Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for March 14, 2007

Minerals… are what you body is really craving!

Malnutrition is on the rise in our society. Since most people are not educated in nutrition, they are malnourished and don’t even know it. The US Department of Agriculture did a survey of over 20,000 people and found only 10% (or 1 out of 10) got even the minimum RDA for the seven essential nutrients. Several factors play a part in this epidemic of malnutrition, poor food consumption, eating too fast, fried foods, highly processed ingredients, and food full of sugar are chiefly to blame.

Since our fruits and vegetables come from depleted soils, it is a challenge to get all our vitamins and minerals from even properly grown foods. The Encyclopedia Of World Problems and Human Potential states that in productivity, approximately one-third of the world’s crop land had fallen dramatically by the 1980’s. One example is spinach, it has only two percent of the mineral content of iron that it had 60 years ago. The end result is that the foods we consume to give us nutrition are not doing the job they were meant to do.

Enzymes also contribute to malnutrition which are essential to break down of the nutrients so that our bodies can absorb and use them. When food is either cooked or processed, the end result is that the naturally occurring enzymes are destroyed. Based on this lack of enzymes, our digestive system can not properly absorb the vital nutrients we require from our diets. Even though we may be eating all of the necessary foods required for health; we may still be suffering from malnutrition.

In addition to the above mentioned problems, malnutrition can also be attributed to mucous plaque build-up on the intestinal walls. This layer of toxic waste material builds up over time due to inadequate diet and a sluggish colon. The absorption of nutrients becomes greatly hindered, and a failure to achieve optimum nutrition from our foods occurs.

Todays soils are depleted of nutrients

Today’s modern family finds it a challenge to not only eat right, but to also obtain the true nutrition that they think they are obtaining from their foods. Commercially available synthetic or rock-based supplements are chiefly undigested by the body… and simply flushed away. The secret to vitamin & mineral absorption, is in the fact that our bodies are designed to best absorb plant-sourced nutrients. The key factor, is in consuming organic, whole foods or taking a true plant-derived mineral supplement.

The basic functions of life cannot be performed without minerals. Simply said, minerals are the currency of life. There are 75 metals listed in the periodic chart, all of which have been detected in human blood and other body fluids – we know that at least 60 of these metals (minerals) have physiological value for man. Organically not a single function in the human body can take place without at least one mineral or metal cofactor.

As far as supplements go, vitamins have historically ‘gotten the glory’ and minerals were mere stepchildren in the Muliple Vitamin – as everyone always asks, “Did you take your vitamins today?” Of course they really mean, “Did you take your multiple vitamins and minerals today?” Minerals, however are in fact required by any and all body functions from the basic subcellular molecular biological ‘metallic fingers’ of RNA and DNA to electrochemical, catalytic, structural, reproduction, maintenance, repair and a plethora of miscellaneous functions. As important as minerals are to human flesh and the very existence of man, human-kind has rather placed more value on material possessions and wealth than on our metabolic need for minerals.

According to the World Health Organization, the United States spends more money than any other nation in the world on health care; yet 36 other nations are ranked higher than it in terms of quality of health.

It is projected that by the year 2100 there will be more than 12 billion people on the Earth. There is seemingly no way that our farm soils can sustain the nutritional value of our soils, our foods, or ourselves. Genetic engineering, better varieties of grains, rice, and corn, and perhaps even better fertilizer will produce more tons and bushels of crops that are tastier and have longer shelf life – but they will not adequately sustain us.

The earth has become anemic. In short this means we can no longer get the 60 nutritional minerals we need from our food. We must consciously supplement our daily intake of food with the lacking 60 nutritional minerals or poor health and disease are certain resultants.

‘Humic shale’ is a unique source of plant-derived colloidal minerals. Humic shale originated from plants some 75 million years ago. Those lush tropical plants took up the 60 plus metallic minerals available to them from the a fertile soil that had as many as 84 minerals. Humic shale is like the floor of a forest, very compacted dry leaves and sticks. The consistency is like dried saltine crackers or very dry oak leaves. Put them into your hands and rub them together, and it all crumbles into a real fine dust.

A volcanic eruption covered these mineral-rich forests with a thin layer of mud and ash, thick enough to create an air-tight ‘vault’ and dried or dehydrated the plants into a deep accumulation of ‘hay’, but not deep enough or heavy enough to pressurize the dried plant material into coal or oil. The entombed humic shale never fossilized or petrified, in other words they never became rocks – just compressed, dried prehistoric ‘hay’ that contains large amounts of plant-derived colloidal minerals

It takes 78 pounds of humic shale to reach the optimum concentration of 38 grams of colloidal minerals per liter; the 78 pounds of humic shale represents approximately 1034 pounds of lush prehistoric green mineral rich plants. The fluid extract of high grade humic shale contains no less than 60 plant-derived colloidal minerals and is 98% bio-available for both animals and humans.

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March 14, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 14, 2007

In my googling I come across this article that talks about the absorption of minerals and the benefit of using colloidal minerals.

Mineral Absorption and Deficiency
By Yvette R. Schlussel, Ph.D.

SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS:

A wide range of minerals is essential for human health. The recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) serve as guidelines for daily intakes of nutrients that population groups in the United States should have in their diets. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) have been established for the following essential minerals: calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium. In addition, DRIs have been set for other trace elements, which have been identified to have important-if not essential roles in maintaining health. These include: iron, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium, boron, chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, vanadium, nickel, lithium, iodine and fluoride.

There is evidence that the need for mineral intake is not being met, especially in certain subpopulations. It is difficult for most individuals to ingest enough calcium from foods available in a cereal-based economy without liberal consumption of dairy products, for example. Supplementation with minerals is recommended to complement dietary intake and avoid deficiencies.

Mineral supplements are associated with different absorptive capacities. The absorption of minerals depends on a number of physiological, biochemical, and hormonal characteristics of the consumer and the form of the mineral consumed. Potential mineral sources are not all alike and should be evaluated for bioavailability.

Factors that enhance mineral absorption include the form of the mineral ingested, maintenance of chemical stability, presence of a specific transporter, small particle size, solubility, ascorbic acid, and low intestinal motility. Factors that inhibit absorption include oxalic acid, phytic acid, fiber, sodium, tannins, caffeine, protein, fat, antacids, rapid transit time, malabsorption syndromes, precipitation by alkalinization, other minerals, hormones and nutritional status.

Colloidal minerals exhibit properties that enhance absorption. Principles of biochemistry support the view that colloidal minerals may be more bioavailable than minerals in solid supplement or food forms. A number of diseases are associated with mineral deficiencies or impaired metabolism of minerals. Supplementation with minerals has improved the nutritional status and lowered disease risk and progression factors among patients with arthritis, diabetes, cancer, anorexia, and hypertension.

INTRODUCTION

There is no doubt that nutrient deficiencies and excesses can influence disease states. Despite advances in the development of therapeutic agents, nutritional balance is crucial for prevention and resolution of disease. To expect the human body to function properly in the face of nutrient deficiency neglects current knowledge of the physiological needs of metabolically active tissues. While there are extensive studies on how nutrient deficiencies and supplementation affect diseases, there are considerably fewer direct studies available on the mechanisms of action of nutrient supplementation. This report applies generally accepted principles of chemistry and biological systems to mineral supplementation and their absorbability. This report addresses factors affecting the differences in the body’s absorption of minerals with particular attention to colloidal minerals and the role of mineral deficiencies in disease. Specific issues addressed include:

• Mineral Requirements
• Mineral Absorption and Bioavailability
• Mechanisms of absorption
• Essential Minerals and their specific absorption
• Physiologic factors affecting absorption
• Food and Non-Food Sources and Absorption
• Diseases Associated with Mineral Deficiencies
• Cancer
• Arthritis
• Diabetes
• Anorexia
• Hypertension

Mineral Requirements

Throughout the life span, the human body requires new supplies of nutrients and adequate and appropriate reserves of nutrients for proper metabolic and structural function. There is evidence that nutritional need for mineral intakes are not being met, especially in certain age-sex groups and populations. Supplementation with minerals is recommended to prevent deficiencies. Vitamins and minerals are generally dispensed in solid (tablet or capsule form). However some mineral supplementation is available in colloidal form. Mineral absorption is complicated and dependent upon a number of factors related to mineral solubility and absorbability.

