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Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 18, 2008

Vitamins and Minerals for Diabetes

VITAMINS AND MINERALS THAT LOWERS BLOOD SUGAR

Minerals are the vital constituents for the formation of body structures such as bones and tissues. They are also involved in major physiological processes such as proper metabolism and energy production. There are various minerals that are helpful in treating diabetes and slowing down diabetic complications.

The most important mineral is Chromium. It is also known as Diabetic Mineral. It is because the main function of chromium in is body is to turn carbohydrates into glucose. Chromium also helps in the regulation and production of hormone insulin. It has been observed that due to chromium only the

Insulin works effectively in the body and without it, insulin simply would not function. Good sources of chromium are nuts, cheese, whole, grains, oysters, mushrooms, brewer’s yeast, etc. Long time researches have shown that the symptoms of diabetes completely reverses particularly of Type –2 Diabetes mellitus.

It is because insulin regulates and normalize blood sugar and it also improves body’s ability to transport blood glucose into cells. It has also been seen that the chromium supplements improves glucose tolerance and thus brings it to normal. It reduces fasting glucose and insulin levels in

gestational diabetes. It encourages the loss of body fat. It enhances insulin secretion and decreases trighlycerides Chromium also promotes muscular gains.

Vanadium: It is also associated with proper glucose regulation. It acts like insulin in the body and also enhances its effects. That is why this mineral is extensively known for its role in the management of diabetes. Food sources of vanadium include skin milk, lobster, vegetables, butter and cheese. Vanadium is named after the Scandinavian goddess of beauty and youth. Vanadium is also a building material of bones and teeth. Although, researchers have know vanadium for more than forty

years but the mineral is not yet considered as a essential constituent for humans. It is essential for plants and animals. But Vanadium must be needed to be as an essential nutrient in our diet. Vanadium in case of diabetics- improves fasting glucose levels. It also increases insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. It lowers the insulin requirements in type –1 diabetes.

Manganese: Manganese maintains the blood glucose level in normal range and hence is useful in treating diabetes and hypoghlycaemia. Manganese is also used in our body for fat and protein metabolism and the production of energy. It is needed for growth, maintenance of connective tissue, bone, cartilage and

also helps in fatty acid synthesis. Manganese is also useful in the treatment of epilepsy, anosexia and iron deficiency. Moreover, the absorption of vitamin C, B and E depends upon the sufficient amount of manganese so the person’s multi-vitamin supplement should contain sufficient amount of manganese in it. Dietary sources of manganese include whole green cereals, leafy vegetables, nuts and tea.

Magnesium: Magnesium is mainly important for hypoglycaemics because it helps in the digestion of sugar, starches and fats and also helps in stabilizing blood sugar levels. It has been known from many years that the secretion and action of insulin require magnesium. Hence for diabetic patient and for persons

in whom intake of refined carbohydrates is too much, in them the supplement of magnesium is very much necessary. It is a person crave for chocolate, it may be an indication that he is low in magnesium. The dietary sources of magnesium are whole grains, nuts, seeds, cocoa milk, green vegetables, sea food,

brown rice. Magnesium is also involved in thyroid hormone production. Magnesium along with calcium helps in muscle contraction and helps in producing energy especially in muscle cells. Magnesium is also involved in producing stomach acid and digestive enzymes.

Zinc: Zinc is needed for proper release of insulin and many hypoglycaemics may be deficient. Zinc supplements are beneficial for patients with chronic diseases like diabetes. Some of the other Zinc’s functions include cholesterol, protein and energy metabolism growth, healing and immune functions. Dietary sources of Zinc include meat, eggs, sunflower seeds, milk, wholegrains, spinach etc. But a person should keep in mind that Zinc is destroyed when food is processed so they should eat the Zinc containing food in their natural form as much as possible. Moreover, Zinc absorption is reduced in alcoholics and diuretics. Stress also causes Zinc levels to drop rapidly.

Vitamins are an essential part of human body. The vitamin helps in improving digestion and therefore, increases the body’s ability to tolerate low glucose levels. They also know as Anti-Stress vitamins because of their good effects on the brain and nervous system. The B-complex vitamins are a group of eight vitamins, which include Thiamine (B1), Riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), Pyridoxina (B6), Folic Acid (B9), Cyanocobalmin (B12), Pantothenic acid and bioten. A particular potential benefit of vitamin B supplements for diabetics is mainly its ability to lower blood levels of homocysteine (a suphur-containing amino acid). Hence, the vitamins B are also essential for breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, which provides energy for the body. It also helps in breakdown of fats and proteins, which helps in normal functioning of the nervous system.

Vitamin B-6 is helpful in the women reporting with gestational diabetes and for protection against metabolic imbalances associated with the use of some oral contraceptive. Vitamin B6 is also useful in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. It help in reducing homocysteine. It maintains fluid balance and is essential for cellular energy production. It is somewhat beneficial to prevent skin eruptions also. Therefore, the amaging family of vitamin B is very helpful. Vitamin B6 levels are even lower in people with diabetes who have nerve damage i.e. neuropathy. So, the administration of bath Vitamin B1 (25 mg per day) and vitamin B6 (50 mg per day) shows significant improvement of symptoms of diabetic neuropathy after four weeks, because Vitamin B1 is also found to be low in people with type 1 diabetes.

Biotin (The Vitamin B) is needed to process of glucose. Patient with Type-1 of diabetes showed fasting glucose level dropped by 50% on administration of 16 mg of biotin per day for one week. Biotin may also reduce pain from diabetic nerve damage.

Vitamin C: Diabetic people also have low vitamin C levels. Vitamin C may reduce glycosylation. Vitamin C also lowers sorbital in people with diabetes. Sorbital is a sugar that can accumulate and damage the nerves eyes and kidney of people with diabetes. Vitamin C may improve glucose tolerance in patients with Type-2 diabetes. Vitamin C significantly reduces urinary protein loss in people with diabetes. Diabetic people should have 1-3 grams per day of vitamin C.

Vitamin B-12: Vitamin B-12 is needed for normal functioning of nerve cells. Vitamin B12 taken orally, intravenously or by injection reduces the nerve damage caused by diabetes in most of the people. The intake of large amounts of niacin (a form of the vitamin B 3), such as 2-3 grams per day, may impair glucose tolerance and shall be used by diabetic people only under doctor’s advice.

Vitamin D: It is needed to maintain adequate blood levels of insulin. Vitamin D receptors have been found in the pancreas where insulin is produced hence the supplements of vitamin D, increases insulin level in people suffering form diabetes. But it should be given in accurate dose as high dose of vitamin D can be toxic.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E prevents the destructive vascular damage that may occur in diabetes. Vitamin E supplements prevents the arterial degeneration in patients suffering from diabetes. Vitamin E decreases the requirement of insulin by diabetic people. Vitamin E is available naturally in whole grain products, wheat products, fruits, green leafy vegetables milk, whole raw or sprouted seeds.

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October 24, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for October 09, 2007

Today I decided to start taking less vitamins. No reason really, just want to see what the effect is…

January 17, 2008 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for September 21 2007

A couple of days with the liquid amino and I can’t say I feel a difference. Once again, I’m impatient for results and probably need to take it a while longer. I will say one thing through… I’ve felt the positive effect that Arginine has on my candida. Another deficiency. So here’s my theory on Candida and all the web sites and supplements that suggest they work.

