Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 16, 2007

For the past couple of days I’ve had water itchy eyes and although I thought it was because of something I was taking, I now think it’s something that I need…

I’ve cut down on my vitamins and yesterday I only took calcium/magnesium. This morning I still had the problem so I took calcium/magnesium again but I also took B complex which I stopped taking on a regular basis a while back.

That seemed to do the trick so are we back to B vitamins again?

The calcium/magnesium does seem to have an effect on the vibration but yesterday morning I didn’t take my morning dosage and the cold hands returned around noon time which was a bit disappointing…

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August 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Nutrition/Vitamins

Hair loss occurs when the diet is inadequate in the B vitamins – especially B6, biotin, inositol and folic acid; and the minerals magnesium, sulfur and zinc. The B vitamins, especially B5 (pantothenic acid and B3 (niacin), are especially important for hair growth.

Certain essential amino acids are found to control the thinning and thickening of hair in laboratory animals. For example, when rats were fed a diet deficient in magnesium, they lost their hair in bunches. The situation was even more serious with some other B-vitamins. When rats were fed a diet low in biotin or inositol, they became hairless! This nutrient-deficient condition was found to be reversible. When the rats were fed a diet that was rich in B vitamins, it resulted in the complete restoration of hair.

Heavy intake of vitamin supplements, in some cases, have resulted in stimulating hair growth. Men deficient in vitamin B6 often lose their hair. When they are deficient in folic acid, some men became completely bald! As in case of animals, when normal intake of theses vitamins were restored, the hair also returned in most instances.

Taking large doses of vitamin A (100,000 IU or more daily) for a long period of time, on the other hand, can trigger hair loss, but stopping the vitamin A will reverse the problem. As in case of deficiencies, often the hair grows back when the cause is corrected.

Essential fatty acids (flaxseed oil, primrose oil, and salmon oil are good sources) improves hair texture. Prevents dry, brittle hair.

Raw thymus glandular stimulates immune function and improves functioning capacity of glands. Dosage: 500 mg daily. (Caution: Do not give this supplement to a child.)

Poor circulation can also hamper hair growth. A study of young men diagnosed with male pattern baldness showed that the blood flow to their scalps was on average 2.6 times lower than in a control group. In many individuals the extremities, including the top of the head, are the most difficult places in the body for blood to reach. Follicles which are constantly deprived of blood, and therefore nutrients, cannot produce hair properly.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 28, 2007

DRUGLESS METHODS TO HELP GET RID OF ANXIETY

NIACIN – vitamin B-3 is so effective against actual psychoses that half of all mental ward inmates in the South were able to be released once a depression-era deficiency of this vitamin was corrected. Niacin in appropriate doses acts as a natural tranquilizer and induces relaxation or sleep. It is non-addictive, cheap, and safer than any pharmaceutical product. Dosage varies with condition. The best author on the subject is Abram Hoffer, M.D., whose experience dates back to the early 1950’s. He routinely gave at least as much VITAMIN C as he did niacin.

LECITHIN – a food supplement that is high in phosphatidyl choline. The body is able to make acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, out of this. This has a sedating effect. It is interesting to note that one third of your brain, by dry weight, is lecithin. Feeding the organ what it is largely made of might help it to function better. (Don’t worry: lecithin supplements are made from soybeans.) Dosage runs in the tablespoons.

SUGAR – avoid it, to reduce anxiety symptoms. The swings from high to low blood sugar result in corresponding mood swings. Sugar is not your friend. Eat complex carbohydrates instead.

CHROMIUM may help even out the sugar mood-swings and perhaps even sugar craving. Chromium deficiency (daily intake under 50 micrograms) affects 9 out of 10 adults. Somewhere between 50 and 400 mcg of chromium substantially improves your cells ability to use insulin. Don’t gnaw on the bumper of a ’54 Cadillac because that kind of chrome is toxic. Chromium polynicotinate or chromium picolinate are safer and better absorbed.

