Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 22, 2007

No vibration this morning.

Today I’ll split things up a little differently. Here’s today’s dosage:

300 mg Calcium/Magnesium 3x
50 mg Zinc 2x
250 mg Inositol 3x
250 mg Choline 3x
100 mg Phosphorus 2x
Caprylic Acid 3x

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August 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 20, 2007

Today I decided to take a break from the vitamins and minerals just to see what would happen. My eyes are still itchy so maybe I’m taking too much of something. Possibly the phosphorus?

I got to around mid-morning and I could feel the mild nerve feeling in my head. I’m still low in something but I have no idea what it could be. I figure it could be the chromium so I take one capsule with my lunch. I also took 1 50 mg of zinc and left it at that. By mid afternoon, the nerve feeling returned so I took a calcium/magnesium and it never returned.

By the evening my eyes are feeling much better so I take another zinc and another calcium/magnesium with my dinner. I also wanted to try something different.

With the addition of the calcium/magnesium in the 2/1 ratio, my candida has mildly improved. It’s nothing significant, it just feels a little better than usual since I made the change. So tonight I thought I’d add some caprylic acid and a grapefruit seed extract. Two things known for candida and I’ve tried them both before without any success.

About an hour after dinner…I notice a difference. I think it’s working this time. I’ll add these two to my supplements tomorrow.

August 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2007

For the past couple of days I’ve had water itchy eyes and although I thought it was because of something I was taking, I now think it’s something that I need…

I’ve cut down on my vitamins and yesterday I only took calcium/magnesium. This morning I still had the problem so I took calcium/magnesium again but I also took B complex which I stopped taking on a regular basis a while back.

That seemed to do the trick so are we back to B vitamins again?

The calcium/magnesium does seem to have an effect on the vibration but yesterday morning I didn’t take my morning dosage and the cold hands returned around noon time which was a bit disappointing…

August 16, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2007

I always wonder if I would’ve been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or something else if I didn’t dive into the vitamins/minerals and take my own initiative to figure out what was going on?

Symptom Summary:

  1. High level of aluminum
  2. Zinc Deficiency / Magnesium loss
  3. DHA Deficiency
  4. Shrinkage of the Brain? (Osteopath)

Four very real symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and I had them all. I totally believe they are all related to magnesium deficiency.

August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2007

One more thing about Alzheimer’s that bothers me is a person’s level of DHA. A magnesium deficiency can cause low levels of DHA.

Higher DHA Levels Associated With Reduced Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Results from a new study conducted at Tufts University suggest that having increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels in the blood and eating about three fish meals each week are associated with a significant 48 percent reduction in the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in elderly men and women.

The brain is composed mostly of fat, in particular, the Omega 3 fatty acid Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia have shown very low concentrations of DHA in the brain indicating a possible DHA deficiency.

And the link to magnesium?

Magnesium has a multitude of different uses in the and is an essential cofactor of the enzyme delta 6 desaturase which converts vegatable derived omega 3 fatty acids to the brain critical omega 3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) which is essential for the rapid release of dopamine. Thus if magnesium levels are low, DHA deficiency is very likely to exist.

August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2007

Another thing about Alzheimer’s disease is you always hear about the high levels of aluminum in Alzheimer patients but scientists don’t know why. I think it’s simple. Low level of zinc causes magnesium loss which causes the rising level of aluminum. 

This is from the Alzheimer’s Society website:

Aluminum

At the present time Aluminum is one of several factors scientists are investigating in the search for a cause of Alzheimer’s disease. The role of aluminum in the body and the brain is not well understood. Scientists disagree as to whether or not there is a connection between aluminum and Alzheimer’s disease.

And here is an article regarding magnesium’s role with aluminum.

The Aluminum – Magnesium Link

Research have suggested that aluminum may be more likely to accumulate in the brains of persons whose diets are magnesium-deficient — which, unfortunately, includes 90% of Americans! Several studies have shown that animals fed diets low in magnesium accumulate high concentrations of aluminum in the Central Nervous System. One of magnesium’s many functions is to activate the enzyme tubulin involved in the maintenance of nerve tissue cells. It has been suggested that when there is not enough Magnesium in the body to plug into the appropriate receptor site on the tubulin enzyme, aluminum takes its place instead. This leads to the inactivation of tubulin and, consequently, inadequate nerve function. Malic acid can pull aluminum away from this enzyme, making a place for magnesium. This may be a protection against Alzheimer’s disease.

