Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for January 24, 2008

Today I thought I’d make a short list of the amino acids that had very low levels in the test so I can focus on these one at a time:

1-Threonine
2-Aspartic acid (Aspartate)
3-Methionine
4-Glycine
5-Asparagine (Made from 2-Aspartic acid)
6-Isoleucine

Below is a quick overview of each amino acid and the best source of food to eat.

Asparagine: Asparagine is needed to maintain a balance, preventing over nervousness. Aspartic Acid and Asparagine have high concentrations in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. The hippocampus is a part of the brain that plays the main role in short-term memory, while the hypothalamus is involved in the biology of emotion, and serves as a neurological gate between the brain and the rest of the nervous system. Asparagine deficiency could be a contributing cause of fatigue and immune system stress including autoimmune disorders, infections and severe allergies. Asparagine is most commonly found in poultry, dairy, eggs, fish, lactalbumin, legumes, meat, nuts, seafood, seeds, soy, whey, whole grains, and beef.

Aspartic Acid: Aspartic Acid is a non-essential amino acid, existing mainly in the form of its amide, asparagine. It also performs an important role in the urea cycle and helping to transport minerals. Aspartic acid is a nonessential amino acid which is made from glutamic acid by enzymes using vitamin B6. The amino acid has important roles in the urea cycle and DNA metabolism.

Aspartic acid may also be a significant immunostimulant of the thymus and can protect against some of the damaging effects of radiation. Involved in immune system function by enhancing immunoglobulin production and anti- body formation. Calcium and magnesium deficiencies. Because of this association, low aspartic acid levels should lead the clinician to test for calcium and/or magnesium deficiencies. Aspartic Acid can be easily converted to glucose when demand for glucose exceeds supply. Aspartic acid plays an important role in the citric acid cycle, or Krebs cycle, during which other amino acids and biochemicals, such as asparagine, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, and isoleucine, are synthesized. Aspartic acid is found in high levels throughout the human body, especially in the brain, sprouting seeds, oat flakes, luncheon meats, sausage meat, wild game, avocado, asparagus.

Glycine: Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, especially in the spinal cord. High concentrations of glycine are found not only in the muscles, but in the skin and other connective tissues as well. Almost 1/3 of collagen, which keeps the skin and connective tissue firm and flexible, is composed of glycine. (High amounts of Glycine are also found in gelatin, which is a form of denatured collagen). Without glycine the body would not be able to repair damaged tissues; the skin would become slack as it succumbed to UV rays, oxidation, and free radical damage, and wounds would never heal. Sources of glycine: High protein food contains good amounts of glycine and is present in fish, meat, beans, and dairy products.

Isoleucine: Nitrogen balance in adults. L-Isoleucine is a branched chain amino acid found in high concentrations in muscle tissues. Food sources include almonds, cashews, chicken, chickpeas, eggs, fish, lentils, liver, meat, rye, seeds, and soy protein.

Methionine: Methionine is a precursor for the other sulfur amino acids, cystine, taurine, and glutathione. Methionine plays a role in cysteine, carnitine and taurine synthesis by the transsulfuration pathway, lecithin production, the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and other phospholipids. Methionine helps reduce histamine levels, which are amino acids that control dilation of blood vessels and influence brain function. Methionine is essential for the formation of healthy collagen used to form skin, nails, and connective tissue, and helps reduce the level of inflammatory histamines in the body. People with conditions linked to excessive histamine production, such as arthritis and chronic allergies, may benefit from methionine supplementation. Food sources include beans, eggs, fish, garlic, lentils, meat, onions, soybeans, seeds, yogurt.

Threonine: Required for formation of collagen. Needed by the gastrointestinal tract for normal functioning. Threonine is an important component in the formation of protein, collagen, elastin and tooth enamel. It is also important for production of neurotransmitters and health of the nervous system. Threonine is one of the immune-stimulating nutrients (cysteine, lysine, alanine, and aspartic acid are others), Threonine is found in most meats and fish, dairy foods, eggs, wheatgerm, bananas, carrots, nuts, beans and seeds. Rich sources of threonine include meats, dairy foods and eggs. Wheat germ, many nuts, beans, and seeds, and vegetables contains some small level of threonine.

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June 14, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 20, 2007

Woke up today and I can feel a real improvement with the candida. My eyes feel a lot better too. I think the Arginine and the Glycine are working and definitely something I was low in.

