Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for July 18, 2007


I’m really starting to get annoyed because I can’t figure out what the problem is. I know it’s deficiency…but what?

Back to googling “nervousness” + “deficiency”. I’m looking through all the regular vitamins and minerals and I feel like I’ve tried them all but then I notice one that maybe of interest. I don’t think I’ve done any in depth research on it. It goes on to mention how a reaction requires selenium and that a deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects. I can say without a doubt that I had a deficiency with all of the above vitamins and minerals so I really need to look at this very closely. It also has a link to candida.

Nutrient Interactions: Iodine

How do other nutrients interact with iodine?

The conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodthyronine (T3) requires the removal of an iodine molecule from T4. This reaction requires the mineral selenium. The iodine molecule that is removed gets returned to the body’s pool of iodine and can be reused to make additional thyroid hormones.

If your body is deficient in selenium, the conversion of T4 to T3 is slowed, and less iodine is available for the thryoid to use in making new hormones.

Animal studies have shown that arsenic interferes with the uptake of iodine by the thyroid, leading to goiter. In addition, dietary deficiency of vitamin A, vitamin E, zinc and/or iron can exaggerate the effects of iodine deficiency.

Iodine deficiency causing defective free radical generation

Most people who do not regularly eat seafood (either fish or kelp) or use iodized salt have some degree of iodine deficiency; this can also occur as a result of a low-salt diet. These individuals may become hypothyroid and hypometabolic, because iodine is an essential ingredient in thyroid hormone. At the same time they may become more sensitive to yeast infections, due to inactivity of the myeloperoxidase enzyme, which uses iodine in cell mediated immune function.

The iodine is used by this enzyme to product iodine-free radicals which are part of the cellular anti-yeast “free radical artillery”. Previous to the use of nystatin as an antifungal drug, iodine therapy was successfully used to treat yeast infections; however, one must be very careful with the dosage. People who are sensitive to various foods and chemicals are frequently intolerant to iodine and should only use it in very low dosages.

Advertisements

July 18, 2007 - Posted by | Health | , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: