Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for December 28, 2007

I find it very weird that for the week I’m on vacation I haven’t had one day with cold hands. I’ve been fighting this now for weeks almost on a daily basis. So what’s the difference? There’s been a lot of talk recently about the effects of Bisphenol A and how it’s easily found in plastic water bottles. When I’m at work, I drink at least two litres of water a day with a store bought plastic water bottle. Since I’ve been on vacation, I haven’t been drinking any water. I drink mostly milk or juice from a mug.

Health Effects of Bisphenol A

Bisphenol A has low acute toxicity, with an oral LD50 of 3250 mg/kg in rats, but it is an endocrine disruptor. Low doses of bisphenol A can mimic the body’s own hormones, possibly causing negative health effects. There is thus concern that long term low dose exposure to bisphenol A may induce chronic toxicity in humans.

 

Drink your water in glass, not plastic
By Dr. Colleen Huber, NMD

Plastic polycarbonate bottles such as Nalgene are still popular as drinking water bottles. However polycarbonate releases a chemical known as bisphenol A also know as BPA. Whereas plastic industry safety studies find no significant health effects from typical daily doses of bisphenol A, a full 90% of government studies found harmful health effects especially to children and expecting moms, but also for male sexuality and reproduction as well.

The problem is that bisphenol A acts as a “xenoestrogen,” which just means it’s like the female hormone estrogen, except for two things: 1) it’s foreign to the body, which is what “xeno” means, and 2) it is way more harmful than our natural estrogen for everyone, male and female. Breast cancers are much more of a risk in women who carry a high burden of xenoestrogens, and both sexes are subject to a huge range of other harmful health effects. The most far-reaching effects are birth defects and miscarriages. Another effect is a disruption of beta cell function in the pancreas, which creates a pre-diabetes type condition of high blood insulin and insulin resistance.

We have previously warned our readers never to leave a plastic water bottle on a hot car seat, because the phthalates used in the manufacture of plastics leach into the water that you then drink. Phthalates are another xenoestrogen. However, with the polycarbonate bottles it has been found that even at room temperature, bisphenol A leaches into the water, and more so with increased temperature. Also with repeated use of plastics, you may notice the fine line scratches that you see on an old plastic container. These increase the surface area exposed to the liquid inside and release more of the xenoestrogens into the water.

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May 31, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 31, 2006

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I get into work and I ask my friend if he was able to get me the Miswaak. He reaches under his desk and pulls out a small twig. It’s about eight inches long and it doesn’t have the bristles that a regular toothbrush has. He says the bristles will form as I use it. He told me I should clean it using water and to place it in water for thirty minutes before using. After thirty minutes, I give it a try. It has a nice mild tree taste to it and although a little weird and unconventional, I like it. Now let’s see if it works for my allergies…

I’ve been taking 200 mg of Niacin now for three weeks and I’m feeling great. The vitamins really seem to be working. The vibration is very faint and I can barely feel it anymore. I’m so excited about my recent success that I’ll tell anyone who will listen. As I’m explaining my story to a women in the office, I mention how I had Plantar Fasciitis and a guy mentions that he’s been dealing with the same problem and has orthopedic inserts that don’t seem to fix the pain. So I’m now explaining my story to both of them and how the Niacin got rid of it within a week.

He was absolutely amazed at hearing this and was willing to give it a try. I tell him to pick up 100 mg of pure Niacin at his local health food store.

My follow up appointment with the Naturopath should be fun on Saturday. Wait until I tell her about the microwaved plastic allergy and my new toothbrush. I’m going to ask her if there is a positive way to test for the benzyl butyl phthalate plastic allergy and I’m also thinking about the hormone test for Xenoestrogen. Something that will confirm my new diagnosis.

May 31, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 30, 2006

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I mentioned to a friend of mine about my allergies to plastic chemicals in a toothbrush. Am I supposed to stop brushing my teeth all together? He tells me about a natural toothbrush that is used in muslim religion called a Miswaak and he can get me one.

Miswaak: An Oral Health Device
Preliminary Chemical and Clinical Evaluation

A variety of oral hygiene measures have been used since the dawn of time. This has been verified by various excavations done all over the world, in which toothpicks, chewsticks, tree twigs, linen strips, bird feathers, animal bones and porcupine quills were recovered.

Those that originated from plants are tasty twigs and although primitive they represented a transitional step towards the modern toothbrush. It has been stated that about seventeen plants could be enumerated as natural sources for several of these oral hygiene devices.

The most widely used tree twigs since early times is the Siwak or Miswaak. The stick is obtained from a plant called Salvadore Persica that grows around Mecca and the Middle East area in general. It is widely used among Muslims after Prophet Mohammed realised its value as a device which should be used by Muslims to clean their teeth. In this respect he is considered the first dental educator in proper oral hygiene.

Advantages of the Miswaak:

1. Miswaak strengthens the gums and prevents tooth decay.
2. Miswaak assists in eliminating toothaches and prevents further decay.
3. Miswaak creates a fragrance in the mouth.
4. Miswaak is a cure for illness.
5. Miswaak eliminates bad odors and improves the sense of taste.
6. Miswaak sharpens the memory.
7. Miswaak is a cure for headaches.
8. Miswaak creates lustre (noor) on the face of the one who continually uses it.
9. Miswaak causes the teeth to glow.
10. Miswaak strengthens the eyesight.
11. Miswaak assists in digestion.
12. Miswaak clears the voice.

May 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 29, 2006

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To assist recycling of disposable items, the Plastic Bottle Institute of the Society of the Plastics Industry devised a now-familiar scheme to mark plastic bottles by plastic type. A recyclable plastic container using this scheme is marked with a triangle of three “chasing arrows”, which enclose a number giving the plastic type.
 
The resin identification codes:

  1. PETE: Polyethylene Terephthalate – Commonly found on: 2-liter soft drink bottles, cooking oil bottles, peanut butter jars.
  2. HDPE: High Density Polyethylene – Commonly found on: detergent bottles, milk jugs.
  3. PVC: Polyvinyl Chloride – Commonly found on: plastic pipes, outdoor furniture, shrink-wrap, water bottles, salad dressing and liquid detergent containers.
  4. LDPE: Low Density Polyethylene – Commonly found on: dry-cleaning bags, produce bags, trash can liners, food storage containers.
  5. PP: Polypropylene – Commonly found on: bottle caps, drinking straws
  6. PS: Polystyrene – Commonly found on: packaging pellets or Styrofoam peanuts, cups, plastic tableware, meat trays, take-away food clamshell containers.
  7. OTHER: Other – This plastic category, as its name of “other” implies, is any plastic other than the named #1–#6, Commonly found on: certain kinds of food containers and Tupperware.

May 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 29, 2006

If using plastic containers in a microwave is a such a health risk, why do they make them?? The term “Microwave safe”only means it won’t melt in a microwave oven and has nothing to do with the safety of people’s health.

Chemicals in plastic

Several research studies have found that when plastic comes in contact with certain foods, molecules of the chemicals in the plastic can leach into the food or beverage. Certain characteristics of the food item can make it more likely pick up plastic molecules.

The more liquid a food is, the more it touches the plastic, so the more opportunity it has to pick up plastic molecules. Acid foods, such as tomato sauce, appear to be particularly interactive with plastic. If you heat a food item in a plastic container—even if the container is microwave safe—the transference of plastic from the container to the food is even more likely.When molecules of plastic—or more properly, molecules of the chemicals that get added to plastics during manufacturing—get into our bodies, it’s not a good thing. They can cause unwanted effects in the human body; for instance, some of the chemicals mimic estrogen. Estrogen, of course, is a normal, essential human hormone; but having too much of it (or the molecules that mimic estrogen) has been associated with breast cancer and other health problems. In general, chemicals that fool the body into thinking they are estrogen or other hormones are called endocrine disruptors.

So, what would a better food-storage solution look like? The primary characteristic you want in a container material is inertness—that is, you want a material that holds tightly to its own molecules and does not let them go floating off into the food or drink touching it. On this score, glass and porcelain arethe best choices. Companies do make some storage containers with glass or porcelainbottoms and plastic tops. Some of them are oven-safe and large enough to cook in; in those cases, you can simply store the leftovers in the same thing you cooked in. Although these “combo containers” are designed to be air- and liquid-tight, they often don’t seal quite as tightly as the best all-plastic wares. But given the health advantages of food-on-glass storage vs. food-on-plastic storage, the tradeoff seems more than acceptable. The glass and porcelain containers are usually microwave-safe, too, though it’s usually best to microwave the dish covered with a plate or paper towel rather than the plastic lid.

May 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 26, 2006

And after fifteen years of Allergic Rhinitis, Doctor Google may have found the answer when no other doctor could. A chemical called Benzyl Butyl Phthalate. Very interesting reading but I really don’t eat a lot of microwaved food in plastic but something to think about for sure.

Plastic Chemicals Linked to Asthma, Allergies

Oct. 6, 2004 — Certain chemicals commonly added to plastics are associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis (hay fever), and eczema, according to a new study.

The findings come from researchers including Carl-Gustaf Bornehag of the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute in Boras, Sweden. The report appears in the October issue of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Bornehag and colleagues compared 200 Swedish children who had persistent allergy or asthma symptoms with a similar number of kids without such symptoms.

Doctors screened the children for common allergens (substances that can trigger an allergic reaction or asthma symptoms) such as certain tree pollens, cat dander, dust mites, and mold.

Affected children had at least two incidents of eczema (an allergy-related skin condition), wheezing related to asthma, or hay fever symptoms (runny nose without a cold) in the past year. At the study’s end, they had at least two of three possible symptoms.

Researchers took dust samples from the moulding and shelves in the children’s bedrooms.

Samples containing higher concentrations of chemicals called phthalates were associated with symptoms of asthma, hay fever, and eczema.

PVC flooring in the children’s bedrooms was also associated with symptoms.

Phthalate Primer

Phthalates are commonly added to plastics as softeners and solvents. They’re used in a wide variety of products including nail polish and other cosmetics, dyes, PVC vinyl tile, carpet tiles, artificial leather, and certain adhesives.

By leaching out of products, phthalates have become “global pollutants,” say the researchers. More than 3.5 million metric tons of phthalates are produced annually.

Phthalates aren’t new, but they have become more common in recent decades. Towards the end of World War II, only “very low levels” of phthalates were produced.

In fact, phthalates are now so widespread that they are hard to avoid.

Asthma and allergies have also increased in the developed world during the last 30 years, prompting some experts to wonder if environmental changes are responsible, since genetic shifts might not be seen as quickly.

This study concentrated on three common phthalates: BBzP, DEHP, and di-n-butyl phthalate.

BBzP was associated with rhinitis and eczema and DEHP was linked to asthma; di-n-butyl phthalate was not associated with any symptoms.

The dust samples didn’t have outlandish concentrations of the phthalates. Levels fell within the range of what is normally found in indoor environments, say the researchers.

“Given the phthalate exposures of children worldwide, the results from this study of Swedish children have global implications,” they conclude.

So with the new information, I went back to the site with the effects of microwaved water to find out if the water was microwaved using plastic…and it was!

We have seen a number of comments on this, such as what was the water in the microwave boiled in. The thinking is that maybe some leaching took place if it was in plastic. It was boiled in a plastic cup, so this could be a possibility.

May 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 26, 2006

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Great in Microwave!

“Major microwave oven manufacturers recommend the use of plastic wrap as a cover for microwave proof containers.”

And then there is the other side:

Students Studies Toxicity of Plastic Food Wrap

As a seventh grade student, Claire Nelson learned that Di(2-ethylhexyl)Adipate (DEHA), considered a carcinogen, is found in plastic wrap. She also learned that the FDA has never studied the effect of microwave cooking on plastic-wrapped food. So Claire began to wonder: “Can cancer-causing particles seep into food covered with household plastic wrap while it is being microwaved?”

Three years later, with encouragement from her high school science teacher and the cooperation of Jon Wilkes at the National Center for Toxicological Research, Claire set out to test her hypothesis. The research center let her use its facilities to perform her experiments, which involved microwaving plastic wrap in virgin olive oil.

Claire tested four different plastic wraps and found that “…not just the carcinogens but also xenoestrogens (substances that act like estrogen) were migrating into the oil… “ Xenoestrogens are linked to low sperm counts in men and to breast cancer in women.
Throughout her junior and senior years, Claire continued her experiments. An article in Options magazine reported that “her analysis found that DEHA was migrating into the oil at between 200 parts and 500 parts per million. The FDA standard is 0.05 parts per billion.”

Claire’s dramatic results have been published in science journals. She received the American Chemical Society’s top science prize for students during her junior year and fourth place at the International Science and Engineering Fair (Fort Worth, Texas) as a senior.

Claire’s experimental results suggest that heating plastic-wrapped foods in the microwave is dangerous, and that it’s safer to use tempered glass or a ceramic container instead. For the record, a study reported in the June 1998 issue of Consumer Reports suggested that toxins may migrate into food from plastic wrap at room temperature too. So the best choice may be to avoid plastic food wraps altogether.

Starting around 1995, I’ve had mild hair loss mostly on the top of my head. I thought it was normal although both of my parents have a full head of hair. The only person to ever comment on it was my acupuncture doctor. She found the hair loss unusual and mentioned that poor function of the kidneys could cause this.

Then I come across the following web site that talks about the effects of Xenoestrogen:

Exposure to xenoestrogen chemicals in food and water may also cause early follicle burnout.

May 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 26, 2006

My wife mentioned something interesting tonight. We were talking about the microwaved food and she mentioned that I could have the allergy to the food cooked in plastic containers. What if I cooked things using ceramic or glass?Would that will make a difference?

Something to think about…

May 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

   

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