MINERAL ABSORPTION: A COMPLEX PROCESS

Absorption

Absorption is the rate at which and the process by which molecules and atoms from the environment enter the interior of the organism via passage across (or around) the lining cells of the gastro-intestinal tract. Absorption can occur all the way from the stomach to the rectum, although the small intestine is the organ most importantly involved in absorption.

Absorptive efficiency for many nutrients, notably iron, calcium and zinc, is governed by homeostatic feedback regulation. When the body stores are too low, the intestine up-regulates the avidity with which the intestine takes up the nutrient. When the body reserves are adequate or increased, the gut down-regulates the nutrient’s uptake. At a molecular level, this regulation can be expressed by the control of intraluminal binding ligands, cell surface receptors, intracellular carrier proteins, intracellular storage proteins, or the energetics of the transmembrane transport.

Bioavailability

Bioavailability refers to the extent to which a nutrient reaches its site of pharmacologic action. For practical purposes, this definition includes the extent to which the nutrient reaches a fluid (e.g. blood) that bathes the site of action and via which the nutrient can readily reach the site of action. The bioavailability of a mineral depends directly on the extent to which the mineral is absorbed and distributed to the site of action and depends inversely on the extent to which it is metabolized and excreted prior to arriving at the site of action. It is necessary to consider the factors that affect absorption in order to determine the relative bioavailability of nutrients in different forms.

Factors Affecting Absorption

Current knowledge on intestinal absorption of nutrients includes multiple factors that can affect absorption. Physiochemical processes that influence both the extent and the rate at which minerals cross the mucosal barrier and enter the bloodstream influence absorption.

Mechanisms of Absorption

The vast bulk of mineral absorption occurs in the small intestine. The best-studied mechanisms of absorption are clearly for calcium and iron, deficiencies of which are significant health problems throughout the world. Intestinal absorption is a key regulatory step in mineral homeostasis. Mineral homeostasis is the body’s physiologic efficiency in absorbing the level of minerals the body requires from those minerals that are available to it.

EVIDENCE THAT MINERALS IN COLLOIDAL FORM ARE MORE ABSORBABLE THAN MINERALS IN SOLID FORMS

Colloidal Minerals

Liquid preparations of minerals are known as “colloidal minerals.” A “colloid” is a substance dispersed in particle size large enough to prevent or delay passage through a semipermeable membrane, but small enough to remain in suspension in a liquid or gas. Colloids consist of very tiny particles that are usually between 1 nanometer and 1000 nanometers in diameter and that are suspended in a continuous medium, such as a liquid, a solid, or a gaseous substance.

The surface area
of colloidal particles is very large. Particles may be electrically charged and have stabilizing agents added to prevent precipitation. Most are negatively charged but this varies between different colloid types. The charges are particularly important for attracting water molecules and cations. The enormous surface area and charged sites on colloids attract and bind many biologically active substances. Another advantage of minerals in colloidal form is that the bound substances are able to withstand enzymatic attack.

The ionic form of minerals is important for mineral absorbability. Colloidal minerals from humic shale extracts predominantly contain sulfates of iron and aluminum and traces of metal hydroxides. Many of the minerals in humic shale extracts are present in ionic forms. This may make it easier for them to cross cellular membranes. Mineral bioavailability is facilitated by the way in which metals cross the intestinal mucosa. A variety of conditions may affect metal transport across the intestinal mucosa. These factors can act at the brush border membrane, within the cytosol, and at the basolateral membrane. Metal ions, probably bound to intracellular ligands, cross the cytosol and are extruded across the basolateral membrane into the portal circulation. Once a metal ion enters the enterocyte, it may be used by the cell for its own metabolic needs or released in the circulation for the metabolic needs of other tissues. Because colloidal minerals do not have to undergo disintegration and dissolution, in contrast with minerals taken in the form of tablets and capsules, under applicable principles of biochemistry they are said to have enhanced-absorption capability, i.e. absorbability.

This absorbability is evident in solubility. For example, small-molecular weight ligands, such as amino acids and other organic acids, can increase solubility and facilitate absorption; In liquid supplements, minerals are already dissolved and therefore are immediately bioavailable. Furthermore, the liquid supplements usually are acidic; specifically, they are formulated to contain citric acid, ascorbic acid, and other substances that increase the bioavailability of minerals, such as carbohydrates (glucose, lactose), polyols (sorbitol), amino acids (arginine, lysine), vegetable gums, peptides, and emulsifying agents. Solid vitamin-mineral preparations instead contain inert excipients and are usually buffered so as not to cause gastric discomfort on ingestion, although this may reduce mineral bioavailability.

The bioavailability of a mineral in the body is governed by multiple factors, including body stores, hormonal regulation, the chemical form of the nutrient, and concomitant nutrient intake. There are few controlled clinical studies that examine the composition, efficacy, absorbability, or other properties of mineral supplements. There are, however, biochemical reviews of the properties of colloidal minerals that conclude that they are more bioavailable than minerals in other forms. That conclusion is consistent with the applicable principles of biochemistry discussed above.

Commercial supplements of minerals are available in a wide variety of forms. The time required for absorption affects their absorbability. These include isolated compounds such as inorganic salts, organic salts, amino acid chelates and a yeast form. Bioavailability of trace elements has been studied in long-term animal supplementation (3-4 weeks) studies by measuring the trace element in liver, blood, serum or plasma and comparing the slope of the dose-concentration plots. A preliminary depletion is usually performed using trace element deficient food. In short-term experiments, the area under the blood, serum or plasma concentration-time curve is used to compare bioavailabilities after a single dose of the test substance is given. In laboratory studies, examination of the blood concentration-time curves for short-term human experiments involving selenium, zinc and copper revealed that the yeast form was more slowly absorbed, i.e., took longer to reach its maximum concentration, and was thus more bioavailable.

Conclusion

While the ultimate absorption of minerals by the human body is dependent upon numerous factors including homeostasis, body stores, and hormonal regulation, the absorbability of minerals (their availability for absorption) is also affected by the form in which the minerals are ingested. Minerals in solid forms such as in solid dosage supplements and in foods must be dissolved and disintegrated prior to being available for absorption. Principles of biochemistry show that minerals in a liquid medium, or in soluble acids, i.e. colloidal minerals, can be expected to be more absorbable due to their smaller size, larger surface area and relative charge. The solubility of a mineral has been shown to enhance its bioavailability. Thus, there is scientific evidence that colloidal minerals may be more efficient, a preferred vehicle for absorption, than minerals in solid forms.

Colloidal minerals exhibit properties that enhance absorption. Principles of biochemistry support the view that colloidal minerals may be more bioavailable than minerals in solid supplement or food forms.

Yvette Schlussel, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
Dept. of Nutritional Sciences
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ

March 14, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 27, 2007

First day off the diet and I grab a bag of apples and three bananas for my morning routine. It’s great to be back! I know I have candida and I know how to deal with it but it’s the magnesium loss that I’m really struggling with.

It’s almost been three weeks and my follow up with the nutritionist is Thursday night. I haven’t received one phone call or any emails from her. No follow up advice whatsoever. I wonder what happened? Did she meet with her discussion group? Who knows?

Now that I’ve given up the diet, it’s time to rethink the vitamins. I’m going to cut back to only the main ones. Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc, Selenium, Pantothenic Acid, the enzymes and the multivitamin. I’m going to stop taking the niacin just to see what happens. I’ve taken it everyday since I discovered the deficiency.

Still vibrating….

February 27, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 20, 2007

Switched back to eating cucumbers and celery today. I had a few sunflower seeds in the morning but I’ve since decided to get rid of those too just in case. I’m mad at myself for straying from the strict diet but by the end of the day, my thrush is actually quite better. More improvement than I expected and I can feel the improvement in my nose.

Found this article talking about the different vitamins and mineral deficiencies that can effect candida.

CANDIDA

Selenium deficiency and anemia appear to be the biggest factors in promoting candida growth. Years ago when I had hypoT I also had a severe candida infection. I found a book titled “Candida: Silver (Mercury) Fillings and the Immune System” which eventually led me to getting my mercury fillings removed. Following this and supplementation with zinc and selenium, my candida and hypoT both ended.

