Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 13, 2007

One more thing about Alzheimer’s that bothers me is a person’s level of DHA. A magnesium deficiency can cause low levels of DHA.

Higher DHA Levels Associated With Reduced Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Results from a new study conducted at Tufts University suggest that having increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels in the blood and eating about three fish meals each week are associated with a significant 48 percent reduction in the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in elderly men and women.

The brain is composed mostly of fat, in particular, the Omega 3 fatty acid Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia have shown very low concentrations of DHA in the brain indicating a possible DHA deficiency.

And the link to magnesium?

Magnesium has a multitude of different uses in the and is an essential cofactor of the enzyme delta 6 desaturase which converts vegatable derived omega 3 fatty acids to the brain critical omega 3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) which is essential for the rapid release of dopamine. Thus if magnesium levels are low, DHA deficiency is very likely to exist.

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August 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 30, 2006

I’ve always known that tuna made me feel better but I never quite understood why. It has very little B vitamins and some magnesium, but maybe it was the DHA content all along? Maybe, it was because it contained all three…

DHA

The most efficient natural source of pre-formed DHA and EPA is oily fish such as mackerel, sardines, herring, salmon and fresh tuna. Tuna oil is particularly interesting in that it contains a five to one ratio of DHA to EPA, which is similar to the ratio found in human breast milk.

Adequate DHA whether preformed or converted from ALA ­ is required to ensure the healthy function of cell membranes of neurons in brain grey matter and in the retina of the eye. Preformed DHA and EPA together help to maintain a healthy heart and circulation.

August 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 30, 2006

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How to Properly Increase Intake of Omega-3 with Fish Oil to Protect Against Disease

You want to increase your overall health and energy level. You want to prevent heart disease, cancer, depression and Alzheimer’s. Perhaps you also want to treat rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, ulcerative colitis, Raynaud’s disease and a host of other diseases. One of the most important things you can do for all of these is increase your intake of the omega-3 fats found in fish oil and cod liver oil, and reduce your intake of omega-6 fats.

These two types of fat, omega-3 and omega-6, are both essential for human health. However, the typical American consumes far too many omega-6 fats in their diet while consuming very low levels of omega-3. The ideal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats is 1:1. Our ancestors evolved over millions of years on this ratio. Today, though, our ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 averages from 20:1 to 50:1! That spells serious danger for you, and as is now (finally!) being reported throughout even the mainstream health media, lack of omega-3 from fish oil is one of the most serious health issues plaguing contemporary society.

The primary sources of omega-6 are corn, soy, canola, safflower and sunflower oil; these oils are overabundant in the typical diet, which explains our excess omega-6 levels. Avoid or limit these oils. Omega-3, meanwhile, is typically found in flaxseed oil, walnut oil, and fish.

By far, the best type of omega-3 fats are those found in that last category, fish. That’s because the omega-3 in fish is high in two fatty acids crucial to human health, DHA and EPA. These two fatty acids are pivotal in preventing heart disease, cancer, and many other diseases. The human brain is also highly dependent on DHA – low DHA levels have been linked to depression, schizophrenia, memory loss, and a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Researchers are now also linking inadequate intake of these omega-3 fats in pregnant women to premature birth and low birth weight, and to hyperactivity in children.

August 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 11, 2006

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His store is called “The Medicine Shoppe” and inside is a small pharmacy on one side and a bunch of supplements and vitamins on the other. I mention to the pharmacist that the osteopath from next door recommended I speak to the owner about a health issue. I wait about ten minutes for him as he was one the phone. He has a slight look of the mad scientist in Back to the Future movies but more reserved.

He comes out to talk to me and I start by mentioning that I have a vitamin deficiency. He says he could talk for hours on vitamin deficiencies so I go into more detail with riboflavin. He asked if my urine turns yellow when I take B2 and of course it does. He said that if I am seeing yellow then the body is taking what it needs and the rest is being discarded by the body. I explain further that I’ve been taking B complex for months without any results.

He asks me if I’ve had a hormone test and yes, I’ve had one done recently and the results were normal. He said he was interested in seeing what the results were. Then he asks me if I had my thyroid checked and yes that was my doctor’s first suspicion and that too was normal. He asked me what the results were and other than normal, I’m not quite sure what the actual readig was.

He said most doctors don’t know how to check the thyroid and they only check for the level of T4. He said my actual level of T4 could be fine but that my level of T3 is needed to activate T4 and he went into more detail about thyroid function. A quick google search turns up exactly what he is talking about minus the cold body temperature:

CLINICAL MEASUREMENT:  Broda Barnes, M.D. recognized that one of the primary effects of thyroid is to raise body temperature.  A fat, hypothyroid child will be one degree Fahrenheit cooler than a thin, active child.  The measurements of thyroid function include TSH, T3 (free), T4 (free).  But normal blood tests do not tell the complete picture of thyroid disease.

