Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for July 29, 2006

Went to the Chiropractor today. I mentioned to him about the Riboflavin deficiency and the myelin shealths. He’s very interested and explains about B vitamins and suggests I look up an amino acid called Lysine. Also suggested looking up information on vitamin D because it is used to treat Multiple Sclerosis.

In multiple sclerosis, the body incorrectly directs antibodies and white blood cells against proteins in the myelin sheath.

I told him that the Iridoligist had advised me that I didn’t need it because it was summer. He disagreed and said I should look it up. I told him there seemed to be some similarities to Guillian Barre Syndrome but I didn’t think I had something that serious. He suggested looking up something called Alrnold Chiari Syndrome.

He also suggested that if I was taking B complex without any results, then there is a definate imbalance for absorption and he talked about a few examples. He asks how much vitamin C I was taking and I said around 1500 mg a day. He thought that was too much and he said for greater absorption, the stomach needs to be less acidic and more alkaline. He recommended I see a Homeopathic Doctor and Nutritional Consultant. He gave me the name and I looked him up when I got home.

I also received a phone message tonight from the Naturopath. She said she looked up Riboflavin Butyrate in her medical journals and is unable to order it. She offered to contact Kabs Pharmaceutical but wanted to speak to me first.

I don’t think I’ll bother.

When I’m out I check the health food store for some Lysine. Instead of getting just Lysine, I decided to get the full range of Amino Acids and I purchased an Amino Complex.

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July 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 12, 2006

Woke up with the vibration today so I’ll change my vitamins a little. I’ve been doing a bit of reading on the treatment of magnesium deficiency and I found a web site that mentions that 1500 mg of calcium should be included. So I won’t take my single 250 mg magnesium and increase the calcium as it contains just as much magnesium.

By the afternoon I’m not feeling so good so I take my nightly vitamins early and feel better almost instantly. So much for that. I’ll go back to my regular routine. Saturday is the follow up with the Iridologist so hopefully it’s only for a few more days. Maybe by then I’ll have the test results.

Yea right.

Found another article on vitamin D:

D is for DEFENSE

Few foods have it and most people don’t get enough sun to make it. Skin cells can manufacture vitamin D when exposed to adequate sunlight. Ten to fifteen minutes of bright sunlight on the arms and face 2 to 3 times per week is usually sufficient time to manufacture enough vitamin D to meet one’s needs. The UVB rays of ultraviolet light are the rays that are responsible for making the vitamin D precursor.

However, people who live north of Atlanta in the East and Los Angeles in the West don’t get enough UVB from the sun in winter to make sufficient vitamin D. During the winter months when the sun’s rays are of insufficient strength, people living in Southern Michigan cannot manufacture sufficient vitamin D from November through March.

While some vitamin D is stored in the body during the summer months, it is important that you get a good dietary source of vitamin D to help you out during the winter months. Many breakfast cereals, some dairy products, and some soy and rice beverages are fortified with 25 percent of the daily value (DV) for vitamin D. In addition, some orange juices are now fortified with both calcium and vitamin D, and Viactiv soft calcium chews contain similar amounts of vitamin D.

You can, however, get too much vitamin D, although it would be difficult to get too much from food and it is impossible to get too much from sun exposure. Vitamin D toxicity is possible from taking an excessive amount from vitamin supplements. One has to be careful since many calcium supplements are often fortified with vitamin D to help with calcium absorption.

The National Academy of Science recommends that people not consume in excess of 2000 IU a day. Above that level vitamin D may be unsafe. If you consume too much vitamin D from food and pills you could absorb excessive levels of calcium. This can lead to kidney stones, kidney calcification, kidney failure, and calcification of soft tissue.

The recommended daily intake of vitamin D is 200 IU for adults up to age 50. The level jumps to 400 IU for people over 50 yrs age and 600 IU for people over 70 years age. The elderly tend to be deficient in vitamin D, due to impaired vitamin D metabolism. By age 70, vitamin D production is only about 30 percent of what it was at age 25, for exposure to similar levels of sunlight. The elderly at highest risk of vitamin D deficiency include those who are homebound or institutionalized, those living in the northern third of the country and who have a low vitamin D intake. Persons with dark skin need twice as much sunlight exposure as fair skinned persons since skin pigment-ation reduces vitamin D production. The use of sun screen is also known to reduce vitamin D production. Sunblock with an SPF factor of 8 or greater can block out 90 percent or more of the UVB rays.

