Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 18, 2008

Vitamins and Minerals for Diabetes

VITAMINS AND MINERALS THAT LOWERS BLOOD SUGAR

Minerals are the vital constituents for the formation of body structures such as bones and tissues. They are also involved in major physiological processes such as proper metabolism and energy production. There are various minerals that are helpful in treating diabetes and slowing down diabetic complications.

The most important mineral is Chromium. It is also known as Diabetic Mineral. It is because the main function of chromium in is body is to turn carbohydrates into glucose. Chromium also helps in the regulation and production of hormone insulin. It has been observed that due to chromium only the

Insulin works effectively in the body and without it, insulin simply would not function. Good sources of chromium are nuts, cheese, whole, grains, oysters, mushrooms, brewer’s yeast, etc. Long time researches have shown that the symptoms of diabetes completely reverses particularly of Type –2 Diabetes mellitus.

It is because insulin regulates and normalize blood sugar and it also improves body’s ability to transport blood glucose into cells. It has also been seen that the chromium supplements improves glucose tolerance and thus brings it to normal. It reduces fasting glucose and insulin levels in

gestational diabetes. It encourages the loss of body fat. It enhances insulin secretion and decreases trighlycerides Chromium also promotes muscular gains.

Vanadium: It is also associated with proper glucose regulation. It acts like insulin in the body and also enhances its effects. That is why this mineral is extensively known for its role in the management of diabetes. Food sources of vanadium include skin milk, lobster, vegetables, butter and cheese. Vanadium is named after the Scandinavian goddess of beauty and youth. Vanadium is also a building material of bones and teeth. Although, researchers have know vanadium for more than forty

years but the mineral is not yet considered as a essential constituent for humans. It is essential for plants and animals. But Vanadium must be needed to be as an essential nutrient in our diet. Vanadium in case of diabetics- improves fasting glucose levels. It also increases insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. It lowers the insulin requirements in type –1 diabetes.

Manganese: Manganese maintains the blood glucose level in normal range and hence is useful in treating diabetes and hypoghlycaemia. Manganese is also used in our body for fat and protein metabolism and the production of energy. It is needed for growth, maintenance of connective tissue, bone, cartilage and

also helps in fatty acid synthesis. Manganese is also useful in the treatment of epilepsy, anosexia and iron deficiency. Moreover, the absorption of vitamin C, B and E depends upon the sufficient amount of manganese so the person’s multi-vitamin supplement should contain sufficient amount of manganese in it. Dietary sources of manganese include whole green cereals, leafy vegetables, nuts and tea.

Magnesium: Magnesium is mainly important for hypoglycaemics because it helps in the digestion of sugar, starches and fats and also helps in stabilizing blood sugar levels. It has been known from many years that the secretion and action of insulin require magnesium. Hence for diabetic patient and for persons

in whom intake of refined carbohydrates is too much, in them the supplement of magnesium is very much necessary. It is a person crave for chocolate, it may be an indication that he is low in magnesium. The dietary sources of magnesium are whole grains, nuts, seeds, cocoa milk, green vegetables, sea food,

brown rice. Magnesium is also involved in thyroid hormone production. Magnesium along with calcium helps in muscle contraction and helps in producing energy especially in muscle cells. Magnesium is also involved in producing stomach acid and digestive enzymes.

Zinc: Zinc is needed for proper release of insulin and many hypoglycaemics may be deficient. Zinc supplements are beneficial for patients with chronic diseases like diabetes. Some of the other Zinc’s functions include cholesterol, protein and energy metabolism growth, healing and immune functions. Dietary sources of Zinc include meat, eggs, sunflower seeds, milk, wholegrains, spinach etc. But a person should keep in mind that Zinc is destroyed when food is processed so they should eat the Zinc containing food in their natural form as much as possible. Moreover, Zinc absorption is reduced in alcoholics and diuretics. Stress also causes Zinc levels to drop rapidly.

Vitamins are an essential part of human body. The vitamin helps in improving digestion and therefore, increases the body’s ability to tolerate low glucose levels. They also know as Anti-Stress vitamins because of their good effects on the brain and nervous system. The B-complex vitamins are a group of eight vitamins, which include Thiamine (B1), Riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), Pyridoxina (B6), Folic Acid (B9), Cyanocobalmin (B12), Pantothenic acid and bioten. A particular potential benefit of vitamin B supplements for diabetics is mainly its ability to lower blood levels of homocysteine (a suphur-containing amino acid). Hence, the vitamins B are also essential for breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, which provides energy for the body. It also helps in breakdown of fats and proteins, which helps in normal functioning of the nervous system.

Vitamin B-6 is helpful in the women reporting with gestational diabetes and for protection against metabolic imbalances associated with the use of some oral contraceptive. Vitamin B6 is also useful in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. It help in reducing homocysteine. It maintains fluid balance and is essential for cellular energy production. It is somewhat beneficial to prevent skin eruptions also. Therefore, the amaging family of vitamin B is very helpful. Vitamin B6 levels are even lower in people with diabetes who have nerve damage i.e. neuropathy. So, the administration of bath Vitamin B1 (25 mg per day) and vitamin B6 (50 mg per day) shows significant improvement of symptoms of diabetic neuropathy after four weeks, because Vitamin B1 is also found to be low in people with type 1 diabetes.

Biotin (The Vitamin B) is needed to process of glucose. Patient with Type-1 of diabetes showed fasting glucose level dropped by 50% on administration of 16 mg of biotin per day for one week. Biotin may also reduce pain from diabetic nerve damage.

Vitamin C: Diabetic people also have low vitamin C levels. Vitamin C may reduce glycosylation. Vitamin C also lowers sorbital in people with diabetes. Sorbital is a sugar that can accumulate and damage the nerves eyes and kidney of people with diabetes. Vitamin C may improve glucose tolerance in patients with Type-2 diabetes. Vitamin C significantly reduces urinary protein loss in people with diabetes. Diabetic people should have 1-3 grams per day of vitamin C.

Vitamin B-12: Vitamin B-12 is needed for normal functioning of nerve cells. Vitamin B12 taken orally, intravenously or by injection reduces the nerve damage caused by diabetes in most of the people. The intake of large amounts of niacin (a form of the vitamin B 3), such as 2-3 grams per day, may impair glucose tolerance and shall be used by diabetic people only under doctor’s advice.

