Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for March 10, 2007

Today for something different. I’m going to try taking two 25 mg doses of zinc along with my multivitamin. Morning dosage is equal to 62 mg of zinc and 0.5 mg of copper. I also take my amino acids, vitamin C, potassium and vitamin K with some enzymes.

Picked up the book fromt he library today “Why Am I Always So Tired?” by leading nutritionist Ann Louise Gittleman. A book that talks about copper imbalance.

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March 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 27, 2007

So after reading a bit about apple cider vinegar, I take a trip to the local health food store and pick some up. Some of the testimonials on the web site were amazing to read. I’d really like to know if this will work for me. God knows I’ve tried everything else.

Readers have found success in curing yeast infections by either drinking 2 TBLSP of Apple Cider Vinegar in water, 3x day or by bathing in it. However, please note: certain acv brands can stop a yeast infection, yet some brands are so acidic that they can actually cause a yeast infection. Thus start with a lower dose to see how your body responds to the vinegar.

So I take some just after lunch and I’ll try taking a bath in it tonight. While I’m in the store, I decide to try a Vitamin K supplement. The main source of Vitamin K is green leafy vegetables and not eating them has probably contributed to this mess in the first place.

February 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 25, 2007

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Day two and I have another batch of celery and cucumbers. Now we are getting somewhere. I check in the mirror and the thrush is slowly getting better! But why? So I do some googling…

I’ve just started taking St. Johns Wort again so does this have any connection with candida?

St. Johns Wort (Wound-Healing and Antibacterial Actions)

St. John’s wort acts against a wide variety of bacteria. In one study, it was found to be more effective than the antibiotic sulfanilamide against the Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria responsible for many hospital epidemics. The bacterium that causes tuberculosis, the fungus Candida, and the gastrointestinal parasite Shigella have all responded to St. John’s wort. These findings are particularly important because of the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

WOW! I’ve also started eating celery and cucumbers. Let’s see if that has any effect on candida? I looked up cucumbers but they didn’t have anything really significant so what is the main nutrient in celery? Vitamin K. Huh? Not a common vitamin and I can’t say I’ve seen that in any health food store and I’ve been to so many. Here I found a link between candida, mitral valve prolapse and…Vitamin K.

Candida (systemic yeast) infections have been linked to vitamin K deficiencies. An overgrowth of candida albicans or other kinds of yeast can crowd out the helpful bacteria in the digestive tract that make vitamin K. People who eat a lot of sugary foods, an unusually high proportion of alkaline foods and/or take antibiotics tend to be at high risk for Candida infections.

Not consuming enough vitamin K from one’s diet can contribute to a deficiency. Dietary vitamin K is highest in leafy green vegetables such as lettuce, kale, broccoli and collard greens. These are foods that many people don’t eat frequently.

The primary symptoms associated with vitamin K deficiencies are osteoporosis and prolonged bleeding times. Other symptoms that occur frequently in conjunction with osteoporosis and prolonged bleeding times in connective tissue disorders are mitral valve prolapse, scoliosis and hypermobility.

Mitral valve prolapse, scoliosis and hypermobility tend to occur in conjunction with each other whether they occur as an “isolated” conditions or together as features of defined genetic disorders. In fact, most connective tissue disorders have scoliosis, mitral valve prolapse and hypermobility as primary features.

And found this on a site regarding Mitral Valve Prolapse:

Most features of the Mitral Valve Prolapse syndrome can be attributed to direct physiological effects of Magnesium deficiency or to secondary effects produced by blockade of EFA desaturation. These include valvular collagen dissolution, ventricular hyperkinesis, cardiac arrhythmias, occasional thromboembolic phenomena. autonomic dysregulation and association with LT, pelvic fibrosis, autoimmune disease, anxiety disorders, allergy and chronic candidiasis.

Mitral Valve Prolapse: Magnesium deficiency and secondary symptoms of anxiety, allergies and chronic candidiasis. I’m a walking text book for all of the above…

January 25, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

Lecithin

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system.

Besides being an important factor in controlling cholesterol levels and aiding coronary health, lecithin is involved in a myriad of body functions. Every cell of your body contains lecithin. Lecithin is responsible for maintaining the surface tension of the cell membrane. It therefore controls what goes in and out of each cell, allowing nutrients in, or wastes out. Without enough lecithin, the cell wall hardens, thus not allowing enough nutrients in or wastes out. This means premature aging of cells. The surface tension of the cell maintained by lecithin is also responsible for transmitting nerve impulses and messages through or from the cell.

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system. A key factor in proper brain and nerve transmissions is the presence of cellular substance called acetylcholine.

Until as recently as six years ago, medical researchers were using choline chloride to help their patients who suffered from these insidious brain disorders to produce more acetylcholine in their bodies. However, in 1977, Dr. Richard Wurtinan and his colleagues at Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that lecithin (which contains phosphatidyl choline) increased serum choline levels more than three times as much as the previously used choline chloride and kept those levels raised more than three times as long. This meant that researchers had found a way to significantly raise acetylcholine levels in their patients since acetylcholine production in the brain was dependent on serum choline levels.

Dr. Wartman’s research further astounded the medical community by showing that choline was taken up directly by the brain and used almost at once to help the brain make acetylcholine. This meant that the amount of lecithin (phosphatidyl choline) furnished by each meal could have a direct and almost immediate effect on the efficiency of the brain. Researchers found this so surprising because it had long been believed that the so called blood/brain barrier shielded the brain from such direct influences by nutrients and substances that are excessive or lacking in the day-to-day diet. Only a few substances such as alcohol or powerful drugs were thought to be able to cross this barrier.

Additional Findings on Lecithin’s Interaction in the Body

Without sufficient lecithin, your body cannot utilize the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. By adding an adequate amount of lecithin to your diet, you could improve your digestion and utilization of these vitamins by 100% or more if your diet is now deficient in lecithin.

When a person exercises regularly to improve their muscle tone, the amount of lecithin contained in the muscles increases. This increase in muscle lecithin is in part responsible for the greater endurance of the muscle.

Cirrhosis of the liver is no longer a disease of the heavy drinker only. Being the body’s waster disposal plant, many toxic materials, like food additives, preservatives, insecticides, growth hormones, etc., all pass through the liver. Lecithin and good general nutrition readily reverses liver damage.

W.S. Hartroff, M.D., Ph.D., reported in the American Journal of Public Health that the lack of choline was found to head infants toward high blood pressure. Furthermore, it has been found that a choline deficiency induced tendency to high blood pressure can not be reversed. Interestingly enough, human milk contains lecithin while cow’s milk does not.

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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