with chelated chromium (not GTF), than with many other supplements – provided they conform to the side-specific requirements (see introduction above), provided that calcium and magnesium are close to normal, since they are also involved with various disorders of the musculoskeletal system, and provided that potassium levels are not below normal, since chromium is a potent potassium antagonist.

When supplementing chromium, its level will generally not increase at first, but instead it will gradually lower copper, and in the example below, potassium, since they are high in ratio to chromium.  Only after copper and potassium have been reduced to normal levels, chromium may at that point start to go up.  However, since sufficient amounts of chromium are rarely used, in practice, copper and potassium just come down closer to normal, and chromium levels stay the same.

I end up having cold hands all morning so is it because of the stress of the new job or because I took one dose of Chromium? Or something else?

I start calling around looking for a naturopathic doctor and I found someone local who has an opening for tomorrow. Fantastic!! I’ll have to gather all of my notes and be sure to include a brief overview of my health history and that could take a while but I want to make sure I get it right this time.

May 30, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 20, 2007

Today I decided to take a break from the vitamins and minerals just to see what would happen. My eyes are still itchy so maybe I’m taking too much of something. Possibly the phosphorus?

I got to around mid-morning and I could feel the mild nerve feeling in my head. I’m still low in something but I have no idea what it could be. I figure it could be the chromium so I take one capsule with my lunch. I also took 1 50 mg of zinc and left it at that. By mid afternoon, the nerve feeling returned so I took a calcium/magnesium and it never returned.

By the evening my eyes are feeling much better so I take another zinc and another calcium/magnesium with my dinner. I also wanted to try something different.

With the addition of the calcium/magnesium in the 2/1 ratio, my candida has mildly improved. It’s nothing significant, it just feels a little better than usual since I made the change. So tonight I thought I’d add some caprylic acid and a grapefruit seed extract. Two things known for candida and I’ve tried them both before without any success.

About an hour after dinner…I notice a difference. I think it’s working this time. I’ll add these two to my supplements tomorrow.

August 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 01, 2007

All this week I’ve had the cold hands around lunch time and nothing seems to fix it. It doesn’t seem to matter what I take or what I eat, it always happens around lunch and it doesn’t return. Sometimes I skip my evening vitamins just to see what happens…nothing!

I go back to researching phosphorus again and I’ve been into a few health food stores lately looking for phosphorus and everyone seems to think it’s weird that I am asking for such a thing. I came across some info with a theory as to what can cause a phosphorus deficiency and it makes perfect sence to me.

DEFICIENCY

Fructose: A recent study of 11 adult men found that a diet high in fructose (20% of total calories) resulted in increased urinary loss of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance (i.e., daily loss of phosphorus was higher than daily intake). This effect was more pronounced if the diet was also low in magnesium. A potential mechanism for this effect is the lack of feed back inhibition of the conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate in the liver. In other words, increased accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate in the cell does not inhibit the enzyme that phosphorylates fructose, using up large amounts of phosphate. This phenomenon is known as phosphate trapping. This finding is relevant because fructose consumption in the U.S. has been increasing rapidly since the introduction of high fructose corn syrup in 1970, while magnesium intake has decreased over the past century.

I did manage to find a web site that sells liquid phosphorus but I’ll wait a bit longer before I do something like that.

In my phosphorus reserach, I come across a bit of information that suggests that phosphorus plays a role with glucose. Could this be why chromium has an effect?

Not getting enough phosphorus can contribute to the following health problems: anxiety, bone problems, fatigue, irregular breathing, irritability, numbness, skin sensitivity, stress, teeth weakness, tremors, weakness, worry, and weight changes. You can also get malaise, stiff joints, and bone pain. It may also cause glucose intolerance, irregular heartbeat and difficulty breathing. Phosphorus deficiency results in bone loss just as calcium deficiency does. Phosphorus toxicity can result in twitching, jerking, and convulsions.

A diet consisting of junk food can have too much phosphorus and this effects the body’s processing of calcium. It has also been found that vitamin D boosts the effectiveness of phosphorus. Magnesium helps in the absorption of phosphorus. Phosphorus speeds up healing, helps to prevent and treat osteoporosis, helps treat bone diseases such as rickets and prevents stunted or slow growth in children.

Phosphorus is needed for healthy nerve impulses, normal kidney functioning, and the utilization of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and for energy production. Phosphorus is a component of DNA and RNA and serves in the preparation of glucose for energy formation.