Vitamin D: It is needed to maintain adequate blood levels of insulin. Vitamin D receptors have been found in the pancreas where insulin is produced hence the supplements of vitamin D, increases insulin level in people suffering form diabetes. But it should be given in accurate dose as high dose of vitamin D can be toxic.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E prevents the destructive vascular damage that may occur in diabetes. Vitamin E supplements prevents the arterial degeneration in patients suffering from diabetes. Vitamin E decreases the requirement of insulin by diabetic people. Vitamin E is available naturally in whole grain products, wheat products, fruits, green leafy vegetables milk, whole raw or sprouted seeds.

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October 24, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 11, 2007

Just as we got to the beach, I took 1000 mg of vitamin C, 400 IU of vitamin E and 400 IU of vitamin D and hit the water. From three o’clock until six thirty I spent the day in full sunshine. My wife didn’t use any sunblock either and we made the slightly nervous decision not to use any sunblock on my daughter who is 21 months tomorrow.

We had a great time and spent most of the time in the water with my shirt off. By the time we left, I didn’t feel burnt at all. My daughter looked fine with no visible tan lines.

I think it worked again! We’ll find out tomorrow…

August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 10, 2007

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Tomorrow I’m going up to Wasaga Beach and the weather forcast is 32 degrees and full sunshine all day. Last year I made the discovery regarding the sunblock vitamins so this year I’ll try the same thing again to see if it works.

Vitamins C, D and E.

August 12, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 18, 2007

I’m really starting to get annoyed because I can’t figure out what the problem is. I know it’s deficiency…but what?

Back to googling “nervousness” + “deficiency”. I’m looking through all the regular vitamins and minerals and I feel like I’ve tried them all but then I notice one that maybe of interest. I don’t think I’ve done any in depth research on it. It goes on to mention how a reaction requires selenium and that a deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects. I can say without a doubt that I had a deficiency with all of the above vitamins and minerals so I really need to look at this very closely. It also has a link to candida.

Nutrient Interactions: Iodine

How do other nutrients interact with iodine?

The conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodthyronine (T3) requires the removal of an iodine molecule from T4. This reaction requires the mineral selenium. The iodine molecule that is removed gets returned to the body’s pool of iodine and can be reused to make additional thyroid hormones.

If your body is deficient in selenium, the conversion of T4 to T3 is slowed, and less iodine is available for the thryoid to use in making new hormones.

Animal studies have shown that arsenic interferes with the uptake of iodine by the thyroid, leading to goiter. In addition, dietary deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects of iodine deficiency.

Iodine deficiency causing defective free radical generation

Most people who do not regularly eat seafood (either fish or kelp) or use iodized salt have some degree of iodine deficiency; this can also occur as a result of a low-salt diet. These individuals may become hypothyroid and hypometabolic, because iodine is an essential ingredient in thyroid hormone. At the same time they may become more sensitive to yeast infections, due to inactivity of the myeloperoxidase enzyme, which uses iodine in cell mediated immune function.

The iodine is used by this enzyme to product iodine-free radicals which are part of the cellular anti-yeast “free radical artillery”. Previous to the use of nystatin as an antifungal drug, iodine therapy was successfully used to treat yeast infections; however, one must be very careful with the dosage. People who are sensitive to various foods and chemicals are frequently intolerant to iodine and should only use it in very low dosages.

July 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 27, 2007

Woke up this morning with no vibration and there was none last night. So was it the switch to magnesium gluconate? I’ll try the same thing again today with vitamin A and vitamin E along with the 100 mg of zinc. I’ll also add pantothenic acid. The lower dosage of magnesium didn’t seem to be as troublesome as I thought it would be. Recently with the fatigue my legs feel really heavy, I’m wondering if it has to do with my blood circulation as I stopped taking niacin a while back. I’ll add that too.

Progress? I was briefly looking through the symptom time line diary and I was looking at the changes I made after the iridology appointment. That’s when I started eating more fruit, discovered active B vitamins and started multivitamins and taking a higher dosage of magnesium in a form that is better absorbed. I think there will be a lot of change since the last reading. The adrenals is the one thing that I can’t seem to improve along with the anxiety. I’m sure the anxiety is related to the magnesium loss or the zinc/copper imbalance and I’ve just discovered those.

March 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 27, 2007

Discovered that Adrenal exhaustion depletes manganese, zinc, vitamin C, pantothenic acid, vitamin E, vitamin A. A few more vitamins and mineral deficiencies with a link to the adrenals.

Metabolic Aspects Of Candida Albicans Infection

 

A number of metabolic factors influence the body’s ability to directly or indirectly control Candida Albicans overgrowth. While certain of these factors overlap, a separate presentation will lend more clarity to the multiplicity of factors involved.

• Bio-unavailability of copper. Copper has a fungicidal value in the body’s tissues. Copper compounds are used commercially as sprays on vegetables, as algicides in swimming pools, etc.

• Zinc deficiency. Zinc is an essential mineral nutrient related to copper metabolism and is necessary for the synthesis of all body proteins.

• Inadequate biochemical energy production. Biochemical energy is required for all body functions, including immune system function, and all other body systems.

• Excessive alkalinity of the digestive tract. An alkaline environment of the intestinal tract favors yeast growth.

• Excessive systemic alkalinity of body tissues. May permit candida to thrive in other body tissues.

• Impaired short-chain fatty Acid metabolism. Short-chain fatty acids have fungicidal properties. Caprylic and butyric acid are frequently used as anti-candida agents. A healthy body synthesizes appropriate protective fatty acid compounds

• Immune System Incompetence. Yeast infections are far more common in immune-suppressed patients.

• Impaired Carbohydrate Metabolism. Impaired carbohydrate metabolism (hypoglycemia, dysinsulinism and diabetes) is intimately associated with candidiasis overgrowth.

• Stress. Psychological stress impairs immune system function.

• Other Nutrient Imbalances. Tissue mineral testing can identify other metabolic imbalances. Through tissue mineral testing, these metabolic factors can be monitored and corrected, resulting in an individualized and more effective approach to candidiasis.