Malic Acid is found abundantly in fruits such as apples. Malic Acid is also produced in the human body. It is a metabolite of the Krebs cycle the set of biochemical reactions used to produce 90% of all energy in the cells of the body. Malic Acid readily crosses the Blood-Brain-Barrier and has been shown to bind to aluminum. It functions in the body by drawing aluminum away from the tubulin enzyme, so that Magnesium can plug into the receptor sites instead. Malic Acid’s unique ability to bind with aluminum means it can be flushed out of the body, preventing unwanted build-up.

Because a Magnesium-deficient diet may increase the amount of aluminum taken up and stored by the body, it is vitally important that we take in sufficient amounts.

August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 13, 2007

In the beginning when I discovered vitamin and mineral deficiencies I read so much about magnesium and getting to understand the role it plays within the body. One of the things I kept running into was about is how magnesium loss played a role in Alzheimer’s disease.

There are a number of different factors for magnesium loss but from a first hand account I know now that a zinc deficiency can cause magnesium loss. When I came across this article I was mildly amused because zinc plays a role in the sense of smell. Made me wonder if warts are linked with Alzheimer’s? If they’re not, they should be…

Alzheimer’s linked to poor sense of smell

Study finds those who do poorly on odour tests more likely to show mental decline over time

Jul 03, 2007 04:30 AM
Associated Press

CHICAGO–Difficulty identifying common smells such as lemon, banana and cinnamon may be the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study that could lead to scratch-and-sniff tests to determine a person’s risk for the progressive brain disorder.

Such tests could be important if scientists find ways to slow or stop Alzheimer’s and the memory loss associated with it. For now, there’s no cure for the more than 5 million Americans and estimated 300,000 Canadians over 65 with the disease.

Researchers have long known that microscopic lesions considered the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s first appear in a brain region important to the sense of smell. “Strictly on the basis of anatomy, yeah, this makes sense,” said Robert Franks, an expert on odour perception and the brain at the University of Cincinnati. Franks was not involved in the study, appearing in yesterday’s Archives of General Psychiatry.

Other studies have linked loss of smell to Alzheimer’s, Franks said, but this is the first one to measure healthy people’s olfactory powers and follow them for five years, testing for signs of mental decline.

In the study, 600 people between the ages of 54 and 100 were asked to identify a dozen familiar smells: onion, lemon, cinnamon, black pepper, chocolate, rose, banana, pineapple, soap, paint thinner, gasoline and smoke. For each mystery scent, they were given a choice of four answers. A quarter of the people correctly identified all the odours or missed only one. Half of them knew at least nine of the 12. The lowest-scoring quarter correctly identified eight or fewer of the odours.

The subjects took 21 cognitive tests annually over the next five years. Those who made at least four errors on the odour test were 50 per cent more likely to develop memory problems than people who made no more than one error. Difficulty identifying odours also was associated with a higher risk of progressing from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s.

August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 10, 2007

So today I switched to a calcium/magnesium supplement in a 2/1 ratio along with phosphorus and vitamin D. My usual daily cold hands was greatly reduced, in fact it was hardly there at all.

I also came across a mineral deficiency website that said cold hands were a sign of low calcium. First time I’ve come across that before…typical. Another web site suggested a calcium deficiency can result from a magnesium deficiency.

MINERALS OF SPECIAL IMPORTANCE

Calcium (Ca)

RDA 800 mg, recommended intake 0.6-1.2 g daily. Deficiency frequently due to overacidity, lack of vitamin D, magnesium or boron.

August 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | 2 Comments

Entry for August 10, 2007

Some information on the relationship between calcium and magnesium. Nutritionist Peter Gillham’s research on minerals warns that too much calcium may be deadly.

“Misconception drives consumers to consume excess amounts of calcium which can be deadly when taken without its partner, magnesium.”