Experiments with animals show that candida growth can be increased by selenium deprivation and reduced by selenium supplementation. Since mercury depletes selenium, it makes sense that candida is higher when there are mercury fillings in the teeth.

Other studies show that anemia and iron deficiency increase candida growth. There are some studies suggesting that B12 and folic acid deficiencies may be involved in candida, since deficiencies of these lead to anemia. In anemia and iron deficiency friendly bacteria cannot grow well in the body. A lack of these bacteria probably is a key factor which promotes candida growth, since candida is a fungal growth rather than a bacteria growth.

Another study showed that women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis are deficient in zinc compared to normals and that only a mild zinc deficiency is necessary for this recurring problem.

Basically it seems that the deficiencies associated with candidiasis correlate very well with the deficiencies associated with hypothyroidism. The key nutrient deficiencies are probably selenium, zinc, iron, B12, and folic acid.

Probably the best indicator of the level of candida growth in the body is the coating on the tongue. The more white coating there is, the more candida there probably is throughout the body. We want to get to the point where our tongues are clear, pink, and not sore.

The following study shows that candida albicans has a higher resistance to elevated concentrations of copper than baker’s yeast. This may mean that in hypothyroidism, when zinc is low and copper is high, candida growth will not be suppressed by copper, which is normally toxic to fungal infections.

February 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 13, 2007

A review of the blog led me into a new direction today. Back on January 07, 2007, I posted a list of vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by excessive amounts of sugar intake. On February 04, 2007, I posted a list of reasons why sugar is bad for your health. From that list, there were two minerals that I missed the first time around so I modified the original entry to add Chromium and Copper. So a quick search and I find this:

“Without copper, nerves would fray like toaster cords,” said Sharon Faelten in The Complete Book of Minerals for Health. “Cooper helps forge the protective myelin sheath around each of the millions of nerve fibers in our bodies. Calm nerves and clear thinking depend on it.

Copper is as important as calcium and zinc for bone formation, red blood cell integrity, skin and immune functions, nervous system functions, the conversion of beta-carotene to vitamin A and the processing of vitamin C, wrote Gershon M. Lesser, M.D., in Growing Younger.

And then I came across this article:

Chromium & Copper:

These two elements are the most important nutrients next to calcium and magnesium for their anti-inflammatory properties. They share left / right-sided cell receptors and are considered essential to human health. While neither one – with few exceptions – is generally found to be very deficient level-wise, chromium is on average always lower than copper, with virtually no exceptions. Copper, on the other hand is elevated in the majority of patients, which creates a chronic copper / chromium conflict ratio-wise in these individuals.

In fact, of all the patients I have tested since the mid 70’s, nearly 90% exhibited a chemical profile that in addition to their own unique chemistry contained an underlying pattern that reflected the impact of high copper levels on various opposing nutrients, which include chromium, molybdenum, sulfur, nickel, Vitamin C, hesperidin, and others. Although chromium appears to be normal on the following graph, it is very low in ratio to copper, its associated element, so when supplementing chromium, its level will generally not increase at first, but instead it will gradually lower copper, and in the example below, potassium, since they are high in ratio to chromium. Only after copper and potassium have been reduced to normal levels, chromium may at that point start to go up. However, since sufficient amounts of chromium are rarely used, in practice, copper and potassium just come down closer to normal, and chromium levels stay the same.

Magnesium levels frequently go up following long-term supplementation of chromium because of its synergism with chromium, and also because of potassium (which is a magnesium antagonist) going down, and thus not exerting an inhibiting effect on magnesium any longer.

Copper works synergistically with potassium and calcium, so when patients do exhibit low copper levels, then calcium and potassium are frequently on the low side as well. Taking a 3mg copper pill for one or two months, or less, is all that is needed for an adult to normalize any copper deficiency, and then it should always be discontinued, otherwise copper will go too high – being another reason why most people should avoid multi-mineral formulations containing more than 1 mg of copper.

The interesting thing about all of this is I started taking 3 mg of copper once a day in between two 30 mg doses of zinc a few weeks ago.

February 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 04, 2007

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After reading that sugar can have an effect on appendicitis, I decide to do some more research. My mother tells a story where I had really bad stomach pains when I was around seven years old. The doctor’s couldn’t find anything obviously wrong so one day it was so bad, she took me to the hospital emergency. There it was decided to do exploratory surgery to find out what the problem was. They came back with appendicitis and I had an appendectomy.

So here we go again…I’ve mentioned this to to every doctor so far because when I start with a new doctor, there is always the generic form that I need to fill out and the section that includes surgical procedures. How many mentioned that one of the causes of appendicitis was poor diet? Not one.

I always knew I had a long history of poor diet and high sugar I just never realized there was early warning signs at such an young age that of course went ignored.

Nutrition

In England and Wales, a study was performed to review whether low intake of fiber and high intake of sugar and meat may influence the development of acute appendicitis. The study evaluated the dietary habits of 49,690 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Although no specific correlation was found with sugar or meat, the analysis did suggest that the more fresh and frozen green vegetables and fresh and processed tomatoes people ate, the less likely they were to develop appendicitis. The researchers concluded that eating green vegetables—particularly cabbages, cauliflowers, peas, beans, and Brussels sprouts—and possibly tomatoes may protect against appendicitis.

Another study reviewed the link between abdominal microbes and the immune system in children with acute appendicitis who had or had not been breastfed. Children (mean age 7 to 8 years) with acute appendicitis were less likely to have been breastfed over a long period of time compared to a group of randomly selected children from the same geographic area. The authors suggest that human milk may boost the immune system, and it may make infections and inflammation less severe.

Another early sign of health issues? I had bed wetting problems as a child and now I’m wondering if this was a sign of poor diet and even a sign of a copper imbalance even then?

Children’s Biochemistry

Every human being begins life as a fast oxidizer. This means their hair tissue calcium and magnesium levels are low in comparison with the tissue sodium and potassium levels. Some characteristics of fast oxidation include a rapid pulse and a high degree of nervous sensitivity or irritability. Fast oxidizing children are more active. Very fast oxidation produces extreme irritability, inability to relax and often aggressive behavior. Fast oxidizers require dietary fat and calcium such as that found in full-fat milk. Children may remain fast oxidizers for years. However, in general, as one ages the oxidation rate slows.

Bed-Wetting

Children with a copper imbalance display this symptom more than other children. A copper deficiency or excess (biounavailability), can cause excessive nervousness that may result in poor bladder control. When the copper imbalance is corrected through a nutrition program, often the bed-wetting problem subsides.

Sugar and Carbohydrate Sensitivity

Many children are highly sensitive to sugar and any form of sweets in their diet. One reason for this is a fast oxidation rate. Fast oxidizers burn their food at a faster-than-normal rate. Many children are also born today with deficiencies of manganese, zinc, chromium and vanadium. These elements are involved in blood sugar regulation.

Sugar is a rapidly-absorbed food. When a high-sugar diet is coupled with a rapid rate of oxidation, it is like pouring gasoline on a fire. There is a dramatic rise in the blood sugar level, stressing the sugar regulation mechanisms and altering calcium and phosphorus levels. This can have profound effects upon mood and behavior.

Avoidance of all sugar-containing foods is a necessity for many children, especially those prone to strong sugar reactions. A diet high in sugar and carbohydrates also aggravates a chronic zinc and magnesium deficiency. Yet zinc and magnesium are precisely the minerals needed to help calm down these children. Fast oxidizers require a diet higher in fat and lower in carbohydrates. In some children, extra protein will help control blood sugar fluctuations.

Supplementing deficient minerals and feeding children a nourishing, appropriate diet for their oxidation type can help prevent and correct excessive sugar sensitivity.

Nutrition

Give your child foods high in silica, calcium and magnesium. Sesame seeds, almonds, porridge, milk pudding with figs and bananas are good sources of these minerals. Calcium and magnesium relax the system and can help counteract the nervous tension which often provokes bedwetting. All nutrients are important for healthy development of the body. Silica is highly recommended for strengthening the urinary tract, kidneys and bladder.

February 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 04, 2007

Since I’ve determinded that a long term diet of high sugar is possibly the main cause of my vitamins/mineral deficiencies, what other things does it effect in the body?