I’ve been casually looking around for a new job. I’m not serious about quitting my job or for any paticualar reason but every now and again I like to see what’s out there. So I’ve sent my resume of to a few places this week and we’ll see what happens…

January 17, 2008 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for October 18, 2007

I’ve been doing so much reading about the different functions of amino acids that I’m going to try Arginine again for the immune system. I took it for the first time last month and took it until I ran out. It had a good effect on the candida so I’m going to get it again. Maybe I didn’t do it long enough.

I’m convinced that amino acids are so much more important than vitamins or minerals. They all work together of course but I find it all fascinating how each one provides a different role in the body but you never really hear anything about them.

A multivitamin doesn’t contain amino acids and yet they are so important. I can still hear my doctor telling me that all I needed was a good multivitamin and suggested Centrum. EEEK!

ARGININE (Non-Essential) L-Arginine is essential in muscle metabolism and tissue generation and regeneration. In the body it creates nitric oxide, which is an important catalyst for healthy dilation of blood vessels, circulation and blood flow. Studies have shown that Arginine improves immune responses to bacteria, viruses and tumor cells, promotes wound healing and regeneration of the liver and the release of growth hormones. Arginine is highly concentrated in the skin and connective tissue and helps keep blood-vessel tissue elastic. Arginine also helps to remove ammonia from the body as part of the urea cycle.

Arginine is gaining popularity as a treatment for high cholesterol. Studies with animals and humans suggest that it may improve coronary blood flow and lower cholesterol levels through its antioxidant properties. Arginine Pyroglutamate moves easily across the blood/brain barrier where it releases Arginine, acts as a slow release Glutamine, and increases acetylcholine.

Another amino acid that I’m interested in is Glycine. In fact Glycine is as much as one third of the amino acid content of collagen. WOW! Again, I’ve taken this before and I knew about the collagen link but 1/3?? That’s significant.

Glycine is one – third of total amino acid content of collagen followed by hydroxyproline and proline account for another one-third of amino acid content of collagen. Hydroxyproline is exclusive to collagen and due to this reason to estimate collagen normally hydroxyproline is estimation is done.

January 17, 2008 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 27, 2007

One full day taking Glycine and once again, I can feel a slight difference with the candida. I’m starting slow by taking one teaspoon in the morning and again at night. I can feel the benefits from it but it also gives me a weird feeling whenever I take it. Almost like it has an effect on my magnesium. So I’ve been adding one or two 250 mg of magnesium during the day. Not sure why it has the effect or maybe it’s because my copper is still low enough to effect the magnesium.

I guess I really need to focus on taking the 3 mg of copper a day along with some higher dosages of magnesium and build those up for a while…

October 17, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 25, 2007

The past couple of days I’ve been doing more research regarding amino acids and although the Arginine did make a difference with the candida, there must be something else. I go out on my lunch to check out a number of health food stores and body building stores along Yonge street during my lunch. Not one had Glycine but one store did say they could order it for me next Friday but I didn’t want to wait that long.

After getting back to the office I make a few phone calls and actually found a store on Bloor street that have it in stock made by AOR. Exactly the one I’ve been looking for. They put it aside with my name on it and I pick it up on my way home.

GLYCINE is a non-essential glucogenic amino acid that can readily convert to serine. It is the simplest of all the amino acids and can be synthesized from acetic acid and Vitamin B. Necessary for optimal growth, glycine is involved in phospholipid and collagen production, and in the release of energy. Glycine received its name because it resembled the sweet taste of glucose and glycogen.

Glycine is an integral part of bile salts and the heme pigment in the RBC’s (red blood cells). It is also a major part of of the amino acid pool available for the synthesis of non-essential amino acids when required.

Glycine is essential for the biosynthesis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), as well as that of bile acids. It is used as a gastric antacid and a dietary supplement, and in the treatment of various myopathies (disease of the eye muscles). It also functions as an inhibitory nerotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glycine retards muscle degeneration by supplying additional creatine. It is necessary for central nervous system function and a healthy prostate. Its inhibitory action helps prevent epilepsy and has been used in the treatment of bipolar depression. It is sometimes utilized in liver detoxification compounds with glutathione.

October 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 14, 2007

Found some Arginine at my local health food store but I tried several other places looking for Glycine but I can’t seem to find it anywhere. The store clerks seem confused whenever I mention that I’m looking for it.