With the link between riboflavin and niacin, I really need to see if I can find some phosphorus…

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 30, 2007

Back to work today and I’ve got a big bag of pears and apples for the week. Around noon I start to get the cold hands again. I’ve only taken the chromium so I’m not sure what I did wrong? It’s something that I’ve noticed for a while now but there’s no doubt about it anymore. It seems to happen every time I’m at work. It never happens in the evenings or the weekends. I only get my cold hand symptoms when I’m at work and usually, it’s around lunch time.

This is craziness…it’s not making sense anymore…

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 26, 2007

Okay, now I’m confused… woke up with a slight vibration. Yesterday there was none and today it’s back. I’m still taking the chromium and now I’m eating pears so how could it return?

One thing I’ve noticed lately is my hair. Although I can’t really say 100%, it seems to be a little thicker on top. I have my hair cut really short these days and it’s good for checking the progress.

The amazing thing is that I haven’t had my daily cold hands at all for the entire trip so far. This is all very weird…

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 24, 2007

No vibration last night and again this morning. This chromium seems to be working great.

I started the day by adding magnesium back into the rotation with my regular dosage of zinc. Around noon I start to feel a muscle spasm in my upper left arm. I haven’t had muscle spasms in a while so because I’ve taken the magnesium, I figure it’s my level of calcium so I took one capsule of the Cal Apatite and it doesn’t happen again.

Until today, I’ve been taking only zinc and chromium to see what effect it has. I’m adding packham pears to the diet and I’m going to try to eat at least two every day for my natural dosage of chromium.

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Two days with chromium supplementation and no cold hands. No other kind of weird symptoms either.

Great! Just in time for my vacation. Although I’m taking everything with me just in case…

oh, and one more thing. I went to the library yesterday and signed out two books on chromium. In one of the books it mentions that chromium is very, very difficult to get enough of the daily intake through food. And that’s from a healthy eater! Imagine all of the people who don’t eat properly? Anyway, in the back of the book it gives a listing of all kinds of food and how much chromium it contains.

It’s a very interesting read because there are very little foods high in chromium. But what makes it even more interesting is as I was scanning through the list, a certain kind of fruit stood out.

Yup, it was pears. Pears have 30% of daily chromium per 200 g.

Nutrition Information

Pears are a good source of Vitamin C and copper, and an excellent source of chromium and dietary fiber.

Nutrition Facts
Serving size 1 pear with skin (200 g)
Amount Per Serving & % Daily Value*

Calories 120
Fat Cal 0
Total Fat 1g 2%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 30g 10%
Dietary Fiber 5g 21%
Protein 1g 2%
Chromium 30%
Copper 11%
Vitamin A 1%
Vitamin C 13%
Calcium 2%
Iron 3%

Pears have a whopping 30% of chromium but on a regular nutritional web site that I use, chromium is not provided in the list of minerals. I contacted the web site and here is the reply:

“Chromium is not one of the nutrients that the USDA currently test for. As such, we can’t provide information on it.”

Last year I noticed that eating one pear wouldn’t always work and sometimes I would have to eat three of them to actually stop the vibration. Of course I mentioned the pears to anyone who would listen but nobody had a clue. My regular doctor, the naturopath, the nutritionist and the iridoligst were all very, very confused.

Does this solve the mystery of the pears? See you in a week!

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

What are the Side Effects of Chromium Picolinate?

Chromium is a mineral that humans require in trace amounts. It’s found in small quantities in foods such as brewer’s yeast, calf liver, whole grains, processed meats and cheese. In 1959, chromium was first identified as an element that enables the hormone insulin to function properly. Since then, chromium has been studied for diabetes and has become a popular dietary supplement. It is widely available in health food stores, drug stores and online.

Studies on Chromium

Chromium is also believed to help the body process carbohydrates and fats. It is marketed as a weight loss aid for dieters and an ergogenic (muscle-building) aid for bodybuilders and athletes. One form in particular, chromium picolinate, is popular because it is one of the more easily absorbed forms. In 1995, a study headed by Diane Stearns, PhD, at Dartmouth College generated controversy about the safety of chromium picolinate.

The researchers added high concentrations of chromium picolinate, chromium chloride or chromium nicotinate to hamster cells in culture and found that only chromium picolinate could damage the genetic material of the hamster cells. Since then, other laboratory studies using cell cultures and animals have suggested chromium picolinate causes oxidative stress and DNA damage. Critics say that the scientists used unrealistically high doses and that administering chromium to cells in test tubes is not the same as taking chromium supplements orally.

