Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for January 31, 2008

I’ve been doing a lot of reading about lecithin and methionine lately and I came aross something called s-adenosyl methionine with a link to the adrenals and how it can be effected by methionine and riboflavin deficiencies. This sounds all too familiar…

Methionine is also used by the body to manufacture SAMe, also known as S-adenosyl-methionine or S-adenosyl-L-methionine. SAMe is found in every cell in the body. SAMe has been shown to be effective as a treatment for osteoarthritis and associated joint pain, stiffness, and inflammation.

It is important to note that dietary supplements of methionine do not appear to elevate SAM-e levels or have the same effect on mood states found with SAM-e. Doses of 200-600 mg per day may be effective in elevating mood and treating mild depression.

Highest concentration of SAM in body (in order):
1) Adrenal gland
2) Pineal gland

“Deficiencies of any of the active coenzyme forms of vitamins B2, B6, B12 and folic acid will disrupt SAMe production, and conversely diminished SAMe production will impair conversion of folic acid and B12 to their coenzyme forms.

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August 17, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 24, 2007

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Every morning for the longest time, whenever I woke up, I’d have tired, itchy eyes and usually it went away slowly throughout the morning. I always thought it was because I was tired and I was tired all the time. For the past two days since taking choline and inositol, my eyes feel like new in the mornings. It’s such a big obvious difference.

I don’t think it was riboflavin causing the dry itchy eyes of late that disappeared when I took B vitamins. Turns out that choline and inositol are included in my B complex supplement.

So now with the idea of a potassium deficiency, I grab three bananas on the way into work.

August 25, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 17, 2007

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Because the watery itching eyes started after taking calcium/magnesium for a few days, and this morning it seemed to improve when I took some B complex vitamins, I decide to look at the interrelationships and there is one between calcium and riboflavin that I never noticed before. Never really thought about it.

I’ve got to look at phosphorus and niacin again…when I have some time…

August 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 10, 2007

When I discovered vitamin and mineral deficiencies for the very first time, I have always said that there was a problem with the myelin sheaths based on how I felt with these weird feelings in my head and with the hydro transmission towers. Of course everyone thought I was crazy but I knew I had a problem…I just didn’t understand how or why?

Came across this today which is only a “hypothesis” but it makes perfect sense to me. It really makes me wonder where I would be now if I didn’t take the bull by the horns to figure out my health issues myself.

Accumulated copper and low vitamin B2 can exacerbate low uric acid levels, which in turn is hypothesized to lead to myelin degeneration seen in Multiple Sclerosis.

Low uric acid levels may be associated with a molybdenum deficiency, copper toxicity, and a worsening of multiple sclerosis.

August 12, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 03, 2007

Went to bed last night and I was fine. Then my wife did something that scared me for whatever reason and I started vibrating right away. It’s weird and I don’t really remember what she did because I was so tired. That kind of thing hasn’t happened in a while so I’m not sure what happened?

Here’s a comment about the relationship between Niacin and Riboflavin that suggest a niacin deficiency can cause a riboflavin deficiency. Interesting because that was the order of my symptoms. The vibration, upset stomach, then the nerve tingling in my head. So if the vibration is being caused by phosphorus this would make sense but I’m still not sure about that…

CONSEQUENCES OF A NIACIN DEFICIENCY

There are many symptoms of niacin deficiency. Initially, muscular weakness, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions occur, with severe deficiencies of niacin commonly leading to pellagra. Symptoms of pellagra include dermatitis, senile dementia, and diarrhea. Tremors and a sore tongue are also symptomatic. With pellagra, the skin becomes cracked and pigmented in the parts exposed to sunlight. Lesions can appear in the central nervous system, producing confusion, disorientation and neuritis.

Inflammation of the mucous membranes of the mouth and the gastrointestinal tract can result from digestive abnormalities developed in niacin deficiency. Symptoms of severe riboflavin deficiency appear; many of the niacin deficiencies are similar due to the close interrelationship of riboflavin and niacin in cell metabolism.

I added niacin back today but I didn’t take any chromium to see what the effect is. If phosphorus is responsible for niacin absorption, then I suppose it’s possible that even though I’d taken it for months, it wasn’t being absorbed in enough quantity to reverse a deficiency.

August 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 17, 2007

Okay…about the new theory.

If I stop for a second and review my “case” from the very beginning, the very first symptom was the internal vibration followed by gastric upset and then the nerve endings in my head started tingling.

I discovered that the gastric upset was caused by a niacin deficiency and the nerve endings was a riboflavin B vitamin deficiency. I always thought having a deficiency in these two particular vitamins was unusual to say the least. With the niacin, I would take 300 mg a day for months and no matter how much riboflavin I took, it never seemed to make a difference until I started the B vitamin injections.