Following are details of each of the factors that contribute to Candida overgrowth:

Copper Bio-Unavailability A Major Cause of Candida Infection

The most commonly observed mineral imbalance we find in many patients with Candida infection is termed bio-unavailable copper. Bio-unavailable copper is indicated on a tissue mineral test by a copper level above 3.0 mg/% or below 1.0 mgs/%. Other mineral indicators of a candida overgrowth are an elevated calcium level, elevated calcium/magnesium ratio, (greater than 10/1) or a low sodium/potassium ratio (less than 2.3/1).

Bio-unavailability means there is an excess of copper stored in various tissues and organs. While in excess, it is not able to be accessed. When copper is bio-unavailable, it cannot serve its normal function as a fungicide. Copper is involved in enzymes in cellular oxidative (aerobic) metabolism, and this appears to be the reason for its anti-fungal action.

The causes of copper bio-unavailability are several, however the principal one is adrenal gland insufficiency, exhaustion or burnout. Inadequate secretion of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones prevents adequate synthesis of the major copper-binding protein, ceruloplasmin.

Adrenal exhaustion results from stress, which results in a depletion of various nutrients such as manganese, zinc, vitamin C, pantothenic acid, vitamin E, vitamin A, etc., which are vital for optimal adrenal gland activity.

February 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 06, 2007

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I start going through the blog to see if I have missed anything. Looking for anything, any clues that I may have overlooked. I come across an entry on April 29th and this is when I first discovered the Niacin deficiency. It mentions about a how a deficiency can cause anxiety and lower the absorption of the A, D and E vitamins. How interesting. It wasn’t until I saw the iridologst a few months later did I discover that I had anxiety and this was before I tried taking vitamins A, D and E to know I had a deficiency.

Another interesting point? Niacin is usually the only vitamin that is not included in a multivitamin. They normally use Niacinamide instead at a very low dosage. I have been taking 150-300 mg of Niacin everyday since last April. Was I taking enough to correct a deficiency?

Niacin
Niacin (nicotinic acid) is another one of the B-complex vitamins that may be linked to neurological damage. Mild niacin deficiency is associated with weakness, tremor, anxiety, depression and irritability.

Niacin helps increase energy through improving food utilization and has been used beneficially for treating fatigue, irritability, and digestive disorders, such as diarrhea, constipation, and indigestion. It may also stimulate extra hydrochloric acid production.

Nicotinic acid also helps reduce blood pressure and, very importantly, acts as an agent to lower serum cholesterol. Treatment with about 2 grams a day of nicotinic acid has produced significant reductions in both blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

In general, niacin deficiency affects every cell, especially in those systems with rapid turnover, such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system. Other than photosensitivity, the first signs of niacin deficiency are noted as decreased energy production and problems with maintaining healthy functioning of the skin and intestines. These symptoms include weakness and general fatigue, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions. These can progress to other problems, such as a sore, red tongue, canker sores, nausea, vomiting, tender gums, bad breath, and diarrhea. The neurological symptoms may begin with irritability, insomnia, and headaches and then progress to tremors, extreme anxiety and depression. The skin will worsen, as will the diarrhea and inflammation of the mouth and intestinal tract. There will be a lack of stomach acid production (achlorhydria) and a decrease in fat digestion and, thus, lower availability from food absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins, such as A, D, and E.

Found this entry from May 4th, 2006:

Diagnosis and Treatment

Niacin deficiency must be distinguished from other causes of stomatitis, glossitis, diarrhea, and dementia. Diagnosis is easy when the clinical findings include skin and mouth lesions, diarrhea, delirium, and dementia. More often, the condition is less fully developed, and a history of a diet lacking niacin and tryptophan is significant.

Multiple deficiencies of B vitamins and protein often occur together; therefore, a balanced diet is needed. Supplemental niacinamide 300 to 1000 mg/day should be given orally in divided doses. In most cases, 300 to 500 mg is sufficient. Niacinamide is generally used to treat deficiency states, because niacin can cause flushing, itching, burning, or tingling sensations, whereas niacinamide does not; however, niacinamide does not possess hypolipidemic or vasodilating properties as does niacin.

When oral therapy is precluded because of diarrhea or lack of patient cooperation, 100 to 250 mg should be injected sc bid to tid. In encephalopathic states, 1000 mg po plus 100 to 250 mg IM is recommended. Other B-complex vitamins should also be given in therapeutic dosages.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 29, 2006

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I came across a web site yesterday that includes tools to track your health. So out of curiosity, I thought it was be interesting to track by blood pressure results taken around the time I was getting the acupuncture treatments. I entered in every reading starting March 8th to May 9th over my ten appointments. At the time, I knew it was slightly on the high side but I maybe didn’t pay close enough attention as I should have.

After entering the information, it produced a nice looking chart. My Systolic reading took an obvious downward trend after I started taking Niacin.

I’ve only taken one reading since I starting taking my daily routine of vitamins and it was at the suggestion of the chiropractor on June 10th, 2006. My reading was 122/87.

I never told the iridoligst about my high blood pressure readings and she was able to indentify that I had prevented a heart attack based on what she saw in my iris. She said there were healing lines around the area of the heart and that whatever I was doing was helping.

The interesting thing? By complete coinidence, I added five supplements that are well known to prevent heart attacks before I went to her. Niacin, Omega three, Vitamin E, B Complex and magnesium.

B Vitamins: Prevent Heart Attacks

A multivitamin each day can reduce your chance of a heart attack by 33 percent. Make sure that the multivitamin contains B6, B12 and Folic acid to decrease your homocysteine levels for a further risk decrease.

Eat a variety of fruit and vegetables to get all the nutrients required for good health. High fiber foods reduce your heart disease risk and hot tea’s flavonoids decrease heart attacks. Nuts contain monounsaturated fat, omega-3s, phytochemicals, magnesium and the antioxidant vitamin E, all of which decrease heart disease risk.

Vitamin E: Cuts the Risk of Heart Attack

By Steve Austin, ND

Healthnotes Newswire (October 12, 2000)—People taking vitamin E supplements have a dramatically reduced risk of suffering heart attacks, according to a report in the current issue of The Lancet.1

In this latest chapter in the on-again, off-again story of the effect of vitamin E on heart-disease prevention, Israeli researchers found that patients given vitamin E supplements suffered 70% fewer heart attacks than did those given placebo.