B-COMPLEX VITAMINS also help even out your blood sugar. In addition, the metabolism of just about everything you digest hinges on one or more of this group of B-vitamins. Taken together, they are especially safe and effective. The body needs proportionally more niacin than the other B’s, so extra niacin as mentioned above is still valid.

EXERCISE reduces anxiety. Is it because you are too pooped to worry? Who cares; it helps. Exercise has many other health benefits, too, so there is no way you can lose by trying it. Start easily and work up.

HOMEOPATHIC REMEDIES such as Aconite, Coffea Cruda and Kali Phos. have been used to treat symptoms of anxiety for nearly 200 years. These very dilute natural remedies are safe and can help significantly. I recommend that you get a copy of The Prescriber, by J.H. Clarke, M.D. This very practical book concisely explains this healing approach and helps you easily select the most appropriate remedy. Homeopathic remedies are non-prescription. Many health food stores carry them. I know people who carry a bottle of Kali Phos 6X tablets in their pocket or purse, just in case.

HERBS such as chamomile and catnip make a soothing tea. There are certainly other useful herbs to consider as well. A good herb store or health food store will have books that will help you learn more.

January 28, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2007

I’ve made list of vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by high sugar intake. Also made a list of deficiency symptoms that include anxiety and nervousness.

Vitamin/Minerals (Factors that inhibit absorption) : Excessive Sugar

Vitamin B (complex), Vitamin B-2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B-5 (Pantothenic Acid), Niacin (nicotinic acid), Chromium, Choline, Copper, Inositol, Phosphorus, Potassium and Magnesium.

There is one more aspect of health that is effected by excessive sugar: Candida

Vitamin/Mineral deficiencies

Anxiety: Chromium, Niacin, Magnesium, Phosphorus

Nervousness: Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Iodine, Vitamin D, Zinc, Vitamin B-1 (Thiamine), Vitamin B-5 (Pantothenic Acid), Vitamin B-6 (Pyridoxine).

And the common link between sugar and anxiety? B Complex, Niacin, Phosphorus and Potassium. B complex contains the vitamins B-1, B-2, B-5 and B-6. My B-1 and B-6 tested okay and I had three riboflavin (B-2) injections. So that narrows down the list of possibilities.

I’m really not sure about the difference between anxiety and nervousness so I decide to look them up.

Anxiety: distress or uneasiness of mind caused by fear of danger or misfortune: He felt anxiety about the possible loss of his job.

Nervousness: highly excitable; unnaturally or acutely uneasy or apprehensive: to become nervous under stress.

After looking at the definitions, I’d say that my problem is more linked to nervousness than anxiety.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I’ve been telling my doctor for sometime now that I have some really low vitamin B deficiencies and luckily convinced him to give me a riboflavin injection. I noticed several improvements but he seems hung up on the anxiety diagnosis from the neurologist. Any research on B vitamins suggest that they all work together so if you have one deficiency, you’ll have several and my doctor didn’t seem interested in pursuing it any further.

Found this tonight from who else? Doctor Google:

Anxiety and the Vitamin B complex

Deficiencies of members of the vitamin B complex appear to be common in patients with agoraphobia (fear of open spaces). (1) The same is likely to be true for other anxiety-related conditions. We will review the evidence suggesting that individual members of this family may affect the experience of anxiety.

Inositol Supplementation

Inositol is a key intermediate of the phosphatidyl-inositol cycle, a second-messenger system used by several noradrenergic, serotonergic and cholinergic receptors. Since ingestion has been shown to raise inositol levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, this nutrient could potentially serve as an anti-anxiety agent.

Indeed, when a group of 21 patients with panic disorder either with or without agoraphobia received 12 grams daily of inositol or placebo in random order for 4 weeks each, the inositol supplement was associated with a significantly greater reduction in the frequency and severity of panic attacks and of agoraphobia than the placebo. Moreover, while the efficacy of the nutrient was judged to be comparable to that of imipramine, its side effects were minimal.