Vitamin D increases the efficiency of calcium and phosphorus absorption from food. These 2 minerals are needed to form dense bone structure. Hence, a deficiency of vitamin D can increase the risk of bone fractures. If a person is vitamin D deficient and not getting enough calcium, then the body draws calcium from the bones, resulting in osteoporosis. The risk of bone fractures can be markedly reduced in post-menopausal women taking modest levels of vitamin D supplements.

New research is revealing that vitamin D may be involved with a diverse range of body processes beyond maintaining healthy bones. Many tissues in the body have a vitamin D receptor, suggesting a wide-spread function for vitamin D. Elderly women who took a vitamin D supplement reduced their risk of falls by 20 percent. Falls in the elderly can have severe consequences and are responsible for about 40 percent of nursing home admissions. Tufts researchers believe that vitamin D may promote better muscle function. Stronger muscles are better able to support the body, and reduce the risk of falls.

People who live close to the equator have lower rates of cancer. The further one lives from the equator, the less exposure to UVB rays, and the less vitamin D produced in the body. Vitamin D is a very potent hormone that inhibits cell proliferation. Studies have shown that vitamin D inhibits the growth of breast, colon, lung, and prostate cancer cells.

Children who received a daily vitamin D supplement during the first year of life experienced an 80 percent reduction in risk of type 1 diabetes compared with those children who took no supplement. Preliminary evidence also suggests that adequate vitamin D inhibits the development of multiple sclerosis and lowers blood pressure (through its action on renin production).

July 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 11, 2006

Three days ago we went up to Wasaga beach. My wife has a friend that owns a cottage right near the waterfront. The weather was a hot 32 degrees, full sunshine and not a cloud in the sky so it was the perfect day to go to the beach. Every year this guy has a party and invites all of his friends from work and we spend the day playing Beach Bocce, volleyball and of course swimming.

We were invited up two years ago and I got a really good sunburn from being in the sun so long. My arms were red, the back of neck was sore and I was so red that everybody at work made comments because it was so bad. And I seem to recall that I was wearing sun block but I can’t say for sure.

This time with my knowledge of chemicals, I refuse to put on any sun block and I’ll just watch my exposure in the sun. We had such a great time that I ended up spending a lot of time in the sun and forgot that I wasn’t wearing any sun block. I must have spent a least three hours in direct sunlight. I’ll pay for this tomorrow….and I’ll look like a lobster again.

The next day, I check out my arms and to my surprise there is no sign of sunburn. No redness whatsoever and I can’t believe it. The back of my neck is fine and my arms and legs show no sign that I was in the sun at all. How is this possible? Doctor Google…

Guarding against Sun Singe

Of course, we all know that a milligram of prevention is worth many pounds of cure when it comes to sunburn. The best way to prevent sunburn is to simply use common sense by avoiding excess exposure and using sunscreen. You can also help your skin by taking some supplements when you know you’re going to be exposed to the sun.

Vitamin C has qualities that can help protect skin from sunlight, and it’s also well-known for its antioxidant properties, says Leon Hecht, N.D., a naturopathic doctor at the North Coast Family Health Center in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

For people who spend a lot of time in the sun, Dr. Hecht suggests up to 1,000 milligrams of vitamin C three or four times a day. “Vitamin C stimulates repair of sun-damaged skin,” he says.

In a controlled study, 10 people took either 2,000 milligrams of vita min C with 1,000 IU of vitamin E a day or an inactive substance (placebo). The sunburn reaction after eight days of treatment revealed that the skin of people in the treatment group showed less damage than that of those in the placebo group.

Dr. Hecht also states that vitamins C and E used in topical sunscreens prove effective as well. “Early studies show that it is prudent to add vitamins C and E to your sunscreen to protect against ultraviolet phototoxic injury to your skin,” he says. Sunscreens with these vitamins already added can be found in drugstores.

Well as it turns out, vitamins C and E have been part of my daily vitamins for months now. I’ve also read that vitamin D can have a positive effect as sunblock and I’ve just added that.

Doctor Google found this:

Sunblock and skin cancer: Not the relationship you thought there was.

1. You need vitamin D. Sunlight on the skin (up to an hour a day) is the most important source of vitamin D. The other source of vitamin D is the food you eat.

2. Vitamin D may have a role in preventing skin cancer and certain other cancers as well (breast and prostate).

3. Using sunblock prevents production of vitamin D by your body. Therefore, using sunblock could actually increase your risk of getting cancer.

The biggest issue with vitamin D is that, at the levels thought to provide protection from cancer, it depletes the level of calcium in the body. This can lead to problems with osteoporosis, but you can take supplements to deal with this.