The researchers studied 196 patients with a history of heart disease and with kidney failure and dependency on kidney dialysis machines. Subjects were given either 800 IU (international units) of natural vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol) per day or placebo for an average of 519 days. Participants were chosen for the trial because the combination of kidney failure and a history of heart disease leads to an extraordinarily high risk of suffering a future heart attack. Also, such patients show evidence of unusually high oxidative damage—the very kind of damage vitamin E is likely to protect against.

Niacin: Treatment reduces risk of heart attack by 70 percent

Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer in most industrialized countries. A new study indicates that combining the use of a statin drug and niacin can reduce the risk of heart attack or hospitalization for chest pain by 70 percent among people likely to suffer heart attacks and/or death from coronary heart disease.

The treatment used in the study combined two well-known ways of improving cardiac health: the use of a statin drug called simvastatin to lower levels of the so-called “bad” cholesterol, LDL, and the use of niacin, also called vitamin B-3, to boost levels of the “good” cholesterol, HDL. Niacin is the best agent known to raise blood levels of HDL, which helps remove cholesterol deposits from the artery walls.

Magnesium: The Heart Connection

Did you know that without sufficient magnesium you would actually die? Your heart will stop beating and the doctors will then call it a “heart attack” (#1 cause of death in America). Never do they say, “He dies from a Magnesium Deficiency.” This is how critical it is to have proper magnesium levels in the body. The early signs of such terminal extinction are racing heart-beats, or any unsual change in heart beats, angina pains, collapsing from echaustion after heavy physical exercise or work such as running a race, playing football or basket ball. Due to lack of magnesium the heart muscle develops a spasm or cramp and stops beating. this is because there is insufficient magnesium to relax the heart ready for the next contraction. Irregular heartbeats are also caused by magnesium deficiency. This may be the answer why so many young athletes are having heart attack for no known reason.

And still to this day, I can feel a difference if I miss taking any of these four vitamins.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 22, 2006

In the same vitamin/mineral book I look up magnesium. To my shock and amazement I discover that cod liver oil and fat soluble vitamins inhibit the absorption of magnesium!! I’ve never read that anywhere! Not even doctor google.

I’ve been taking fat soluble vitamins A and E for months now. Could that be my problem? I’ve also been taking Omega three supplements. Is that the same as cod liver oil? I’ll have to look into that.

Oh boy…

September 23, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 03, 2006

Vitamin E link to early asthma
Posted: Sat 02/09/2006

Children are more likely to develop asthma and wheezing by the age of five if their mothers consumed low levels of vitamin E during pregnancy, the results of a new study indicate.

A team of researchers at the University of Aberdeen followed the progress of 1,253 mothers and children over a five-year period.

They found that children whose mothers had consumed the lowest levels of vitamin E during pregnancy were over five times more likely to have early persistent asthma, compared to children whose mothers had consumed the highest levels of the vitamin. Good sources of vitamin E include vegetable oils, such as sunflower oil, margarine, wheat germ, nuts and sunflower seeds.

According to Dr Graham Devereux of the university, the findings suggest that vitamin E has important effects on lung function and airway inflammation. However the team noted that as the airways are fully developed 16 weeks after conception, vitamin E exposure in early pregnancy may be more likely to influence airway function than exposure later in pregnancy.

In an earlier study of the same children, the researchers found that when they were two years old, they were more likely to wheeze if their mother’s vitamin E intake during pregnancy had been relatively low.

“The results of the present study suggest that dietary modification or supplementation during pregnancy to reduce the likelihood of childhood asthma warrants further investigation”, Dr Devereux said.

The team added that vitamin E supplementation in adults with established asthma has been shown to be of no clinical benefit.

Details of these findings are published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

September 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 14, 2006

I start the day organizing the myelin sheath building vitamins. B1, B6, B12, folate, vitamin C, D, and E, Magnesium, Omega 3 and Lecithin.

Here’s what I find on magnesium absorption:

Best taken: At bedtime with calcium in the ratio of one or two parts calcium to one part magnesium. Most absorbable forms are magnesium orotate and amino-chelated magnesium. Magnesium gluconate and magnesium chloride are less effective but can be taken orally.

The process of digestion and absorption of magnesium is very similar to that of calcium. The suggested ratio of intake of these two vital nutrients is about 2:1, calcium to magnesium. Magnesium also requires an acidic stomach environment for best absorption, so taking it between meals or at bedtime is recommended. Meals high in protein or fat, a diet high in phosphorus or calcium (calcium and magnesium can compete), or alcohol use may decrease magnesium absorption.

Usually, about 40-50 percent of the magnesium we consume is absorbed, though this may vary from 25-75 percent depending on stomach acid levels, body needs, and dietary habits.

The levels of magnesium used by physicians are commonly in the range of 600-1,000 mg.; however, the researchers in the kidney stone studies used only 200-300 mg. of supplemental magnesium oxide. Calcium and magnesium are both alkaline minerals, so they are not taken with or after meals, as they can reduce stomach acid as well as being absorbed poorly when taken with food. They are absorbed better when taken between meals or on an empty stomach, especially with a little vitamin C as ascorbic acid.

Many calcium-magnesium combinations are formulated with hydrochloric acid and vitamin D to aid the mineral absorption. And taking them before bedtime may be very helpful in increasing utilization of both these important minerals and lead to a sleep-filled night.

The best forms of supplemental magnesium seem to be the ones chelated to an amino acid (magnesium glycinate, magnesium taurate) or a krebs cycle intermediate (magnesium malate, magnesium citrate, magnesium fumarate). These forms seem to be better utilized, absorbed, and assimilated. Try to stay away from inorganic forms of magnesium like magnesium chloride or magnesium carbonate because they may not be absorbed as well and may cause gastric disturbances.

The magnitude of increased absorption with true amino acid chelates is biologically profound. Comparing a magnesium amino acid chelate to magnesium oxide (a typical salt found in many supplements) the amino acid chelate had 9 times the absorption as the oxide. This study compared the use of the single mineral. If another inorganic mineral were given at the same time, such as calcium carbonate, the usual effect would be no reduction of the amino acid chelate, but a further 70-80% reduction of magnesium absorption from the oxide form. The net effect on absorption of chelated to inorganic magnesium, if two or more inorganic minerals are taken, can be 20-30 fold greater absorption or more of the amino acid chelate.