If someone has Candida, there is an underling deficiency. The worse the candida, the more deficiencies exist. This includes all Vitamins, all Minerals and all Amino Acids.

I’m of the opinion now that the amino complex might be the same as a multivitamin whereas you can’t solve a deficiency unless you focus on a single amino acid.

October 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

Nutritional Deficiency

Symptoms & Recommendations For 24 Common Nutritional Deficiencies
By: B. SixWise

When the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion compiled their Healthy Eating Index for 1999-2000, they found only a slight reason to smile. Ten percent of the population had a good diet.

This was based on 10 aspects including how many servings of fruits, vegetables and meat were being consumed, along with how much sodium and cholesterol, and variety in a person’s diet.

The rest of their findings left something to be desired:

16 percent of the population had a “poor” diet

The rest of the population (74 percent) had a diet that “needed improvement”

As the USDA pointed out, poor or inadequate diets are linked to four of the top 10 causes of death — heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. And as it turns out, most of us have less-than-ideal diets that essentially leave our bodies starving for more nutrients.

Along with poor diets, studies have found that key nutrients in foods have declined from 1909 to 1994, likely because the soil is not as nutrient-dense as it once was and processing of foods degrades nutrients that do exist. So not only are we eating fewer healthy foods, but those we do eat contain fewer nutrients than they once did.

As a result, many Americans — even those who think they are eating relatively healthy — may be suffering from a nutritional deficiency. Some of the more common ones in the United States include: Zinc Iron B vitamins Magnesium Calcium Vitamins E and C Phosphorus Vitamin D Fiber Folic Acid Essential Fatty Acids Chromium

If you are experiencing any unusual health symptoms, a nutrient deficiency could be to blame. Below is a list of common and not-so-common nutrients, along with deficiency symptoms and foods you should eat if you think you need more.

Biotin

Deficiency: Uncommon

Symptoms: Dermatitis, eye inflammation, hair loss, loss of muscle control, insomnia, muscle weakness

Recommended Foods: Swiss chard, cauliflower, liver, salmon, carrots, bananas, cereals, yeast

Calcium

Deficiency: Average diet contains 40 to 50% of RDA

Symptoms: Brittle nails, cramps, delusions, depression, insomnia, irritability, osteoporosis, palpitations, peridontal disease, rickets, tooth decay

Recommended Foods: Spinach, turnip greens, mustard greens, collard greens, yogurt, milk, mozzarella cheese

Chromium

Deficiency: 90% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Anxiety, fatigue, glucose intolerance, adult-onset diabetes

Recommended Foods: Romaine lettuce, onions, tomatoes, brewer’s yeast, oysters, liver, whole grains, bran cereals, potatoes

Copper

Deficiency: 75% of diets deficient; average diet contains 50% of RDA

Anemia, arterial damage, depression, diarrhea, fatigue, fragile bones, hair loss, hyperthyroidism, weakness

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, crimini mushrooms, turnip greens, blackstrap molasses, raw cashew nuts, sunflower seeds, spinach, asparagus

Essential fatty acids

Deficiency: Very common

Symptoms: Diarrhea, dry skin and hair, hair loss, immune impairment, infertility, poor wound healing, premenstrual syndrome, acne, eczema, gall stones, liver degeneration

Recommended Foods: Wild-caught salmon (avoid farm-raised salmon because of pollutants), flax seeds, walnuts

Folic Acid

Deficiency: Average diet contains 60% of RDA; deficient in 100% of elderly in one study; deficient in 48% of adolescent girls; requirement doubles in pregnancy

Symptoms: Anemia, apathy, diarrhea, fatigue, headaches, insomnia, loss of appetite, neural tube defects in fetus, paranoia, shortness of breath, weakness

Recommended Foods: Romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, mustard greens, calf’s liver, parsley, collard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, beets, lentils

Iodine

Deficiency: Uncommon since the supplementation of salt with iodine

Symptoms: Cretinism, fatigue, hypothyroidism, weight gain

Recommended Foods: Sea vegetables, yogurt, cow’s milk, eggs, strawberries, mozzarella cheese

Iron

Deficiency: Most common mineral deficiency

Symptoms: Anemia, brittle nails, confusion, constipation, depression, dizziness, fatigue, headaches, inflamed tongue, mouth lesions

Recommended Foods: Chard, spinach, turmeric, thyme, shitake mushrooms, green beans

Magnesium

Deficiency: 75 to 85% of diets deficient: average diet contains 50 to 60% of RDA

Symptoms: Anxiety, confusion, heart attack, hyperactivity, insomnia, nervousness, muscular irritability, restlessness, weakness

Recommended Foods: Swiss chard, spinach, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, black beans, navy beans

Manganese

Deficiency: Unknown, may be common in women

Symptoms: Atherosclerosis, dizziness, elevated cholesterol, glucose intolerance, hearing loss, loss of muscle control, ringing in ears

Recommended Foods: Mustard greens, kale, chard, raspberries, pineapple, romaine lettuce, collard greens, maple syrup Niacin (B3)

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Bad breath, canker sores, confusion, depression, dermatitis, diarrhea, emotional instability, fatigue, irritability, loss of appetite, memory impairment, muscle weakness, nausea, skin eruptions, inflammation

Recommended Foods: Crimini mushrooms, tuna (be cautious of mercury and other pollutants that can be found in fish), wild-caught salmon, chicken breast, asparagus

Pantothenic acid (B5)

Deficiency: Average elderly diet contains 60% of RDA

Symptoms: Abdominal pains, burning feet, depression, eczema, fatigue, hair loss, immune impairment, insomnia, irritability, low blood pressure, muscle spasms, nausea, poor coordination

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, mushrooms, cauliflower, broccoli, turnip greens, sunflower seeds

Potassium

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Acne, constipation, depression, edema, excessive water consumption, fatigue, glucose intolerance, high cholesterol levels, insomnia, mental impairment, muscle weakness, nervousness, poor reflexes

Recommended Foods: Chard, button mushrooms, spinach, avocado, papaya, lima beans, lentil beans

Pyridoxine (B6)

Deficiency: 71% of male and 90% of female diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, anemia, arthritis, eye inflammation, depression, dizziness, facial oiliness, fatigue, impaired wound healing, irritability, loss of appetite, loss of hair, mouth lesions, nausea

Recommended Foods: Bell peppers, turnip greens, spinach, tuna, banana, chicken breast, turkey breast

Riboflavin

Deficiency: Deficient in 30% of elderly Britons

Symptoms: Blurred vision, cataracts, depression, dermatitis, dizziness, hair loss, inflamed eyes, mouth lesions, nervousness, neurological symptoms (numbness, loss of sensation, “electric shock” sensations), seizures, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, weakness

Recommended Foods: Mushrooms, calf’s liver, spinach, spelt

Selenium

Deficiency: Average diet contains 50% of RDA

Symptoms: Growth impairment, high cholesterol levels, increased incidence of cancer, pancreatic insufficiency (inability to secrete adequate amounts of digestive enzymes), immune impairment, liver impairment, male sterility

Recommended Foods: Button mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, cod, shrimp, snapper, tuna, halibut, calf’s liver, wild-caught salmon (again, be wary of pollutants like mercury and PCBs in seafood)