The niacin fixed the gastric upset and although it did stop the vibration, it would never stop it completely and that lead me in other directions.

One of the things I’ve been thinking about lately is that I still have candida so whatever is causing the vibration is causing an imbalance that will cause candida and I know that niacin is anti fungal. My candida is the best it’s ever been but it’s not perfect but I feel it’s very close.

My New Theory:

I’m beginning to think that the vibration is caused by niacin but the reason it never fixed the problem was because I was low in phosphorus and it wasn’t activated. Riboflavin worked because of the mega-dosage injection. I’d be willing to bet that if I didn’t discover the low phosphorus, the riboflavin symptoms would return.

The B vitamins are essential for the nerves and the current nerve ending feelings in my head are different but they are somewhat similar to the riboflavin nerve symptoms.

I take one 100 mg of niacin with dinner and another one just before going to bed. Tomorrow, I’ll try another experiment. I’m going to add niacin of course but I’ll delay taking the other supplements and see if I get any of my regular symptoms…

July 17, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 12, 2007

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I found this mineral relationship chart but now I have even more questions than before. Just this week I read that phosphorus is required for the activation of riboflavin and niacin and yet, there is no apparent relationship between them. Same thing for magnesium. A magnesium group I belonged told me that low levels of zinc can cause magnesium loss and that’s exactly what I discovered when I started taking zinc. But again, there is no direct relationship.

But there are some new relationships that I’ve never come across before. Copper and Niacin (B3)! Riboflavin (B2) with Selenium. How interesting…

July 12, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 02, 2007

I’ve been at this now for a long time. I would consider myself with advanced knowledge of nutritional deficiencies and yet today, I’m still learning.

A quick google search and although I’ve looked at phosphorus before, I stumble upon some very interesting clues. Two of the first vitamin deficiencies I discovered were B2 Riboflavin and B3 Niacin and I had very obvious symptoms for both. I always thought it was odd that I had deficiencies of those two specific vitamins when the most popular was always B6 or B12.

Phosphorus is necessary for the conversion of niacin and riboflavin to their active coenzyme forms. Niacin and riboflavin cannot be digested properly by the body unless phosphorus is present. Could this be the reason I was taking B vitamins for such a long time without any success? This is becoming painfully obvious…

It’s also required for healthy nerves and one of the symptoms is something called “Tremulousness”. I have never come across a term like that for a vitamin or mineral symptom so I look up the definition. If that doesn’t describe what I have, then I don’t know what does. Nervousness and a vibratory sensation.

Two other things that interests me? Phosphorus can be destroyed by sugar and just like iron, a symptom is hair loss and eating ice. I thought the iron would make a difference with the hair loss but it didn’t…maybe it’s phosphorus? I’ve also had paresthesia (pins and needles) here and there. Nothing serious but it does happen from time to time and I’ve always thought it was just a sign of poor circulation caused by magnesium. Maybe not?

I’m also interested in one other thing. It plays a role in the heart muscle contraction and with mitral valve prolapse and the relationship with magnesium, it’s time to look at this more seriously. Is it possible to convince a doctor that I have a deficiency in phosphorus? No way, they’d lock me up for sure! Now only if I can actually find it. Off to doctor google:

trem·u·lous·ness

1. (of persons, the body, etc.) characterized by trembling, as from fear, nervousness, or weakness.
2. timid; timorous; fearful.
3. (of things) vibratory, shaking, or quivering.
4. (of writing) done with a trembling hand.

Phosphorus (P)

Phosphorus is the second most abundant mineral in the body and is found in every cell. The balance of calcium and phosphorus is needed for them to be effectively used by the body. Phosphorus plays a part in almost every chemical reaction within the body because it is present in every cell. It is important in the utilization of carbohydrates, fats and protein for growth, maintenance and repair and mediation, both within and without the cells, and for the production of energy. It stimulates muscle contractions, including the regular contractions of the heart muscle. Niacin and riboflavin cannot be digested unless phosphorus is present.

Phosphorus is an essential part of nucleoproteins, which are responsible for cell division and reproduction. Phosphorus helps prevent the accumulation of too much acid or too much alkali in the blood, assist in the passage of substances through the cell walls and promote the secretion of glandular hormones. It’s also needed for healthy nerves and efficient mental activity. B-Complex Vitamins and many enzymes require phosphorus to function.