Magnesium-containing products are either used in treating a primary or secondary magnesium deficiency or are given for prophylaxis as food supplement. Various inorganic (oxides, chlorides, sulfates and carbonates) and organic (citrates, aspartates) magnesium compounds are available for oral administration.

A comparison of the magnesium content of food as stated in tables of nutritional values and the actual analytical values showed that food contains less magnesium than reported in the literature. This means that a deficiency may arise even when the calculated intake is sufficient. Also, food processing, such as polishing rice or cooking fresh vegetables, can lead to loss of magnesium. However, insufficient supply due to nutrition is only one of many causes of magnesium deficiency.

Those suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome also seem to do better with magnesium given by injection. This may be due to the superior absorption of injectable magnesium or because high concentrations in the body are necessary for maximal therapeutic effects.

August 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 14, 2006

And this:

It is now known the cause for the destruction of the myelin in the lesions is overactivation of the microglia in the region of the myelin. An enzyme that converts glutamine to glutamate called glutaminase increases tremendously, thereby greatly increasing excitotoxicity. Mercury also activates microglia, even in subtoxic doses.
 
Any dietary excitotoxin can activate the microglia, thereby greatly aggravating the injury. This includes the aspartate in aspartame. The methanol adds to this toxicity as well. Now, the secret to treatment appears to be shutting down, or at least calming down, the microglia. It has been found that the antibiotic minocycline powerfully shuts down the microglia. I tried this treatment on a friend of mine who just came down with fulmanant MS. He was confined to a wheelchair. I had him placed on minocycline and now, just a few weeks later, he is walking.
 
The good news is that other things also calm the microglia-the most potent are: silymarin, curcumin and ibuprophen. Phosphatidylcholine helps re-myelinate the nerve sheaths that are damaged, as does B12, B6, B1, vitamin D, folate, vitamin C, natural vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) and L-carnitine. DHA plays a major role in repairing the myelin sheath. Vitamin D may even prevent MS, but it acts as an immune modulator, preventing further damage – the dose is 2000 IU a day. Magnesium, as magnesium malate, is needed in a dose of 500 mg 2X a day. They must avoid all excitotoxins, even natural ones in foods-such as soy, red meats, nuts, mushrooms and tomatoes. Avoid all fluoride and especially all vaccinations since these either inhibit antioxidant enzymes or triggers harmful immune reactions.

Phosphatidylcholine helps re-myelinate the nerve sheaths. What is this stuff and how can I get me some?

Phosphatidylcholine is a phospholipid that is a major constituent of cell membranes. Phosphatidylcholine is also known as 1, 2-diacyl-:ussn:ue-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PtdCho and lecithin.

So Phosphatidylcholine, is a fancy name for lecithin. Perfect! I already have some. Interestingly enough, three of the main supplements that are required for rebuilding the myelin sheath, the iridologist told me I didn’t need them:

Magnesium, Vitamin D and DHA from Omega 3.

More about Magnesium Malate:

Heavy Metal Toxicity

Magnesium malate may be one of the few compounds capable of pulling aluminum from the body over time.

And my hair analysis came up with high aluminum levels and this form of magnesium is recommened for building the myelin sheaths and removing aluminum from the body. The Naturopath didn’t mention this? She gave me a standard calcium/magnesium but I’m sure it wasn’t magnesium malate.

August 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 11, 2006

Three days ago we went up to Wasaga beach. My wife has a friend that owns a cottage right near the waterfront. The weather was a hot 32 degrees, full sunshine and not a cloud in the sky so it was the perfect day to go to the beach. Every year this guy has a party and invites all of his friends from work and we spend the day playing Beach Bocce, volleyball and of course swimming.

We were invited up two years ago and I got a really good sunburn from being in the sun so long. My arms were red, the back of neck was sore and I was so red that everybody at work made comments because it was so bad. And I seem to recall that I was wearing sun block but I can’t say for sure.

This time with my knowledge of chemicals, I refuse to put on any sun block and I’ll just watch my exposure in the sun. We had such a great time that I ended up spending a lot of time in the sun and forgot that I wasn’t wearing any sun block. I must have spent a least three hours in direct sunlight. I’ll pay for this tomorrow….and I’ll look like a lobster again.

The next day, I check out my arms and to my surprise there is no sign of sunburn. No redness whatsoever and I can’t believe it. The back of my neck is fine and my arms and legs show no sign that I was in the sun at all. How is this possible? Doctor Google…

Guarding against Sun Singe

Of course, we all know that a milligram of prevention is worth many pounds of cure when it comes to sunburn. The best way to prevent sunburn is to simply use common sense by avoiding excess exposure and using sunscreen. You can also help your skin by taking some supplements when you know you’re going to be exposed to the sun.

Vitamin C has qualities that can help protect skin from sunlight, and it’s also well-known for its antioxidant properties, says Leon Hecht, N.D., a naturopathic doctor at the North Coast Family Health Center in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

For people who spend a lot of time in the sun, Dr. Hecht suggests up to 1,000 milligrams of vitamin C three or four times a day. “Vitamin C stimulates repair of sun-damaged skin,” he says.

In a controlled study, 10 people took either 2,000 milligrams of vita min C with 1,000 IU of vitamin E a day or an inactive substance (placebo). The sunburn reaction after eight days of treatment revealed that the skin of people in the treatment group showed less damage than that of those in the placebo group.

Dr. Hecht also states that vitamins C and E used in topical sunscreens prove effective as well. “Early studies show that it is prudent to add vitamins C and E to your sunscreen to protect against ultraviolet phototoxic injury to your skin,” he says. Sunscreens with these vitamins already added can be found in drugstores.

Well as it turns out, vitamins C and E have been part of my daily vitamins for months now. I’ve also read that vitamin D can have a positive effect as sunblock and I’ve just added that.

Doctor Google found this:

Sunblock and skin cancer: Not the relationship you thought there was.

1. You need vitamin D. Sunlight on the skin (up to an hour a day) is the most important source of vitamin D. The other source of vitamin D is the food you eat.

2. Vitamin D may have a role in preventing skin cancer and certain other cancers as well (breast and prostate).

3. Using sunblock prevents production of vitamin D by your body. Therefore, using sunblock could actually increase your risk of getting cancer.