Thiamine

Deficiency: Commonly deficient in elderly

Symptoms: Confusion, constipation, digestive problems, irritability, loss of appetite, memory loss, nervousness, numbness of hands and feet, pain sensitivity, poor coordination, weakness

Recommended Foods: Asparagus, romaine lettuce, mushrooms, spinach, sunflower seeds, tuna, green peas, tomatoes, eggplant, Brussels sprouts

Vitamin A

Deficiency: 20% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, dry hair, fatigue, growth impairment, insomnia, hyperkeratosis (thickening and roughness of skin), immune impairment, night blindness, weight loss

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, milk, eggs, carrots, spinach, sweet potato, kale, collard greens, chard, red bell peppers

Vitamin B-12

Deficiency: Serum levels low in 25% of hospital patients

Symptoms: Anemia, constipation, depression, dizziness, fatigue, intestinal disturbances, headaches, irritability, loss of vibration sensation, low stomach acid, mental disturbances, moodiness, mouth lesions, numbness, spinal cord degeneration

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, snapper, venison, salmon, beef tenderloin, lamb, scallops

Vitamin C

Deficiency: 20 to 50% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Bleeding gums, depression, easy bruising, impaired wound healing, irritability, joint pains, loose teeth, malaise, tiredness

Recommended Foods: Parsley, broccoli, bell pepper, strawberries, oranges, lemon juice, papaya, cauliflower, kale, mustard greens, Brussels sprouts

Vitamin D

Deficiency: 62% of elderly women’s diets deficient

Symptoms: Burning sensation in mouth, diarrhea, insomnia, myopia, nervousness, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, rickets, scalp sweating

Recommended Foods: Shrimp, milk, cod liver oil, eggs (you can also get vitamin D from sensible sun exposure)

Vitamin E

Deficiency: 23% of male and 15% of female diets deficient

Symptoms: Gait disturbances, poor reflexes, loss of position sense, loss of vibration sense, shortened red blood cell life

Recommended Foods: Mustard greens, chard, sunflower seeds, turnip greens, almonds, spinach

Vitamin K

Deficiency: Deficiency in pregnant women and newborns common

Symptoms: Bleeding disorders

Recommended Foods: Spinach, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, carrots, green string beans, asparagus, red bell peppers, strawberries, eggs, tomatoes, green peas

Zinc

Deficiency: 68% of diets deficient

Symptoms: Acne, amnesia, apathy, brittle nails, delayed sexual maturity, depression, diarrhea, eczema, fatigue, growth impairment, hair loss, high cholesterol levels, immune impairment, impotence, irritability, lethargy, loss of appetite, loss of sense of taste, low stomach acid, male infertility, memory impairment, night blindness, paranoia, white spots on nails, wound healing impairment

Recommended Foods: Calf’s liver, mushrooms, spinach, beef tenderloin, pumpkin seeds, green peas.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

Another weird day. Today I have a bunch of vitamins and minerals with me and I’ll take them as I need them. Because I’m having such a hard time trying to figure it which supplements are actually helping, I take one at a time to see if it has any effect.

Around lunchtime, I start getting the cold hands so I take the magnesium, then manganese and a few more but nothing seems to have an effect. I don’t start lunch until around 1:30 PM and my hands are still very cold and I’m not sure what to do? Nothing seems to work like it used to.

About 15 minutes into my lasagna my hands go warm. Huh? Okay, now I’m really confused…

On my way back to the office, I start to realize that for most of this week my cold hands disappear after lunch and I would skip the night time vitamins because I felt so good. But for every day this week, I’d take my daily routine of supplements with my lunch…except for today.

What does this mean? Having symptoms disappear after eating food. Isn’t that diabetes?

I do a quick google search and discover this:

Pantothenic Acid Deficiency

Excessive copper levels have been associated with low levels of pantothenic acid

Hypoglycemia

Functional hypoglycemia is frequently associated with elevated tissue copper levels. An excess of tissue copper reduces manganese and zinc, thereby interfering with normal glucose metabolism.

Well, there’s no doubt in my mind that high copper can reduce manganese and zinc. I do another search on hypoglycemia and start reading about the link with the mineral chromium. Destroyed by sugar intake the symptoms are anxiety, elevated blood triglycerides and peripheral neuropathy. I still remember a doctor at the walk in clinic making the comment about how high my triglycerides were but stopped short of telling me what I should do about it.

Chromium is already extremely hard to get within a healthy diet. Everybody must be low in chromium.

Great. Something new to research…

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 15, 2007

Do you know where in the digestive system vitamins and minerals enter the bloodstream?

While different vitamins and minerals are absorbed as they pass through different areas of the digestive tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine), they technically never enter the blood stream directly from the digestive system. This is because these nutrients are first absorbed from the digestive tract into the epithelial cells that line the digestive tract before they enter the blood stream. Once they have been absorbed into the epithelial cells they are no longer considered to part of the digestive system.

As noted above, nutrients undergo absorption in different areas of the digestive tract. For example, some nutrients can even undergo absorption at the very beginning of the digestive tract – inside the mouth! We know that vitamins B6, B12, folate and C can be absorbed in this way, and so can the mineral zinc. (You’ll find “sublingual” or “under-the-tongue” supplements in most health food stores for exactly this reason). Exactly how much vitamin and mineral absorption takes place in your mouth, however, depends on the form in which these vitamins and minerals are found in your food, how long you chew the food in question, the enzyme contents of your saliva, and other factors. In general, we get relatively little vitamin and mineral absorption in the mouth, but what we do get may be very important. There is good research in this area for supplements, and we need better research in this area for foods.

After the mouth, the next potential absorption site in our digestive tract is the stomach. While some vitamin and mineral absorption may also take place directly through the wall of your stomach, this amount appears to be minor and has not traditionally been considered to be part of our vitamin and mineral absorption process. Exceptions here would be the minerals copper, iodine, fluoride, and molybdenum, which may be significantly absorbed directly from the stomach.

The small intestine is by far the most important site in our digestive tract for both vitamin and mineral absorption. The small intestine is quite long (many feet in length) and virtually all vitamins and minerals can be absorbed from different areas of its surface. The part of the intestine closest to the stomach (called the duodenum) and the middle part of the small intestine (called the jejunum) specialized in absorption of most minerals. The vitamins are also spotlighted in these areas, with the exception of vitamin B12, whose primary absorption site is the very last segment of the small intestine, called the ileum. Literally hundreds of nutritive substances are absorbed from the small intestine.

The last part of the digestive tract – the large intestine – is particularly important for vitamin K absorption, biotin absorption, and the electrolyte minerals (sodium, chloride, and potassium).

Here is some further information from our website about the mechanisms involved with digestion and absorption of vitamins and minerals:

“Vitamins and minerals are quite varied in structure and amount in the foods you eat. They can be found in food in a free form, chemically bound to a larger molecule, or tightly encased inside a food aggregate. In most cases, they are liberated during eating by the mechanical process of grinding. They may also be liberated during the breakdown of the large molecules like proteins and starch, in which they may be encased.

Since your body requires specific amounts of these key nutrients, most vitamins and some minerals have active transports in place for absorption and are taken into the body in very specific ways. These active transport protein molecules act as shuttles, picking up the vitamin or mineral and taking it through the intestinal cell wall into the body, where it may be directly released or transferred to another transport molecule. Since vitamins and minerals are small and are usually found in much lower levels than amino acids, carbohydrate, and fats, these active transport protein molecules must select and pull these important molecules out of the food and take them into your body. Active transports require energy to function properly.

