Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for September 13, 2007

Did some more research into the amino acids and came across some interesting things. There are three amino acid deficiencies that are seen in people with candida. I already have Taurine so I do some reading about Arginine and discover it’s another amino acid that is a precursor to GABA. I’ll see if can pick up some Arginine and Glycine.

ARGININE
Main Functions:

Essential for normal immune system activity.
Necessary for wound healing.
Assists with regeneration of damaged liver.
Necessary for production and release of growth hormone
Increases release of insulin and glucogen. Arginine is the most potent amino acid in releasing insulin.
Assists in healing through collagen synthesis
Precursor to GABA, an important inhibitory neurotransmitter
Aids in wound healing

Arginine Deficiencies Seen In:

AIDS
Immune deficiency syndromes.
Candidiasis

GLYCINE
Main Functions:

Part of the structure of haemoglobin.
Part of cytochromes, which are enzymes involved in energy production.
Inhibits sugar cravings.
One of the 3 critical glycogenic amino acids, along with serine and alanine.
Involved in glycogen production, which assists in glycogen metabolism.

Glycine Deficiency Seen In:

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Hypoglycaemia
Anaemia
Viral Infections
Candidiasis

TAURINE
Main Functions:

In the nervous system, stabilises cell membranes, which raises the seizure threshold, and helps treat epileptic seizures.
Acts as inhibitory neurotransmitter and is as potent as Glycine
Anti-convulsant effect is long-lasting and can be confirmed both clinically and by repeat EEG’s (electroencephalograms).
Anti-oxidant. Slows down the aging process by neutralising free radicals.
Highest concentration of Taurine is in the heart.
Reduces risk of gall stones by combining with bile acids to make them water soluble.
Involved in stabilization of heart rhythm. Loss of intracellular Taurine in the heart leads to arrhythmias.
Useful in treatment of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).
Strengthens neutrophils (white blood cells/part of immune system) in their ability to kill bacteria.
Useful in brain injury
Decreases cholesterol levels

Highly concentrated in the eye.

Taurine Deficiency Seen In:

Parkinson’s disease
Anxiety
Candida
AIDS
Cardiac insufficiency
Hypertension
Depression
Kidney failure

So there is a link between a Taurine deficiency and candida. The only problem with this is that a zinc deficiency can cause Taurine levels to rise. I have candida and low zinc levels? So is my Taurine low or high?

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September 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 08, 2007

Well I can’t really say that there is a difference using the Glutathione and Taurine. So it’s off the health food store once again. This time, I pick up some GABA. GABA and is helpful for brian function and used for anxiety.

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) Supplements

GABA is an amino acid that acts as a neurotransmitter, chemicals that facilitate communication between nerve cells. GABA, which is produced by the brain, suppresses nerve impulses related to stress and anxiety. In a healthy, well-nourished person, the brain produces sufficient amounts of GABA.

However, since many people eat poor diets and are over-exposed to environmental toxins, GABA levels may fall below optimum amounts. A low level of GABA is associated with a range of problems, including anxiety, depression, irritability and sleeplessness.

GABA is manufactured in the body from another amino acid, glutamic acid. GABA essentially acts as a tranquilizer in the body, and its effects are comparable to prescription drugs such as Valium and other tranquilizers. Because GABA helps to subdue the firing of nerve cells in the brain, it may be useful for treatment of disorders thought to be linked to over stimulation of the brain’s motor centers, such as epilepsy and attention deficit disorder. Research indicates that it may also help treat alcoholism by reducing alcohol cravings, which have been shown to respond to treatment with the precursor of GABA, glutamic acid, as well.

September 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 06, 2007

I think I took too much of something. My stomach is in knots and although I’m not 100% sure what caused it, it could be either the taurine or the glutathione. I have a feeling it was the glutathione because although the bottle said one a day, I took two after reading about the safe dosages. My dosage was only 50 milligrams.

ADVERSE REACTIONS (Glutathione)

Oral doses of up to 600 milligrams daily are well tolerated. There are no reports of adverse reactions

It’s an awful feeling to have so I’ll cut down on the supplements tomorrow and do some more research. One thing I’ve noticed lately is the supplements for candida don’t seem to be working as well as in the past. I know they always tell you to rotate them with different types of antifungals so I’ll check my supply because I know I have a couple of things that didn’t work the first time so this time we’ll see if it makes a difference.

September 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 05, 2007

So with these new idea swirling around in my head, I pick up some taurine and glutathione on my way home. Back to google for some more research…

Neurotransmitter Amino Acids

Abnormalities in this group are widespread in their implications, and are seen in virtually all mental/emotional problems, primary brain problems (stroke, Alzheimer’s Disease, epilepsy), depression, anxiety, insomnia, poor concentration, memory problems, and mental exhaustion.

Aspartic Acid
Asparagine
Gamma Amino Butyric Acid (GABA) (minor amino acid)
Glutamic Acid
Glutamine
Glycine
Phenylalanine
Taurine
Tryptophan
Tyrosine

After some brief reading, I focus in on something called GABA. I know I’ve come across that in the health food stores but what is it exactly?

GABA

Neurons in the brain’s temporal lobes produce the biochemical GABA and their resulting theta brain waves. GABA is the brain’s natural valium providing calmness and aiding in the production of endorphins. When in balance the GABA dominant person is characterized by stability and reliability. These people are team players who thrive on organization and long-term relationships. Homemakers, administrators, technicians, nurses, security officers, accountants, bus drivers are all ideal occupations for GABA natured people. GABA natured people are nurturers and are tend to be very traditional. 50% of the world’s population is GABA dominant so it is very important to understand how to balance this vital brain neurotransmitter.

An excess of GABA can result in a person not taking care of their own needs at the expense of nurturing others.

Early signs that you are may be GABA deficient include: feeling anxious, nervous or irritable. You may start to feel overwhelmed and stressed out. Other symptoms include: allergies, light-headedness, muscle aches. This is just the beginning of what could become serious health problems.

As with all the brain’s neurotransmitters GABA deficiencies affect all four major domains of brain function. Physical, personality, memory and attention issues can present themselves as GABA deficiencies become more prominent.

Factors which reduce GABA levels:

  • Glutamaine (precursor) deficiency
  • B1, B6, zinc, manganese & iron deficiency
  • Chronic stress
  • Chronic pain
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Progesterone deficiency
  • Mercury and lead exposure
  • Alcohol withdrawal
  • Caffeine excess
  • Excessive electromagnetic radiation
  • Excessive loud noise exposure

Two things really stands out from this list:

1) Zinc, manganese and iron deficiencies.

2) Exposure to excessive electromagnetic radiation

There is no doubt whatsoever that I was low with all three of those minerals and I had exposure to electromagnetic radiation for a year before I discovered the intercom system. So these two things can cause a GABA deficiency and can cause anxiety…

I’ll try the glutathione, taurine for a couple of days to see what effect it has. If I still have the vibration, then I’ll try the GABA.

September 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for September 05, 2007

More research and I discover that Taurine is usually low in people who have candida. Not only that, but it’s low in people who have a zinc deficiency and can cause anxiety.

Taurine Deficiency – Possible Causes

There are many reasons your body could be low in taurine. Your body does not make enough taurine due to a deficiency in one or more of the following:

  • Cysteine and methionine (amino acids that make taurine in your body).
  • Pyridoxal-5-phosphate (the active form of vitamin B6).
  • Zinc (deficiency in zinc is common with elevated mercury levels).
  • Vitamin A.
  • Candida. If you have this systemic fungal infection, it produces an amino acid, beta-alanine, which competes with taurine for reabsorption in the kidney.

WHAT IS TAURINE?

Taurine is an amino acid which plays a major role in the brain as an “inhibitory” neurotransmitter & neuromodulator. It is similiar in structure to the amino acids GABA & L-Glycine, which are also neuroinhibitory. This means it helps to calm or stabilize an excited brain.

Taurine stabilizes nerve cell membranes thus depressing the firing of brain cells & dampening the nerve cell action of the excitatory amino acids, glutamate, aspartate, & quinolinate.

Taurine acts by regulating the sodium & potassium concentration in the cells & the magnesium level between the cells. This has everything to do with the electrical activity of the cells & subsequent communication between cells.

By this mechanism, it has anti-anxiety & anti-convulsant activity. It has also been found useful in some cases of migraine, insomnia, agitation, restlessness, irritability, alcoholism, obsessions, depression, hypomania/mania.

Dosage is from 500 mg twice daily to a total of 5000 mg daily in 3-4 divided doses, though I rarely recommend that high a dose. The total ideal body pool of taurine for adults is 12,000- 18,000 mg.

Since taurine also affects the hypothalamus to help regulate body temperature, a higher dose can decrease your temperature & give chilliness, so be aware of that.

Taurine also plays a role in memory & increases the level of a memory neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, in the brain (in animal studies).

September 5, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 15, 2007

What else do I discover? A zinc deficiency due to copper toxicity can also result in anxiety. I wonder if the zinc deficiency is the cause of my mystery vibration? I came across the Cleveland clinic website of neurological symptoms and there are a number of people with a similar internal vibration feeling and all of them are saying that their doctors have discovered nothing wrong in their blood tests. This leads me to believe that my problem is shared with other people and not some rare disease. My vibration is stronger when I take high doses of zinc which would cause copper toxicity symptoms.

I’ve asked for one week vacation starting March 26th and I’ll attempt the copper detoxification when I’m not at work. That will give me some time to prepare for it.

I alter my vitamins slightly for the evening dosage as I’d like to change them to help with the excess copper. I switch to a multivitamin that contains no copper and has iron instead. My other multi didn’t have iron. I also replace one magnesium with calcium/magnesium in a 1/1 ratio for added calcium. I’ve picked up manganese recently so I’ll take one of those as well. Taurine is recommended and I still have some left over so I’ll start that tomorrow.