About Peter Gillham:

Peter Gillham is a clinical nutritionist, chemist, and pioneer in the field of nutritional research. Recently nominated for Man of the Year award for his discoveries in the field of magnesium and developing a breakthrough product.

Los Angeles CA – March 19, 2003

The following is being issued by Peter Gillham. “There is a mindset today that people need a lot of calcium. This mindset is creating disease,” according to Peter Gillham, a clinical nutritionist, educator and pioneer in the field of nutritional research. “This misconception drives consumers to consume excess amounts of calcium which can be deadly when taken without its partner, magnesium.”

Taking all this calcium without sufficient magnesium is leaving it unactivated. This imbalance is the cause of much disease and health trauma. Calcium needs its partner “magnesium” to do its job and assimilate correctly. Some symptoms of a calcium-magnesium imbalance are: headaches, insomnia, anxiety, high blood pressure, fatigue, extreme tension, depression, nervousness and worst of all heart disease.

A study done at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, revealed that magnesium is crucial to balance the actions of calcium. And that magnesium widens the arteries in the heart essentially lowering blood pressure and maintaining healthy blood flow to the heart.

Some 20 million people take calcium supplements, which is big business. Marketers, taking advantage of consumer fears about osteoporosis, have flooded the market with hundreds of calcium-enriched products. This has created a dangerous imbalance and many people are paying for it with their health. People need equal amounts of magnesium in order to keep up with the calcium intake.

“Lack of calcium may not kill people, but lack of magnesium is in fact a leading cause of death in our nation,” according to Gillham. Why? “It is the underlying cause of heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure and many other diseases. Scores of people can’t tolerate high calcium supplements and react to it adversely.” Both minerals are extremely vital to life, however it is magnesium that makes calcium active, and regulates it. Taking magnesium, particularly in water soluble form restores the balance and causes health resurgence. “Mother nature always puts magnesium where ever calcium is found, marketers need to start doing the same,” said Gillham.

“Excess calcium can become a real problem,” said Gillham, who has spent decades researching nutrition. “America has the highest rate of consumption of milk and calcium supplements. So obviously, America must have the lowest occurrence of osteoporosis (calcium loss) of all countries, right? Wrong! America has the highest rate! Why? Excess calcium combined with low magnesium. Taking more calcium will not fix a calcium deficiency. However, more magnesium will handle the calcium deficiency as well as the magnesium deficiency.”

The population in general is running at an all time high on nervousness and irritability. Aside from obvious political situations, there is an underlying nutritional imbalance, which aggravates this. Magnesium is also known as “Natures Tranquilizer”, it also provides a “refreshed” feeling due to completing metabolic processes. Magnesium can often be difficult to find and absorb properly. This is what led to the discovery of the product, “Natural Calm” from Natural Vitality, available at health food and vitamin stores. A formula which Gillham was the first to discover and has received humanitarian awards for.

“There is only one way to get a magnesium supplement to absorb properly into the body. I developed a formula with superior absorption and discovered the only method of doing this. We have been amazed at the results. The world needs more ‘Calm’, that is for sure”.

August 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | 2 Comments

Entry for August 10, 2007

A couple of google searches and I think I found my answer… Here is one person’s story and it’s exactly what I am looking for. A different scenario but with the same problem.

CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM

Calcium and magnesium are extremely important minerals that are often out of balance in persons with thyroid disease. Imbalances of these minerals can result in very rapid heart rate, low heart rate, and irregular heart rate. Thyroid function itself is most likely controlled by the ratio of these minerals.

Most people with thyroid disease find that they have to supplement calcium and magnesium. Supplementing these minerals in the correct ratio can make a huge improvement in the symptoms. However, supplementing them in the wrong ratio can make symptoms worse. To further complicate the situation, the correct ratio of cal/mag changes as you recover from thyroid disease.

I have struggled a very long time with finding the right cal/mag ratio for myself. Well after recovering from hyperthyroidism, swinging back hypo, and then getting normal again, I had many months of fast, irregular heart rate that was often initiated by strenuous exercise. Because magnesium had been an important factor in reducing my heart rate when I was hyper, I would take a cal/mag supplement in a 1:1 ratio or take 400-800 mgs of magnesium only to correct this problem. Usually I would have this irregular heart rate throughout the night but would be recovered by morning.

