Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for October 25, 2007

For a couple of weeks now I’ve been reading Braverman’s book “The Edge Effect”. I think it’s brilliant and it makes a lot of sense but I’m still trying to really understand it. From his self test, I appear to be low in Dopamine. One of the things I came across lately was the factors that can cause a Dopamine deficiency. Okay, now we are getting somewhere…

There are a lot of different things that can have an effect and I know for absolute certain that I had problems with seven of them. Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Niacin, Vitamin D, excess Copper and adrenal insufficiency.

Dopamine deficiency

Dopamine levels may be low due to a combination of genetic and acquired reasons. Dopamine can be raised effectively using either nutrient based therapies or medications. Dopamine is synthesized form the amino acid tyrosine.

Factors which reduce dopamine levels:

  • Magnesium deficiency
  • Iron deficiency
  • Zinc deficiency
  • Vitamin B3 deficiency
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Excess copper levels
  • Adrenal insufficiency
  • Vitamin B6 deficiency
  • Vitamin C deficiency
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Glutathione deficiency
  • Chronic stress
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Lead, arsenic and cadmium exposure
  • Tyrosine (precursor) deficiency
  • Genetic dopamine receptor abnormalities
  • Chronic opioid, alcohol & marijuana use
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Influenza
  • Estrogen deficiency
  • Human growth hormone deficiency
  • Under-methylation

The only item on the list that I didn’t understand was the term “Under-methylation”. Here’s what I found:

Under-methylation/HISTADELIA

Individuals with high-histamine levels may be due to a metabolic imbalance that results from under-methylation. As a consequence, these individuals overproduce and retain excessive levels of histamine. Histamine is a substance in the body that has wide ranging effects. There are receptors for histamine in the brain, stomach, skin, lungs, mucus membranes, blood vessels, etc. For some individuals, high levels of blood histamine (called histadelia) have psychological, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms.

Many patients with obsessive-compulsive tendencies, “oppositional-defiant disorder,” or seasonal depression are under-methylated, which is associated with low serotonin levels. Often with inhalant allergies, frequent headaches, perfectionism, competitiveness and other distinctive symptoms and traits. Tend to be very low in calcium, magnesium, methionine, and vitamin B-6 with excessive levels of folic acid. People with histadelics have a positive effect from SSRIs and other serotonin-enhancing medications (Paxil, Zoloft, Prozac, Celexa, Effexor, etc.) because methylation is a step in the manufacture of mood stabilizing neurotransmitters. Unfortunately, histadelics often have nasty side effects with these medications.

Histamine excess can be manifest as asthma, vasomotor rhinitis, allergic skin disorders with pruritis, excess stomach acid production (acts as a gastric hormone to stimulate flow of HCl), saliva, tears, and thin nasal and bronchial secretions, and certain types of vascular headaches. This is the basis of anti-histamine medications. Excessive histamine results because of the inadequate methylation in liver detoxification. Histamine opposes adrenalin in its effects and as expected fatigue occurs just as it occurs in adrenal exhaustion.

Biochemical treatment revolves around antifolates, especially calcium and methionine. Certain forms of buffered vitamin C can help by providing calcium and ascorbic acid. Three to six months of nutrient therapy are usually needed to correct this chemical imbalance. As in most biochemical therapies, the symptoms usually return if treatment is stopped.

Methylation is involved in DNA synthesis, masking and unmasking of DNA, detoxification, heavy mental detoxification, nerve myelination, carnitine and coenzyme Q 10 synthesis. The relationship of mood and behavior to Histadelia is due to the fact that methylation is involved in neurotransmitter synthesis.

This is sounding too familiar… High-histamine levels. Something to look into further when I have more time.

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May 22, 2008 Posted by | Health | , , , , | 3 Comments

Entry for January 31, 2007

I was looking up Adrenals in my health book and I came across a reference for an amino acid called Tyrosine. I’ve tried an amino acid complex before without much luck but this time, I look further:

Diagnosis

Essential vitamin, mineral, and amino acid deficiencies frequently go undiagnosed in conventional medicine because conventional testing methods look for pathology—meaning the tests only check for chronic conditions that are present, and NOT for the precursors that lead to illness. In a conventional medical setting, symptoms may go undiagnosed for months or even years before a chronic condition fully develops. That’s why it’s important to choose functional testing, which is designed to detect the biochemical imbalances that are causing your symptoms, before they lead to chronic conditions.

Amino Acids – Amino acids are the “building blocks” of proteins and are necessary for virtually everything in our bodies, including most hormones and all neurotransmitters. Low levels of amino acids are closely associated with several chronic ailments.

In particular, people with Candida have been found to be deficient in nearly all amino acids. Many Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients have low levels of L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine. L-tyrosine plays a key role in the production of thyroid hormone, so low levels of this amino acid may explain the prevalence of thyroid issues among chronically ill people. Amino acids can be maintained at healthy levels with the use of well-balanced dietary supplements, but only while also striving to get enough high-quality protein in the diet.

Glycine, Serine, Taurine and Arginine deficiencies are seen in Candidiasis.

Found another web site that suggested taking Proline for candida. And another suggested a link to low magnesium levels:

Low L-aspartic acid can be associated with low calcium and magnesium levels. Therefore, if one has this deficiency, calcium and magnesium levels should be checked.

January 31, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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