No adverse events have been consistently and frequently reported with short-term chromium use in human studies. For this reason, the Institute of Medicine has not set a recommended upper limit for chromium.

Little Information on Safety of Chromium

In 2004, the Institute of Medicine reviewed the safety information on chromium for a prototype monograph and concluded that chromium picolinate is safe when used in a way consistent with published clinical data (up to 1.6 milligrams of chromium picolinate per day or 200 micrograms of chromium per day for three to six months).
There is very little information, however, about the safety of long-term use of chromium. There have been rare clinical case reports of adverse side effects after taking chromium picolinate supplements.

For example, a report published in the journal The Annals of Pharmacotherapy described the case of a 33-year-old woman who developed kidney failure, liver damage, and anemia after taking 1,200 to 2,400 micrograms of chromium picolinate (approximately six to 12 times the recommended daily allowance) for five months for weight loss.

The woman was being actively treated with antipsychotic medication, so it’s difficult to say whether it was the chromium, the combination of chromium with the medication, or another medical problem that predisposed her to such a reaction.

In a separate case report, a 24-year-old man who had been taking a supplement containing chromium picolinate for two weeks during his workout sessions developed acute kidney failure. Although chromium picolinate was the suspected cause, it’s important to note that there were other ingredients in the supplement which may have been responsible.

There are some concerns that chromium picolinate may affect levels of neurotransmitters (substances in the body that transmit nerve impulses). This may potentially be a concern for people with conditions such as depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

Chromium picolinate may have an additive effect if combined with diabetes medication and cause blood glucose levels to dip too low. That’s why it’s important to talk your doctor before taking any form of chromium if you are also taking diabetes medication.

Chromium supplements taken with medications that block the formation of prostaglandins (hormone-like substances), such as ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen, and aspirin, may increase the absorption of chromium in the body.

The safety of chromium picolinate in pregnant or nursing women has not been established. Although there is no human data, chromium picolinate administered to pregnant mice was found to cause skeletal birth defects in the developing fetus.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

So what I find interesting is that in everything that I’ve read, they all seem to say that chromium is a difficult mineral to absorb. So why did it work after one dosage for me? I used a formula called Chromium Picolinate.

Chromium

Chromium is a difficult mineral to absorb. Figures range from 0.5-3 percent absorption for the inorganic chromium salts often found in food. The organic complexes of chromium, such as GTF, are absorbed better, at about 10-20 percent. The kidneys clear any excess from the blood, while much of chromium intake is eliminated through the feces. This mineral is stored in many parts of the body, including the skin, fat, brain, muscles, spleen, kidneys, and testes.

Following yeast in chromium concentration are beef, liver, whole wheat, rye, fresh chilies, oysters, potatoes, wheat germ, green peppers, eggs, chicken, apples, butter, bananas, and spinach. Yeast (44 ppm), black pepper (10 ppm), and molasses (2 ppm) are good sources of chromium, but since they are usually consumed in small quantities, it is best to have other chromium foods in the diet. In general, the whole grains, meats, shellfish, chicken, wheat germ and bran, and many vegetables, especially potato skins, are adequate sources. Beets and mushrooms may contain chromium.

Requirements: There is no specific RDA for chromium. Average daily intake may be about 80-100 mcg. We probably need a minimum of 1-2 mcg. going into the blood to maintain tissue levels; since only around 2 percent of our intake is absorbed, we need at least 100-200 mcg. in the daily diet. A safe dosage range for chromium supplementation is between 200-300 mcg. Children need somewhat less.

Many vitamin or mineral supplements contain about 100-150 mcg. of chromium. Some people take up to 1 mg. (1,000 mcg.) per day for short periods without problems; this is not suggested as a long-term regimen but rather to help replenish chromium stores when deficiency is present. All of the precursors to the active form of GTF are used in some formulas, but usually with chromium in lower doses, such as 50 mcg., since it is thought to be better absorbed with niacin and the amino acids glycine, cysteine and glutamic acid.

The Best Form of Chromium

Chromium picolinate is a unique molecule that combines chromium with picolinic acid, a compound found in breast milk, which helps the body better absorb and process minerals. In 11 clinical trials, chromium picolinate has distinguished itself as more bioactive than other forms in insulin resistant people.

In a sampling of 31 studies using chromium picolinate, chromium polynicotinate and chromium chloride, chromium picolinate had the greatest number of studies supporting its efficacy. More importantly, a greater percentage of the total number of chromium clinical studies show significant positive benefit in blood glucose control in people with diabetes when chromium picolinate is the supplement.