Phosphorus deficiency has been associated with the following symptoms or illnesses:

Alopecia (Hair Loss)
Anemia
Aneurysms
Bone Pain
Dyspnea
Fatigue
Irritability
Numbess
Parathesias (Pins and Needles)
Pica (Eating ice, etc)
Tremulousness
Weakness
Weight Loss

IMPORTANCE:

Needed for blood clotting, bone and teeth formation, cell growth, contraction of the heart muscle, normal heart rhythm, and kidney function; assists the body in the utilization of vitamins and the conversion of food into energy; is involved in virtually all physiological chemical reactions.

Dietary Source: Legumes, milk & milk products, bone meal, nuts, yellow cheese, eggs, fish, grains, poultry

Importance: Works with calcium to form bones, teeth; cell growth and repair; utilizes carbohydrate-fat-protein; heart muscle contraction; nerve activity

Inhibits Absorption: Excessive intake of magnesium, white sugar, iron

Enhances Absorption: Protein, manganese, iron, calcium, A, F, D.

July 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I’ve been telling my doctor for sometime now that I have some really low vitamin B deficiencies and luckily convinced him to give me a riboflavin injection. I noticed several improvements but he seems hung up on the anxiety diagnosis from the neurologist. Any research on B vitamins suggest that they all work together so if you have one deficiency, you’ll have several and my doctor didn’t seem interested in pursuing it any further.

Found this tonight from who else? Doctor Google:

Anxiety and the Vitamin B complex

Deficiencies of members of the vitamin B complex appear to be common in patients with agoraphobia (fear of open spaces). (1) The same is likely to be true for other anxiety-related conditions. We will review the evidence suggesting that individual members of this family may affect the experience of anxiety.

Inositol Supplementation

Inositol is a key intermediate of the phosphatidyl-inositol cycle, a second-messenger system used by several noradrenergic, serotonergic and cholinergic receptors. Since ingestion has been shown to raise inositol levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, this nutrient could potentially serve as an anti-anxiety agent.

Indeed, when a group of 21 patients with panic disorder either with or without agoraphobia received 12 grams daily of inositol or placebo in random order for 4 weeks each, the inositol supplement was associated with a significantly greater reduction in the frequency and severity of panic attacks and of agoraphobia than the placebo. Moreover, while the efficacy of the nutrient was judged to be comparable to that of imipramine, its side effects were minimal.

Niacinamide Supplementation

Niacinamide has been shown in an animal study to have benzodiazepine-like actions including anti-conflict, anti-aggressive, muscle relaxant and hypnotic effects. In contrast to niacin, it passes readily from the plasma to the cerebrospinal fluid where it is taken up into brain cells by a high-affinity accumulation system, suggesting it is the preferred form of vitamin B3 for the treatment of anxiety.

Lactate (which is associated with anxiety) reacts with niacinamide-adenine dinucleotide [NA[D.sub.+]] to form pyruvic acid and reduced NAD (NADH + [H.sup.+]). The equilibrium of this reaction favors lactate and NA[D.sup.+]), but it can be driven by adding excess NA[D.sup.+]. It may be that supplementation with niacinamide helps to drive the reaction, thus reducing lactate concentrations.

Anecdotal reports suggest that niacinamide has anxiolytic effects comparable to the benzodiazepines, and it may be particularly effective for patients whose anxiety is secondary to reactive hypoglycemia. Typical dosages are between 500 mg twice daily and 1,000 mg 3 times daily. Hoffer believes that the optimal daily dosage is just below the amount that produces nausea.

Thiamine Deficiency

Elevated lactate may also be caused by inadequate pyruvate dehydrogenase activity resulting from a thiamine deficiency or dependency. In that case, the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA is inhibited, fostering its conversion to lactic acid. Symptoms of a prolonged moderate thiamine deficiency may include fearfulness progressing to agitation as well as emotional instability and psychosomatic complaints.

When more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline thiamine-deficient were currently feeling significantly more anxiety–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. There are no published studies on the repletion of a borderline thiamine deficiency to treat anxiety.

Vitamin B6 Deficiency

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter which is involved in the regulation of anxiety, requires vitamin B6 for its synthesis; thus a deficiency of this vitamin may theoretically result in heightened anxiety. Vitamin B6 is also required for the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin, a neurotransmitter suspected of being involved in anxiety.

When over 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those found to be chronically deficient in vitamin B6 had a significantly greater tendency to become anxious, although they were not significantly more anxious at the time of the study. Also, in an open trial, patients with hyperventilation syndrome who also had abnormal xanthurenic acid excretion (an indicator of vitamin B6 deficiency) improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan, suggesting that a marginal B6 deficiency, by causing serotonin depletion, may have produced the syndrome.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Anxiety may be part of the neuropsychiatric syndrome seen in advanced cases of pernicious anemia which is well-known to be caused by B12 deficiency. When cobalamin levels of more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline vitamin B12-deficient were significantly more anxious at the time of the study–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. Whether B12 supplementation reduces anxiety when the vitamin is borderline deficient remains to be investigated.