Calcium and iron are examples of minerals that are taken into the body by active transport. Most of the water-soluble vitamins have an active transport in place as well, and these active transports are primarily found in the middle section of the small intestine, the jejunum. Some minerals, like iron and calcium, are absorbed in the first part of the small intestine as well as the jejunum. The fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, K, and E), as discussed above, are absorbed with fat micelles, and therefore require fat to be present for their full absorption.

Magnesium is a mineral of tremendous importance for bone health, energy production, and overall healthy functioning throughout the body since it activates more than 300 cellular enzymes. Like calcium, magnesium must be constantly supplied to maintain optimal function. Magnesium doesn’t have an active transport, but depends entirely on dietary intake and a healthy intestinal lining for its absorption, and can be absorbed throughout the entire small intestine and even in the colon. Low intakes of magnesium, or loss of ability of the intestinal tract to absorb magnesium due to intestinal inflammation or disease, can result in a variety of problems such as muscle twitching or tremors, weakness, irritability and restlessness, depression, and weak bones. Magnesium is found at highest levels in whole foods such as grains but is often removed during processing. Whole grain bread and cereals will have a much higher amount of magnesium than white bread, which is made from refined flour.

Vitamin B12 is also absorbed differently from the other vitamins and minerals. First, it is most commonly found attached to proteins, and therefore requires protein breakdown to be liberated. Then, it requires a protein made in the stomach, called intrinsic factor, for its absorption, but is not absorbed until the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex reaches the final part of the small intestine, the ileum. Optimal digestion of vitamin B12 is dependent on your ability to make a healthy amount of stomach acid, since protein breakdown requires stomach acid and research has shown that intrinsic factor is also not secreted in adequate levels when stomach acid is low.”

June 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 16, 2007

I’ve got to admit, I was very interested when I read the headline “Vitamin-popping linked to prostate cancer”. Probably a study funded by the pharmaceutical companies. But as usual, it’s a story that contains a screaming headline and very little details. I think it’s very important for a study like this to indicate the actual formula of the multivitamin used in this study because they are NOT all equal. In fact, in my experience, some are harmful.

It’s quite easy to take too much of one mineral in a multivitamin. Take copper as an example. If there is 3 mg in a multivitamin, 6 mg a day over a prolonged period of time would probably cause a problem within the body.

The article is quite silly because anybody who exceeds the recommended dose of anything is at risk.

Vitamin-popping linked to prostate cancer

May 15, 2007 02:53 PM
Julie Steenhuysen
Reuters News Agency

CHICAGO – Men who pop too many vitamins in the hope of improving their health may in fact be raising their risk of the deadliest forms of prostate cancer, especially men with a family history of the disease, researchers said Tuesday.

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute found that men who exceeded the recommended dose – taking more than seven multivitamins a week – increased the risk of advanced cancer by about 30 per cent.

The researchers followed 295,344 men over five years to see if there was a link between multivitamin use and prostate cancer.

“We didn’t see any relationship with overall prostate cancer,” said Dr. Michael Leitzmann, a National Cancer Institute investigator who worked on the study.

He said the increased risk from overuse of multivitamins was linked to more aggressive cancer that has spread beyond the prostate gland or cancer that proved fatal.

In men who took too many multivitamins, the risk of aggressive cancer increased by one third, and the risk of fatal prostate cancer doubled compared to those who took no multivitamins, according to the study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“We only saw the increase among the subgroup of men who used multivitamins in excessive amounts,” Leitzmann said in a telephone interview.

The researchers said the association was strongest in men with a family history of prostate cancer and men who also took selenium, beta-carotene or zinc supplements.

Just over a quarter of a million men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States this year, but fewer than 30,000 will die of it because the tumors grow slowly.

No studies have yet found that people benefit from taking multivitamin and mineral supplements, and some studies have found that vitamins like A and iron are toxic at high levels. Beta-carotene has been found to increase the risk of lung cancer in smokers.

Leitzmann said the researchers were not able to pinpoint which vitamin or supplement ingredient could be driving the cancer. What it does suggest is the need for more study,

“It’s certainly a red flag,” he said.

The important thing, Leitzmann said, was that men should heed the dosage on their vitamin bottle and use as directed.

May 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 21, 2007

Came across an interesting article the other day called “Dietary Supplements That Don’t Work”. I can certainly agree with the comments for magnesium oxide and garlic supplements.

Dietary Supplements That Don’t Work

1. Magnesium oxide – This widely sold, economical form of magnesium is preferred by dietary supplement manufacturers because it is 70% elemental magnesium and only 30% carrier (oxide). But only 4% of magnesium oxide is absorbed.

2. Calcium supplements – Calcium is an essential, but over-promoted, mineral.

3. High-lignan flaxseed oil – So now, if you are convinced calcium supplements are not the sole answer to the problem of age-related bone loss, then what about plant estrogens?

4. Vitamin C – What, vitamin C pills don’t work? Calm down, that false notion was contrived from flawed science conducted by National Institutes of Health researchers who refuse to recant.

5. Garlic supplements – You may have your favorite garlic pill. Larry King, CNN TV commentator, has his. But the problem with garlic pills is that most of the studies involving garlic and its health benefits involve its primary active ingredient, allicin, which most of the garlic pills provide little or none.

6. Ginseng – the list of health benefits associated with this herb are growing, and include blood sugar control, blood pressure normalization and even help for male impotency. But ginseng often fails to meet its promise because dietary supplements often fail to provide ginseng’s primary active ingredient, called ginsenosides.

7. Resveratrol – undoubtedly this herbal extract from grapes or other botanical sources will continue to be widely acclaimed. Its potential health benefits are endless.

8. Red yeast rice – so you’re searching for a more natural alternative to statin drugs to lower your cholesterol. You don’t want to experience the liver-toxic effects of statin molecules. So you begin your search at the local health food store.

Dietary supplements have great promise, serve as economical and safe alternatives to problematic prescription drugs, but often disappoint because they are not properly made or labeled.

March 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Nutrition/Vitamins

Hair loss occurs when the diet is inadequate in the B vitamins – especially B6, biotin, inositol and folic acid; and the minerals magnesium, sulfur and zinc. The B vitamins, especially B5 (pantothenic acid and B3 (niacin), are especially important for hair growth.

Certain essential amino acids are found to control the thinning and thickening of hair in laboratory animals. For example, when rats were fed a diet deficient in magnesium, they lost their hair in bunches. The situation was even more serious with some other B-vitamins. When rats were fed a diet low in biotin or inositol, they became hairless! This nutrient-deficient condition was found to be reversible. When the rats were fed a diet that was rich in B vitamins, it resulted in the complete restoration of hair.

Heavy intake of vitamin supplements, in some cases, have resulted in stimulating hair growth. Men deficient in vitamin B6 often lose their hair. When they are deficient in folic acid, some men became completely bald! As in case of animals, when normal intake of theses vitamins were restored, the hair also returned in most instances.

Taking large doses of vitamin A (100,000 IU or more daily) for a long period of time, on the other hand, can trigger hair loss, but stopping the vitamin A will reverse the problem. As in case of deficiencies, often the hair grows back when the cause is corrected.