I experimented with potassium and found that taking 800-1200 mgs of potassium before my night time basketball often prevented the irregular heart rate and began thinking that I was potassium deficient. One time I grabbed an unlabeled baggie that I thought was potassium and took 6 capsules before playing. I had extreme irregular heart rate that lasted all night. I later discovered that I had mistakenly taken magnesium.

This was very strange to me because magnesium had been my savior for such a long time. Whenever I had high heart rate when I was hyper, magnesium would slow my heart, usually within 20-30 minutes. So I was wondering, “Why doesn’t it work now?” I began to think that the manufacturer had made a mistake and there was a problem with the product.

Eventually the answer came in a sudden insight. I was lying awake at night with my heart beating very irregular and fast. Paying close attention to my heart, I realized that my heart was not just irregular and fast, it was beating very weakly. I noted that this was in stark contrast to the time when I was hyper. Then my heart was beating fast and irregular, but very strong.

The insight was that it was the strength of my heart beat and not the speed and irregularity that was the key. I thought back on how calcium is the mineral that is responsible for the heart contracting and magnesium is responsible for the heart relaxing.

During hyperthyroidism, magnesium is low and calcium is high. This imbalance is the result of other mineral imbalances (copper, zinc, iron, etc.), but the effects on the heart rate are direct effects of a calcium/magnesium imbalance. This can be demonstrated by taking a magnesium supplement or a cal/mag supplement with much higher magnesium than the usual 2:1 cal/mag ratio when your heart rate is high. This intake of more magnesium will slow the heart rate temporarily. However, as we have seen, the body can’t maintain normal magnesium levels in the blood if copper is low. So until copper is replenished, extra magnesium is needed on a constant basis to control the rapid heart rate.

The key to understanding the effects of calcium and magnesium on the heart is this: Calcium is needed for muscles to contract and magnesium is needed for muscles to relax. The heart muscles are like all muscles. Calcium causes heart contraction; magnesium causes heart relaxation.

If magnesium is low, as during hyperthyroidism, and calcium is adequate, the heart contracts normally but the relaxation phase is shortened and incomplete. If the normal heart contracts for .5 seconds and relaxes for .5 seconds, we have a 1.0 second cycle which translates into a 60 beats per minute heart rate. If magnesium is low and the relaxation phase is shortened to .25 seconds, then the complete cycle is .75 seconds, which translates to a 80 beats per minute heart rate (60 seconds divided by .75 seconds). As you can see, as magnesium gets more depleted, the relaxation phase shortens and the heart rate increases.

When I was experiencing the irregular heart rate, what was happening was that it was calcium that was low and not magnesium. When calcium is low, the contraction phase is shortened while the relaxation phase remains normal. If the contraction phase shortens to .25 seconds and the relaxation phase stays at .5 seconds, the heart rate also increases to 80 beats per minute. If you just looked at the increase in rate, you might, as I did, think that magnesium was deficient.

The key to the insight that it was calcium that was deficient was the observation that the heart rate was weak. A weak heart rate means that calcium is deficient and the contraction phase is weak and short. This results in an increase in heart rate and also an irregular heart rate because some contractions are missed entirely. Contrast this to a magnesium deficiency where the heart rate is irregular because some of the relaxations are missed.

Once I reached this insight, it all became so simple. I was amazed that I had continued to make the same mistake over and over again. The key mental block for me was that I thought that magnesium always slowed and regulated the heart rate. Once I thought through the whole process of how calcium and magnesium affect the heart, I realized that a calcium deficiency can also lead to a fast and irregular heart rate.

With this new insight, I switched my cal/mag ratio to 2:1. I had been mixing a 1:1 ratio supplement with a 2:1 supplement which resulted in a ratio of about 3:2. However with the addition of extra magnesium or extra 1:1 cal/mag after basketball, I probably had about a 1:1 overall ratio.