Niacinamide Supplementation

Niacinamide has been shown in an animal study to have benzodiazepine-like actions including anti-conflict, anti-aggressive, muscle relaxant and hypnotic effects. In contrast to niacin, it passes readily from the plasma to the cerebrospinal fluid where it is taken up into brain cells by a high-affinity accumulation system, suggesting it is the preferred form of vitamin B3 for the treatment of anxiety.

Lactate (which is associated with anxiety) reacts with niacinamide-adenine dinucleotide [NA[D.sub.+]] to form pyruvic acid and reduced NAD (NADH + [H.sup.+]). The equilibrium of this reaction favors lactate and NA[D.sup.+]), but it can be driven by adding excess NA[D.sup.+]. It may be that supplementation with niacinamide helps to drive the reaction, thus reducing lactate concentrations.

Anecdotal reports suggest that niacinamide has anxiolytic effects comparable to the benzodiazepines, and it may be particularly effective for patients whose anxiety is secondary to reactive hypoglycemia. Typical dosages are between 500 mg twice daily and 1,000 mg 3 times daily. Hoffer believes that the optimal daily dosage is just below the amount that produces nausea.

Thiamine Deficiency

Elevated lactate may also be caused by inadequate pyruvate dehydrogenase activity resulting from a thiamine deficiency or dependency. In that case, the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA is inhibited, fostering its conversion to lactic acid. Symptoms of a prolonged moderate thiamine deficiency may include fearfulness progressing to agitation as well as emotional instability and psychosomatic complaints.

When more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline thiamine-deficient were currently feeling significantly more anxiety–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. There are no published studies on the repletion of a borderline thiamine deficiency to treat anxiety.

Vitamin B6 Deficiency

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter which is involved in the regulation of anxiety, requires vitamin B6 for its synthesis; thus a deficiency of this vitamin may theoretically result in heightened anxiety. Vitamin B6 is also required for the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin, a neurotransmitter suspected of being involved in anxiety.

When over 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those found to be chronically deficient in vitamin B6 had a significantly greater tendency to become anxious, although they were not significantly more anxious at the time of the study. Also, in an open trial, patients with hyperventilation syndrome who also had abnormal xanthurenic acid excretion (an indicator of vitamin B6 deficiency) improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan, suggesting that a marginal B6 deficiency, by causing serotonin depletion, may have produced the syndrome.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Anxiety may be part of the neuropsychiatric syndrome seen in advanced cases of pernicious anemia which is well-known to be caused by B12 deficiency. When cobalamin levels of more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline vitamin B12-deficient were significantly more anxious at the time of the study–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. Whether B12 supplementation reduces anxiety when the vitamin is borderline deficient remains to be investigated.

References

1. Abbey LC. Agoraphobia. J Orthomol Psychiatry 11:243-59, 1982

2. Benjamin J et al. Inositol treatment in psychiatry. Psychopharmacol Bull 31(1):167-75, 1995a

3. Levine J et al. Inositol treatment raises CSF inositol levels. Brain Res 627(1):168-70, 1993

4. Benjamin J et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of inositol treatment for panic disorder. Am J Psychiatry 15(7):1084-6, 1995b

So I’ve had a blood test for vitamin B12 and Thiamine and both were normal. Still waiting on the results from the vitamin B6 test. I’ve long discovered the Niacin deficiency with some great results but not for anxiety and Inositol I don’t know much about. I believe it’s included in B complex.

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for December 29, 2006

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I came across a web site yesterday that includes tools to track your health. So out of curiosity, I thought it was be interesting to track by blood pressure results taken around the time I was getting the acupuncture treatments. I entered in every reading starting March 8th to May 9th over my ten appointments. At the time, I knew it was slightly on the high side but I maybe didn’t pay close enough attention as I should have.