Essential fatty acids (flaxseed oil, primrose oil, and salmon oil are good sources) improves hair texture. Prevents dry, brittle hair.

Raw thymus glandular stimulates immune function and improves functioning capacity of glands. Dosage: 500 mg daily. (Caution: Do not give this supplement to a child.)

Poor circulation can also hamper hair growth. A study of young men diagnosed with male pattern baldness showed that the blood flow to their scalps was on average 2.6 times lower than in a control group. In many individuals the extremities, including the top of the head, are the most difficult places in the body for blood to reach. Follicles which are constantly deprived of blood, and therefore nutrients, cannot produce hair properly.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Hair Loss – Vitamins, Diet and Supplements

  • Vitamin A is an essential vitamin to help you with hair loss and thinning hair. However, be sure to not take more than 25,000 IU daily as it could lead to more hair loss or other severe problems.
  • Vitamin C and E are two antioxidants vitamins that are important for keeping your hair, looking fuller and shinier, and scalp healthy.
  • Vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin, deficiencies are associated with an increased production of sebum (oil produced by the hair follicles). However, too much B2 and increased sebum production may result in reduced strength of the hair shaft.
  • Vitamin B3, Niacin – can produce a skin “flush”, an uncomfortable feeing, or “hot flash”. If you do decide to take this, take the minimum and see how your body reacts first.
  • Vitamin B6, pyridoxine hydrochloride – studies have shown B6 to help with healthy hair growth.
  • Vitamin B12
  • Folic acid is known for its importance in healthy cellular activity, proper cell division, and proper hair growth.
  • Biotin – Helps produce keratin, may prevent graying and hair loss.
  • Inositol – Keeps hair follicles healthy at the cellular level.

Many of these vitamins are provided by taking a good daily multi-vitamin and from eating a healthy diet. Adjusting your diet will slow down the loss of hair as many of the vitamins that help you with health hair may be provided by the diet you eat.

Vitamin C can be found in several vegetables and fruit, especially in citrus fruits. Vitamin E is known to help with circulation in your scalp area. This is found in various beans, as well as oils. Sources of B2 come from grains, or breads and cereals, milk and milk products as well as meat, poultry, and fish. Niacin (B3) food sources include brewer’s yeast, wheat germ, fish, chicken, turkey and meat. B6 comes from brewer’s yeast, liver, whole grain cereals, vegetables, organ meats and egg yolk. Sources of B12 include chicken, fish, eggs and milk. Biotin is found in yeast, grains, liver, rice, milk, egg yolk, liver, kidney, soy and barley. Foods rich in inositol are whole grains, yeast, liver, citrus fruits, eggs, rice, and milk. With the addition of inositol, you will be able to promote hair growth beneath the scalp and have healthier hair.

…And lastly, supplement such as saw palmetto and zinc are very helpful for those looking for natural ways to help with hair loss. Saw palmetto is a type of fruit that is legendary in helping to solve problems with baldness and prostate health in the U.S. and throughout Europe.

Zinc is best known to effect hair loss when there is an absence of a substantial amount of the nutrient. Zinc deficiency not only produces problems with hair loss, but also with changes in the scalp. The scalp may become too dry or flaky and may often times be irritated because of the lack of nutrients. There are many times where zinc has also shown to be effective in stopping hair from turning gray.

Stopping hair loss and giving yourself a great looking, healthy head, of hair is not that difficult. Making sure that you are getting the vitamins you need, whether from a multi-vitamin or food sources, and even supplementing that with zinc and saw palmetto.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 20, 2007

Switched back to eating cucumbers and celery today. I had a few sunflower seeds in the morning but I’ve since decided to get rid of those too just in case. I’m mad at myself for straying from the strict diet but by the end of the day, my thrush is actually quite better. More improvement than I expected and I can feel the improvement in my nose.

Found this article talking about the different vitamins and mineral deficiencies that can effect candida.

CANDIDA

Selenium deficiency and anemia appear to be the biggest factors in promoting candida growth. Years ago when I had hypoT I also had a severe candida infection. I found a book titled “Candida: Silver (Mercury) Fillings and the Immune System” which eventually led me to getting my mercury fillings removed. Following this and supplementation with zinc and selenium, my candida and hypoT both ended.

Experiments with animals show that candida growth can be increased by selenium deprivation and reduced by selenium supplementation. Since mercury depletes selenium, it makes sense that candida is higher when there are mercury fillings in the teeth.

Other studies show that anemia and iron deficiency increase candida growth. There are some studies suggesting that B12 and folic acid deficiencies may be involved in candida, since deficiencies of these lead to anemia. In anemia and iron deficiency friendly bacteria cannot grow well in the body. A lack of these bacteria probably is a key factor which promotes candida growth, since candida is a fungal growth rather than a bacteria growth.

Another study showed that women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis are deficient in zinc compared to normals and that only a mild zinc deficiency is necessary for this recurring problem.

Basically it seems that the deficiencies associated with candidiasis correlate very well with the deficiencies associated with hypothyroidism. The key nutrient deficiencies are probably selenium, zinc, iron, B12, and folic acid.

Probably the best indicator of the level of candida growth in the body is the coating on the tongue. The more white coating there is, the more candida there probably is throughout the body. We want to get to the point where our tongues are clear, pink, and not sore.

The following study shows that candida albicans has a higher resistance to elevated concentrations of copper than baker’s yeast. This may mean that in hypothyroidism, when zinc is low and copper is high, candida growth will not be suppressed by copper, which is normally toxic to fungal infections.

February 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 04, 2007

Since I’ve determinded that a long term diet of high sugar is possibly the main cause of my vitamins/mineral deficiencies, what other things does it effect in the body?

The list was staggering!!!!

146 Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health

By Nancy Appleton, Ph.D.
Author of LICK THE SUGAR HABIT and LICK THE SUGAR HABIT SUGAR COUNTER.

