Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for July 19, 2007

Potassium…time to take a look at this again.

The Adrenals

The adrenal glands are a pair of triangle shaped organs that rest on top of the kidneys. The glands are made up of two parts, the cortex or outer section, which produces cortisone, and the medulla or center section, which secretes adrenaline.

In addition to producing cortisone, the adrenal cortex also helps to maintain the salt and water balance in the body, and is involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates and the regulation of blood sugar.

The adrenal medulla produces adrenaline, also known as the hormone epinephrine, when the body is under stress. This hormone speeds up the metabolism and produces other changes within the body that assist in coping with danger.

The adrenal help wake us up in the morning by producing cortisol which suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. The adrenal help control our blood sugar. They make hormones, which help raise our blood sugar under times of stress so that we can have energy. The adrenals control sodium, potassium and chlorides in our body, which adjust our fluid balance. They do this by working with the kidneys. The adrenals work closely with our thyroid gland to keep are metabolism high. The adrenals act like the fuel pump and the thyroid like the spark plugs. This keeps the fuel we consume for our food being combusted into energy.

When we have stress, whether physical or emotional, adrenal hormones help provide energy for us to get through the stress. The adrenals need vitamins, minerals and amino acids in order to make the hormones and to repair and keep themselves healthy. Vitamin C, B5, B6, iron, manganese, sodium and potassium act as stimulants to the adrenals. Vitamin B12, B2, Calcium, magnesium, copper, vitamin D can regulate the adrenals by slowing them down if they are going to fast or by suppressing them below normal. It takes more then the RDA or the amounts found common it foods to do this.

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Adrenal Exhaustion

An all-four-low mineral pattern is usually accompanied by a wide range of distressful symptoms, not the least of which is exhaustion. It is important to realize that individuals who suffer from all-four-low macro-minerals were probably at one time fast oxidizers. However, due to severe stress over a prolonged period of time, their adrenal glands eventually collapsed, as indicated by their current below normal levels of sodium and potassium.

Many of the problems associated with a fast oxidizer who has slipped into adrenal exhaustion, as indicated by all-four-low macro minerals, are directly related to inadequate reserves of calcium, magnesium and zinc.

Correction of the Problem

To correct the multitude of problems associated with four-low macro minerals, it is necessary to give relatively large amounts of calcium, magnesium and zinc as this trio of minerals is effective in alleviating current everyday stress placed upon the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands can be made less responsive to mineral-depleting stress, by supplementing the principal nutrients that are sacrificed during stress, (calcium, magnesium and zinc) rather than allowing the adrenal glands to be further exhausted by stress.

Sodium/Magnesium Ratio

Sodium and magnesium tend to be antagonistic. As one goes up the other goes down. The ratio of the two minerals often gives a better picture of adrenal activity than the sodium level alone.

I love that last paragraph. Even though the mineral relationships don’t indicate anything between sodium and magnesium, they suggest there is one. Interestingly, as one goes up the other goes down…so if I was extremely low in magnesium wouldn’t the sodium be high enough to cause the potassium to go low?

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July 19, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2007

MINERALS

Minerals are inorganic substances composed of a metal and a non-metal, both in ionic form. Metals most important for our health are calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium as bulk elements, and boron, chromium, cobalt, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium and zinc as trace elements. Essential non-metals are chloride, phosphorus and sulfur. Harmful are aluminium and the heavy metals cadmium, lead and mercury. While unbalanced intakes of bulk metals can cause health problems, trace elements easily become toxic in excessive doses.

The extensive use of chemical fertilizers and the refinement of food, together with unhealthy eating habits, have caused widespread mineral deficiencies and imbalances. Especially lacking are chromium, manganese, magnesium, selenium and zinc. Further problems are created by heavy-metal contamination of lead from paints and exhaust fumes; of mercury from pesticides, fumigated seeds or large fish and from amalgam fillings in teeth. Symptoms include fatigue, low resistance to infections, arthritis, hyperactivity and mental retardation. High intakes of calcium, magnesium and zinc help to expel heavy metals from the body. Acid-fruit juices in contact with metal are another danger. While cans are now commonly lined with plastic, chemicals leaching out of the plastic may be as dangerous as the heavy metals.