Once I switched to a 2:1 ratio, the heart irregularity completely disappeared and hasn’t occurred in months. I found that the cal/mag ratio is the key. However along the way to this discovery I ran across some other interesting information.

As I was struggling through this irregular heart rate problem, I found that two things often helped the situation: potassium and vitamin B-5. Potassium often helped and I think the reason for this is that potassium and magnesium are antagonistic minerals. Since I was essentially suffering from too much magnesium (or too little calcium), the potassium helped because it reduced the metabolic effect of the magnesium (or assisted the metabolism of calcium). I think this is important, particularly for persons with hypothyroidism, because they need a higher calcium to magnesium ratio. A potassium deficiency could prevent the cells from getting enough calcium which is an activator in the cellular response to thyroid hormone.

The other discovery was that vitamin B-5 is important in preventing irregular heart rate. If B-5 gets deficient, it seems to have an effect on the calcium/magnesium metabolism so that calcium doesn’t work as well. A B-5 deficiency has similar effects to a calcium deficiency. I don’t know why this happens, but I now realize that it’s important when supplementing B complex vitamins to always make sure that you are taking as much B-5 as any of the other B vitamins. For example, if you are supplementing with high amounts of niacin (for headaches or other reasons), be aware that you will need to increase B-5 to the same amount or a little greater to prevent a disturbance of the cal/mag ratio which could result in irregular heart rate.

One other discovery in all this was that by not taking enough calcium and taking too much magnesium, another of my teeth died. I developed an extreme tooth ache which led to another root canal. For dental and bone health, don’t maintain a high magnesium/calcium ratio past the point where you need it.

Remember that balancing calcium and magnesium won’t correct thyroid problems. You’ll need to correct the other minerals like copper, zinc, iron, selenium, chromium, manganese, etc. to achieve this. Calcium and magnesium get out of balance because of these other nutritional problems. However, getting your calcium/magnesium balance corrected is essential for normalizing heart rate, preventing dental decay and osteoporosis, and preventing muscle cramps (too little magnesium).

In summary, to balance calcium and magnesium keep these points in mind: a normal person need a cal/mag ratio of about 2:1; a hyper needs more magnesium and a hypo needs more calcium, but these ratios need to be constantly adjusted as you approach normality; irregular heart rate can be a sign of either too little calcium or too little magnesium; the key to knowing whether you need calcium or magnesium is the strength of the heart beat, not the speed or the irregularity–if it’s too strong, take more magnesium and if it’s too weak, take more calcium.

August 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Entry for August 09, 2007

Same minerals as yesterday except that I took an extra magnesium and after the first dosage, it’s not working. I have cold hands all morning and throughout the day and skip the nighttime dosage. I really need to do more research…

I’m really interested in calcium because it’s something I’ve avoided for so long.

1) Magnesium deficiency
2) Because it always made the vibration worse.

It’s time to take a closer look because I’ve fixed the magnesium loss and nothing else seems to really work and I know there is a link between calcium, nerves and the symptom of nervousness. I can stop the vibraton but I can never get rid of it.

Experimental studies show that magnesium deficiency also induces calcium deficiency despite a high intake of calcium and vitamin D. Even intravenous administration of calcium did not improve the induced calcium deficiency until magnesium was supplied as well.

If I do have a calcium deficiency, how or why did taking it make my symptoms worse? I still have a calcium/magnesium/phosphorus supplement so I’ll add vitamin D and try that tomorrow.

I’ve also been reading about Colloidal Minerals lately and I still have my bottle from the first time I tried so I’d like to start that again.

August 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 08, 2007

Second day with my new minerals but this time, it didn’t go so well… Throughout the day I have a very mild pain in my chest and it’s a pain I’m very familiar with: Low magnesium. How is this possible when I’m taking calcium/magnesium in a 1/1 ratio and it’s from the same company called NuLife that had the best magnesium.

I ended up taking the homeopathic magnesium a couple of times today but I’m not really sure what happened because yesterday I was getting results.

Maybe I’ll try the same thing tomorrow except I’ll add more magnesium.