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.
2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.
3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.
4. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.
5. Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).
6. Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity and function you loose.
7. Sugar reduces high density lipoproteins.
8. Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.
9. Sugar leads to cancer of the ovaries.
10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.
11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.
12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
13. Sugar can weaken eyesight.
14. Sugar raises the level of a neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.
15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.
16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.
17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.
18. Sugar malabsorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.
19. Sugar can cause premature aging.
20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.
21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.
22. Sugar contributes to obesity
23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis.
24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.
25. Sugar can cause arthritis.
26. Sugar can cause asthma.
27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).
28. Sugar can cause gallstones.
29. Sugar can cause heart disease.
30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.
31. Sugar can cause multiple sclerosis.
32. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.
33. Sugar can cause varicose veins.
34. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.
35. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.
36. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.
37. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.
38. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.
39. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E (alpha-Tocopherol in the blood.
40. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.
41. Sugar can increase cholesterol.
42. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.
43. Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.
44. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs)(Sugar bound non-enzymatically to protein)
45. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.
46. Sugar causes food allergies.
47. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
48. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.
49. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.
50. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.
51. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA
52. Sugar can change the structure of protein.
53. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.
54. Sugar can cause cataracts.
55. Sugar can cause emphysema.
56. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.
57. Sugar can promote an elevation of low density lipoproteins (LDL).
58. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.
59. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.
60. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson’s disease.
61. Sugar can cause a permanent altering the way the proteins act in the body.
62. Sugar can increase the size of the liver by making the liver cells divide.
63. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.
64. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.
65. Sugar can damage the pancreas.
66. Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.
67. Sugar is enemy #1 of the bowel movement.
68. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).
69. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.
70. Sugar can make the tendons more brittle.
71. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.
72. Sugar plays a role in pancreatic cancer in women.
73. Sugar can adversely affect school children’s grades and cause learning disorders..
74. Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha, and theta brain waves.
75. Sugar can cause depression.
76. Sugar increases the risk of gastric cancer.
77. Sugar and cause dyspepsia (indigestion).
78. Sugar can increase your risk of getting gout.
79. Sugar can increase the levels of glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test over the ingestion of complex carbohydrates.
80. Sugar can increase the insulin responses in humans consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.
81 High refined sugar diet reduces learning capacity.
82. Sugar can cause less effective functioning of two blood proteins, albumin, and lipoproteins, which may reduce the body’s ability to handle fat and cholesterol.
83. Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.
84. Sugar can cause platelet adhesiveness.
85. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance; some hormones become underactive and others become overactive.
86. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.
87. Sugar can lead to the hypothalamus to become highly sensitive to a large variety of stimuli.
88. Sugar can lead to dizziness.
89. Diets high in sugar can cause free radicals and oxidative stress.
90. High sucrose diets of subjects with peripheral vascular disease significantly increases platelet adhesion.
91. High sugar diet can lead to biliary tract cancer.
92. Sugar feeds cancer.
93. High sugar consumption of pregnant adolescents is associated with a twofold increased risk for delivering a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant.
94. High sugar consumption can lead to substantial decrease in gestation duration among adolescents.
95. Sugar slows food’s travel time through the gastrointestinal tract.
96. Sugar increases the concentration of bile acids in stools and bacterial enzymes in the colon. This can modify bile to produce cancer-causing compounds and colon cancer.
97. Sugar increases estradiol (the most potent form of naturally occurring estrogen) in men.
98. Sugar combines and destroys phosphatase, an enzyme, which makes the process of digestion more difficult.
99. Sugar can be a risk factor of gallbladder cancer.
100. Sugar is an addictive substance.
101. Sugar can be intoxicating, similar to alcohol.
102. Sugar can exacerbate PMS.
103. Sugar given to premature babies can affect the amount of carbon dioxide they produce.
104. Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.
105. The body changes sugar into 2 to 5 times more fat in the bloodstream than it does starch.
106. The rapid absorption of sugar promotes excessive food intake in obese subjects.
107. Sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
108. Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.
109. Sugar can slow down the ability of the adrenal glands to function.
110. Sugar has the potential of inducing abnormal metabolic processes in a normal healthy individual and to promote chronic degenerative diseases.
111.. I.Vs (intravenous feedings) of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.
112. High sucrose intake could be an important risk factor in lung cancer.
113. Sugar increases the risk of polio.
114. Hi
gh sugar intake can cause epileptic seizures.
115. Sugar causes high blood pressure in obese people.
116. In Intensive Care Units, limiting sugar saves lives.
117. Sugar may induce cell death.
118. Sugar can increase the amount of food that you eat.
119. In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44% drop in antisocial behavior.
120. Sugar can lead to prostate cancer.
121. Sugar dehydrates newborns.
122. Sugar increases the estradiol in young men.
123. Sugar can cause low birth weight babies.
124. Greater consumption of refined sugar is associated with a worse outcome of schizophrenia
125. Sugar can raise homocysteine levels in the blood stream.
126. Sweet food items increase the risk of breast cancer.
127. Sugar is a risk factor in cancer of the small intestine.
128. Sugar may cause laryngeal cancer.
129. Sugar induces salt and water retention.
130. Sugar may contribute to mild memory loss.
131. As sugar increases in the diet of 10 years olds, there is a linear decrease in the intake of many essential nutrients.
132. Sugar can increase the total amount of food consumed.
133. Exposing a newborn to sugar results in a heightened preference for sucrose relative to water at 6 months and 2 years of age.
134. Sugar causes constipation.
135. Sugar causes varicous veins.
136. Sugar can cause brain decay in prediabetic and diabetic women.
137. Sugar can increase the risk of stomach cancer.
138. Sugar can cause metabolic syndrome.
139. Sugar ingestion by pregnant women increases neural tube defects in embryos.
140. Sugar can be a factor in asthma.
141. The higher the sugar consumption the more chances of getting irritable bowel syndrome.
142. Sugar could affect central reward systems.
143. Sugar can cause cancer of the rectum.
144. Sugar can cause endometrial cancer.
145. Sugar can cause renal (kidney) cell carcinoma.
146. Sugar can cause liver tumors.