After entering the information, it produced a nice looking chart. My Systolic reading took an obvious downward trend after I started taking Niacin.

I’ve only taken one reading since I starting taking my daily routine of vitamins and it was at the suggestion of the chiropractor on June 10th, 2006. My reading was 122/87.

I never told the iridoligst about my high blood pressure readings and she was able to indentify that I had prevented a heart attack based on what she saw in my iris. She said there were healing lines around the area of the heart and that whatever I was doing was helping.

The interesting thing? By complete coinidence, I added five supplements that are well known to prevent heart attacks before I went to her. Niacin, Omega three, Vitamin E, B Complex and magnesium.

B Vitamins: Prevent Heart Attacks

A multivitamin each day can reduce your chance of a heart attack by 33 percent. Make sure that the multivitamin contains B6, B12 and Folic acid to decrease your homocysteine levels for a further risk decrease.

Eat a variety of fruit and vegetables to get all the nutrients required for good health. High fiber foods reduce your heart disease risk and hot tea’s flavonoids decrease heart attacks. Nuts contain monounsaturated fat, omega-3s, phytochemicals, magnesium and the antioxidant vitamin E, all of which decrease heart disease risk.

Vitamin E: Cuts the Risk of Heart Attack

By Steve Austin, ND

Healthnotes Newswire (October 12, 2000)—People taking vitamin E supplements have a dramatically reduced risk of suffering heart attacks, according to a report in the current issue of The Lancet.1

In this latest chapter in the on-again, off-again story of the effect of vitamin E on heart-disease prevention, Israeli researchers found that patients given vitamin E supplements suffered 70% fewer heart attacks than did those given placebo.

The researchers studied 196 patients with a history of heart disease and with kidney failure and dependency on kidney dialysis machines. Subjects were given either 800 IU (international units) of natural vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol) per day or placebo for an average of 519 days. Participants were chosen for the trial because the combination of kidney failure and a history of heart disease leads to an extraordinarily high risk of suffering a future heart attack. Also, such patients show evidence of unusually high oxidative damage—the very kind of damage vitamin E is likely to protect against.

Niacin: Treatment reduces risk of heart attack by 70 percent

Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer in most industrialized countries. A new study indicates that combining the use of a statin drug and niacin can reduce the risk of heart attack or hospitalization for chest pain by 70 percent among people likely to suffer heart attacks and/or death from coronary heart disease.

The treatment used in the study combined two well-known ways of improving cardiac health: the use of a statin drug called simvastatin to lower levels of the so-called “bad” cholesterol, LDL, and the use of niacin, also called vitamin B-3, to boost levels of the “good” cholesterol, HDL. Niacin is the best agent known to raise blood levels of HDL, which helps remove cholesterol deposits from the artery walls.

Magnesium: The Heart Connection

Did you know that without sufficient magnesium you would actually die? Your heart will stop beating and the doctors will then call it a “heart attack” (#1 cause of death in America). Never do they say, “He dies from a Magnesium Deficiency.” This is how critical it is to have proper magnesium levels in the body. The early signs of such terminal extinction are racing heart-beats, or any unsual change in heart beats, angina pains, collapsing from echaustion after heavy physical exercise or work such as running a race, playing football or basket ball. Due to lack of magnesium the heart muscle develops a spasm or cramp and stops beating. this is because there is insufficient magnesium to relax the heart ready for the next contraction. Irregular heartbeats are also caused by magnesium deficiency. This may be the answer why so many young athletes are having heart attack for no known reason.

And still to this day, I can feel a difference if I miss taking any of these four vitamins.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 22, 2006

I had a really interesting experience today. I was running out of my supply of vitamin B6 so I head to the local health food store. As I was looking at the vitamins, the lady asked me if I needed any help. Usually I tell them that I’m okay and brush them aside. Today I decided to ask her about the absorption of B6. She questioned why I thought I had a B6 deficiency because she said it’s unusual for men and more common among women. I asked her about B complex in the liquid form and she agreed that it had a better absorption rate so I decided to purchase some to give it a try.