1. Build up your sun exposure in spring and summer so you can get an hour of sunlight on your body every day, without sunblock. Start slow and AVOID GETTING SUNBURNED. It doesn’t have to be an hour straight – several periods of exposure adding up to an hour is enough. In other places, I have read that (for caucasians, anyway), all that needs to be exposed in summer is the arms and the face, not the whole body. One source says that for caucasians twenty minutes is enough to provide all the vitamin D you need for the day. I wish these guys could come to an agreement, but it looks like 20 to 60 minutes total would be a good idea, more than that is probably asking for trouble with sunburn and increased cancer risk.

2. If you are staying out of the sun, and for everyone in winter, take fish oil as a supplement. African-Americans and others with dark skin living in temperate latitudes should probably take fish oil routinely rather than increase sun exposure, because the melanin in your skin cuts down on the amount of vitamin D produced. (Read this in other places, not in the article – some scientists think that caucasians are humans that lost pigmentation as an adaptation to allow their bodies to produce enough vitamin D in relatively sunless northern latitudes. The jury is still out on that one.) Anyway, Mercola recommends cod liver oil for everybody, both for the vitamin D in it and for the Omega-3 fatty acids. I also read that in the winter, at the latitiude of Boston, a fair-skinned person could stand outside naked all day and not get enough sun to produce any vitamin D. That person would also probably have a severe case of frostbite and an arrest record by the end of the day. Take your cod-liver oil.

3. Reduce your consumption of foods containing Omega-6 fatty acids. If your favorite snack is sunflower seeds, you might want to reconsider that, or reduce your consumption of them/balance your consumption of sunflower seeds by eating more fish containing Omega-3 fatty acids. Remember that corn oil, safflower oil, etc. (he lists them in the article) are almost pure Omega-6 fatty acids and also need to be reduced so that you get as close as possible to a 1:1 ratio of consumption. This is coming out more and more as being important to prevention of certain cancers.

Dr. Mercola points out the irony in our (appropriate) concern about cancer and exessive sun exposure, while at the same time it appears that moderate exposure to sun may actually help to prevent skin cancer and sunblock use could be a problem.

July 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 11, 2006

New clues about vitamin D function in the nervous system

Accumulating data have provided evidence that 1 alpha,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25-(OH)(2)D(3)] is involved in brain function. Thus, the nuclear receptor for 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) has been localized in neurons and glial cells. Genes encoding the enzymes involved in the metabolism of this hormone are also expressed in brain cells.

The reported biological effects of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) in the nervous system include the biosynthesis of neurotrophic factors and at least one enzyme involved in neurotransmitter synthesis. 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) can also inhibit the synthesis of inducible nitric oxide synthase and increase glutathione levels, suggesting a role for the hormone in brain detoxification pathways.

Neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects of this hormone have been described in several experimental models, indicating the potential value of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) pharmacological analogs in neurodegenerative and neuroimmune diseases. In addition, 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) induces glioma cell death, making the hormone of potential interest in the management of brain tumors.

These results reveal previously unsuspected roles for 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) in brain function and suggest possible areas of future research.

July 11, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 11, 2006

For three days in row now I’ve had no vibration at night but I have it when I wake up. I am now starting to suspect that it’s linked to a Vitamin D deficiency.

So here we go again…

Vitamin D Deficiency

In vitamin D deficiency, calcium absorption cannot be increased enough to satisfy the bodys calcium needs. Consequently, PTH production by the parathyroid glands is increased and calcium is mobilized from the skeleton to maintain normal serum calcium levels a condition known as secondary hyperparathyroidism. Although it has long been known that severe vitamin D deficiency has serious consequences for bone health, recent research suggests that less obvious states of vitamin D deficiency are common and increase the risk of osteoporosis and other health problems.

Importance

Very important in infancy and childhood; healthy bone formation; healthy nervous system maintenance; good for thyroid gland, skin, teeth, normal blood clotting.

Enhances Absorption

Phosphorus, calcium, choline and vitamins A, C, F.

Vitamin D is vital to the human body as it promotes absorption of calcium and magnesium, which are essential for the normal development of healthy teeth and bones. It also helps maintain adequate levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood.

Muscle Weakness and Pain

Vitamin D deficiency causes muscle weakness and pain in children and adults. Muscle pain and weakness was a prominent symptom of vitamin D deficiency in a study of Arab and Danish Moslem women living in Denmark. In a cross-sectional study of 150 consecutive patients referred to a clinic in Minnesota for the evaluation of persistent, nonspecific musculoskeletal pain, 93% had serum 25(OH)D levels indicative of vitamin D deficiency. A randomized controlled trial found that supplementation of elderly women with 800 IU/day of vitamin D and 1,200 mg/day of calcium for three months increased muscle strength and decreased the risk of falling by almost 50% compared to supplementation with calcium alone.

Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

The results of epidemiological and clinical studies suggest an inverse relationship between serum 1,25(OH)2D levels and blood pressure, which may be explained by recent findings that 1,25(OH)2D decreases the expression of the gene encoding renin (see Function). Data from epidemiological studies suggest that conditions that decrease vitamin D synthesis in the skin, such as having dark skin and living in temperate latitudes, are associated with increased prevalence of hypertension. A controlled clinical trial in 18 hypertensive men and women living in the Netherlands found that exposure to UVB radiation three times weekly for six weeks during the winter increased serum 25(OH)D levels and significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements by an average of 6 mm Hg. In randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation, a combination of 1,600 IU/day of vitamin D and 800 mg/day of calcium for eight weeks significantly decreased systolic blood pressure in elderly women by 9% compared to calcium alone, but supplementation with 400 IU/day or a single dose of 100,000 IU of vitamin D did not significantly lower blood pressure in elderly men and women over the next two months. At present, data from controlled clinical trials are too limited to determine whether vitamin D supplementation will be effective in lowering blood pressure or preventing hypertension.

Tolerable Upper Intake Level

Adults 19 years and older 50 mcg (2000 IU)

So vitamin D is used in the aborption of calcium and magnesium. Could this be why there has been no improvement despite taking a calcium/magnesium suppliment? Interestingly with the success I’ve had in the past three days, I’ve managed to increase my calcium, magnesium and added vitamin D to my daily intake. Coincidence?

Calcium Balance

Maintenance of serum calcium levels within a narrow range is vital for normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as for bone growth, and maintenance of bone density. Vitamin D is essential for the efficient utilization of calcium by the body. The parathyroid glands sense serum calcium levels, and secrete parathyroid hormone (PTH) if calcium levels drop too low. Elevations in PTH increase the activity of 25(OH)D3-1-hydroxylase enzyme in the kidney, resulting in increased production of 1,25(OH)2D. Increasing 1,25(OH)2D production results in changes in gene expression that normalize serum calcium by

1) Increasing the intestinal absorption of dietary calcium.

2) Increasing the reabsorption of calcium filtered by the kidneys.

3) Mobilizing calcium from bone when there is insufficient dietary calcium to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Parathyroid hormone and 1,25(OH)2D are required for the latter two effects.

And with that. I’ll increase my vitamin D to 2000 IU per day. It will be interesting to see if that makes a difference on the morning vibration.

July 11, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 09, 2006

Still vibrating when I woke up.

I was on the computer for most of the morning and I don’t take my vitamins until around noon but all morning I had itchy watery eyes. A bit of research and vitamin A deficiency can cause it and it can also help if you have allergies. A bit more reading and a vitamin D defciency can cause nervousness and muscle weakness and will help the absorption of magnesium so I pick up both at the local health food store.

If you accept the root cause of my vitamin/mineral deficiencies as electromagnetic exposure then it’s possible that I could be deficient in a lot more than B1 or magnesium.

Today I add Vitamin A and D to my vitamin schedule.

Vitamin A 10000 IU
Vitamin D3 1000 IU

July 9, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

Lecithin

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system.

Besides being an important factor in controlling cholesterol levels and aiding coronary health, lecithin is involved in a myriad of body functions. Every cell of your body contains lecithin. Lecithin is responsible for maintaining the surface tension of the cell membrane. It therefore controls what goes in and out of each cell, allowing nutrients in, or wastes out. Without enough lecithin, the cell wall hardens, thus not allowing enough nutrients in or wastes out. This means premature aging of cells. The surface tension of the cell maintained by lecithin is also responsible for transmitting nerve impulses and messages through or from the cell.

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system. A key factor in proper brain and nerve transmissions is the presence of cellular substance called acetylcholine.

Until as recently as six years ago, medical researchers were using choline chloride to help their patients who suffered from these insidious brain disorders to produce more acetylcholine in their bodies. However, in 1977, Dr. Richard Wurtinan and his colleagues at Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that lecithin (which contains phosphatidyl choline) increased serum choline levels more than three times as much as the previously used choline chloride and kept those levels raised more than three times as long. This meant that researchers had found a way to significantly raise acetylcholine levels in their patients since acetylcholine production in the brain was dependent on serum choline levels.