The list was staggering!!!!

146 Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health

By Nancy Appleton, Ph.D.
Author of LICK THE SUGAR HABIT and LICK THE SUGAR HABIT SUGAR COUNTER.

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.
2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.
3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.
4. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.
5. Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).
6. Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity and function you loose.
7. Sugar reduces high density lipoproteins.
8. Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.
9. Sugar leads to cancer of the ovaries.
10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.
11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.
12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
13. Sugar can weaken eyesight.
14. Sugar raises the level of a neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.
15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.
16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.
17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.
18. Sugar malabsorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.
19. Sugar can cause premature aging.
20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.
21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.
22. Sugar contributes to obesity
23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis.
24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.
25. Sugar can cause arthritis.
26. Sugar can cause asthma.
27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).
28. Sugar can cause gallstones.
29. Sugar can cause heart disease.
30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.
31. Sugar can cause multiple sclerosis.
32. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.
33. Sugar can cause varicose veins.
34. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.
35. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.
36. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.
37. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.
38. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.
39. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E (alpha-Tocopherol in the blood.
40. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.
41. Sugar can increase cholesterol.
42. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.
43. Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.
44. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs)(Sugar bound non-enzymatically to protein)
45. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.
46. Sugar causes food allergies.
47. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
48. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.
49. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.
50. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.
51. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA
52. Sugar can change the structure of protein.
53. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.
54. Sugar can cause cataracts.
55. Sugar can cause emphysema.
56. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.
57. Sugar can promote an elevation of low density lipoproteins (LDL).
58. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.
59. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.
60. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson’s disease.
61. Sugar can cause a permanent altering the way the proteins act in the body.
62. Sugar can increase the size of the liver by making the liver cells divide.
63. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.
64. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.
65. Sugar can damage the pancreas.
66. Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.
67. Sugar is enemy #1 of the bowel movement.
68. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).
69. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.
70. Sugar can make the tendons more brittle.
71. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.
72. Sugar plays a role in pancreatic cancer in women.
73. Sugar can adversely affect school children’s grades and cause learning disorders..
74. Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha, and theta brain waves.
75. Sugar can cause depression.
76. Sugar increases the risk of gastric cancer.
77. Sugar and cause dyspepsia (indigestion).
78. Sugar can increase your risk of getting gout.
79. Sugar can increase the levels of glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test over the ingestion of complex carbohydrates.
80. Sugar can increase the insulin responses in humans consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.
81 High refined sugar diet reduces learning capacity.
82. Sugar can cause less effective functioning of two blood proteins, albumin, and lipoproteins, which may reduce the body’s ability to handle fat and cholesterol.
83. Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.
84. Sugar can cause platelet adhesiveness.
85. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance; some hormones become underactive and others become overactive.
86. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.
87. Sugar can lead to the hypothalamus to become highly sensitive to a large variety of stimuli.
88. Sugar can lead to dizziness.
89. Diets high in sugar can cause free radicals and oxidative stress.
90. High sucrose diets of subjects with peripheral vascular disease significantly increases platelet adhesion.
91. High sugar diet can lead to biliary tract cancer.
92. Sugar feeds cancer.
93. High sugar consumption of pregnant adolescents is associated with a twofold increased risk for delivering a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant.
94. High sugar consumption can lead to substantial decrease in gestation duration among adolescents.
95. Sugar slows food’s travel time through the gastrointestinal tract.
96. Sugar increases the concentration of bile acids in stools and bacterial enzymes in the colon. This can modify bile to produce cancer-causing compounds and colon cancer.
97. Sugar increases estradiol (the most potent form of naturally occurring estrogen) in men.
98. Sugar combines and destroys phosphatase, an enzyme, which makes the process of digestion more difficult.
99. Sugar can be a risk factor of gallbladder cancer.
100. Sugar is an addictive substance.
101. Sugar can be intoxicating, similar to alcohol.
102. Sugar can exacerbate PMS.
103. Sugar given to premature babies can affect the amount of carbon dioxide they produce.
104. Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.
105. The body changes sugar into 2 to 5 times more fat in the bloodstream than it does starch.
106. The rapid absorption of sugar promotes excessive food intake in obese subjects.
107. Sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
108. Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.
109. Sugar can slow down the ability of the adrenal glands to function.
110. Sugar has the potential of inducing abnormal metabolic processes in a normal healthy individual and to promote chronic degenerative diseases.
111.. I.Vs (intravenous feedings) of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.
112. High sucrose intake could be an important risk factor in lung cancer.
113. Sugar increases the risk of polio.
114. Hi
gh sugar intake can cause epileptic seizures.
115. Sugar causes high blood pressure in obese people.
116. In Intensive Care Units, limiting sugar saves lives.
117. Sugar may induce cell death.
118. Sugar can increase the amount of food that you eat.
119. In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44% drop in antisocial behavior.
120. Sugar can lead to prostate cancer.
121. Sugar dehydrates newborns.
122. Sugar increases the estradiol in young men.
123. Sugar can cause low birth weight babies.
124. Greater consumption of refined sugar is associated with a worse outcome of schizophrenia
125. Sugar can raise homocysteine levels in the blood stream.
126. Sweet food items increase the risk of breast cancer.
127. Sugar is a risk factor in cancer of the small intestine.
128. Sugar may cause laryngeal cancer.
129. Sugar induces salt and water retention.
130. Sugar may contribute to mild memory loss.
131. As sugar increases in the diet of 10 years olds, there is a linear decrease in the intake of many essential nutrients.
132. Sugar can increase the total amount of food consumed.
133. Exposing a newborn to sugar results in a heightened preference for sucrose relative to water at 6 months and 2 years of age.
134. Sugar causes constipation.
135. Sugar causes varicous veins.
136. Sugar can cause brain decay in prediabetic and diabetic women.
137. Sugar can increase the risk of stomach cancer.
138. Sugar can cause metabolic syndrome.
139. Sugar ingestion by pregnant women increases neural tube defects in embryos.
140. Sugar can be a factor in asthma.
141. The higher the sugar consumption the more chances of getting irritable bowel syndrome.
142. Sugar could affect central reward systems.
143. Sugar can cause cancer of the rectum.
144. Sugar can cause endometrial cancer.
145. Sugar can cause renal (kidney) cell carcinoma.
146. Sugar can cause liver tumors.