References

1. Abbey LC. Agoraphobia. J Orthomol Psychiatry 11:243-59, 1982

2. Benjamin J et al. Inositol treatment in psychiatry. Psychopharmacol Bull 31(1):167-75, 1995a

3. Levine J et al. Inositol treatment raises CSF inositol levels. Brain Res 627(1):168-70, 1993

4. Benjamin J et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of inositol treatment for panic disorder. Am J Psychiatry 15(7):1084-6, 1995b

So I’ve had a blood test for vitamin B12 and Thiamine and both were normal. Still waiting on the results from the vitamin B6 test. I’ve long discovered the Niacin deficiency with some great results but not for anxiety and Inositol I don’t know much about. I believe it’s included in B complex.

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for October 20, 2006 *D*

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All last night I was planning on what I would say to the doctor and I have a plan.

First thing he ask me about was if I had any tingling. Nope, not since the first riboflavin injection. Secondly he asked me about taking St. John’s Wort. Nope, did nothing for me.

I started telling him about how I did some experiments and I’d like to go in a new direction. He seemed very interested so I told him how I found a magnesium supplement that seems to be working better than any of the others and he was happy to hear about that. Then I told him about how I stopped taking the B vitamins and I’d get a weird feeling in my head. So I continued only with B6 and the weird feeling never came back. His face was more interested and he said if I suspected a B6 deficiency, then we can test for it. GREAT NEWS!

Then he told me how he would like to follow the recommendation from the neurologist. Huh? This caught me off guard because he never mentioned anything about him until now. He said he’d like to give me something called “Paxil CR” in a very small dosage to start. He mentions that it is used for depression and general anxiety disorders and continues about the side effects and that if I didn’t like it, I could stop taking it. He said it may not have any effect and on a scale of 0-10 it may only have an effect of a 2. Hardly seems worth taking but I agreed to continue with his approach if he took mine.

He wrote out a blood test for pyridoxine and added B12 and folic acid. Since it was a blood test, I asked him to check my level of triglycerides and he agreed but he said it would now need to be a fasting blood test.

I go down to the pharmacy and they fill out my prescription. As the pharmacist hands it to me she says how it may cause drowsiness and dizziness and says it could be three weeks until I feel any benefits.

Not so sure I like the sounds of the side effects so I call my wife and explain what happened. She looks it up on the internet and reads me a few more of the side effects including suicidal and mentions that there is a listing for it on crazymeds.com! She is adamant that she doesn’t want me taking this medication and I agree. We’re both confused as to why the doctor felt it was neccesary to take paxil when I clearly don’t have the symptoms to justify taking it.

The only symptoms I still have are an internal vibration and weak muscles. All of my other symptoms have disappeared though my own methods of vitamins and mineral supplements.

October 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 27, 2006

I had an idea today. With the riboflavin injections not having any effect on my chapped lips, I’ve been thinking about a B6 deficiency and thinking it’s possible it effecting my absorption of magnesium.

I took two capsules of magnesium glycinate this morning with my B complex and 50 mg niacin. Then, I didn’t take my magnesium for the rest of the day and I ate three bananas. Usually I get my weird symptoms if I miss any magnesium but so far, it looks like the B6 and magnesium in the bananas is having an effect.

I’ll try it again tomorrow to see what happens.

September 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 23, 2006

I’ve suspected for a while that my chapped lips are from a riboflavin deficiency but after getting three B2 injections, it’s still there with very little improvement. I’ve also thought it could also be a B3 or B6 deficiency. Came across a website that talks about how Bioperine increases the absorption of B6.

Another site talks about the causes of dry lips:

Cheilitis, the medical term for dry lips, can be caused from other factors besides a change in the weather: Dry scaling of the lips and cracks at the side of the mouth are common in riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency. Similar findings may be seen with niacin and B6 deficiency (Source: Pocketguide to Micronutrients In Health and Disease, Dr. Robert Zimmerman, 1999, Thieme). This type of dryness can also be caused by a yeast (candida) infection (diabetics are particularly prone to this condition).

So candida can also cause this. First time I’ve ever come across this…

September 23, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 21, 2006

Went to my doctor today for another riboflavin injection. I mentioned the magnesium injection again and he is still reluctant but we have a good discussion. I explain how I thought I was hanging on with the vitamins and that the riboflavin is only one of the symptoms and not the root cause.