She said from looking at my appearance she suspected I had a mineral deficiency rather than vitamins and commented on my pale skin and dark circles under my eyes. I somehow mentioned about my problem with magnesium and she started telling me about how vitamin deficiencies can be caused by exposure to electromagnetic fields.

WOW! I couldn’t believe my ears. I almost never mention my stories with EMF exposure for fear that people would really think I was a raving lunatic. But not this time… it was mentioned to me so I opened up and explained some of my discoveries and she appeared quite interested. I continued by telling her the success I’ve had using Google for my symptoms instead of the doctors and she said I should see a real doctor and stop using the internet and recommended an in-store homeopathic doctor.

As I was standing there talking to her, a customer came in and purchased a bar of soap. The lady behind the counter seemed to know her quite well and mentioned my B6 deficiency to her. She asked me if would mind trying a test and I agreed. She asked me to hold my arm out and push against it when she pushes on it.

She asked me how old I was and being that my birthday was in two days, I answered 36 just as she pushed on my arm. She told me that my age was incorrect. I gave her my correct age and my arm didn’t go down as far. Okay so I’ve seen this before with the Iridologist…it’s applied kinesiology.

She gave me a bottle from the shelf and asked me to hold it across my chest. She pressed on my arm and it fell down low and she commented on that I didn’t need it. We did the same thing with my liquid B complex and my arm stayed up high when she pushed on it.

Interesting but was it realistic? Who doesn’t need B complex?

November 1, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 17, 2006

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Four capsules of the new magnesium is still not enough. I raise it again to six capsules. Two at each meal for a total of 1500 mg. I have my follow up doctor’s appointment on Friday and I’m not sure what to tell him other than the St. John’s Wort has done absolutely nothing. I’m still eating 2-4 bananas a day and I don’t feel any improvement. I’ve noticed that if I miss taking the B complex, I get this weird feeling in my head. Almost like the tingling with the riboflavin but it’s more mild. I still suspect a B6 deficiency so I’ll stop taking my B complex vitamins and try taking B6 by itself for a while but this time I’ll try something different. I have B6 in a 250 mg dose and usually I take it twice a day. This time, I’ll split the pills and take four throughout the day at 125 mg.

There’s been a lot of talk in the news lately about the cost of eating healthy. Drinking carrot juice will give you botulism, eating spinach will give you e-coli…chemical residue in our fruits and vegetables… It never seems to end. And now we have the new breakfast sandwich at Tim Hortons.

Tim Hortons Breakfast Sandwich

Innocent-looking sandwich packs a wallop of fat and sodium.

Nutritional breakdown:

Sausage, Egg and Cheese: 500 calories, 34 g fat (20 g saturated, 0.5 g trans), 32 carbohydrate (1 g fibre), 18 g protein, 920 mg sodium

Bacon, Egg and Cheese: 400 calories, 24 g fat (17 g saturated, 0.5 g trans), 31 g carbohydrate (1 g fibre), 16 g protein, 740 mg sodium

Analysis: Tim Hortons is now offering some protein at breakfast time this is good news. The bad news is that the protein comes with a lot of saturated fat (a day’s supply) and sodium (one-third of a day’s supply).

Health Canada recommends a total of 20 g per day of saturated and trans fats. Well, if you pull up to the drive-in and order your Sausage, Egg and Cheese Breakfast Sandwich, you should just turn around and go home, because you will have had your entire day’s intake of saturated and trans fats. The daily value (DV) for sodium is 2,400 mg, which is about the amount of sodium in 1 tsp of salt. The breakfast sandwiches have 740-920 mg of sodium.