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16. Ibid.
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18. Ibid.
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45. Lee AT, Cerami A. “Role of Glycation in Aging.” Ann N Y Acad Sci. Nov 21,1992 ;663:63-70.
46. Appleton, N. New York:Lick the Sugar Habit. (New York:Avery Penguin Putnam:1988).
47. “Sucrose Induces Diabetes in Cat.” Federal Protocol. 1974;6(97).
48. Cleave, T.:The Saccharine Disease: (New Canaan Ct: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1974).131.
49. Ibid. 132.
50. Vaccaro O., Ruth, K. J. and Stamler J. “Relationship of Postload Plasma Glucose to Mortality with 19 Year Follow-up.” Diabetes Care. Oct 15,1992;10:328-334.
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51. Lee, A. T. and Cerami, A. “Modifications of Proteins and Nucleic Acids by Reducing Sugars: Possible Role in Aging.” Handbook of the Biology of Aging. (New York: Academic Press, 1990.).
52. Monnier, V. M. “Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process.” Journal of Gerontology 1990:45(4 ):105-110.
53. Dyer, D. G., et al. “Accumulation of Maillard Reaction Products in Skin Collagen in Diabetes and Aging.” Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1993:93(6):421-422.
54. Veromann, S.et al.”Dietary Sugar and Salt Represent Real Risk Factors for Cataract Development.” Ophthalmologica. Jul-Aug 2003 ;217(4):302-307.
55. Monnier, V. M. “Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process.” Journal of Gerontology. 1990:45(4):105-110.
56. Schmidt A.M. et al. “Activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products: a mechanism for chronic vascular dysfunction in diabetic vasculopathy and atherosclerosis.” Circ Res.1999 Mar 19;84(5):489-97.
57. Lewis, G. F. and Steiner, G. “Acute Effects of Insulin in the Control of VLDL Production in Humans. Implications for Theinsulin-resistant State.” Diabetes Care. 1996 Apr;19(4):390-3
R. Pamplona, M. .J., et al. “Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis.” Medical Hypotheses. 1990;40:174-181.
58. Ceriello, A. “Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation.” Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
59. Appleton, Nancy. New York; Lick the Sugar Habit. (New York:Avery Penguin Putnam, 1988).
60. Hellenbrand, W. ”Diet and Parkinson’s Disease. A Possible Role for the Past Intake of Specific Nutrients. Results from a Self-administered Food-frequency Questionnaire in a Case-control Study.” Neurology. Sep 1996;47(3):644-650
61. Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., and Brownlee, M. “Glucose and Aging.” Scientific American. May 1987: 90.
62. Goulart, F. S. “Are You Sugar Smart?” American Fitness. Mar-Apr 1991: 34-38.
63. Ibid.
64. Yudkin, J., Kang, S. and Bruckdorfer, K. “Effects of High Dietary Sugar.” British Journal of Medicine. Nov 22, 1980;1396.
65. Goulart, F. S. “Are You Sugar Smart?” American Fitness. March_April 1991: 34-38
66. Ibid.
67. Ibid.
68. Ibid.
69. Ibid.
70. Nash, J. “Health Contenders.” Essence. Jan 1992-23: 79_81.
71. Grand, E. “Food Allergies and Migraine.”Lancet. 1979:1:955_959.
72. Michaud, D. ”Dietary Sugar, Glycemic Load, and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in a Prospective Study.” J Natl Cancer Inst. Sep 4, 2002 ;94(17):1293-300.
73. Schauss, A. Diet, Crime and Delinquency. (Berkley Ca; Parker House, 1981).
74. Christensen, L. “The Role of Caffeine and Sugar in Depression.” Nutrition Report. Mar 1991;9(3):17-24.
75. Ibid.
76. Cornee, J., et al. “A Case-control Study of Gastric Cancer and Nutritional Factors in Marseille, France,” European Journal of Epidemiology. 1995;11:55-65.
77. Yudkin, J. Sweet and Dangerous.(New York:Bantam Books,1974) 129.
78. Ibid, 44
79. Reiser, S., et al. “Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986:43;151-159.
80. Reiser,S., et al. “Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:151-159.
81. Molteni, R, et al. “A High-fat, Refined Sugar Diet Reduces Hippocampal Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor, Neuronal Plasticity, and Learning.” NeuroScience. 2002;112(4):803-814.
82. Monnier, V., “Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process.” Journal of Gerontology. 1990;45:105-111.
83. Frey, J. “Is There Sugar in the Alzheimer’s Disease?” Annales De Biologie Clinique. 2001; 59 (3):253-257.
84. Yudkin, J. “Metabolic Changes Induced by Sugar in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease and Diabetes.” Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):5-8.
85. Ibid.
86. Blacklock, N. J., “Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone.” Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):9-12.
Curhan, G., et al. “Beverage Use and Risk for Kidney Stones in Women.” Annals of Internal Medicine. 1998:28:534-340.
87. Journal of Advanced Medicine. 1994;7(1):51-58.
88. Ibid
89. Ceriello, A. “Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation.” Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
90. Postgraduate Medicine. Sept 1969:45:602-07.
91. Moerman, C. J., et al. “Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Biliary Tract Cancer.” International Journal of Epidemiology. Ap 1993;2(2):207-214.
92. Quillin, Patrick, “Cancer’s Sweet Tooth.” Nutrition Science News. Ap 2000.
Rothkopf, M.. Nutrition. July/Aug 1990;6(4).
93. Lenders, C. M. “Gestational Age and Infant Size at Birth Are Associated with Dietary Intake among Pregnant Adolescents.” Journal of Nutrition. Jun 1997;1113-1117.
94. Ibid.
95. Bostick, R. M., et al. “Sugar, Meat.and Fat Intake and Non-dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer Incidence in Iowa Women.” Cancer Causes & Control. 1994:5:38-53.
96. Ibid.
Kruis, W., et al. “Effects of Diets Low and High in Refined Sugars on Gut Transit, Bile Acid Metabolism and Bacterial Fermentation.” Gut. 1991;32:367-370.
Ludwig, D. S., et al. “High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating, And Obesity.” Pediatrics. Mar 1999;103(3):26-32.
97. Yudkin, J and Eisa, O. “Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men”. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988:32(2):53-55.
98. Lee, A. T. and Cerami A. “The Role of Glycation in Aging.” Annals of the New York Academy of Science. 1992; 663:63-70.
99. Moerman, C. et al.”Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Gallbladder Tract Cancer.” Internat J of Epi. Ap 1993; 22(2):207-214.
100. “Sugar, White Flour Withdrawal Produces Chemical Response.” The Addiction Letter. Jul 1992:4.
Colantuoni, C., et al. “Evidence That Intermittent, Excessive Sugar Intake Causes Endogenous Opioid Dependence.” Obes Res. Jun 2002 ;10(6):478-488.
101. Ibid.
102. The Edell Health Letter. Sept 1991;7:1.
103. Sunehag, A. L., et al. “Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition” Diabetes.
1999 ;48 7991-8000).
104. Christensen L. et al. “Impact of A Dietary Change on Emotional Distress.” Journal of Abnormal Psychology .1985;94(4):565-79.
105. Nutrition Health Review. Fall 85. Sugar Changes into Fat Faster than Fat.”
106. Ludwig, D. S., et al. “High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating and Obesity.” Pediatrics.Mar1999;103(3):26-32.
107. Girardi, N.L.” Blunted Catecholamine Responses after Glucose Ingestion in Children with Attention Deficit Disorder.” Pediatrics Research. 1995;38:539-542.
Berdonces, J. L. “Attention Deficit and Infantile Hyperactivity.” Rev Enferm. Jan 2001;4(1)11-4
108. Blacklock, N. J. “Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone.” Nutrition Health. 1987;5(1 & 2):9-17.
109. Lechin, F., et al. “Effects of an Oral Glucose Load on Plasma Neurotransmitters in Humans.” Neurophychobiology. 1992;26(1-2):4-11.
110. Fields, M. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Aug 1998;17(4):317-321.
111. Arieff, A. I. Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco. San Jose Mercury; June 12/86. “IVs of Sugar Water Can Cut Off Oxygen to the Brain.”
112. De Stefani, E.“Dietary Sugar and Lung Cancer: a Case Control Study in Uruguay.” Nutrition and Cancer. 1998;31(2):132_7.
113. Sandler, Benjamin P. Diet Prevents Polio. Milwakuee, WI,:The Lee Foundation for for Nutritional Research, 1951.
114. Murphy, Patricia. “The Role of Sugar in Epileptic Seizures.” Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients. May, 2001.
115. Stern, N. & Tuck, M. “Pathogenesis of Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus.” Diabetes Mellitus, a Fundamental and Clinical Test. 2nd Edition, (Phil. A:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000)943-957.
116. Christansen, D. “Critical Care: Sugar Limit Saves Lives.” Science News. June 30, 2001;159:404.
117. Donnini, D. et al. “Glucose May Induce Cell Death through a Free Radical-mediated Mechanism.”Biochem Biohhys Res Commun. Feb 15, 1996:219(2):412-417.
118. Allen S. Levine, Catherine M. Kotz, and Blake A. Gosnell . “Sugars and Fats: The Neurobiology of Preference “J. Nutr.2003 133:831S-834S.
119. Schoenthaler, S. The Los Angeles Probation Department Diet-Behavior Program: Am Empirical Analysis of Six Institutional Settings. Int J Biosocial Res 5(2):88-89.
120. Deneo-Pellegrini H,. et al.Foods, Nutrients and Prostate cancer: a Case-control study in Uruguay. Br J Cancer. 1999 May;80(3-4):591-7.
121. “Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition. Diabetes. 1999 Apr;48(4):791-800.
122. Yudkin, J. and Eisa, O. “Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988;32(2):53-5.
123. Lenders, C. M. “Gestational Age and Infant Size at Birth Are Associated with Dietary Intake Among Pregnant Adolescents.” Journal of Nutrition 128; 1998::807-1810.
124. . Peet, M. “International Variations in the Outcome of Schizophrenia and the Prevalence of Depression in Relation to National Dietary Practices: An Ecological
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125. Fonseca, V. et al. “Effects of a High-fat-sucrose Diet on Enzymes in Homosysteine Metabolism in the Rat.” Metabolism. 200; 49:736-41.
126. Potischman, N, et.al. “Increased Risk of Early-stage Breast Cancer Related to Consumption of Sweet Foods among Women Less than Age 45 in the United States.” Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Dec;13(10):937-46.
127.Negri. E. et al. “Risk Factors for Adenocarcinoma of the Small Intestine.”
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128.Bosetti, C. et al. “Food Groups and Laryngeal Cancer Risk: A Case-control Study from Italy and Switzerland.” International Journal of Cancer, 2002:100(3): 355-358.
129. Shannon, M. “An Empathetic Look at Overweight.”CCL Family Found.” Nov-Dec.1993. 20(3):3-5.
130. Harry G. Preuss, M.D., of Georgetown University Medical School
131., “Health After 50.” Johns Hopkins Medical Letter. May, 1994.
132. Allen, S. “Sugars and Fats: The Neurobiology of Preference.” Journal of Nutrition. 2003;133:831S-834S.
133. Booth, D.A.M. etc al. “Sweetness and Food Selection: Measurement of Sweeteners’ Effects on Acceptance.” Sweetness. Dobbing, J., Ed., (London:Springer-Verlag, 1987).
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135. Cleve, T.L On the Causation of Varicose Veins. “Bristol, England, John Wright, 1960”.
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141.Jarnerot, G., “Consumption of Refined Sugar by Patients with Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, or Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Scand J Gastroenterol. 1983 Nov;18(8):999-1002.
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February 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 07, 2007