He wants me to try St. Johns Wort. I’ve always heard of it but I have no clue what it does so I ask him. He says he doesn’t want to interfere with the results and wants me to try it and tell him if it has any effect so I agree to get some. I push for the magnesium injection again and says he has no problem doing it if I can find it (haha) but wants me to use St. Johns Wort for three weeks slowing increasing the dosage weekly until I see him again in three weeks.

I don’t have a problem trying St. Johns Wort but it’s still not dealing with the root cause. I’m hardly deficient in St. Johns Wort? I pick some up on my way home and I take one capsule with my lunch.

When I get home I use doctor google to find out more:

Medically Valid Uses:

St. John’s wort has been used successfully to treat mild to moderate depression. Several studies have indicated that it is as effective as many prescription antidepressants when used to treat mild or moderate depression. St. John’s wort is not useful for treating major or severe depression.

Externally, oily hypericum preparations have been used in the treatment of injuries, muscle pain and first-degree burns.

Unsubstantiated Claims:

Please note that this section reports on claims that have NOT yet been substantiated through scientific studies.

Traditionally, St. John’s wort has been used as a muscle relaxant to relieve menstrual cramps and as a mild tranquilizer.

Although without scientific confirmation, it is also claimed to function as a nerve tonic (has a beneficial effect on the nervous system), as an anti-inflammatory (decreases swelling), as an astringent (contracts the tissues or canals of the body), as a vulnerary (brings about healing in wounds and inflammation), as a antineoplastic (cancer fighting) and as an antiviral. For instance, it is claimed that it may possibly help inhibit viral infections, including herpes and HIV.

St. John’s wort has also been claimed to be good for nerve pain (neuralgia), anxiety, tension, nervous debility, stress, irritability and insomnia. It is also claimed to ease the pain associated with fibrositis, sciatica, rheumatoid arthritis, menstruation, itching and burning of hemorrhoids, and itching and irritation caused by vaginitis.

When used externally, St. John’s wort has been claimed to possibly speed the healing of bruises, wounds, varicose veins, mild burns and sunburns.

St. John’s wort can interfere with the absorption of iron and other minerals.

Okay, so he wants me to take St. John’s wort for anxiety and for general nervousness. But it can interfere with the absorption of minerals??!!!! You’ve got to be kidding…

September 22, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 06, 2006

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Previous Night Vibration Status: Extremely Weak
Morning Vibration Status: Extremely Weak

It’s been three days now without my B vitamins. I’m not feeling any of the weird symptoms but my eyes are not itchy or watering anymore. I check the bottle of the SISU B vitamins and the instructions are to take 2 capsules a day. This is the formula with the active form of riboflavin: Riboflavin 5′-Phosphate.

 I check the dosage of the supplement and it’s 25 mg per dose. A quick calculation and for my weight I should only be taking 42 mg per day and not 50. Maybe I’m getting too much? I have no idea but I need a new plan…

September 6, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 03, 2006

I’ve added my profile to RemedyFind detailing my history with Allergic Rhinitis:

Personal Bio: I grew up in a small town called Orangeville for most of my life. Late in high school, I had discovered a love for photography and became the yearbook photographer. My health issues started around 1990 after my last year of high school. I was 19 years old and I went to the doctor for allergies.

He gave a nasal spray called RHINARIS. It did nothing for my allergies so I went back to him and he gave me another prescription for the same thing but he told me to try it for a longer period of time. I tried it again and it had no effect so I figured it was something that you just have to live with.

I had just finished working in a photo lab and I had suspected that it could be the photo chemicals but I never handled them, never touched them and I only worked the cash so I really had nothing to do with them. That summer I went on a trip to England and spent three weeks walking around Liverpool discovering the places were the Beatles had found their fame.

Later in the year I moved to Toronto and I thought it was a good time to find a new doctor. I went to a walk in clinic for my allergies and I told him about how I thought the trip to England might have had an effect on my allergies having been out of my regular environment for three weeks but it made no difference. He found this interesting and commented on the fact that if anything it should’ve been worse because of the cold and damp weather. He refered me to an ear, nose and throat specialist.

Went to the specialist and he performed a weird procedure where he used something like a sodering gun and was burning something in each one of my nostrils. I went home with cotton balls in my nose and I wasn’t allowed to blow my nose for a couple of days. He said something would fall out of each nostril within the week and it did. Did it have any effect on my allergies? None.

