Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 14, 2006

I start the day organizing the myelin sheath building vitamins. B1, B6, B12, folate, vitamin C, D, and E, Magnesium, Omega 3 and Lecithin.

Here’s what I find on magnesium absorption:

Best taken: At bedtime with calcium in the ratio of one or two parts calcium to one part magnesium. Most absorbable forms are magnesium orotate and amino-chelated magnesium. Magnesium gluconate and magnesium chloride are less effective but can be taken orally.

The process of digestion and absorption of magnesium is very similar to that of calcium. The suggested ratio of intake of these two vital nutrients is about 2:1, calcium to magnesium. Magnesium also requires an acidic stomach environment for best absorption, so taking it between meals or at bedtime is recommended. Meals high in protein or fat, a diet high in phosphorus or calcium (calcium and magnesium can compete), or alcohol use may decrease magnesium absorption.

Usually, about 40-50 percent of the magnesium we consume is absorbed, though this may vary from 25-75 percent depending on stomach acid levels, body needs, and dietary habits.

The levels of magnesium used by physicians are commonly in the range of 600-1,000 mg.; however, the researchers in the kidney stone studies used only 200-300 mg. of supplemental magnesium oxide. Calcium and magnesium are both alkaline minerals, so they are not taken with or after meals, as they can reduce stomach acid as well as being absorbed poorly when taken with food. They are absorbed better when taken between meals or on an empty stomach, especially with a little vitamin C as ascorbic acid.

Many calcium-magnesium combinations are formulated with hydrochloric acid and vitamin D to aid the mineral absorption. And taking them before bedtime may be very helpful in increasing utilization of both these important minerals and lead to a sleep-filled night.

The best forms of supplemental magnesium seem to be the ones chelated to an amino acid (magnesium glycinate, magnesium taurate) or a krebs cycle intermediate (magnesium malate, magnesium citrate, magnesium fumarate). These forms seem to be better utilized, absorbed, and assimilated. Try to stay away from inorganic forms of magnesium like magnesium chloride or magnesium carbonate because they may not be absorbed as well and may cause gastric disturbances.

The magnitude of increased absorption with true amino acid chelates is biologically profound. Comparing a magnesium amino acid chelate to magnesium oxide (a typical salt found in many supplements) the amino acid chelate had 9 times the absorption as the oxide. This study compared the use of the single mineral. If another inorganic mineral were given at the same time, such as calcium carbonate, the usual effect would be no reduction of the amino acid chelate, but a further 70-80% reduction of magnesium absorption from the oxide form. The net effect on absorption of chelated to inorganic magnesium, if two or more inorganic minerals are taken, can be 20-30 fold greater absorption or more of the amino acid chelate.

Magnesium-containing products are either used in treating a primary or secondary magnesium deficiency or are given for prophylaxis as food supplement. Various inorganic (oxides, chlorides, sulfates and carbonates) and organic (citrates, aspartates) magnesium compounds are available for oral administration.

A comparison of the magnesium content of food as stated in tables of nutritional values and the actual analytical values showed that food contains less magnesium than reported in the literature. This means that a deficiency may arise even when the calculated intake is sufficient. Also, food processing, such as polishing rice or cooking fresh vegetables, can lead to loss of magnesium. However, insufficient supply due to nutrition is only one of many causes of magnesium deficiency.

Those suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome also seem to do better with magnesium given by injection. This may be due to the superior absorption of injectable magnesium or because high concentrations in the body are necessary for maximal therapeutic effects.

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August 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 14, 2006

And this:

It is now known the cause for the destruction of the myelin in the lesions is overactivation of the microglia in the region of the myelin. An enzyme that converts glutamine to glutamate called glutaminase increases tremendously, thereby greatly increasing excitotoxicity. Mercury also activates microglia, even in subtoxic doses.
 
Any dietary excitotoxin can activate the microglia, thereby greatly aggravating the injury. This includes the aspartate in aspartame. The methanol adds to this toxicity as well. Now, the secret to treatment appears to be shutting down, or at least calming down, the microglia. It has been found that the antibiotic minocycline powerfully shuts down the microglia. I tried this treatment on a friend of mine who just came down with fulmanant MS. He was confined to a wheelchair. I had him placed on minocycline and now, just a few weeks later, he is walking.
 
The good news is that other things also calm the microglia-the most potent are: silymarin, curcumin and ibuprophen. Phosphatidylcholine helps re-myelinate the nerve sheaths that are damaged, as does B12, B6, B1, vitamin D, folate, vitamin C, natural vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) and L-carnitine. DHA plays a major role in repairing the myelin sheath. Vitamin D may even prevent MS, but it acts as an immune modulator, preventing further damage – the dose is 2000 IU a day. Magnesium, as magnesium malate, is needed in a dose of 500 mg 2X a day. They must avoid all excitotoxins, even natural ones in foods-such as soy, red meats, nuts, mushrooms and tomatoes. Avoid all fluoride and especially all vaccinations since these either inhibit antioxidant enzymes or triggers harmful immune reactions.