When I asked Tim Horton’s about this, company spokesperson Diane Slopek-Weber stated that their customer research overwhelmingly told them that the most popular choice for a hot breakfast sandwich, was one that included egg and meat. Given their wide menu selection and ordering options, their customers can choose for themselves.

Alternative: The Breakfast Sandwich is made to order, so you can ask for a multigrain bagel instead of the tea biscuit, with only egg and/or cheese. This will change the nutrition breakdown to 380 calories, 10 g fat (so you can keep driving to work).

How does it compare to McDonald\’s? The Sausage McMuffin with Egg has 440 calories, 26 g fat (10 g saturated, 0.4 g trans), 29 g carbohydrate (2 g fibre), 20 g protein, and 930 mg sodium. The Bacon & Egg McMuffin has 310 calories, 14 g fat (5 g saturated, 0.3 g trans), 29 g carbohydrate (2 g fibre), 16 g protein and 710 g sodium.

This becomes a lesson in relativity. Tim Hortons has created something so bad, it makes McDonalds look good. Perhaps this should be their new marketing position.

Take it or leave it: Keep driving.

October 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 04, 2006

Previous Night Vibration Status: NONE
Morning Vibration Status: Slight vibration

For weeks now my eyes have been red, itchy and watering all of the time.  Is it my allergies or a lack of sleep? Who knows…

Since I’ve had two riboflavin injections I might as well stop taking the B vitamins and see if I get any of my “B vitamin” symptoms.

September 4, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 03, 2006

Previous Night Vibration Status: NONE
Morning Vibration Status: Slight vibration

It’s really hard to keep to a vitamin schedule on weekends and yesterday I tried to cut down on the magnesium. There’s a fine fine between how much I think I need and the dosage that will cause diarrhea. I wish my doctor had agreed to a magnesium injection. I’m really having a hard time trying to keep up with the demand.

I didn’t take my magensium this morning until late and I noticed my hands and feet were cold. After taking my regular dosage of 300 mg, it disappeared within 15 minutes.

Today I’ll only take the omega three, magnesium, B complex, vitamin C and the enzymes. I’ll switch back to the B complex from the naturopath to see if that has any difference.

September 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 30, 2006

Previous Night Vibration Status: Extremely Weak
Morning Vibration Status: Extremely Weak

In the Anxiety kit from Shoppers Drug Mart and it talks about the chemical imbalance in more detail. So Doctor Google? I discover that deficient levels of magnesium and B vitamins can be a cause of a chemical imbalance. Interesting…that’s exactly what I told the neurologist… and he certainly didn’t offer any more information.

Understanding Chemical Imbalance

What is a Chemical Imbalance?

Over the course of the last three decades much research into the origins of emotional distress and disturbances have led researchers to embrace “chemical imbalance” as the leading cause. Though the exact mechanisms linking chemical imbalances and common disorders like anxiety, depression and ADHD are not completely understood, clinical studies and medical observations have been able to identify a number of chemical inconsistencies that occur in individuals who report experiencing symptoms related to these disorders.

Common chemical imbalances related to anxiety and depression related disorders that have been observed in clinical practice include:

  • Reduced availability of neurotransmitters like Serotonin, Dopamine, Norepinephrine, GABA and acetylcholine.
  • Increased levels of toxic neurochemicals such as Homocysteine.
  • Lower levels of serum Magnesium, Zinc or Potassium.
  • Unhealthy, or deficient levels of essential vitamins like B6, B9, B12 and Vitamin-C
  • Undersupply of key cofactors like amino acids that are used to help transport neurotransmitter precursors into the blood-brain barrier.
  • Increased cortisol stress hormone levels.

What causes chemical imbalance?

After researching the causes of a chemical imbalance online I came to the conclusion that no one, not even doctors, scientists or clinical researchers, knows what exactly causes a chemical imbalance. In fact, it was virtually impossible to come up with a single source that could provide conclusive evidence.