L-Arginine Dosage

2 to 30 grams. Each person has biochemical individuality, and significantly differing needs for amino acid supplements. When supplementing arginine orally, some researchers recommend taking the supplements for two months, then discontinuing for two months before starting a new “cycle.” A Take a small dosage for one week, note the benefits and the side effects, and increase or decrease the dosage until the benefits are maximized and the side effects minimized.

I’ll start with three capsules a day…

October 4, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for September 13, 2007

Did some more research into the amino acids and came across some interesting things. There are three amino acid deficiencies that are seen in people with candida. I already have Taurine so I do some reading about Arginine and discover it’s another amino acid that is a precursor to GABA. I’ll see if can pick up some Arginine and Glycine.

ARGININE
Main Functions:

Essential for normal immune system activity.
Necessary for wound healing.
Assists with regeneration of damaged liver.
Necessary for production and release of growth hormone
Increases release of insulin and glucogen. Arginine is the most potent amino acid in releasing insulin.
Assists in healing through collagen synthesis
Precursor to GABA, an important inhibitory neurotransmitter
Aids in wound healing

Arginine Deficiencies Seen In:

AIDS
Immune deficiency syndromes.
Candidiasis

GLYCINE
Main Functions:

Part of the structure of haemoglobin.
Part of cytochromes, which are enzymes involved in energy production.
Inhibits sugar cravings.
One of the 3 critical glycogenic amino acids, along with serine and alanine.
Involved in glycogen production, which assists in glycogen metabolism.

Glycine Deficiency Seen In:

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Hypoglycaemia
Anaemia
Viral Infections
Candidiasis

TAURINE
Main Functions:

In the nervous system, stabilises cell membranes, which raises the seizure threshold, and helps treat epileptic seizures.
Acts as inhibitory neurotransmitter and is as potent as Glycine
Anti-convulsant effect is long-lasting and can be confirmed both clinically and by repeat EEG’s (electroencephalograms).
Anti-oxidant. Slows down the aging process by neutralising free radicals.
Highest concentration of Taurine is in the heart.
Reduces risk of gall stones by combining with bile acids to make them water soluble.
Involved in stabilization of heart rhythm. Loss of intracellular Taurine in the heart leads to arrhythmias.
Useful in treatment of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).
Strengthens neutrophils (white blood cells/part of immune system) in their ability to kill bacteria.
Useful in brain injury
Decreases cholesterol levels

Highly concentrated in the eye.

Taurine Deficiency Seen In:

Parkinson’s disease
Anxiety
Candida
AIDS
Cardiac insufficiency
Hypertension
Depression
Kidney failure

So there is a link between a Taurine deficiency and candida. The only problem with this is that a zinc deficiency can cause Taurine levels to rise. I have candida and low zinc levels? So is my Taurine low or high?

September 23, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 31, 2007

I was looking up Adrenals in my health book and I came across a reference for an amino acid called Tyrosine. I’ve tried an amino acid complex before without much luck but this time, I look further:

Diagnosis

Essential vitamin, mineral, and amino acid deficiencies frequently go undiagnosed in conventional medicine because conventional testing methods look for pathology—meaning the tests only check for chronic conditions that are present, and NOT for the precursors that lead to illness. In a conventional medical setting, symptoms may go undiagnosed for months or even years before a chronic condition fully develops. That’s why it’s important to choose functional testing, which is designed to detect the biochemical imbalances that are causing your symptoms, before they lead to chronic conditions.

Amino Acids – Amino acids are the “building blocks” of proteins and are necessary for virtually everything in our bodies, including most hormones and all neurotransmitters. Low levels of amino acids are closely associated with several chronic ailments.

In particular, people with Candida have been found to be deficient in nearly all amino acids. Many Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients have low levels of L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine. L-tyrosine plays a key role in the production of thyroid hormone, so low levels of this amino acid may explain the prevalence of thyroid issues among chronically ill people. Amino acids can be maintained at healthy levels with the use of well-balanced dietary supplements, but only while also striving to get enough high-quality protein in the diet.

Glycine, Serine, Taurine and Arginine deficiencies are seen in Candidiasis.

Found another web site that suggested taking Proline for candida. And another suggested a link to low magnesium levels:

Low L-aspartic acid can be associated with low calcium and magnesium levels. Therefore, if one has this deficiency, calcium and magnesium levels should be checked.

January 31, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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