An additional imbalance is caused by the common overuse of table salt, especially in the form of free-flowing salt. Even ‘genuine unrefined’ sea-salt usually has only a fraction of the minerals contained in seawater – it is ‘fractionated’ instead of refined. However, Macrobiotic sea-salt still appears to have most of the minerals originally present in seawater. Those who live close to the sea may use seawater instead of salt.

If you are overweight, if you have high blood pressure or kidney problems, or if you eat a large amount of animal food or commercially salted products, avoid additional salt, use potassium chloride and kelp. If, on the other hand, you are a vegetarian, with low blood pressure, hypoglycemia, allergies, or weak eyes, or if you are underweight, additional salt is usually beneficial. Because iodine is a common additive to table salt, and many health conscious individuals now minimize their intake of salt, they are in danger of developing iodine deficiency; therefore use also iodine-rich kelp; be it fresh, as powder or tablets.

Boron is not officially recognized as an essential mineral, however, it is important for the calcium metabolism and, therefore, for healthy bones. In a study of postmenopausal women, boron supplementation reduced calcium loss by 44% and increased estrogen to the same levels as in women receiving estrogen replacement therapy. It can also help with arthritis. A therapeutic dose of 9 mg and a maintenance dose of 3 to 6 mg have been used.

MINERAL BALANCING

Mineral supplements can be used to balance body and mind. Use the following guidelines.

1. Calcium tenses muscles and hardens the body structure. Therefore it is indicated in muscle weakness, low blood pressure with poor circulation and, generally, for people with a ‘soft body structure’, as in children and frequently in young women.

2. Magnesium relaxes muscles and nerves. It is indicated in cases of high blood pressure, muscle tension, stiffness and rigidity, a high-strung, irritable and oversensitive nervous system, jumpiness and insomnia. It helps to relieve pain and inflammation and is best for people with a ‘rigid body structure’ – most commonly elderly males.

3. Potassium makes the body more sensitive and responsive.

4. Sodium is required with adrenal weakness, low blood pressure and dehydration.

Experimental studies show that magnesium deficiency also induces calcium deficiency despite a high intake of calcium and vitamin D. Even intravenous administration of calcium did not improve the induced calcium deficiency until magnesium was supplied as well.

A good supplement form of these ‘bulk minerals’ are ascorbates – the salts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), for example calcium or magnesium ascorbate or ascorbic acid neutralized with eggshell powder, magnesia, dolomite or potassium bicarbonate.

Minerals are not well absorbed from grains, seeds and nuts, except if these are sprouted or fermented. This is especially important for vegetarians. The addition of gelatin or chicken or fish broth to cooked grains improves the absorption of minerals, while cereal fiber (bran) decreases their availability. Where grains and seeds are indicated as good sources of specific minerals in the following compilation, this applies only to sprouted or fermented products.

In case of deficiencies, preferably take mineral supplements with meals containing gelatin (for example, fish, poultry), alternatively with fresh vegetable juice or vegetables salads. Also make sure that you have sufficient gastric acid. Minerals are more easily absorbed as chelates or orotates. Orotates deliver minerals directly into the cells. Take calcium orotate and magnesium orotate separately, because they may react against each other.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 17, 2006

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Four capsules of the new magnesium is still not enough. I raise it again to six capsules. Two at each meal for a total of 1500 mg. I have my follow up doctor’s appointment on Friday and I’m not sure what to tell him other than the St. John’s Wort has done absolutely nothing. I’m still eating 2-4 bananas a day and I don’t feel any improvement. I’ve noticed that if I miss taking the B complex, I get this weird feeling in my head. Almost like the tingling with the riboflavin but it’s more mild. I still suspect a B6 deficiency so I’ll stop taking my B complex vitamins and try taking B6 by itself for a while but this time I’ll try something different. I have B6 in a 250 mg dose and usually I take it twice a day. This time, I’ll split the pills and take four throughout the day at 125 mg.

There’s been a lot of talk in the news lately about the cost of eating healthy. Drinking carrot juice will give you botulism, eating spinach will give you e-coli…chemical residue in our fruits and vegetables… It never seems to end. And now we have the new breakfast sandwich at Tim Hortons.

Tim Hortons Breakfast Sandwich

Innocent-looking sandwich packs a wallop of fat and sodium.