If you would ask a medical professional the reasons and causes for anxiety or depression, their answer would most likely be “A chemical imbalance…” As a result, the first impulse for most medical professionals and patients alike is to prescribe an SSRI, MAOI or similar “chemical balancer” to treat the condition.

August 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 21, 2006

I thought I would try another experiment with my diet. I’ve read in Carolyn Dean’s book about magnesium that eating foods high in protein and fats can affect the mineral absorption rate. So today, I’ve cut out the protein from my lunch and I’ll try eating my oats in the morning and only fruits during the day. I’ll cut out the protein as much as possible.

By the end of the day my eyes have improved tremendously. But now I’m beginning to feel the weird kind of feeling in my head when I don’t take the B vitamins. I get home from work and for the next few hours, I have a bunch of weird feelings in my chest and I’m not feeling that great. I decide that taking one B complex capsule would be okay for me to take since I haven’t had any all day. I also take two more capsules of magnesium and within and hour, I’m feeling much better.

Maybe I should switch back to the magnesium citrate so I go out to the local health food store and pick some up. I also inquire about the homeopathic remedies behind the counter and I ask about magnesia phosphorica 30c. They are the same type as the ones in Loblaws and they don’t have it. I ask about placing a special order and she says it will take a about a week. I want to try to get back to my usual routine of vitamins. That energy I had last week was great. I want that again.

August 22, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 21, 2006

Woke up with the vibration. It appears now that I’ve actually had better success with the cheaper form, magnesium citrate.

For the past week I’ve had itchy dry eyes again. I’ve been using that eye lubrication medication and it work’s great. They seem to be watering all of the time and it feels like there is sand in my eyes.

I went for a walk last night around the neighbourhood and my wife happens to remind me that the last time this happened was when I was taking too much riboflavin. Not the regular B2, but the active riboflavin 5-phosphate.

It wasn’t until today that I realize she’s right. I’ve been taking my two B complex capsules with 25 mg of riboflavin 5-phosphate. During the week, I’ve been taking a Redoxon B complex tablet that disolves in my water bottle. That also has the high powered riboflavin in a 10 mg dosage. I was taking it for the magnesium but I forgot about the riboflavin.

So when I should only be taking around 40 mg, I’ve been taking 60 mg. Needless to say, I won’t take any B complex today and let it clear my system. It’s so hard because I want to get better so bad.

August 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 17, 2006

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Health Canada got back to me today on why riboflavin is missing from Quaker Oats:

Your email requesting information on riboflavin and breakfast cereals was referred to the Nutrition Evaluation Division. Thank you for your inquiry.

Vitamins and minerals that are lost during the processing of cereal grains can be restored and added to the final food product such as breakfast cereals. According to the table following Section B.13.060 of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDRs) thiamine, niacin, vitamin B6, folic acid, pantothenic acid, magnesium, iron, and zinc can be added to breakfast cereals. The restoration is permitted only for those nutrients that are originally present in the cereal grain at significant amounts and that are removed or lost during processing. The intent is to bring the amounts of those nutrients back to an acceptable level (approximately that of the original content) in the food.

Since riboflavin is not considered to be present in significant amounts in cereals grains such as oatmeal, it is currently not permitted to be added to breakfast cereals. Foods such as breakfast cereals can also be fortified with vitamins and minerals that may or may not have been originally present in the food.

Historically, fortification has been done to address problems of inadequate nutrient intakes and to protect Canadians against nutritional deficiencies. Unlike certain nutrients, inadequate riboflavin intakes have not been identified in Canada. Thus, there was no rationale under the current regulations for allowing breakfast cereals to be fortified with riboflavin.

In March of 2005, Health Canada released a proposed policy and implementation plan for developing new food fortification regulations. It is proposed that Section B.13.060 of the FDRs be amended to provide for the addition to breakfast cereals of more vitamin and mineral nutrients, such as riboflavin, and at higher levels. The proposals for breakfast cereals are based in part on an effort to allow greater trade harmonization in this product category while ensuring safety.