The biggest issue with vitamin D is that, at the levels thought to provide protection from cancer, it depletes the level of calcium in the body. This can lead to problems with osteoporosis, but you can take supplements to deal with this.

1. Build up your sun exposure in spring and summer so you can get an hour of sunlight on your body every day, without sunblock. Start slow and AVOID GETTING SUNBURNED. It doesn’t have to be an hour straight – several periods of exposure adding up to an hour is enough. In other places, I have read that (for caucasians, anyway), all that needs to be exposed in summer is the arms and the face, not the whole body. One source says that for caucasians twenty minutes is enough to provide all the vitamin D you need for the day. I wish these guys could come to an agreement, but it looks like 20 to 60 minutes total would be a good idea, more than that is probably asking for trouble with sunburn and increased cancer risk.

2. If you are staying out of the sun, and for everyone in winter, take fish oil as a supplement. African-Americans and others with dark skin living in temperate latitudes should probably take fish oil routinely rather than increase sun exposure, because the melanin in your skin cuts down on the amount of vitamin D produced. (Read this in other places, not in the article – some scientists think that caucasians are humans that lost pigmentation as an adaptation to allow their bodies to produce enough vitamin D in relatively sunless northern latitudes. The jury is still out on that one.) Anyway, Mercola recommends cod liver oil for everybody, both for the vitamin D in it and for the Omega-3 fatty acids. I also read that in the winter, at the latitiude of Boston, a fair-skinned person could stand outside naked all day and not get enough sun to produce any vitamin D. That person would also probably have a severe case of frostbite and an arrest record by the end of the day. Take your cod-liver oil.

3. Reduce your consumption of foods containing Omega-6 fatty acids. If your favorite snack is sunflower seeds, you might want to reconsider that, or reduce your consumption of them/balance your consumption of sunflower seeds by eating more fish containing Omega-3 fatty acids. Remember that corn oil, safflower oil, etc. (he lists them in the article) are almost pure Omega-6 fatty acids and also need to be reduced so that you get as close as possible to a 1:1 ratio of consumption. This is coming out more and more as being important to prevention of certain cancers.

Dr. Mercola points out the irony in our (appropriate) concern about cancer and exessive sun exposure, while at the same time it appears that moderate exposure to sun may actually help to prevent skin cancer and sunblock use could be a problem.

July 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

Lecithin

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system.

Besides being an important factor in controlling cholesterol levels and aiding coronary health, lecithin is involved in a myriad of body functions. Every cell of your body contains lecithin. Lecithin is responsible for maintaining the surface tension of the cell membrane. It therefore controls what goes in and out of each cell, allowing nutrients in, or wastes out. Without enough lecithin, the cell wall hardens, thus not allowing enough nutrients in or wastes out. This means premature aging of cells. The surface tension of the cell maintained by lecithin is also responsible for transmitting nerve impulses and messages through or from the cell.

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system. A key factor in proper brain and nerve transmissions is the presence of cellular substance called acetylcholine.

Until as recently as six years ago, medical researchers were using choline chloride to help their patients who suffered from these insidious brain disorders to produce more acetylcholine in their bodies. However, in 1977, Dr. Richard Wurtinan and his colleagues at Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that lecithin (which contains phosphatidyl choline) increased serum choline levels more than three times as much as the previously used choline chloride and kept those levels raised more than three times as long. This meant that researchers had found a way to significantly raise acetylcholine levels in their patients since acetylcholine production in the brain was dependent on serum choline levels.

Dr. Wartman’s research further astounded the medical community by showing that choline was taken up directly by the brain and used almost at once to help the brain make acetylcholine. This meant that the amount of lecithin (phosphatidyl choline) furnished by each meal could have a direct and almost immediate effect on the efficiency of the brain. Researchers found this so surprising because it had long been believed that the so called blood/brain barrier shielded the brain from such direct influences by nutrients and substances that are excessive or lacking in the day-to-day diet. Only a few substances such as alcohol or powerful drugs were thought to be able to cross this barrier.

Additional Findings on Lecithin’s Interaction in the Body

Without sufficient lecithin, your body cannot utilize the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. By adding an adequate amount of lecithin to your diet, you could improve your digestion and utilization of these vitamins by 100% or more if your diet is now deficient in lecithin.

When a person exercises regularly to improve their muscle tone, the amount of lecithin contained in the muscles increases. This increase in muscle lecithin is in part responsible for the greater endurance of the muscle.

Cirrhosis of the liver is no longer a disease of the heavy drinker only. Being the body’s waster disposal plant, many toxic materials, like food additives, preservatives, insecticides, growth hormones, etc., all pass through the liver. Lecithin and good general nutrition readily reverses liver damage.

W.S. Hartroff, M.D., Ph.D., reported in the American Journal of Public Health that the lack of choline was found to head infants toward high blood pressure. Furthermore, it has been found that a choline deficiency induced tendency to high blood pressure can not be reversed. Interestingly enough, human milk contains lecithin while cow’s milk does not.

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 18, 2006

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Searching for information on vitamins and I come across the web page for Health Canada. I’m reading an article on the Safety of Vitamin E Supplements and there is a notice at the bottom of the page:

“The Natural Health Products Directorate of Health Canada is drafting guidelines on vitamin E to ensure that manufacturers provide appropriate information on product labels. Such information would include recommended dosages, the length of time products should be taken, and information on potential risk.”

Seems strange that they are doing this with vitamins. I hope they are doing the same for precription drugs. If Wendy Mesley had read a warning about the length of time her medication should be taken, maybe she wouldn’t have developed breast cancer.

June 18, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 17, 2006

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I’ve done quite a lot of research on the B vitamins lately and I don’t think the B complex vitamin that the naturopath gave me has the right dosage for me. For the past couple of weeks, I’ve had really itchy eyes and I’ve discovered it’s because of my high dosage of B2.

The optimum intake of supplemental vitamin B2 is not known. 20-25 mg of vitamin B2 is usually included in most good multivitamins and this is usually adequate for more people. Riboflavin is best taken with B group vitamins and vitamin C. If taking a B2 supplement make sure that the B6 amount is nearly the same.

Pyridoxine (B6) should be taken together with the entire B group vitamins, and in supplementation the quantity of B6 should be nearly the same as B2, as the B2 is needed to activate the Pyridoxine.