March 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for January 31, 2007

I was looking up Adrenals in my health book and I came across a reference for an amino acid called Tyrosine. I’ve tried an amino acid complex before without much luck but this time, I look further:

Diagnosis

Essential vitamin, mineral, and amino acid deficiencies frequently go undiagnosed in conventional medicine because conventional testing methods look for pathology—meaning the tests only check for chronic conditions that are present, and NOT for the precursors that lead to illness. In a conventional medical setting, symptoms may go undiagnosed for months or even years before a chronic condition fully develops. That’s why it’s important to choose functional testing, which is designed to detect the biochemical imbalances that are causing your symptoms, before they lead to chronic conditions.

Amino Acids – Amino acids are the “building blocks” of proteins and are necessary for virtually everything in our bodies, including most hormones and all neurotransmitters. Low levels of amino acids are closely associated with several chronic ailments.

In particular, people with Candida have been found to be deficient in nearly all amino acids. Many Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients have low levels of L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine. L-tyrosine plays a key role in the production of thyroid hormone, so low levels of this amino acid may explain the prevalence of thyroid issues among chronically ill people. Amino acids can be maintained at healthy levels with the use of well-balanced dietary supplements, but only while also striving to get enough high-quality protein in the diet.

Glycine, Serine, Taurine and Arginine deficiencies are seen in Candidiasis.

Found another web site that suggested taking Proline for candida. And another suggested a link to low magnesium levels:

Low L-aspartic acid can be associated with low calcium and magnesium levels. Therefore, if one has this deficiency, calcium and magnesium levels should be checked.

January 31, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2006

Went back to my normal vitamins and by noon I feel great with a lot more energy. The only real difference? I took 300 mg of magnesium citrate. I hit google looking for some tips for better absorbtion.

Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency?

Symptoms involving impaired contraction of smooth muscles include constipation; urinary spasms; menstrual cramps; difficulty swallowing or a lump in the throat-especially provoked by eating sugar; photophobia, especially difficulty adjusting to oncoming bright headlights in the absence of eye disease; and loud noise sensitivity from stapedius muscle tension in the ear.

Other symptoms and signs of magnesium deficiency and discuss laboratory testing for this common condition. Continuing with the symptoms of magnesium deficiency, the central nervous system is markedly affected. Symptoms include insomnia, anxiety, hyperactivity and restlessness with constant movement, panic attacks, agoraphobia, and premenstrual irritability. Magnesium deficiency symptoms involving the peripheral nervous system include numbness, tingling, and other abnormal sensations, such as zips, zaps and vibratory sensations.

Prevention and Treatment of Magnesium Deficiency Using Oral and Injectable Magnesium

For people who suffer from chronic magnesium deficiency and also to prevent the development of this condition, oral magnesium supplements can be quite useful. Magnesium is available in many forms. The cheapest is probably magnesium oxide, but this form is not absorbed as well as some other forms, which include chelated magnesium, magnesium glycinate and magnesium aspartate. Dr. Baker feels that the prescription form of magnesium chloride, known as Slow-mag, has been most useful for his patients.

I have found that magnesium taurate, an unusual form of magnesium in which magnesium is chemically combined with the amino acid derivative taurine, is particularly well utilized and beneficial. This is because some of the same effects that one hopes to get from magnesium, such as the calming effect on the nervous system, and the strengthening effect on heart muscle, is also gotten with taurine. So, the two are synergistic together. I use it in all forms of cardiac and nervous system disorders.

What about dosage? The recommended daily allowance or RDA for magnesium is 350 milligrams of elemental magnesium. An important point here is that when reading the label of a supplement containing magnesium, it is important to distinguish between the number of milligrams per tablet or capsule of the entire magnesium complex versus the number of milligrams of elemental magnesium or pure magnesium. For example, one label of a chelated magnesium states that 4 tablets contain 4,000 mg of the chelated magnesium complex with 500 mg of elemental magnesium. The important number is the one that refers to the elemental magnesium. The other 3,500 mg in this case refers to the amino acid complex that is bound to the magnesium.

Keeping this definition of elemental magnesium in mind, many people do not even get the RDA of 350 mg of magnesium daily. A therapeutic dosage could easily run between 400 mg and 1000 mg daily of elemental magnesium in divided doses. In people with normal kidneys, it is difficult to reach toxic levels of magnesium. However, too much oral magnesium will result in diarrhea. Recall that milk of magnesia is a laxative containing a magnesium salt. Patients suffering from chronic kidney failure must be much more careful because their kidneys have difficulty eliminating magnesium and a toxic buildup may occur. Toxic levels of magnesium may lead to depression of the entire nervous system and even coma and death. But, this is extraordinarily rare and occurs only in patients with severe kidney function impairment. In general, magnesium doses of 1000 mg per day or less are extremely safe.

If this form of magnesium taurate has a calming effect on the nervous system and best absorption, then I’m off to see if I can get some.

Magnesium taurate at dosages of 250 to 500 mg., if well tolerated (no diarrhea) by the intestines, is better absorbed than any other oral tablet or capsule. This approach requires 6 to 12 months.

There is virtually no illness, which is not helped significantly by magnesium.

August 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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