Another attempt was made with my allergies when I went to a different doctor. He sent me to an allergy clinic in downtown Toronto. There I had a skin test done and the test came back that I was allergic to dust, pollen, grasses and mold. The strongest reaction? Cats. I found it strange because at the time, I didn’t own any cats and my parents never had any either. They told me that I had Allergic Rhinitis and recommended allergy shots over a five year plan. I started them for a few months and quit. It wasn’t making any difference.

I went four years dealing with my symptoms until I tried again. Another doctor I went to suggested I try Rhinocort. I tried it and again it made no difference. Then I read an article in the Toronto Star about a woman who had a variety of health issues that were greatly improved when she had her mercury fillings removed. I think one of her symptoms were allergies so it was off to my dentist. It seemed logical to me as I had a lot of dental work done around the time my allergies started. I had my mercury fillings removed and it made no difference.

I moved to a downtown location a year later and we lived close to a health food store so I asked them for some advice. She suggested taking a homeopathic remedy called Sinna and this time, I got results. It cleared my nose and there was mild improvement but I still had my allergies. It was helping but I was looking for the root cause.

I always felt that my allergies never fit the usual descriptions to describe them. The doctors would ask me if it changed with the seasons? NO. Did it change with the difference in weather? NO. I had allergies all year round and it never seemed to be affected by the types of food I ate.

This time I decide to go back to the doctor that gave me a referal to the allergy clinic and I started taking allergy shots again. Once a week for two years I took allergy shots and again, it didn’t really make any difference. Maybe a little…it was hard to tell.

I’ve always been a fairly healthy person despite my diet and since moving to Toronto, I’ve never had a regular doctor. I would go to the nearest walk in clinic if I had any minor issues.

Last year I finally developed a weird set of symptoms totally unrelated to my allergies that no doctor could figure out what was causing my problems. I had numerous test results: three blood tests, two urine tests, two ECG tests, chest x-ray, abdominal ultrasound, stool sample, colonoscopy, gastrocopy, hormone testing, hair analysis that all came back normal. I was really irritated because all of these tests and procedures recommended by doctors were showing normal. They seemed to think because the testing was normal then there was nothing wrong. I was of the opinion that they were doing the wrong type of testing. I had neurological symptoms and I was being told it was normal.

It wasn’t until I took to using Google on a daily basis to get an understanding of my symptoms that I began to question the regular doctors. I tried all kinds of alternative methods and nothing worked. No one was able to determine the root cause.

My best results were from Google searches and when I finally made a series of breakthroughs I began questioning everything and everyone. I began reading stories about CBC’s Wendy Mesley’s breast cancer and how she thought it was caused by the birth control pill. Newscaster Bill Cameron who went to a throat specialist to be told there was nothing wrong and he died nine months later of esophageal cancer. 14 year old Brooke Di Bernardo had weird symptoms for four years with doctors and specialists telling her there was nothing wrong because their tests came up normal. Another doctor told the parents that she was doing it for attention. They diagnosed her with pulmonary hypertension the day after she died. The family looked up the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension and they matched her symptoms exactly. How was this missed by so many doctors and specialists? I was outraged by these stories and I started to live by a very famous quote:

“The important thing is to never stop questioning” -Albert Einstein

And I never did. I questioned the doctors because I was finding things that made me better and I would present my findings to them only to be questioned and they never seemed to be interested in nutrition despite me eating things that made me feel better or had an impact on my symptoms. I even gave them a diet diary but they only seemed to be interested in disease and not prevention.

I began to realize that simple obvious signs that I had ignored were actually symptoms and connected to my current health problems even though I had them for years. Symptoms like chapped lips, muscle twitching and blaming extreme tiredness on a lack of sleep.

Don’t get me wrong. Google should never replace a trained professional medical doctor and I’ve been wrong several times using it. But at the same time, when used to verify or validate what the doctors were telling me or to question what they were telling me, is when I found success.

Because of my success with my other health problems, I thought I would use Google again to try and figure out the cause of my allergies and I did. I came across a quote from the internet that quoted a doctor that said “99 percent of people who have allergies are allergic to microwaved food”. I questioned how people could be allergic to food that was microwaved so I looked further. I then found a study that talked about a chemical that was said to cause Allergic Rhinitis:

http://www.webmd.com/content/article/95/103140.htm

Plastic containers that contained the additive called: Benzyl Butyl Phthalate can cause Allergic Rhinitis. I started to wonder if this chemical was used for microwaveable containers so I stopped eating microwaved food.

I was just finishing my tenth accupuncture treatment and although it made a difference in the blockage in my nose, I still had my allergies. I was also trying different chinese herbs but they too didn’t seem to make a big difference either.