Nutritional breakdown:

Sausage, Egg and Cheese: 500 calories, 34 g fat (20 g saturated, 0.5 g trans), 32 carbohydrate (1 g fibre), 18 g protein, 920 mg sodium

Bacon, Egg and Cheese: 400 calories, 24 g fat (17 g saturated, 0.5 g trans), 31 g carbohydrate (1 g fibre), 16 g protein, 740 mg sodium

Analysis: Tim Hortons is now offering some protein at breakfast time this is good news. The bad news is that the protein comes with a lot of saturated fat (a day’s supply) and sodium (one-third of a day’s supply).

Health Canada recommends a total of 20 g per day of saturated and trans fats. Well, if you pull up to the drive-in and order your Sausage, Egg and Cheese Breakfast Sandwich, you should just turn around and go home, because you will have had your entire day’s intake of saturated and trans fats. The daily value (DV) for sodium is 2,400 mg, which is about the amount of sodium in 1 tsp of salt. The breakfast sandwiches have 740-920 mg of sodium.

When I asked Tim Horton’s about this, company spokesperson Diane Slopek-Weber stated that their customer research overwhelmingly told them that the most popular choice for a hot breakfast sandwich, was one that included egg and meat. Given their wide menu selection and ordering options, their customers can choose for themselves.

Alternative: The Breakfast Sandwich is made to order, so you can ask for a multigrain bagel instead of the tea biscuit, with only egg and/or cheese. This will change the nutrition breakdown to 380 calories, 10 g fat (so you can keep driving to work).

How does it compare to McDonald\’s? The Sausage McMuffin with Egg has 440 calories, 26 g fat (10 g saturated, 0.4 g trans), 29 g carbohydrate (2 g fibre), 20 g protein, and 930 mg sodium. The Bacon & Egg McMuffin has 310 calories, 14 g fat (5 g saturated, 0.3 g trans), 29 g carbohydrate (2 g fibre), 16 g protein and 710 g sodium.

This becomes a lesson in relativity. Tim Hortons has created something so bad, it makes McDonalds look good. Perhaps this should be their new marketing position.

Take it or leave it: Keep driving.

October 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 30, 2006

Two symptoms that I have had for years are related to a Magnesium deficiency: Sensitivity to bright lights and weak knees.

Reasons Your Brain Needs Magnesium

#1 Your brain needs magnesium to build the protective myelin sheaths that insulate the nerve fibers which network your nervous system.

#2 Magnesium activates a key enzyme in cell membranes that controls the balance of sodium and potassium. This is absolutely essential to the electrical activity of nerve cells, as well as to the very existence of a cell. If its sodium-potassium ratio got too far out of balance, the cell would burst.

#3 Magnesium activates glutamine synthetase, an enzyme responsible for converting waste ammonia – an extremely toxic byproduct of normal protein metabolism – into urea for proper disposal. The ability to focus and pay attention can be compromised by even small increases in brain ammonia.

#4 Magnesium activates almost all the key enzymes needed for your neurons to produce energy from glucose, in the form of ATP molecules. Magnesium is also necessary for the stable storage of ATP, so it won’t spontaneously break down and waste its energy as heat.

#5 Of the 300+ different enzymes in the human body that require magnesium to function, a great many are crucial to cerebral metabolism and cognitive function. In the cerebrospinal fluid that bathes the brain and spinal cord, magnesium is present in higher concentrations than in the blood plasma.

#6 Magnesium is needed to activate the enzyme (D6D) that converts dietary fatty acids into DHA, the most abundant fatty acid in brain cell membranes. Deficiencies in DHA have been associated with numerous neurological disorders – from attention-deficits to Alzheimer’s disease

Here’s another web site:

Magnesium is the central atom in the chlorophyll molecule and in physiology it activates the ATP energy system. More than 300 enzymes require the presence of this mineral. Seventy percent of the body’s magnesium is found in the bones, and the rest is found mainly in the soft tissues and blood. There is more magnesium than calcium in muscle tissue and the brain has twice as much magnesium as any other tissue.

Every person, every doctor that I’ve mentioned my health history to has commented on the fact that I have done a tremendous amount of research to try and figure out my symptoms and the more deeper I get, the more I realize how I’ve only scratched the surface and looking back, I wish I’d done a better job.

I think if I was a doctor, I’d hire a research assistant to google symptoms for me. Actually, it’s more like an investigative researcher.

My iridology exam is tomorrow and I can’t wait. Hopefully, it’s the beginning of the end.

June 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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