Dr. Wartman’s research further astounded the medical community by showing that choline was taken up directly by the brain and used almost at once to help the brain make acetylcholine. This meant that the amount of lecithin (phosphatidyl choline) furnished by each meal could have a direct and almost immediate effect on the efficiency of the brain. Researchers found this so surprising because it had long been believed that the so called blood/brain barrier shielded the brain from such direct influences by nutrients and substances that are excessive or lacking in the day-to-day diet. Only a few substances such as alcohol or powerful drugs were thought to be able to cross this barrier.

Additional Findings on Lecithin’s Interaction in the Body

Without sufficient lecithin, your body cannot utilize the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. By adding an adequate amount of lecithin to your diet, you could improve your digestion and utilization of these vitamins by 100% or more if your diet is now deficient in lecithin.

When a person exercises regularly to improve their muscle tone, the amount of lecithin contained in the muscles increases. This increase in muscle lecithin is in part responsible for the greater endurance of the muscle.

Cirrhosis of the liver is no longer a disease of the heavy drinker only. Being the body’s waster disposal plant, many toxic materials, like food additives, preservatives, insecticides, growth hormones, etc., all pass through the liver. Lecithin and good general nutrition readily reverses liver damage.

W.S. Hartroff, M.D., Ph.D., reported in the American Journal of Public Health that the lack of choline was found to head infants toward high blood pressure. Furthermore, it has been found that a choline deficiency induced tendency to high blood pressure can not be reversed. Interestingly enough, human milk contains lecithin while cow’s milk does not.

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for April 29, 2006

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With these new theories swirling around my head, I go to the Nutritional Summary web site and look up pears. From the list of protein and amino acids I notice that two of the highest ingredients are acids.

Pear (Raw)

Protein & Amino Acids:

Aspartic acid: 173 mg
Glutamic acid: 49.5 mg

Both of these work as excitatory neurotransmitters in the nervous system. As I look up the effects of Amino Acids and how diet can effect the nervous system, I come across Niacin deficiency:

Niacin
Niacin (nicotinic acid) is another one of the B-complex vitamins that may be linked to neurological damage. Mild niacin deficiency is associated with weakness, tremor, anxiety, depression and irritability.

Niacin helps increase energy through improving food utilization and has been used beneficially for treating fatigue, irritability, and digestive disorders, such as diarrhea, constipation, and indigestion. It may also stimulate extra hydrochloric acid production.

Nicotinic acid also helps reduce blood pressure and, very importantly, acts as an agent to lower serum cholesterol. Treatment with about 2 grams a day of nicotinic acid has produced significant reductions in both blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

In general, niacin deficiency affects every cell, especially in those systems with rapid turnover, such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system. Other than photosensitivity, the first signs of niacin deficiency are noted as decreased energy production and problems with maintaining healthy functioning of the skin and intestines. These symptoms include weakness and general fatigue, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions. These can progress to other problems, such as a sore, red tongue, canker sores, nausea, vomiting, tender gums, bad breath, and diarrhea. The neurological symptoms may begin with irritability, insomnia, and headaches and then progress to tremors, extreme anxiety and depression. The skin will worsen, as will the diarrhea and inflammation of the mouth and intestinal tract. There will be a lack of stomach acid production (achlorhydria) and a decrease in fat digestion and, thus, lower availability from food absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins, such as A, D, and E.

The liver can synthesize niacin from the essential amino acid tryptophan but the synthesis is extremely slow and requires vitamin B6. Bacteria in the gut may also perform the conversion but are inefficient.

Many food charts list only sources that actually contain niacin and do not take into account tryptophan conversion into niacin. Approximately 60 mg of tryptophan can generate 1 mg of niacin. But tryptophan is available for conversion only when there are more than sufficient quantities in the diet to synthesize the necessary proteins as tryptophan is used in our body with the other essential amino acids to produce protein.

Niacin needs are based on caloric intake. We need about 6.6 mg. per 1,000 calories, and no less than 13 mg. per day. Women need at least 13 mg. and men at least 18 mg. per day. The RDA for children ranges from 9-16 mg.

A mild niacin deficiency can cause a tremor! How interesting… Is this the breakthrough I’ve been waiting for? I’m also wondering now if this explains why my triglyceride levels were so high on the last blood test. Back on April 11th, the acupuncture doctor told me there was only two reasons for high triglycerides.

1) Eat a lot of fat red meat.

2) Not eating enough fruits and vegetables.

Now there is a third: NIACIN Deficiency.

I look up pears and they only contain 0.3 mg of Niacin however a can of tuna has 21.5 mg per can and it contains 440 mg of tryptophan.

Looks like I’m having Tuna for lunch!

April 28, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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