I had an idea today to contact the iridologist from last year to see if she will send me the pictures of my iris. I’d love to see what it looked like back then because I think I’ve improved so much. Couldn’t hurt to try…

August 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for August 08, 2007

Woke up this morning with a slight vibration but I’m very happy with the new found results and I think it’s from the extra calcium/magnesium. Because of the vibration, I’m going to add niacin back into the rotation. 100 mg dosage, three times a day and I’m also going to reduce the amount of phosphorus by half.

Daily Supplement Summary:

900 mg Calcium/Magnesium (300 mg 1/1 ratio)
300 mg Niacin (100 mg)
300 mg Phosphorus (100 mg)
600 mg Vitamin D (200 mg)
90 mg Zinc (30 mg)
25 mg Manganese

August 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

When I first discovered my magnesium deficiency, I thought all I needed to do was take magnesium and fix the problem. It wasn’t until later that I discovered how important a mineral balance can be. At the time, I never really thought to do any research on calcium because it was in the opposite direction. I find it really interesting reading about it now.

Zinc, along with calcium and magnesium, are called the sedative elements. All three help inhibit excessive sympathetic nervous system dominance.

More info on calcium:

The Calcium and Magnesium Relationship

In addition to all of its enzyme functions, magnesium is an important component of cell membranes. As a result, it is vitally important in regulating what goes into, and what comes out of, all the body’s cells. This makes magnesium crucial to mineral balance.

In simple solutions, such as salt water, all dissolved minerals are evenly dispersed. This is not so in living cells, where they’re distributed differently, depending on their functions. This specialized distribution requires energy, and it’s absolutely vital to life processes and health.

Calcium and sodium ions, for the most part, are kept outside the cells, while magnesium and potassium are kept inside the cells. These four minerals are the most plentiful in the body, and collectively they are known as electrolytes.

When the level of magnesium within the cells falls below normal, calcium and sodium rush inside, while potassium and magnesium leak out. This can cause big problems.

Calcium excites nerves, whereas magnesium calms them down.

The normal concentration of magnesium ion inside cells is easily 10,000 times more than that of intracellular calcium ions – under healthy conditions. But if the amount of magnesium in a cell falls, for any reason, calcium ions flow into the cell. With this abnormal situation, a couple of things happen:

Higher than normal calcium inside a cell excites a lot of reactions. It puts the cell into hyperactive state. Heart and blood-vessel cells are especially excitable because they need to react rapidly during sudden stress situation. As such, they are truly vulnerable to deficits in magnesium that allow abnormal rises in calcium, with resulting hyperactivity.

Sometimes, a hyperactive state is just what you want. It is the essence of the body’s “fight-or-flight” reaction to danger. Without calcium, there is no muscle contraction, and without muscle contraction there is no fight or flight.

But in normal circumstances, you don’t want excess muscle contractions. The muscles would soon cramp, bringing on severe muscle pain. To relax, the muscles need magnesium. Magnesium, physiologically the opposite of calcium, relaxes muscles. Under normal, healthy cellular conditions, magnesium levels inside muscle cells are high and calcium levels are low, so that the muscles can relax. This is just one way in which calcium enhances and allows the fight-or-flight reaction while magnesium calms it all down.

If calcium levels inside a cell get especially high because of low magnesium, the cell physically changes. High calcium tends to make things stiff and hard. But if soft tissue begins to get hard, it’s a real problem — it’s called “calcification”. In artery and heart cells, the stiffness caused by calcification hampers proper function and can be an important aspect of heart disease.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 07, 2007

Today I’m back at work so my routine is a bit more stable. I’ve decided to take three doses of 300mg calcium/magnesium in the 1/1 ratio along with the phosphorus and vitamin D. No reason for the change just want to keep trying something different until I find something that works.

I also changed the zinc dosage from two doses of 50 mg to three doses of 30 mg. I didn’t take any niacin today as I’m still not convinced that it’s the cause of the vibration although I didn’t have any all weekend.

By the end of the work day the eyes aren’t as itchy and the stuffiness in my nose feels better than usual. I’ll keep doing this combination of minerals for sure!

The million dollar question….Will it have any effect on the vibration?