Then I stopped eating food in plastic microwaveable containers. Every day following my ban I could feel the inflamation in my nose slowing disappearing. Then I found another study that suggested that same chemical was found in our toothbrushes so I switched to one from the health food store.

Here’s the site: http://www.mst.dk/chemi/01083703.htm

I also cames across another study that suggested there was a link between Allergic Rhinitis and infants exposed to cigarette smoke:

http://www.brightsurf.com/news/headlines/view.article.php?ArticleID=24477

My father smoked until I was 10 years old and the above link was only a study on infants. My Allergic Rhinitis didn’t develop until I was 19 so is there a connection? Who knows…but it’s something I’m very suspicious of. I am the oldest child and my younger brother doesn’t have allergies just like the article suggested.

Very recently I’ve had really bad allergies for two days then they disappear. This has happened twice lately and I questioned it because it didn’t make any sense and it seemed to be related to take out food. Is it possible I ate microwaved food without knowing it? I ate a different resaurant each time so it’s possible that I may have an undiagnosed food allergy that I always thought was my regular allergies. I had roasted greek potatoes both times and I suspect it had something to do with the sauce.

Self discovery is a wonderful thing and I am thrilled that a site like RemedyFind is around to share my experiences to help other people.

My recent health problems? A combination of severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Did I learn this from a any doctor or specialist? Nope. I learned from self education. I’ve been to so many different types of doctors. Numerous Walk-in Clinic Doctors, my regular Doctor, a Naturopath, a Gastroenterologist, an Acupuncturist, a Chiropractor, an Osteopath, an Iridoligist and finally a Neurologist.

Each one of them provided me clues that I strung together for a self diagnosis. Some of them sent me in wrong directions and I came to the conlusion that they were guessing as much as I was. The fact that I had Google for my searches seemed to give me an advantage because I found that they never seemed to do any research of their own. I’d get the normal lines “We’re not sure why that happens…” or “I believe in the art of medicine…if it makes you feel good, keep doing it.”

I’ve never been a person to eat any type of raw fruits and I rarely had any vegetables with my meals. It wasn’t until I did my research about eating healthy and the importance of eating fruits and vegetables that I realized how malnutritioned I was. Did any doctor mention the importance of eating fruits and vegetables? Nope, not one.

For the past six months I’ve been constantly trying different combinations of vitamins, minerals and enzymes to find out what worked best. I noticed the biggest difference when I started taking vitamin A and vitamin E probably because they are fat soluble vitamins. Vitamin A helped the blockage in my nose and vitamin E made a huge difference to my skin and I was shocked at the improvement.

I have a severe Riboflavin deficiency that seems to be caused by a chronic level of Magnesium. Based on my diet over the past fifteen years it’s not hard to see why. But the main things that worked for my current symptoms?

A prescription from a medical doctor for a B2 Riboflavin injection when I convinced him that it matched my symptoms (And this was over a year after my symptoms first started). Then I discovered that I couldn’t get it from any pharmacy anywhere in Canada so I ordered it from Europe. An Omega Three supplement that was recommended by a friend for no reason other than good health, and Magnesium for a deficiency that a two doctors told me I didn’t have.

I’ve read the book by Carolyn Dean called “The Miracle of Magnesium” and it turns out I have nineteen symptoms of a magnesium deficiency.

“No one knows your health better than you.”

September 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 31, 2006

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Follow appointment with my doctor…

As he walks in he notices that I am sneezing and have a runny nose. He casually mentions that my symptoms appear to be sinusitis but doesn’t say anything more.

The first thing he asks is if there is any improvement since the B2 injection. Yup, the tingling on the top of my head has stopped completely. I even stopped using the vitamins that would make it stop and it never came back. He was very happy to hear this great news. Then I launch into my latest research about magnesium leading to the chemical imbalance.

I tell him that I’ve been experimenting with different dosages and he wants me to keep taking it. I ask him about magnesium injections and he said he would prefer to see me try the oral doses before we get to the injection.

He writes down some notes on my file and he’s very happy about these new discoveries. He gives me the B2 injection and it was a bit more painful than the first time around and he explains he switched to a smaller needle this time. He recommends that I also take a multivitamin daily.

My eyes are slightly red and itchy so I quickly ask him to take a look. He takes a quick glance and asks me if I drink tea? He then recommends that I put used tea bags underneath my eyes for the citric acid content.

He doesn’t think it’s anything serious although he’s not an eye doctor and it was hardly a eye exam. I don’t drink tea so I won’t bother with the teabags.

Another follow up in three weeks.