The control of the thyroid gland is TRH, thyroid releasing hormone, in the hypothalamus, deep within the brain.  With age, the hypothalamus fails to release adequate stimulation: it acts like it is asleep. This is called \’down-regulation.\’  Under normal conditions, the TRH triggers the pituitary in the midbrain to release TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone. TSH causes the thyroid to produce T3 and T4 from precursors: iodine, tryptophan and T2 (di-iodothyronine).

Doctors have been taught to look for elevated levels of TSH.  This implies that the pituitary cannot recognize adequate blood levels of either T3 or T4.  A TSH over 100 means the individual is severely hypothyroid.  A TSH less than 1 (when not on thyroid replacement) implies that the individual is on thyroid replacement or that the thyroid overactive and out-of-control.

But, those of us researching thyroid disease have learned that these thyroid tests are just \’tests at best.\’  If the patient complains of a low body temperature on awakening (basal body temperature) then there is inadequate thyroid hormone no matter what the blood tests show.  If there is fatigue, dry skin, brittle hair and weight gain on a low calorie diet, then there is insufficient thyroid hormone. This is one of the thyroid resistant syndromes or thyroid insensitive syndrome. The pituitary does not respond properly and produce enough TSH.

He asks me a few questions:

Do have have any energy in the mornings? NO
Do I feel refreshed after a night’s sleep? NO
How do my muscles feel? WEAK

He suggests taking Selenium at 200 mg a day and comments how it is really lacking in today’s diet. He asks me if I am taking Omega 3 supplement. I was until the iridologst told me I didn’t need it so he asked if it contained EPA or DHA and I have no idea.

He gave me a sample package of NutraSea Omega-3 to try and said he takes it everyday. I thank him for all of the information and his time and he again mentioned that he would like to see the results of the hormone test.

I do some reading when I get home and as it turns out, on the back of the NutraSea package there is an endorsment from the homopathic doctor that the chiropractor mentioned! I want to start the day with this new omega 3 so I take a look at the one I have. The EPA or DHA is much lower in mine so I take three capsules at dinner.

So I mention all of this to my wife and we both start googling thyroid again and she mentions the simple test that the naturopath told me to do and how your morning body temperature indicates your thyroid. Back then, my body tempurature was really low. I did mention the readings to my naturopath at the time and I guess we got side tracked by other things as it was never mentioned again.

August 12, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for June 30, 2006

Two symptoms that I have had for years are related to a Magnesium deficiency: Sensitivity to bright lights and weak knees.

Reasons Your Brain Needs Magnesium

#1 Your brain needs magnesium to build the protective myelin sheaths that insulate the nerve fibers which network your nervous system.

#2 Magnesium activates a key enzyme in cell membranes that controls the balance of sodium and potassium. This is absolutely essential to the electrical activity of nerve cells, as well as to the very existence of a cell. If its sodium-potassium ratio got too far out of balance, the cell would burst.

#3 Magnesium activates glutamine synthetase, an enzyme responsible for converting waste ammonia – an extremely toxic byproduct of normal protein metabolism – into urea for proper disposal. The ability to focus and pay attention can be compromised by even small increases in brain ammonia.

#4 Magnesium activates almost all the key enzymes needed for your neurons to produce energy from glucose, in the form of ATP molecules. Magnesium is also necessary for the stable storage of ATP, so it won’t spontaneously break down and waste its energy as heat.

#5 Of the 300+ different enzymes in the human body that require magnesium to function, a great many are crucial to cerebral metabolism and cognitive function. In the cerebrospinal fluid that bathes the brain and spinal cord, magnesium is present in higher concentrations than in the blood plasma.

#6 Magnesium is needed to activate the enzyme (D6D) that converts dietary fatty acids into DHA, the most abundant fatty acid in brain cell membranes. Deficiencies in DHA have been associated with numerous neurological disorders – from attention-deficits to Alzheimer’s disease

Here’s another web site:

Magnesium is the central atom in the chlorophyll molecule and in physiology it activates the ATP energy system. More than 300 enzymes require the presence of this mineral. Seventy percent of the body’s magnesium is found in the bones, and the rest is found mainly in the soft tissues and blood. There is more magnesium than calcium in muscle tissue and the brain has twice as much magnesium as any other tissue.

Every person, every doctor that I’ve mentioned my health history to has commented on the fact that I have done a tremendous amount of research to try and figure out my symptoms and the more deeper I get, the more I realize how I’ve only scratched the surface and looking back, I wish I’d done a better job.

I think if I was a doctor, I’d hire a research assistant to google symptoms for me. Actually, it’s more like an investigative researcher.

My iridology exam is tomorrow and I can’t wait. Hopefully, it’s the beginning of the end.

June 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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