For example, 91 percent of studies with chromium picolinate showed significant benefit while only 38 percent of chromium chloride studies showed any benefit. and only 29 percent of studies using other forms of chromium showed any positive results; conversely, a majority (71 percent) of studies using other forms of chromium showed “no significant benefit.”

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Chromium is closely associated with the pancreas, and therefore helps to alleviate symptoms of a hypoglycemic and/or diabetic condition by balancing the blood sugar. Chromium helps us to burn fat, build muscle mass, and properly metabolize calories.

Chromium is zapped out of our bodies in our youth as a result of eating starchy demineralized foods and refined sugar. Most chromium deficiencies are chronic. It is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium.

Chromium is the second most prevalent mineral deficiency in America after magnesium. Seems like an obvious place to look? But then again, I’ve tried chomium before without the same success but I’ll bet it was because I had to fix the imbalance with copper first. And here’s a site that says that exact thing.

“The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance.”

So it’s not only copper, it was the other minerals as well…

CHROMIUM

Chromium deficiency is a major factor in the development of heart disease (heart attacks, hardening of the arteries). Chromium is stored principally in the kidneys, spleen and testes, with trace amounts found in the heart, lungs, pancreas and brain. The body cannot easily absorb chromium if other minerals are out of balance as well.

Chromium helps the body regulate metabolism, and regulate insulin and blood sugar levels. Chromium helps the body lose weight by stimulating enzymes that metabolize glucose for energy. It plays an important role in the liver synthesis of fatty acids (burns fat). When the body is deficient in chromium, twice the amount of time is needed for insulin to remove glucose from the blood. Chromium enhances insulin performance and glucose utilization and helps carry proteins. Chromium works best if taken before meals. Refined sugar causes the body to deplete chromium more rapidly. Strenuous exercise can also deplete chromium levels. The elderly are unable to store as much chromium in the body as are younger people. The refining of starches and carbohydrates robs foods of chromium. If you are American you have less chromium in the soil compared to European soil.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

No vibration last night and none again this morning.

So was it the chromium or the pantothenic acid? Yesterday I felt really good all day and I think it was the chromium. I barely took any supplements and I had no cold hands for the entire day. I took half a magnesium and one chromium in the morning and pantothenic acid throughout the day. I also took molybdenum and a vitamin C but that’s it.

I’m going on vacation starting tomorrow and I’ll be making sure that I have all my vitamins and minerals with me…especially the chromium.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 21, 2007

No vibration last night and none again this morning.

Chromium & Copper: These two elements are the most important nutrients next to calcium and magnesium for their anti-inflammatory properties. They share left / right-sided cell receptors and are considered essential to human health.

While neither one – with few exceptions – is generally found to be very deficient level-wise, chromium (Cr) is on average always lower than copper (Cu), with virtually no exceptions. Copper, on the other hand is elevated in the majority of patients, which creates a chronic copper / chromium conflict ratio-wise in these individuals.

In fact, of all the patients I have tested since the mid 70’s, nearly 90% exhibited a chemical profile that in addition to their own unique chemistry contained an underlying pattern that reflected the impact of high copper levels on various opposing nutrients, which include chromium, molybdenum, sulfur, nickel, Vitamin C, hesperidin, and others.

Although chromium appears to be normal on the following graph, it is very low in ratio to copper, it’s associated element, so when supplementing chromium, its level will generally not increase at first, but instead it will gradually lower copper, and in the example below, potassium, since they are high in ratio to chromium. Only after copper and potassium have been reduced to normal levels, chromium may at that point start to go up. However, since sufficient amounts of chromium are rarely used, in practice, copper and potassium just come down closer to normal, and chromium levels stay the same.

Magnesium levels frequently go up following long-term supplementation of chromium because of it’s synergism with chromium, and also because of potassium (which is a magnesium antagonist) going down, and thus not exerting an inhibiting effect on magnesium any longer.

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

I go through my vitamins and minerals looking for pantothenic acid and chromium. I’ve tried both before without much luck but this time it maybe different. If they are both linked to high levels of copper, now that I have that somewhat under control, it might make a difference this time.

I managed to find them in my archived section of vitamins and so I take one of each and go to bed. They both have a link to high levels of copper and candida. Pantothenic acid has a link with the adrenals too.

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

Another weird day. Today I have a bunch of vitamins and minerals with me and I’ll take them as I need them. Because I’m having such a hard time trying to figure it which supplements are actually helping, I take one at a time to see if it has any effect.