So I check the dosage of B2 in the  B complex vitamin and it contains 25 mg but I take it twice a day. The amount of B6 is 250 mg for a total of 500 mg per day.

After the lab, I decide that I’ll drop into the health food store and take a look. I’m going to create my own version of B complex as I don’t need too much B2 and I need the pure Niacin form of B3.

Here is the old dosage for taking 2 B complex pills from the Naturopath:

B1: 100 mg (Thiamine)
B2: 50 mg (Riboflavin)
B3: 160 mg (Niacinamide)
B5: 100 mg (Pantothenic Acid)
B6: 500 mg (Pyridoxine)
B7: 160 mcg (Biotin)
B9: 0.2 mg (Folic Acid)
B12: 100 mcg (Cobalamin)

————————————————————————————————————

While I am in the store checking out the vitamins, they sell a vitamin/mineral chart listing the benefits, diet recommendations, daily dosage, toxic dosage, and risk groups. It’s very clean and easy to understand. I’m looking at the hi-potency B complex and it actually not that high so with the chart, I’ll create my own. Yesterday was the first day I took the B1 vitamins (200 mg) and after reading that folic acid (B9) is required for B2 to work, I’ll make sure I have some of that. 0.2 mg doesn’t seem to be enough although the RDA is 400-mcg. Folic acid is also required for B12.

As I’m reading the chart, I come across serveral other vitamins that are good for the brain and nervous system. So I pick up Panothenic acid (B5) and Biotin (B7). I keep reading and I notice that Chromium, a mineral suppliment that the naturopath gave me on my first visit is recommended for the brain and nervous system and I still have some of that at home. It mentions that the upper daily limit for vitamin E is 1000 mg and it’s also good for brain and nerve function. I have been taking 400 mg every other day so maybe I’ll start taking that every day.

Zinc, another mineral suppliment that the naturopath recommended for reducing my high silver is listed as helpful for brain function. I get home and take all of the vitamins. I write the dosage on top with a marker.

This is my version of Hi-Potent B Complex:

B1: 300 mg (Thiamine)
B2: 30 mg (Riboflavin)
B3: 200 mg (Niacin)
B5: 250 mg (Pantothenic Acid)
B6: 500 mg (Pyridoxine)
B7: 300 mcg (Biotin)
B9: 1000 mcg (Folic Acid)
B12: 1000 mcg (Cobalamin)

Chromium: 150 mg?
Vitamin E: 400 IU
Acidophilus: 2 capsules
Zinc: 50 mg

Let’s see if it will make a difference…

June 17, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 30, 2006

Almost a week after taking vitamin E supplements and I’m noticing a difference. Not with the nervous system, but with my skin. On the top of my chest, I have always had oily skin and a few small zits. I never go anywhere without a shirt on so what do I care? But since I’ve taken the vitamin E, the difference in my skin is incredible. Not only has the small zits cleared up, but my skin all over is so smooth I can’t believe the difference.

Imagine people who are deficient in vitamin E, buying skin care lotions to make their skin beautiful and soft, and I’m sure these products do. But what happens when they stop using it? The skin returns back to the way it was before and so they go back and keep buying the product. They are covering a symptom and not getting to the root cause of the problem.

Came across this article in the paper this morning. Bill Cameron went to the doctor for heartburn, coughing and hiccups. Simple symptoms that maybe people wouldn’t even bother going to see a doctor and later he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. What’s the point of going to a doctor if they can’t put all of the symptoms together and recognize the early symptoms of cancer?

Spreading esophageal awareness

The slight weakening in Bill Cameron’s voice, his heartburn, coughing and the bouts of hiccups were all treated as individual complaints. But when the journalist couldn’t swallow, a doctor did a biopsy and told him he had esophageal cancer.

After hearing the grim news, Cheryl Hawkes, Cameron’s wife, was asked by the doctor: How did this get so far? Her husband died nine months after being diagnosed.

She came up with the idea to make May 31 esophageal cancer awareness day. She went to see her city counsellor. He took it to Mayor David Miller, who liked the idea and proclaimed the day.

Esophageal cancer is most curable when diagnosed early. But since early symptoms are either non-existent or include mild heartburn or coughing bouts, the cancer is usually more advanced when diagnosed, the People Living with Cancer website (www.plwc.org) reports.

May 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 27, 2006

Kevin Trudeau says you should visit a chiropractor once a month, whether you need to or not and today was my appointment.

My wife and I arrived at the chiropractor’s office and the first thing the receptionist hands us is a three page health questionnaire. I’m filling out the form for internal vibrations and my wife for her lower back pain. Both of us don’t really have any of the chronic symptoms listed in the questionnaire. In fact, my wife feels silly even going to a chiropractor at all. Having read the book by Kevin Trudeau, I was going for a check up and wasn’t really looking for anything more.

The doctor calls me into his office and reviews my file. I mention the internal vibration and the vitamin deficiencies. I told him about taking Niacin and the B Complex vitamins and how they have had the greatest effect. He said B complex vitamins play a large part of a healthy nervous system and explained that the first visit is primarily to check the range of motion, posture analysis, muscle tone and strength. The next ten minutes are spent in a variety of positions and he places pressure quite hard at times. He mentions that I should also be taking vitamin E at 200-400 IU. He says the B vitamins are lost through the urine and that is why treatment is slow and over a long period of time. Vitamin E however is stored within the body. I mention about my research and the parasympathetic nerves. He doesn’t say too much about them and mentions that I should research some other medical conditions called “Bruit” and “Fasciculations”.

As the appointment progresses, I decide to mention that my knees are weak when I try to get back up from a crouched position. I told him that I’ve been talking calcium/magnesium suppliments for about a week and it appears to mild improvement. He checks my knee strength with a hammer and trys a few things. I also mention that I have muscle twitching and he says it can be a symptom of calcium deficiency and could explain the weakness in my knees as nothing appears to be obviously wrong. By the end he says my upper back is stiffer than it should be and my neck is too straight causing my head to be further from my body. He recommends a follow up appointment in a week.

My wife then goes in for her appointment not really expecting too much and she came out with the following diagnosis: Sacroiliac joint syndrome and facet syndrome. She came out quite surprised at the things he was saying. Her posture was incorrect as one of her legs was longer than the other and one of her syndromes left uncorrected can lead to a hip replacement later in life. He mentioned these problems existed long before the pregnancy!