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49. Ibid. 132.
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58. Ceriello, A. “Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation.” Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
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61. Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., and Brownlee, M. “Glucose and Aging.” Scientific American. May 1987: 90.
62. Goulart, F. S. “Are You Sugar Smart?” American Fitness. Mar-Apr 1991: 34-38.
63. Ibid.
64. Yudkin, J., Kang, S. and Bruckdorfer, K. “Effects of High Dietary Sugar.” British Journal of Medicine. Nov 22, 1980;1396.
65. Goulart, F. S. “Are You Sugar Smart?” American Fitness. March_April 1991: 34-38
66. Ibid.
67. Ibid.
68. Ibid.
69. Ibid.
70. Nash, J. “Health Contenders.” Essence. Jan 1992-23: 79_81.
71. Grand, E. “Food Allergies and Migraine.”Lancet. 1979:1:955_959.
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73. Schauss, A. Diet, Crime and Delinquency. (Berkley Ca; Parker House, 1981).
74. Christensen, L. “The Role of Caffeine and Sugar in Depression.” Nutrition Report. Mar 1991;9(3):17-24.
75. Ibid.
76. Cornee, J., et al. “A Case-control Study of Gastric Cancer and Nutritional Factors in Marseille, France,” European Journal of Epidemiology. 1995;11:55-65.
77. Yudkin, J. Sweet and Dangerous.(New York:Bantam Books,1974) 129.
78. Ibid, 44
79. Reiser, S., et al. “Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986:43;151-159.
80. Reiser,S., et al. “Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:151-159.
81. Molteni, R, et al. “A High-fat, Refined Sugar Diet Reduces Hippocampal Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor, Neuronal Plasticity, and Learning.” NeuroScience. 2002;112(4):803-814.
82. Monnier, V., “Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process.” Journal of Gerontology. 1990;45:105-111.
83. Frey, J. “Is There Sugar in the Alzheimer’s Disease?” Annales De Biologie Clinique. 2001; 59 (3):253-257.
84. Yudkin, J. “Metabolic Changes Induced by Sugar in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease and Diabetes.” Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):5-8.
85. Ibid.
86. Blacklock, N. J., “Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone.” Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):9-12.
Curhan, G., et al. “Beverage Use and Risk for Kidney Stones in Women.” Annals of Internal Medicine. 1998:28:534-340.
87. Journal of Advanced Medicine. 1994;7(1):51-58.
88. Ibid
89. Ceriello, A. “Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation.” Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
90. Postgraduate Medicine. Sept 1969:45:602-07.
91. Moerman, C. J., et al. “Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Biliary Tract Cancer.” International Journal of Epidemiology. Ap 1993;2(2):207-214.
92. Quillin, Patrick, “Cancer’s Sweet Tooth.” Nutrition Science News. Ap 2000.
Rothkopf, M.. Nutrition. July/Aug 1990;6(4).
93. Lenders, C. M. “Gestational Age and Infant Size at Birth Are Associated with Dietary Intake among Pregnant Adolescents.” Journal of Nutrition. Jun 1997;1113-1117.
94. Ibid.
95. Bostick, R. M., et al. “Sugar, Meat.and Fat Intake and Non-dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer Incidence in Iowa Women.” Cancer Causes & Control. 1994:5:38-53.
96. Ibid.
Kruis, W., et al. “Effects of Diets Low and High in Refined Sugars on Gut Transit, Bile Acid Metabolism and Bacterial Fermentation.” Gut. 1991;32:367-370.
Ludwig, D. S., et al. “High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating, And Obesity.” Pediatrics. Mar 1999;103(3):26-32.
97. Yudkin, J and Eisa, O. “Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men”. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988:32(2):53-55.
98. Lee, A. T. and Cerami A. “The Role of Glycation in Aging.” Annals of the New York Academy of Science. 1992; 663:63-70.
99. Moerman, C. et al.”Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Gallbladder Tract Cancer.” Internat J of Epi. Ap 1993; 22(2):207-214.
100. “Sugar, White Flour Withdrawal Produces Chemical Response.” The Addiction Letter. Jul 1992:4.
Colantuoni, C., et al. “Evidence That Intermittent, Excessive Sugar Intake Causes Endogenous Opioid Dependence.” Obes Res. Jun 2002 ;10(6):478-488.
101. Ibid.
102. The Edell Health Letter. Sept 1991;7:1.
103. Sunehag, A. L., et al. “Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition” Diabetes.
1999 ;48 7991-8000).
104. Christensen L. et al. “Impact of A Dietary Change on Emotional Distress.” Journal of Abnormal Psychology .1985;94(4):565-79.
105. Nutrition Health Review. Fall 85. Sugar Changes into Fat Faster than Fat.”
106. Ludwig, D. S., et al. “High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating and Obesity.” Pediatrics.Mar1999;103(3):26-32.
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110. Fields, M. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Aug 1998;17(4):317-321.
111. Arieff, A. I. Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco. San Jose Mercury; June 12/86. “IVs of Sugar Water Can Cut Off Oxygen to the Brain.”
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115. Stern, N. & Tuck, M. “Pathogenesis of Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus.” Diabetes Mellitus, a Fundamental and Clinical Test. 2nd Edition, (Phil. A:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000)943-957.
116. Christansen, D. “Critical Care: Sugar Limit Saves Lives.” Science News. June 30, 2001;159:404.
117. Donnini, D. et al. “Glucose May Induce Cell Death through a Free Radical-mediated Mechanism.”Biochem Biohhys Res Commun. Feb 15, 1996:219(2):412-417.
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February 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 06, 2007

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Today I thought I might try to see what happens if I don’t take any vitamins.

Late morning and my hands and feet are cold. By the afternoon, I have this weird sensation in my left leg. Almost like a twitch but more like a nerve ending kind of feeling. Just before bedtime I start feeling a mild chest pain in the upper right hand side of my chest.

Time for the vitamins…

Just before I go to bed I take 500 mg of magnesium, the multivitamin and 500 mg of pure Niacin. About 30 minutes later, I start to get the flushing. It lasts for almost two hours. It bothered me so much that I had a bath to try and minimize the effect without much success. Then later, I had diarrhea twice and a touch of nausea. Both symptoms of a high Niacin dosage and I’ve had it happen before. I’ll try taking the 100 mg of Niacin and spread them throughout the day.

I hate it when I’m wrong.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 06, 2007

I’ve been doing some research on candida lately and I came across a web site that suggests taking garlic throughout the day with yogurt that contains bacterial culture. So we went shopping today and I picked some up.

Time to REGROUP.

I really need to summarize my observations, review my successes and list my outstanding symptoms.

1) The first thing I need to do is to use iridology to see if there is any change since the last set of photos. It’s been six months since the last time so there should be some changes. I’ve been taking a great multivitamin and a higher dose of magnesium so I would expect to see some improvement because the vibration is not as strong as it used to be.

2) I really need to go through the entire blog again to see if anything I’ve discovered in the past is relevant now that I have overlooked at the time. I’d like to look at the deficiencies that I know for sure: Magnesium, vitamin A, Niacin, Riboflavin and vitamin E to see if I can find a common ground to the cause.

3) I need to find a list of factors that contribute to Magnesium loss and investigate the symptoms of each one.

4) Make a list of vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by high sugar intake.

January 6, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 28, 2006

The nutritionist from last week left me a follow up voice mail. She wanted to know if I had made a decision regarding the treatment and I’ve been thinking a lot about it lately. I think a nutritionist would be a really great thing for me but I would want a condition.

I’ll contact her on the weekend and tell her that I will start the treatment with the condition that I have the option to quit if I am not happy with the food testing analysis from the naturopath. I don’t want the same results as the last naturopath telling me that I didn’t have a magnesium deficiency from the hair analysis.

And this time I will mark the questionaires with stars to indicate the symptoms that are being hidden by my current intake of vitamins and minerals. I will also document my entire history before I meet with anyone to ensure that nothing gets missed, including my issues with the EMF exposure.

Those are my conditions.

I’ll also tell her that I am still waiting for my B6 test result from my own doctor and will persue the injection through him if I am able to.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 27, 2006

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Thought it might be time to document my daily intake of vitamins, minerals and herbs for the record. I’ve been taking the core vitamin and minerals for a while now and the herbal remedies where only recently added to fight candida. The magnesium, niacin and the multivitamin are the only ones that I know if I’ve missed taking it. The multivitamin has the active form of B6 and sometimes I take it earlier in the day because I have that “weird” feeling in my head. It goes away everytime I take any form of B6.

———————————————————–

I start every morning with the candida trauma kit:

Pysillium Fibre/Caprilic Oil/Bennonite mix

Nu Life: Magnesium: 500 mg three times a day
Vitamin C: 500 mg three times a day
Niacin: 50-100 mg three times a day
Enzymes: 1 capsule three times a day

Nu Life Multivitamin: Twice a day
Olive Leaf & Black Walnut: Twice a day

Nu Life: Omega Three: Once a day (380 DHA content)
Co-enzyme Q10: Once a day
Garlic 1000 mg Once a day

Acidophilus just before bed.

I also take the Magnesia Phosphorica in between doses of magnesium if I need to. I usually get a very mild pain in my chest and it goes away the instant I take it.

For the past few months I’ve also taken a more serious approach to eating more fruits and vegetables and healthy eating. I try to eat 1-2 Fuji apples and 1-3 bananas a day. I’ll have oatmeal with flax seeds for breakfast and sometimes I’ll eat cucumbers and tomatoes as snack foods.

December 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 14, 2006

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With my recent time off on parental leave, I’m finding myself in a lot of new places and whenever I see a health food store, I’m always curious to find if they have something new that I’ve never seen before that can help me.

This store will offer a nutritional analysis but it doesn’t say how. I don’t bother asking anything about it as my first thought is a hair analysis and we know how good that works…

I’ve been taking Glucosamine now for one week. The results? No difference whatsoever.

October 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 17, 2006

Very mild vibration last night and again this morning. I had assumed this would happen but today I’m going to avoid calcium and dairy products.