MINERALS

Minerals are inorganic substances composed of a metal and a non-metal, both in ionic form. Metals most important for our health are calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium as bulk elements, and boron, chromium, cobalt, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium and zinc as trace elements. Essential non-metals are chloride, phosphorus and sulfur. Harmful are aluminium and the heavy metals cadmium, lead and mercury. While unbalanced intakes of bulk metals can cause health problems, trace elements easily become toxic in excessive doses.

The extensive use of chemical fertilizers and the refinement of food, together with unhealthy eating habits, have caused widespread mineral deficiencies and imbalances. Especially lacking are chromium, manganese, magnesium, selenium and zinc. Further problems are created by heavy-metal contamination of lead from paints and exhaust fumes; of mercury from pesticides, fumigated seeds or large fish and from amalgam fillings in teeth. Symptoms include fatigue, low resistance to infections, arthritis, hyperactivity and mental retardation. High intakes of calcium, magnesium and zinc help to expel heavy metals from the body. Acid-fruit juices in contact with metal are another danger. While cans are now commonly lined with plastic, chemicals leaching out of the plastic may be as dangerous as the heavy metals.

An additional imbalance is caused by the common overuse of table salt, especially in the form of free-flowing salt. Even ‘genuine unrefined’ sea-salt usually has only a fraction of the minerals contained in seawater – it is ‘fractionated’ instead of refined. However, Macrobiotic sea-salt still appears to have most of the minerals originally present in seawater. Those who live close to the sea may use seawater instead of salt.

If you are overweight, if you have high blood pressure or kidney problems, or if you eat a large amount of animal food or commercially salted products, avoid additional salt, use potassium chloride and kelp. If, on the other hand, you are a vegetarian, with low blood pressure, hypoglycemia, allergies, or weak eyes, or if you are underweight, additional salt is usually beneficial. Because iodine is a common additive to table salt, and many health conscious individuals now minimize their intake of salt, they are in danger of developing iodine deficiency; therefore use also iodine-rich kelp; be it fresh, as powder or tablets.

Boron is not officially recognized as an essential mineral, however, it is important for the calcium metabolism and, therefore, for healthy bones. In a study of postmenopausal women, boron supplementation reduced calcium loss by 44% and increased estrogen to the same levels as in women receiving estrogen replacement therapy. It can also help with arthritis. A therapeutic dose of 9 mg and a maintenance dose of 3 to 6 mg have been used.

MINERAL BALANCING

Mineral supplements can be used to balance body and mind. Use the following guidelines.

1. Calcium tenses muscles and hardens the body structure. Therefore it is indicated in muscle weakness, low blood pressure with poor circulation and, generally, for people with a ‘soft body structure’, as in children and frequently in young women.

2. Magnesium relaxes muscles and nerves. It is indicated in cases of high blood pressure, muscle tension, stiffness and rigidity, a high-strung, irritable and oversensitive nervous system, jumpiness and insomnia. It helps to relieve pain and inflammation and is best for people with a ‘rigid body structure’ – most commonly elderly males.

3. Potassium makes the body more sensitive and responsive.

4. Sodium is required with adrenal weakness, low blood pressure and dehydration.

Experimental studies show that magnesium deficiency also induces calcium deficiency despite a high intake of calcium and vitamin D. Even intravenous administration of calcium did not improve the induced calcium deficiency until magnesium was supplied as well.

A good supplement form of these ‘bulk minerals’ are ascorbates – the salts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), for example calcium or magnesium ascorbate or ascorbic acid neutralized with eggshell powder, magnesia, dolomite or potassium bicarbonate.

Minerals are not well absorbed from grains, seeds and nuts, except if these are sprouted or fermented. This is especially important for vegetarians. The addition of gelatin or chicken or fish broth to cooked grains improves the absorption of minerals, while cereal fiber (bran) decreases their availability. Where grains and seeds are indicated as good sources of specific minerals in the following compilation, this applies only to sprouted or fermented products.

In case of deficiencies, preferably take mineral supplements with meals containing gelatin (for example, fish, poultry), alternatively with fresh vegetable juice or vegetables salads. Also make sure that you have sufficient gastric acid. Minerals are more easily absorbed as chelates or orotates. Orotates deliver minerals directly into the cells. Take calcium orotate and magnesium orotate separately, because they may react against each other.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 06, 2007

1168181938-hr-816

Today I thought I might try to see what happens if I don’t take any vitamins.

Late morning and my hands and feet are cold. By the afternoon, I have this weird sensation in my left leg. Almost like a twitch but more like a nerve ending kind of feeling. Just before bedtime I start feeling a mild chest pain in the upper right hand side of my chest.

Time for the vitamins…

Just before I go to bed I take 500 mg of magnesium, the multivitamin and 500 mg of pure Niacin. About 30 minutes later, I start to get the flushing. It lasts for almost two hours. It bothered me so much that I had a bath to try and minimize the effect without much success. Then later, I had diarrhea twice and a touch of nausea. Both symptoms of a high Niacin dosage and I’ve had it happen before. I’ll try taking the 100 mg of Niacin and spread them throughout the day.

I hate it when I’m wrong.

January 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 06, 2007

I’ve been doing some research on candida lately and I came across a web site that suggests taking garlic throughout the day with yogurt that contains bacterial culture. So we went shopping today and I picked some up.

Time to REGROUP.

I really need to summarize my observations, review my successes and list my outstanding symptoms.

1) The first thing I need to do is to use iridology to see if there is any change since the last set of photos. It’s been six months since the last time so there should be some changes. I’ve been taking a great multivitamin and a higher dose of magnesium so I would expect to see some improvement because the vibration is not as strong as it used to be.

2) I really need to go through the entire blog again to see if anything I’ve discovered in the past is relevant now that I have overlooked at the time. I’d like to look at the deficiencies that I know for sure: Magnesium, vitamin A, Niacin, Riboflavin and vitamin E to see if I can find a common ground to the cause.

3) I need to find a list of factors that contribute to Magnesium loss and investigate the symptoms of each one.

4) Make a list of vitamins and minerals that are destroyed by high sugar intake.

January 6, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 28, 2006

The nutritionist from last week left me a follow up voice mail. She wanted to know if I had made a decision regarding the treatment and I’ve been thinking a lot about it lately. I think a nutritionist would be a really great thing for me but I would want a condition.

I’ll contact her on the weekend and tell her that I will start the treatment with the condition that I have the option to quit if I am not happy with the food testing analysis from the naturopath. I don’t want the same results as the last naturopath telling me that I didn’t have a magnesium deficiency from the hair analysis.

And this time I will mark the questionaires with stars to indicate the symptoms that are being hidden by my current intake of vitamins and minerals. I will also document my entire history before I meet with anyone to ensure that nothing gets missed, including my issues with the EMF exposure.