Thank you again for your inquiry and we hope you find this information helpful.

Nutrition Evaluation Division Health Canada

August 17, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 12, 2006

Went to the Chiropractor this morning. The same kind of stretching and he offers a bunch of ideas again. He told me to look up something called immunol, beta glucan and celiac sprue. I did a quick search on those but nothing interesting really came up.

I’ve felt lousy all day with zero energy. Probably the worst I’ve felt in a long time. By mid afternoon I take a hot bath as that will always make me feel better and it does. Why do I have no energy? I’m still taking the B complex vitamins and now the omega 3 so there must be something else.

The riboflavin injection seems to have no effect. The only symptom I haven’t had is the tingling of the myelin sheaths. So maybe my problem is from a number of deficiencies instead of just one.

I keep trying to look for the one thing that is causing my symptoms. Maybe it’s possible there is a combination of deficiencies.

August 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 12, 2006

Today I’ve decided to reduce the amount of vitamins. I start the day with acidophilus and the new powerful Omega 3. I’ll add selenium, niacinamide and B complex for lunch and the same again for dinner minus the selenium.

Encourged by the meeting yesterday, I gather up my health files and go back to his store. Only problem now? He closes at two o’clock on Saturdays and he’s not open now until Monday.

I’m sure we would’ve had an interesting conversation!

August 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 09, 2006

I was in Shoppers Drug Mart this morning picking up some oatmeal for my breakfast and I cruise over to the vitamins. I always like to look at the different types of supplements so if I come across something new in my research, then I know I’ve heard of it before.

As I’m looking at the different vitamins, I notice the brand of vitamin C that my acupuncture doctor recommended. Redoxon 1000 mg of vitamin C. It never worked for me at the time because it was a buffered form and with my alkaline stomach, I needed the acidic content from the ones I was taking and I switched back.

So this morning I notice the same brand also makes something called Redoxon-B. It’s a B-Complex form in the same dissolvable format as the vitamin C. I look at the ingredients and for riboflavin, it contains 15mg of riboflavin 5-phosphate sodium. I couldn’t believe it! This is the one that has the better absorption so I pick it up and drink one with my daily water.

August 9, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | 2 Comments

Entry for August 06, 2006

Woke up with no vibration! This is very good progress and I’ll keep taking the new B complex. I switched because I thought maybe the higher dosage might have a better effect even though I only take it twice a day.

Apparently it does make a difference…

August 6, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 05, 2006

Now that the weekend is here, I switch back to the SISU B Complex. I don’t have the sneezing like I did before so was it the capsules or not? I didn’t really notice any difference by switching the vitamins. The vibration is definitely different this week. It’s much weaker and sometimes gone entirely.

I’m still finding that it’s the usual, no vibration when I go to bed, but it’s there when I wake up. We’ll see what it’s like tomorrow.

August 6, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 02, 2006

I tried an experiment today. I took 1 SISU Multi-Vi-Min capsule with my breakfast and another one with my lunch. For dinner, I decided to have a SISU B Complex instead. About an hour after taking it, I start sneezing like crazy. In fact, I’m sneezing for most of the night. Then I remember what the SISU site said about B Complex allergies.

Super B Complex
The richest sources of the B-vitamins are brewer’s yeast, liver, whole grain cereals, and yeasts, molds, bacteria and fungi. Unfortunately, this poses a problem for people with allergies. To compound the problem, many vitamin B supplements are highly allergenic.

Precautions
Riboflavin should not be taken by anyone with a B vitamin allergy or chronic renal disease. Other populations are unlikely to experience any difficulty from taking supplemental B2.

The SISU B Complex is specially formulated for people with B Complex allergies. So if it turns out that I am allergic, then I am allergic to the one thing I need the most to get better. But was it the vitamins or was it something I ate?

August 2, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

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