I’ve always been very confused as to why taking extra calcium would make the vibration stronger and today I still don’t have an answer. I’m wondering if the magnesium deficiency caused a high calcium ratio? What are the effects of low magnesium and the effect on calcium?

Calcium

Elevated calcium levels are associated with arthritic / joint and vascular degeneration, calcification of soft tissue, hypertension and stroke, an increase in VLDL triglycerides, gastrointestinal disturbances, mood and depressive disorders, chronic fatigue, increased alkalinity, and general mineral imbalances.

If magnesium is insufficient potassium and calcium will be lost in the urine and calcium will be deposited in the soft tissues (kidneys, arteries, joints, brain, etc.).

Calcium Synergists

Copper is required to fix calcium in the bones and helps raise the tissue calcium level. Many people have biologically unavailable copper which causes their calcium problems. In fast oxidizers, copper deficiency contributes to a calcium deficiency. Adequate adrenal hormone levels are also essential for proper calcium metabolism.

Calcium Antagonists

Sugar upsets the calcium/phosphorus ratio in the blood more than any other single factor, according to researcher Dr. Melvin Page. It also stresses the adrenal glands and upsets the hormone balance which affects calcium metabolism.

Copper Bio-Unavailability A Major Cause of Candida Infection

The most commonly observed mineral imbalance we find in many patients with Candida infection is termed bio-unavailable copper. Bio-unavailable copper is indicated on a tissue mineral test. Other mineral indicators of a candida overgrowth are an elevated calcium level, elevated calcium/magnesium ratio, or a low sodium/potassium ratio.

August 7, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 01, 2007

All this week I’ve had the cold hands around lunch time and nothing seems to fix it. It doesn’t seem to matter what I take or what I eat, it always happens around lunch and it doesn’t return. Sometimes I skip my evening vitamins just to see what happens…nothing!

I go back to researching phosphorus again and I’ve been into a few health food stores lately looking for phosphorus and everyone seems to think it’s weird that I am asking for such a thing. I came across some info with a theory as to what can cause a phosphorus deficiency and it makes perfect sence to me.

DEFICIENCY

Fructose: A recent study of 11 adult men found that a diet high in fructose (20% of total calories) resulted in increased urinary loss of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance (i.e., daily loss of phosphorus was higher than daily intake). This effect was more pronounced if the diet was also low in magnesium. A potential mechanism for this effect is the lack of feed back inhibition of the conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate in the liver. In other words, increased accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate in the cell does not inhibit the enzyme that phosphorylates fructose, using up large amounts of phosphate. This phenomenon is known as phosphate trapping. This finding is relevant because fructose consumption in the U.S. has been increasing rapidly since the introduction of high fructose corn syrup in 1970, while magnesium intake has decreased over the past century.

I did manage to find a web site that sells liquid phosphorus but I’ll wait a bit longer before I do something like that.

In my phosphorus reserach, I come across a bit of information that suggests that phosphorus plays a role with glucose. Could this be why chromium has an effect?

Not getting enough phosphorus can contribute to the following health problems: anxiety, bone problems, fatigue, irregular breathing, irritability, numbness, skin sensitivity, stress, teeth weakness, tremors, weakness, worry, and weight changes. You can also get malaise, stiff joints, and bone pain. It may also cause glucose intolerance, irregular heartbeat and difficulty breathing. Phosphorus deficiency results in bone loss just as calcium deficiency does. Phosphorus toxicity can result in twitching, jerking, and convulsions.

A diet consisting of junk food can have too much phosphorus and this effects the body’s processing of calcium. It has also been found that vitamin D boosts the effectiveness of phosphorus. Magnesium helps in the absorption of phosphorus. Phosphorus speeds up healing, helps to prevent and treat osteoporosis, helps treat bone diseases such as rickets and prevents stunted or slow growth in children.

Phosphorus is needed for healthy nerve impulses, normal kidney functioning, and the utilization of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and for energy production. Phosphorus is a component of DNA and RNA and serves in the preparation of glucose for energy formation.

With the link between riboflavin and niacin, I really need to see if I can find some phosphorus…

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 24, 2007

No vibration last night and again this morning. This chromium seems to be working great.