Those are my conditions.

I’ll also tell her that I am still waiting for my B6 test result from my own doctor and will persue the injection through him if I am able to.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 27, 2006

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Thought it might be time to document my daily intake of vitamins, minerals and herbs for the record. I’ve been taking the core vitamin and minerals for a while now and the herbal remedies where only recently added to fight candida. The magnesium, niacin and the multivitamin are the only ones that I know if I’ve missed taking it. The multivitamin has the active form of B6 and sometimes I take it earlier in the day because I have that “weird” feeling in my head. It goes away everytime I take any form of B6.

———————————————————–

I start every morning with the candida trauma kit:

Pysillium Fibre/Caprilic Oil/Bennonite mix

Nu Life: Magnesium: 500 mg three times a day
Vitamin C: 500 mg three times a day
Niacin: 50-100 mg three times a day
Enzymes: 1 capsule three times a day

Nu Life Multivitamin: Twice a day
Olive Leaf & Black Walnut: Twice a day

Nu Life: Omega Three: Once a day (380 DHA content)
Co-enzyme Q10: Once a day
Garlic 1000 mg Once a day

Acidophilus just before bed.

I also take the Magnesia Phosphorica in between doses of magnesium if I need to. I usually get a very mild pain in my chest and it goes away the instant I take it.

For the past few months I’ve also taken a more serious approach to eating more fruits and vegetables and healthy eating. I try to eat 1-2 Fuji apples and 1-3 bananas a day. I’ll have oatmeal with flax seeds for breakfast and sometimes I’ll eat cucumbers and tomatoes as snack foods.

December 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 22, 2006

I had a really interesting experience today. I was running out of my supply of vitamin B6 so I head to the local health food store. As I was looking at the vitamins, the lady asked me if I needed any help. Usually I tell them that I’m okay and brush them aside. Today I decided to ask her about the absorption of B6. She questioned why I thought I had a B6 deficiency because she said it’s unusual for men and more common among women. I asked her about B complex in the liquid form and she agreed that it had a better absorption rate so I decided to purchase some to give it a try.

She said from looking at my appearance she suspected I had a mineral deficiency rather than vitamins and commented on my pale skin and dark circles under my eyes. I somehow mentioned about my problem with magnesium and she started telling me about how vitamin deficiencies can be caused by exposure to electromagnetic fields.

WOW! I couldn’t believe my ears. I almost never mention my stories with EMF exposure for fear that people would really think I was a raving lunatic. But not this time… it was mentioned to me so I opened up and explained some of my discoveries and she appeared quite interested. I continued by telling her the success I’ve had using Google for my symptoms instead of the doctors and she said I should see a real doctor and stop using the internet and recommended an in-store homeopathic doctor.

As I was standing there talking to her, a customer came in and purchased a bar of soap. The lady behind the counter seemed to know her quite well and mentioned my B6 deficiency to her. She asked me if would mind trying a test and I agreed. She asked me to hold my arm out and push against it when she pushes on it.

She asked me how old I was and being that my birthday was in two days, I answered 36 just as she pushed on my arm. She told me that my age was incorrect. I gave her my correct age and my arm didn’t go down as far. Okay so I’ve seen this before with the Iridologist…it’s applied kinesiology.

She gave me a bottle from the shelf and asked me to hold it across my chest. She pressed on my arm and it fell down low and she commented on that I didn’t need it. We did the same thing with my liquid B complex and my arm stayed up high when she pushed on it.

Interesting but was it realistic? Who doesn’t need B complex?

November 1, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 14, 2006

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With my recent time off on parental leave, I’m finding myself in a lot of new places and whenever I see a health food store, I’m always curious to find if they have something new that I’ve never seen before that can help me.

This store will offer a nutritional analysis but it doesn’t say how. I don’t bother asking anything about it as my first thought is a hair analysis and we know how good that works…

I’ve been taking Glucosamine now for one week. The results? No difference whatsoever.

October 21, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 03, 2006

I’ve recently joined a magnesium support group at yahoo groups. I’m just watching what people are saying before I join in. Someone posted that they were having trouble boosting their magnesium levels and I found this in the reply:

Here we are a support and information giving group. A few questions first- how are your potassium levels, copper and Boron and B2 and B6 levels? If any of these are low you will not hold onto the magnesium no matter what you do.

Isn’t that interesting. I had read the opposite about potassium. Now I don’t know what to think. I’ve been taking my B2 and B6 for months now and I already know my B2 is low. Who knows about potassium, copper and boron??

September 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 17, 2006

Very mild vibration last night and again this morning. I had assumed this would happen but today I’m going to avoid calcium and dairy products.

Took my magnesium with potassium, B6 and vitamin C.

August 17, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2006

Exposing Multivitamin Dangers and Deficiencies
By Gailon Totheroh
CBN News Health & Science Reporter

CBN.com – Even if you are eating the recommended number of daily fruits and vegetables, you still arent receiving all the nutrients you need. And government research says those multivitamins don’t begin to cover the gap. CBN News decided to take a deeper look at what science is saying about vitamins you should be taking.

In an article published in June 2002, the American Medical Association reversed their 20-year stance against multivitamins. Just buy a cheap one, the AMA essentially said, that is all you need. But will the popular dime-a-day multis really help consumers attain optimum health?

Nutrition-oriented physician and neuroscientist Russell Blaylock says the answer to that question is “no,” because the vitamin world is a wasteland. “For instance, we’ve found a lot of youthfulness in vitamin D. A lot of these multivitamins don’t even have vitamin D. If they have it, they have it in very low concentrations,” he said.

On top of that, Janie Johnson, general manager of a vitamin store chain, says the media from magazines to TV ads have left consumers confused. “And they’re steered in all different ways and they really don’t know what to take,” she said.

To help consumers identify optimum multis, CBN News employed a set of vitamin standards obtained from scientific research. We used a total of 25 guidelines. At 4 points for each guideline, a perfect score would be 100. Of 55 multivitamins evaluated, only 10 scored a 40 or above. All of the nationally advertised major brands scored a 12 or lower.

Certainly, there is plenty of controversy about what is best in vitamins. For instance, a recent CBN News story on vitamins spoke of having the minerals calcium and magnesium in about equal amounts. But many nutritionists favor double the calcium over magnesium.

In the debate over calcium and magnesium, researchers had largely based their recommendations on the fact that bone has a ratio of 2 parts calcium to 1 part magnesium. However, newer research shows most people have a significant dietary intake of calcium and can experience excess calcium calcifying the blood stream. That can induce circulatory problems.

Also, magnesium is now found to be crucial to muscle function, protection against MSG and related toxins, and 300 chemical reactions in the body.

The bottom line is that individuals may need medical guidance in deciding their optimum intakes of calcium and magnesium.

Other viewers of our previous story were curious about the issue of riboflavin and ultraviolet light.

Our sources recommend no more than 10 milligrams of vitamin B2, or riboflavin. A French study found that excess riboflavin “in the organs and tissues that are permeable to light, such as the eye or skin” could damage cell components “causing inflammation and accelerating aging.” So it is important not to take too much riboflavin.

While 10 milligrams is still several times the government’s recommendation, some multis should be avoided since they contain daily portions of 50 or more milligrams.

Blaylock says some afflictions may require higher doses of B2. Those diseases include Alzheimer’s and the nerve damage that often afflicts diabetics. “Outside of that restricted use, I don’t think that the general public should take more than 10 milligrams of riboflavin,” he said.

And even the most popular individual supplement vitamin C needs supplementation.

Research shows vitamin C works best when matched with bioflavonoids, at a quantity of 70 percent of the vitamin. In other words, 500 milligrams of C should be accompanied by 350 milligrams of bioflavonoids.

Bioflavonoids include the rind of citrus fruit and the popular quercetin derived from apples and red onions.

Yet with all the new research about the right nutrients for staving off disease, Johnson says consumers still seek out multivitamins mostly when they are sick.

She said, “They’re not doing it for the prevention, they’re doing it because of an issue. And they want to feel good, and they don’t want to be fatigued. So, they really kind of need to do the research on their own.”

