Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for June 15, 2006


Nervous System Support

Vitamin B1 also plays a key role in support of the nervous system, where it permits healthy development of the fat-like coverings which surround most nerves (called myelin sheaths). In the absence of vitamin B1, these coverings can degenerate or become damaged. Pain, prickly sensations, and nerve deadening are nerve-related symptoms that can result from vitamin B1 deficiency.
 
A second type of connection between vitamin B1 and the nervous system involves its role in the production of the messaging molecule acetylcholine. This molecule, called a neurotransmitter, is used by the nervous system to relay messages between the nerves and muscles. Acetylcholine cannot be produced without adequate supplies of vitamin B1. Because acetylcholine is used by the nervous system to ensure proper muscle tone in the heart, deficiency of B1 can also result in compromised heart function.
 
Deficiency Symptoms
What are deficiency symptoms for vitamin B1?
Because of its ability to disrupt the body’s energy production, one of the first symptoms of vitamin B1 deficiency is loss of appetite (called anorexia) that reflects the body’s listlessness and malaise.
 
Inability of the nervous system to ensure proper muscle tone in the GI tract can lead to indigestion or constipation, and muscle tenderness, particularly in the calf muscles.
Other symptoms related to nerve dysfunction are commonly associated with thiamin deficiency, since the myelin sheaths wrapping the nerves cannot be correctly made without adequate thiamin. These nerve-related symptoms include “pins and needles” sensations or numbness, especially in the legs.
 
Toxicity Symptoms

What are toxicity symptoms for vitamin B1? Even at extremely high doses of 500 milligrams per day, vitamin B1 intake does not appear to carry a risk of toxicity. This vitamin is often supplemented in high doses during treatment of maple sugar urine disease (MSUD), and may be given intravenously in treatment of alcoholism; these clinical circumstances have provided a broad basis for determining the low risk of toxicity associated with increased intake of thiamin. In its most recent 1998 recommendations for intake of B-complex vitamins, the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences did not establish a Tolerable Upper Limit (UL) for intake of vitamin B1
 
Nutrient Interactions

How do other nutrients interact with vitamin B1? No B-complex vitamin is more dependent on its fellow B vitamins than thiamin. Absorption of thiamin into the body requires adequate supplies of vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid. A deficiency in vitamin B12 can increase loss of thiamin in the urine, and vitamin B6 also appears to help regulate distribution of thiamin throughout the body.  If folic acid is deficient in the cells, then it causes an indirect thiamine deficiency because thiamine is present but cannot be activated.
 
Maybe it’s time to research folic acid.
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June 16, 2006 - Posted by | Health | , , ,

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