August 31, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 28, 2006

All morning I’ve had what I call my “B vitamin” feeling in my head. It’s a feeling I get when I haven’t taken my B vitamins and I think it’s when the myelin sheath is getting very thin. The weird thing is that I’ve already taken my B vitamins this morning.

I’m thinking now that the Omega 3 supplement played a part protecting or building the myelin and that’s the reason I started taking it again. I haven’t had any head pinching/tingling sensation since I had the riboflavin injection. I still have the chapped lips so something is still wrong and my magnesium status is not helping.

I forgot to take my acidophilus this morning but luckiliy, I had one in my desk and felt better after taking it. I also had a tuna sub for lunch which is a great source of Omega 3 and didn’t have any weird feelings again for the rest of the day.

I also cancelled the Iridology appointment. She told me I didn’t need the Omega 3 supplement.

August 28, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 27, 2006

Previous Night Vibration Status: Weak
Morning Vibration Status: Weak

I was quite surpised to have a vibration last night and this morning since I took 300 mg of magnesium citrate right before going to bed. I didn’t have any calcium so I’m not sure what happened.

My new friend David got back to me again:

Some people get good results with magnesium citrate which is a form of chelated magnesium. Don’t buy it in combination with calcium. I take chelated calcium, but I take it separately. Theoretically, people need twice as much calcium as magnesium and, therefore, most calcium/magnesium supplements have twice as much calcium as magnesium. But most Americans are far more deficient in magnesium than in calcium, so they need more supplemental magnesium than calcium.

At your weight you should take 800 mg of chelated magnesium daily and, if severly deficient, 1,000 mg daily. Magnesium and CoQ10 have separate functions, but they do beneficially interact somewhat.

This may be enough but, at your weight, you may need 200 mg of CoQ10 daily. I suggest that you see how you feel after taking 100 mg of CoQ10 and 800 mg of chelated magnesium before deciding if you need more. I also take more than 1,000 mg of chelated magnesium daily because of my weight.

Riboflavin 5 phosphate is more effective than plain riboflavin. How do you know that you have a riboflavin deficiency? You may be deficient in other B-complex vitamins as well — especially B12. B12 deficiency is more common than is generally recognized because many people don’t absorb B12 well through the stomach. I take sublingual B12 which I let dissolve under my tongue. The tissue under the tongue often absorbs B12 better than the stomach does.

The ability of selenium to cut cancer deaths in half was discovered in a large placebo-controlled double-blind clinical study and the results were published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association, yet they have largely been ignored. Also often ignored is the need for vitamin C. Most people should take at least 1,000 mg of vitamin twice a day.

Best wishes, David

August 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 24, 2006

Previous Night Vibration Status: None
Morning Vibration Status: Weak

I stopped taking my acidophilus a couple of days ago to see if the mysterious head tingling would appear and luckily it hasn’t so I really feel it proves the riboflavin deficiency. My fear now is going to the doctor next week and try and convince him that I also have a magnesium deficiency.

All day yesterday I had a mildly sore/itchy tongue and I’m suspecting a yeast overgrowth. I check my tongue in the mirror and yup, I have thrush. So I start taking the acidophilus again…

August 24, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 19, 2006

I forgot to take my vitamins with my lunch today and we had great tasting Angus Beef Burgers. After thirty minutes I start having a lot of gas. I take my vitamins including the enzymes and in another thirty minutes it settles down.

I’ve come up with an idea. I’m deficient in riboflavin and magnesium and both are key in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and fat synthesis so it’s no wonder I need the enzyme supplement.

Why don’t I try eating a diet that doesn’t contain any carbohydrates, proteins and fat? Or at the very least, consume the absolute bare minimum for a while and see if that has any difference on how I feel. I’ve read in Carolyn Dean’s book “The Miracle of Magnesium” that eating a lot of protein and fat can actually inhibit the absorption of magnesium.

Magnesium: Necessary for energy metabolism, protein and fat synthesis. The metabolism of carbohydrates and fats to produce energy requires numerous magnesium-dependent chemical reactions.

Magnesium is required at a number of steps during the synthesis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and proteins. A number of enzymes participating in the synthesis of carbohydrates and lipids require magnesium for their activity. Glutathione, an important antioxidant, requires magnesium for its synthesis.

Riboflavin: Riboflavin is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin, also known as vitamin B2. In the body, riboflavin is primarily found as an integral component of the coenzymes, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Coenzymes derived from riboflavin are also called flavins. Enzymes that use a flavin coenzyme are called flavoproteins.

Flavin coenzymes participate in redox reactions in numerous metabolic pathways. Flavins are critical for the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

August 19, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | 2 Comments

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