Blaylock says that assessment is right, that consumers need to do their homework, and do it based on good science and good sense. “You need to have a vitamin that has all its different components in the right concentrations and the right balances, complete, with no iron,” he said

August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 10, 2006

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I can never understand the standarization for nutritional facts on food. Some packages have a lot of information, some contain very little. Some contain the standard information, but leave out some important ones.

I’ll use the small 500 ml Dairyland 2% Milk as an example from Shoppers Drug Mart.

On the package it reads like this:

Vitamin A————–10%
Vitamin C—————0%
Calcium—————–80%
Iron———————0%
Vitamin D—————45%

On their web site…is a completely different story:

Q: What other nutrients are in Dairyland milk?

A: In addition to calcium and vitamin D, each glass of Dairyland milk provides vitamin B12, vitamin B6, vitamin A, niacin, riboflavin, phosphorus, zinc, and magnesium. This is what we call real food!

Q: Are phosphorus and magnesium important minerals for good health?

A: Milk and milk products contain several vitamins and minerals that are important for maintaining good health. Phosphorus is required for making energy in our cells and for strengthening our bones. Magnesium is also involved in making energy for our cells, but additionally, it is important for controlling calcium blood levels and muscle contractions. 250ml of Dairyland 2% milk provides 22% of our daily requirement of phosphorus and 14% of our daily requirements for magnesium.

Q: Why do I need Potassium?

A: Potassium is required for muscle activity and contractions. It is also involved in our maintaining our body\’s fluid balance. If we don\’t have enough potassium our blood pressure can rise. Dairyland milk and Dairyland yogurts are good sources of this important nutrient.

Q: Why do I need Riboflavin?

A: Riboflavin is required by our bodies for producing energy in our cells and keeping tissues like our skin, eyes, and nervous system healthy. Like calcium, riboflavin is difficult to get in large quantities in our foods. Dairyland milk and milk products are important sources of riboflavin in our diet. 250ml of 2% milk contains 25% of our daily requirements for riboflavin.

Q: Why do I need Zinc?

A: One glass of Dairyland milk provides about 11% of our recommended daily intake of zinc. Zinc helps our bodies build protein and it is involved in the immune response.

For some reason, the “powers that be” feel it’s more important to display ZERO PERCENT for vitamin C and Iron. But fails to tell the consumer that it also contains some very important vitamins and minerals:

250ml of Dairyland 2% milk contains 25% of our daily requirements for riboflavin.
250ml of Dairyland 2% milk provides 22% of our daily requirement of phosphorus.
250ml of Dairyland 2% milk provides 14% of our daily requirements for magnesium.
250ml of Dairyland 2% milk provides 11% of our daily requirements for zinc.

And although they mention that vitamin B6, B12, B3 (Niacin) and potassium are added, they don’t say how much.

August 10, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 31, 2006

One of the best things that the naturopath did was the urine test that told me that I had a very high level of free radicals in my system. At the time I had no idea what they were and based on my symptoms and diet, she suggested the Candida diet and told me to drink 8-10 glasses of water a day. Maybe she thought I could reduce the free radicals naturally by drinking lots of water however, I can’t find that suggestion anywhere on the internet.

Here’s what I found about free radicals and anti-oxidants. I didn’t think to do any research at the time. Maybe I would’ve learned the importance of taking vitamins a lot sooner.

ANTIOXIDANTS AND FREE RADICALS

Free radicals are highly reactive compounds that are created in the body during normal metabolic functions or introduced from the environment. Free radicals are inherently unstable, since they contain extra energy. To reduce their energy load, free radicals react with certain chemicals in the body, and in the process, interfere with the cells ability to function normally. In fact, free radicals are believed to play a role in more than sixty different health conditions, including the aging process, cancer, and atherosclerosis. Reducing exposure to free radicals and increasing intake of antioxidant nutrients has the potential to reduce the risk of free radical-related health problems.

Oxygen, although essential to life, is the source of the potentially damaging free radicals. Free radicals are also found in the environment. Environmental sources of free radicals include exposure to ionizing radiation (from industry, sun exposure, cosmic rays, and medical X-rays), ozone and nitrous oxide (primarily from automobile exhaust), heavy metals (such as mercury, cadmium, and lead), cigarette smoke (both active and passive), alcohol, unsaturated fat, and other chemicals and compounds from food, water, and air.

Antioxidants work in several ways: they may reduce the energy of the free radical, stop the free radical from forming in the first place, or interrupt an oxidizing chain reaction to minimize the damage caused by free radicals.

The body produces several enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, that neutralize many types of free radicals. Supplements of these enzymes are available for oral administration. However, their absorption is probably minimal at best. Supplementing with the “building blocks” the body requires to make SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase may be more effective. These building block nutrients include the minerals manganese, zinc, and copper for SOD and selenium for glutathione peroxidase.

In addition to enzymes, many vitamins and minerals act as antioxidants in their own right, such as vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, vitamin B2, coenzyme Q10, and cysteine (an amino acid). Herbs, such as bilberry, turmeric (curcumin), grape seed or pine bark extracts, and ginkgo can also provide powerful antioxidant protection for the body.

Consuming a wide variety of antioxidant enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and herbs may be the best way to provide the body with the most complete protection against free radical damage.

August 1, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 23, 2006

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With my advanced knowledge of deficiencies from months of research, all of the symptoms of electromagnetic sensitivity appear to be vitamin/mineral deficiencies and that’s exactly what Kevin Trudeau was saying in his book:

“No matter what disease or illness you have , one of, or a combination of, these four things cause it:

  1. Toxins in your body
  2. Nutritional deficiencies
  3. Exposure to electromagnetic chaos
  4. Mental and/or emotional stress

This is the same book that I started reading in the Naturopath’s office on my first visit. Now I’m wondering if she even read the book at all? I told her about the EMF exposure and how I thought it created a niacin deficiency. She agreed at the time but I think she should’ve reviewed the symptoms again and done some research on the types of vitamins and minerals I needed. She never offered anything more. Instead we chased candidiasis, did a hair analysis that told us nothing that helped my symptoms, and did a very expensive hormone test that came up normal.

On my first appointment she suggested drinking 8 – 10  glasses of water a day and gave me water soluable B vitamins. A recipe for disaster…

That was back on August 4, 2005. As of today, (One week shy of one year) I still have the exact same symptom that I went to see her for: An internal vibration.

Exposure to electricmagnetic chaos can create a nutritional deficiency and it’s not hard to figure out why. If the absorption of vitamin and minerals are effected by electromagnetic exposure, then it’s easy to see that the first signs would be water soluble vitamin deficiencies. And it will be a different set of symptoms for each person because whatever vitamin you happen to be low in, is the one that will show up first. If I was deficient in vitamin C, could I have developed Scurvy? If I was low in Niacin could I have developed Pellegra?

Water-soluble Vitamins

The water-soluble vitamins include vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12 and Vitamin C, as well as Biotin (B7) and Folic acid (B9). The water-soluble vitamins are not normally stored in the body in any significant amounts. Therefore, they must be consumed in constant daily amounts to avoid depletion and interference with normal metabloic functioning.

I will always give the Naturopath credit for giving me acidophilus and the B vitamins but that was only the start. Everything I have done has provided me with a very small piece of the puzzle and it was up to the patient to piece it all together. Health care shouldn’t have to be like this.

I’ve made mistakes and done some crazy things but sometimes you need to try different things and make those mistakes. In every example of self discovery, it has lead me in another totally different direction and in some cases: Success. If not success, then it gave me something to think about that eventually lead to something else. I’m not a doctor or a scientist or even a self proclaimed health professional. I’m a normal person who is not getting anywhere with the existing health care system so I forced to do my own research and reach my own conclusions.

I love hearing about how so many people in Ontario don’t have a family doctor. What I would like to know is how many of those people don’t have a doctor by choice.

How many more people are like me doing there own research? How many people don’t have time for doing their own research? How many people have blind faith in the health care system as I once did?

A friend at work summed it up like this: It’s like I’m walking down a very long corridor with a closed door every few feet. Every attempt at solving my symptoms allows me to try opening a door. Sometimes it’s locked and sometimes it opens leading to another corridor and another set of doors. For the past few months, I’ve opened so many doors and now I feel so close to that last door.

And I will open that last door…

July 23, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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