I started the day by adding magnesium back into the rotation with my regular dosage of zinc. Around noon I start to feel a muscle spasm in my upper left arm. I haven’t had muscle spasms in a while so because I’ve taken the magnesium, I figure it’s my level of calcium so I took one capsule of the Cal Apatite and it doesn’t happen again.

Until today, I’ve been taking only zinc and chromium to see what effect it has. I’m adding packham pears to the diet and I’m going to try to eat at least two every day for my natural dosage of chromium.

August 2, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 22, 2007

No vibration last night and none again this morning.

So was it the chromium or the pantothenic acid? Yesterday I felt really good all day and I think it was the chromium. I barely took any supplements and I had no cold hands for the entire day. I took half a magnesium and one chromium in the morning and pantothenic acid throughout the day. I also took molybdenum and a vitamin C but that’s it.

I’m going on vacation starting tomorrow and I’ll be making sure that I have all my vitamins and minerals with me…especially the chromium.

July 22, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 21, 2007

No vibration last night and none again this morning.

Chromium & Copper: These two elements are the most important nutrients next to calcium and magnesium for their anti-inflammatory properties. They share left / right-sided cell receptors and are considered essential to human health.

While neither one – with few exceptions – is generally found to be very deficient level-wise, chromium (Cr) is on average always lower than copper (Cu), with virtually no exceptions. Copper, on the other hand is elevated in the majority of patients, which creates a chronic copper / chromium conflict ratio-wise in these individuals.

In fact, of all the patients I have tested since the mid 70’s, nearly 90% exhibited a chemical profile that in addition to their own unique chemistry contained an underlying pattern that reflected the impact of high copper levels on various opposing nutrients, which include chromium, molybdenum, sulfur, nickel, Vitamin C, hesperidin, and others.

Although chromium appears to be normal on the following graph, it is very low in ratio to copper, it’s associated element, so when supplementing chromium, its level will generally not increase at first, but instead it will gradually lower copper, and in the example below, potassium, since they are high in ratio to chromium. Only after copper and potassium have been reduced to normal levels, chromium may at that point start to go up. However, since sufficient amounts of chromium are rarely used, in practice, copper and potassium just come down closer to normal, and chromium levels stay the same.

Magnesium levels frequently go up following long-term supplementation of chromium because of it’s synergism with chromium, and also because of potassium (which is a magnesium antagonist) going down, and thus not exerting an inhibiting effect on magnesium any longer.

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 20, 2007

Another weird day. Today I have a bunch of vitamins and minerals with me and I’ll take them as I need them. Because I’m having such a hard time trying to figure it which supplements are actually helping, I take one at a time to see if it has any effect.

Around lunchtime, I start getting the cold hands so I take the magnesium, then manganese and a few more but nothing seems to have an effect. I don’t start lunch until around 1:30 PM and my hands are still very cold and I’m not sure what to do? Nothing seems to work like it used to.

About 15 minutes into my lasagna my hands go warm. Huh? Okay, now I’m really confused…

On my way back to the office, I start to realize that for most of this week my cold hands disappear after lunch and I would skip the night time vitamins because I felt so good. But for every day this week, I’d take my daily routine of supplements with my lunch…except for today.

What does this mean? Having symptoms disappear after eating food. Isn’t that diabetes?

I do a quick google search and discover this:

Pantothenic Acid Deficiency

Excessive copper levels have been associated with low levels of pantothenic acid

Hypoglycemia

Functional hypoglycemia is frequently associated with elevated tissue copper levels. An excess of tissue copper reduces manganese and zinc, thereby interfering with normal glucose metabolism.

Well, there’s no doubt in my mind that high copper can reduce manganese and zinc. I do another search on hypoglycemia and start reading about the link with the mineral chromium. Destroyed by sugar intake the symptoms are anxiety, elevated blood triglycerides and peripheral neuropathy. I still remember a doctor at the walk in clinic making the comment about how high my triglycerides were but stopped short of telling me what I should do about it.

Chromium is already extremely hard to get within a healthy diet. Everybody must be low in chromium.

Great. Something new to research…

July 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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