Around lunchtime, I start getting the cold hands so I take the magnesium, then manganese and a few more but nothing seems to have an effect. I don’t start lunch until around 1:30 PM and my hands are still very cold and I’m not sure what to do? Nothing seems to work like it used to.

About 15 minutes into my lasagna my hands go warm. Huh? Okay, now I’m really confused…

On my way back to the office, I start to realize that for most of this week my cold hands disappear after lunch and I would skip the night time vitamins because I felt so good. But for every day this week, I’d take my daily routine of supplements with my lunch…except for today.

What does this mean? Having symptoms disappear after eating food. Isn’t that diabetes?

I do a quick google search and discover this:

Pantothenic Acid Deficiency

Excessive copper levels have been associated with low levels of pantothenic acid

Hypoglycemia

Functional hypoglycemia is frequently associated with elevated tissue copper levels. An excess of tissue copper reduces manganese and zinc, thereby interfering with normal glucose metabolism.

Well, there’s no doubt in my mind that high copper can reduce manganese and zinc. I do another search on hypoglycemia and start reading about the link with the mineral chromium. Destroyed by sugar intake the symptoms are anxiety, elevated blood triglycerides and peripheral neuropathy. I still remember a doctor at the walk in clinic making the comment about how high my triglycerides were but stopped short of telling me what I should do about it.

Chromium is already extremely hard to get within a healthy diet. Everybody must be low in chromium.

Great. Something new to research…

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 29, 2007

Chromium

Chromium decreases insulin resistance and reduces the body’s level of triglycerides. It also helps to control obesity and can stimulate weight loss. Proper insulin regulation promotes the production of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that controls the appetite and curbs sugar cravings.

Analysis has shown that unrefined sugars and grains are rich in chromium and other essential life supporting minerals. When chromium is removed, (during the refining process into white sugar and flour) the human body does not have the element it needs to effectively deal with these two powerful energy sources. The refining of raw sugars and grains gives them a longer shelf life. It also creates foods which strip the body of chromium and other essential minerals necessary for the proper metabolism of these energy foods. Consequently the body must draw on other stores to process the sugar and flour when consumed. This subsequently leads to mineral deficiencies and an inability to deal with the body’s other demands for chromium and other minerals.

March 29, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 23, 2007

March 23rd 2004. It’s been three years since I was diagnosed with mitral valve prolaspse. I remember the date because it’s my father’s birthday.

I’m on vacation from work next week and I plan to do some things around the house that haven’t been dealt with since the move in November. I also plan to dig up my health notes and go through them to find the summary papers from the iridologist. I never googled the things that she wanted me to take and I had always planned to but just never had the time. I remember they were expensive aromatherapy oils and that was one of the reasons I didn’t continue with her. If I can find out what they are and what they can do, maybe I can find some missing clues…

Today for some reason I had early afternoon magnesium loss. Around two o’clock my hands were cold and I thought it was weird because I just had my lunch not so long ago. I had a egg salad sandwich. I took one of my evening magnesium and was better. By four o’clock my hands went cold again and I took another magnesium. Not sure what is causing the magnesium loss as the only thing I’ve changed recently is the potassium and chromium. So I skip my evening vitamins and only take one magnesium, the enzymes and the adrenal complex.

So this is clearly not working. Tomorrow I’m going to lower the zinc intake and only take magnesium and the enzymes with a multivitamin. Forget the other stuff… for now…

March 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 22, 2007

Ran out of enzymes today so I decide to go the entire day without them to see what would happen. I had a blueberry muffin for breakfast, tuna sandwich for lunch, apple for an afternoon snack and chicken pasta for dinner.

By mid-afternoon and into the evening before dinner, I notice I have a lot of gas. The enzymes are working wonders because I haven’t had this much gas in a very long time. So whatever is still wrong, is having an effect on my digestion. Interesting because I was kind of under the impression that I had solved that problem. I was only taking the enzymes for the assimilation of the vitamins.

I really thought that the adrenal complex would make a difference to my overall energy but I can’t really say that it has. I added three potassium and three chromium yesterday. Chromium to remove the excess copper and potassium for my muscle twitching.

The vibration seems to back too. Very weak but noticeable. I really thought that taking the extra zinc had an effect on the vibration but I’m still taking the same dosage as I did when I had the four days without any vibration and it’s still there.

I’ve been keeping the same dosage and routine for the past two weeks and the only difference seems to be candida. I know candida can have an effect on the nervous system and cause gas so I’m wondering now if candida is the cause of the vibration? Only one way to find out I guess…Get rid of the candida.

Still vibrating…

March 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

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