So why isn’t a chiropractor visit standard after child birth? Seems like the logical thing to do after the body has been through a tremendous amout of physical stress. If she didn’t have the birth, she could’ve gone for years not knowing about these conditions leading to more serious problems.

May 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for April 29, 2006

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With these new theories swirling around my head, I go to the Nutritional Summary web site and look up pears. From the list of protein and amino acids I notice that two of the highest ingredients are acids.

Pear (Raw)

Protein & Amino Acids:

Aspartic acid: 173 mg
Glutamic acid: 49.5 mg

Both of these work as excitatory neurotransmitters in the nervous system. As I look up the effects of Amino Acids and how diet can effect the nervous system, I come across Niacin deficiency:

Niacin
Niacin (nicotinic acid) is another one of the B-complex vitamins that may be linked to neurological damage. Mild niacin deficiency is associated with weakness, tremor, anxiety, depression and irritability.

Niacin helps increase energy through improving food utilization and has been used beneficially for treating fatigue, irritability, and digestive disorders, such as diarrhea, constipation, and indigestion. It may also stimulate extra hydrochloric acid production.

Nicotinic acid also helps reduce blood pressure and, very importantly, acts as an agent to lower serum cholesterol. Treatment with about 2 grams a day of nicotinic acid has produced significant reductions in both blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

In general, niacin deficiency affects every cell, especially in those systems with rapid turnover, such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system. Other than photosensitivity, the first signs of niacin deficiency are noted as decreased energy production and problems with maintaining healthy functioning of the skin and intestines. These symptoms include weakness and general fatigue, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions. These can progress to other problems, such as a sore, red tongue, canker sores, nausea, vomiting, tender gums, bad breath, and diarrhea. The neurological symptoms may begin with irritability, insomnia, and headaches and then progress to tremors, extreme anxiety and depression. The skin will worsen, as will the diarrhea and inflammation of the mouth and intestinal tract. There will be a lack of stomach acid production (achlorhydria) and a decrease in fat digestion and, thus, lower availability from food absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins, such as A, D, and E.

The liver can synthesize niacin from the essential amino acid tryptophan but the synthesis is extremely slow and requires vitamin B6. Bacteria in the gut may also perform the conversion but are inefficient.

Many food charts list only sources that actually contain niacin and do not take into account tryptophan conversion into niacin. Approximately 60 mg of tryptophan can generate 1 mg of niacin. But tryptophan is available for conversion only when there are more than sufficient quantities in the diet to synthesize the necessary proteins as tryptophan is used in our body with the other essential amino acids to produce protein.

Niacin needs are based on caloric intake. We need about 6.6 mg. per 1,000 calories, and no less than 13 mg. per day. Women need at least 13 mg. and men at least 18 mg. per day. The RDA for children ranges from 9-16 mg.

A mild niacin deficiency can cause a tremor! How interesting… Is this the breakthrough I’ve been waiting for? I’m also wondering now if this explains why my triglyceride levels were so high on the last blood test. Back on April 11th, the acupuncture doctor told me there was only two reasons for high triglycerides.

1) Eat a lot of fat red meat.

2) Not eating enough fruits and vegetables.

Now there is a third: NIACIN Deficiency.

I look up pears and they only contain 0.3 mg of Niacin however a can of tuna has 21.5 mg per can and it contains 440 mg of tryptophan.

Looks like I’m having Tuna for lunch!

April 28, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for April 25, 2006

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I washed my hair this morning using Jason organic shampoo and WOW! I can feel the difference right away. My hair is so much softer and my forehead feels soft too. Here’s what it says on their web site:

Vitamin E with A & C Shampoo (Body Enhancing)

No Lauryl/Laureth Sulfates
Super Enriched with 5 Vitamins, 22 Amino Acids and 5 Botanicals. Revitalizes Dry, Tired Hair

Using only the purest Natural Vitamins, Amino Acids and Botanicals, this nourishing shampoo is specially formulated to gently cleanse dry or damaged hair without stripping away necessary moisture. It is super-enriched to build body while it adds a healthy shine, and concentrated to save you money. A small amount is all you need.

Acupuncture appointment number seven. Another uneventful week and I still have the mystery internal vibration. I did switch back to her vitamin C tablets but found that I would get the weird head pinching sensation everytime I did. If I took one of my vitamin C tablets, it would disappear. This leads me to believe that my problem is with the gastrointestinal tract and not actually needing vitamin C in my system.

When I told the doctor I was still vibrating and that her new direction had no effect, she was quite confused. She said I was her toughest patient and it was good because she liked the challenge. She wanted to regroup and she asked for my opinion on what I thought the problem was. We reviewed my discoveries and what worked for my symptoms.

1) Acidophilus settles my stomach.

2) Eating pears will stop the vibrations.

3) Vitamin C will also stop the vibrations and get rid of the weird head symptoms.

I tell her about my suspicion of Serotonin because it is a neurotransmitter effecting the central nervous system and it’s created in the gastrointestinal tract. I can’t say for certain but it’s my guess. I have looked up the symptoms of Serotonin deficency and it doesn’t really match.

She tells me how the Parasympathetic Nerve is connected to the stomach but she’ll need to do more research for my symptoms. I’ve never heard of the Parasympathetic Nervous System so I agree to do some research as well.

She takes my blood pressure and it’s high again: 137/90

She wants to change the treatment to focus on the stomach. She starts by cupping my back and this time she says my circulation hasn’t improved. She places new needles in my back for 15 minutes and then the front. She looks at my wart and it’s almost completely gone. She uses Moxa on the wart and then on an acupoint just below the knee on both of my legs. This is new and she explains that this is done for my stomach. How interesting. As I’m still lying on the table, she takes my blood pressure again: 135/79.

As I’m leaving she gives me a new suppliment to try. This one is for my stomach and it’s called BaoHe Wan. Here is what it does:

Bao He Pian (Bao He Wan) promotes digestion, removes stagnated food and regulates the stomach†. The herbal formula is used for the retention of food, distension of fullness in the abdomen, eructating foul odor and acid regurgitation, loss of appetite†. It is also used for incoordination between the spleen and stomach, stomachache due to damp stagnation lying hidden, indigestion, oppression and depression over the chest and diarrhea due to hypofunction of the spleen.

April 28, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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