Phosphatidylcholine helps re-myelinate the nerve sheaths. What is this stuff and how can I get me some?

Phosphatidylcholine is a phospholipid that is a major constituent of cell membranes. Phosphatidylcholine is also known as 1, 2-diacyl-:ussn:ue-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PtdCho and lecithin.

So Phosphatidylcholine, is a fancy name for lecithin. Perfect! I already have some. Interestingly enough, three of the main supplements that are required for rebuilding the myelin sheath, the iridologist told me I didn’t need them:

Magnesium, Vitamin D and DHA from Omega 3.

More about Magnesium Malate:

Heavy Metal Toxicity

Magnesium malate may be one of the few compounds capable of pulling aluminum from the body over time.

And my hair analysis came up with high aluminum levels and this form of magnesium is recommened for building the myelin sheaths and removing aluminum from the body. The Naturopath didn’t mention this? She gave me a standard calcium/magnesium but I’m sure it wasn’t magnesium malate.

August 14, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

Lecithin

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system.

Besides being an important factor in controlling cholesterol levels and aiding coronary health, lecithin is involved in a myriad of body functions. Every cell of your body contains lecithin. Lecithin is responsible for maintaining the surface tension of the cell membrane. It therefore controls what goes in and out of each cell, allowing nutrients in, or wastes out. Without enough lecithin, the cell wall hardens, thus not allowing enough nutrients in or wastes out. This means premature aging of cells. The surface tension of the cell maintained by lecithin is also responsible for transmitting nerve impulses and messages through or from the cell.

Perhaps the most interesting new findings on lecithin concern its connection with the functioning of the brain and nervous system. A key factor in proper brain and nerve transmissions is the presence of cellular substance called acetylcholine.

Until as recently as six years ago, medical researchers were using choline chloride to help their patients who suffered from these insidious brain disorders to produce more acetylcholine in their bodies. However, in 1977, Dr. Richard Wurtinan and his colleagues at Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that lecithin (which contains phosphatidyl choline) increased serum choline levels more than three times as much as the previously used choline chloride and kept those levels raised more than three times as long. This meant that researchers had found a way to significantly raise acetylcholine levels in their patients since acetylcholine production in the brain was dependent on serum choline levels.

Dr. Wartman’s research further astounded the medical community by showing that choline was taken up directly by the brain and used almost at once to help the brain make acetylcholine. This meant that the amount of lecithin (phosphatidyl choline) furnished by each meal could have a direct and almost immediate effect on the efficiency of the brain. Researchers found this so surprising because it had long been believed that the so called blood/brain barrier shielded the brain from such direct influences by nutrients and substances that are excessive or lacking in the day-to-day diet. Only a few substances such as alcohol or powerful drugs were thought to be able to cross this barrier.

Additional Findings on Lecithin’s Interaction in the Body

Without sufficient lecithin, your body cannot utilize the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. By adding an adequate amount of lecithin to your diet, you could improve your digestion and utilization of these vitamins by 100% or more if your diet is now deficient in lecithin.

When a person exercises regularly to improve their muscle tone, the amount of lecithin contained in the muscles increases. This increase in muscle lecithin is in part responsible for the greater endurance of the muscle.

Cirrhosis of the liver is no longer a disease of the heavy drinker only. Being the body’s waster disposal plant, many toxic materials, like food additives, preservatives, insecticides, growth hormones, etc., all pass through the liver. Lecithin and good general nutrition readily reverses liver damage.

W.S. Hartroff, M.D., Ph.D., reported in the American Journal of Public Health that the lack of choline was found to head infants toward high blood pressure. Furthermore, it has been found that a choline deficiency induced tendency to high blood pressure can not be reversed. Interestingly enough, human milk contains lecithin while cow’s milk does not.

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for July 03, 2006

A while back I made the discovery about the link between B1 and the myelin sheaths that protect the nerves. Today, I discover what the myelin sheaths are made out of. Sounds exactly like the feelings on the top of my head…

Nervous System Support

Vitamin B1 also plays a key role in support of the nervous system, where it permits healthy development of the fat-like coverings which surround most nerves (called myelin sheaths). In the absence of vitamin B1, these coverings can degenerate or become damaged. Pain, prickly sensations, and nerve deadening are nerve-related symptoms that can result from vitamin B1 deficiency.

Approximately 30% of your brain is composed of lecithin. Of the insulating and protective sheaths that surround your brain, spine, and thousands of miles of nerves, lecithin accounts for two-thirds of their composition; and of all the muscles in your body, your heart – the hardest muscle to fatigue – has the highest lecithin content.

Prickly sensations? I’ll add lecithin to my daily vitamins…

July 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

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