Took my magnesium with potassium, B6 and vitamin C.

August 17, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2006

Exposing Multivitamin Dangers and Deficiencies
By Gailon Totheroh
CBN News Health & Science Reporter

CBN.com – Even if you are eating the recommended number of daily fruits and vegetables, you still arent receiving all the nutrients you need. And government research says those multivitamins don’t begin to cover the gap. CBN News decided to take a deeper look at what science is saying about vitamins you should be taking.

In an article published in June 2002, the American Medical Association reversed their 20-year stance against multivitamins. Just buy a cheap one, the AMA essentially said, that is all you need. But will the popular dime-a-day multis really help consumers attain optimum health?

Nutrition-oriented physician and neuroscientist Russell Blaylock says the answer to that question is “no,” because the vitamin world is a wasteland. “For instance, we’ve found a lot of youthfulness in vitamin D. A lot of these multivitamins don’t even have vitamin D. If they have it, they have it in very low concentrations,” he said.

On top of that, Janie Johnson, general manager of a vitamin store chain, says the media from magazines to TV ads have left consumers confused. “And they’re steered in all different ways and they really don’t know what to take,” she said.

To help consumers identify optimum multis, CBN News employed a set of vitamin standards obtained from scientific research. We used a total of 25 guidelines. At 4 points for each guideline, a perfect score would be 100. Of 55 multivitamins evaluated, only 10 scored a 40 or above. All of the nationally advertised major brands scored a 12 or lower.

Certainly, there is plenty of controversy about what is best in vitamins. For instance, a recent CBN News story on vitamins spoke of having the minerals calcium and magnesium in about equal amounts. But many nutritionists favor double the calcium over magnesium.

In the debate over calcium and magnesium, researchers had largely based their recommendations on the fact that bone has a ratio of 2 parts calcium to 1 part magnesium. However, newer research shows most people have a significant dietary intake of calcium and can experience excess calcium calcifying the blood stream. That can induce circulatory problems.

Also, magnesium is now found to be crucial to muscle function, protection against MSG and related toxins, and 300 chemical reactions in the body.

The bottom line is that individuals may need medical guidance in deciding their optimum intakes of calcium and magnesium.

Other viewers of our previous story were curious about the issue of riboflavin and ultraviolet light.

Our sources recommend no more than 10 milligrams of vitamin B2, or riboflavin. A French study found that excess riboflavin “in the organs and tissues that are permeable to light, such as the eye or skin” could damage cell components “causing inflammation and accelerating aging.” So it is important not to take too much riboflavin.

While 10 milligrams is still several times the government’s recommendation, some multis should be avoided since they contain daily portions of 50 or more milligrams.

Blaylock says some afflictions may require higher doses of B2. Those diseases include Alzheimer’s and the nerve damage that often afflicts diabetics. “Outside of that restricted use, I don’t think that the general public should take more than 10 milligrams of riboflavin,” he said.

And even the most popular individual supplement vitamin C needs supplementation.

Research shows vitamin C works best when matched with bioflavonoids, at a quantity of 70 percent of the vitamin. In other words, 500 milligrams of C should be accompanied by 350 milligrams of bioflavonoids.

Bioflavonoids include the rind of citrus fruit and the popular quercetin derived from apples and red onions.

Yet with all the new research about the right nutrients for staving off disease, Johnson says consumers still seek out multivitamins mostly when they are sick.

She said, “They’re not doing it for the prevention, they’re doing it because of an issue. And they want to feel good, and they don’t want to be fatigued. So, they really kind of need to do the research on their own.”

Blaylock says that assessment is right, that consumers need to do their homework, and do it based on good science and good sense. “You need to have a vitamin that has all its different components in the right concentrations and the right balances, complete, with no iron,” he said

August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2006

Went back to my normal vitamins and by noon I feel great with a lot more energy. The only real difference? I took 300 mg of magnesium citrate. I hit google looking for some tips for better absorbtion.

Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency?

Symptoms involving impaired contraction of smooth muscles include constipation; urinary spasms; menstrual cramps; difficulty swallowing or a lump in the throat-especially provoked by eating sugar; photophobia, especially difficulty adjusting to oncoming bright headlights in the absence of eye disease; and loud noise sensitivity from stapedius muscle tension in the ear.

Other symptoms and signs of magnesium deficiency and discuss laboratory testing for this common condition. Continuing with the symptoms of magnesium deficiency, the central nervous system is markedly affected. Symptoms include insomnia, anxiety, hyperactivity and restlessness with constant movement, panic attacks, agoraphobia, and premenstrual irritability. Magnesium deficiency symptoms involving the peripheral nervous system include numbness, tingling, and other abnormal sensations, such as zips, zaps and vibratory sensations.

Prevention and Treatment of Magnesium Deficiency Using Oral and Injectable Magnesium

For people who suffer from chronic magnesium deficiency and also to prevent the development of this condition, oral magnesium supplements can be quite useful. Magnesium is available in many forms. The cheapest is probably magnesium oxide, but this form is not absorbed as well as some other forms, which include chelated magnesium, magnesium glycinate and magnesium aspartate. Dr. Baker feels that the prescription form of magnesium chloride, known as Slow-mag, has been most useful for his patients.

I have found that magnesium taurate, an unusual form of magnesium in which magnesium is chemically combined with the amino acid derivative taurine, is particularly well utilized and beneficial. This is because some of the same effects that one hopes to get from magnesium, such as the calming effect on the nervous system, and the strengthening effect on heart muscle, is also gotten with taurine. So, the two are synergistic together. I use it in all forms of cardiac and nervous system disorders.

What about dosage? The recommended daily allowance or RDA for magnesium is 350 milligrams of elemental magnesium. An important point here is that when reading the label of a supplement containing magnesium, it is important to distinguish between the number of milligrams per tablet or capsule of the entire magnesium complex versus the number of milligrams of elemental magnesium or pure magnesium. For example, one label of a chelated magnesium states that 4 tablets contain 4,000 mg of the chelated magnesium complex with 500 mg of elemental magnesium. The important number is the one that refers to the elemental magnesium. The other 3,500 mg in this case refers to the amino acid complex that is bound to the magnesium.

Keeping this definition of elemental magnesium in mind, many people do not even get the RDA of 350 mg of magnesium daily. A therapeutic dosage could easily run between 400 mg and 1000 mg daily of elemental magnesium in divided doses. In people with normal kidneys, it is difficult to reach toxic levels of magnesium. However, too much oral magnesium will result in diarrhea. Recall that milk of magnesia is a laxative containing a magnesium salt. Patients suffering from chronic kidney failure must be much more careful because their kidneys have difficulty eliminating magnesium and a toxic buildup may occur. Toxic levels of magnesium may lead to depression of the entire nervous system and even coma and death. But, this is extraordinarily rare and occurs only in patients with severe kidney function impairment. In general, magnesium doses of 1000 mg per day or less are extremely safe.

If this form of magnesium taurate has a calming effect on the nervous system and best absorption, then I’m off to see if I can get some.

Magnesium taurate at dosages of 250 to 500 mg., if well tolerated (no diarrhea) by the intestines, is better absorbed than any other oral tablet or capsule. This approach requires 6 to 12 months.

There is virtually no illness, which is not helped significantly by magnesium.

August 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

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