Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 29, 2006

From the prevous entry:

I ask him if there is any kind of test that could measure any kind of demyelination and he answered “No not really…”

Here’s what I found:

Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV) Test

What is it?
A nerve conduction velocity test, also called a nerve conduction study, measures how quickly electrical impulses move along a nerve. It is often done at the same time as an electromyogram, in order to exclude or detect muscle disorders.

A healthy nerve conducts signals with greater speed and strength than a damaged nerve. The speed of nerve conduction is influenced by the myelin sheath the insulating coating that surrounds the nerve.

Most neuropathies are caused by damage to the nerve’s axon rather than damage to the myelin sheath surrounding the nerve. The nerve conduction velocity test is used to distinguish between true nerve disorders (such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) and conditions where muscles are affected by nerve injury (such as carpal tunnel syndrome).

Why should I do it?
This test is used to diagnose nerve damage or dysfunction and confirm a particular diagnosis. It can usually differentiate injury to the nerve fiber (axon) from injury to the myelin sheath surrounding the nerve, which is useful in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

How is it performed?
During the test, flat electrodes are placed on the skin at intervals over the nerve that is being examined. A low intensity electric current is introduced to stimulate the nerves.

The velocity at which the resulting electric impulses are transmitted through the nerves is determined when images of the impulses are projected on an oscilloscope or computer screen. If a response is much slower than normal, damage to the myelin sheath is implied. If the nerve’s response to stimulation by the current is decreased but with a relatively normal speed of conduction, damage to the nerve axon is implied.

And perhaps the best of all…I found this about Benfotmaine. The supplement that the Neurologist had never heard of:

Shielding Nerve Structure

While most anti-AGE supplements rely on test-tube browning experiments as the evidence of efficacy, Benfotiamine has been proven in multiple real-world human and animal studies to reduce AGE formation and support tissue structure and function in diabetics.

Most impressively, many randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human trials have proven that Benfotiamine powerfully supports nerve function in diabetic neuropathy. In one trial, 24 people suffering with diabetic neuropathy took either Benfotiamine (plus doses of common B6 and B12 similar to those used in mutivitamins) or a look-alike dummy pill, spread out into three pills over the course of the day, for twelve weeks. The participants started with 320 milligrams of Benfotiamine per day for the first two weeks, followed by 120 milligrams for the rest of the trial. Before and after the trial, the function of patients nerve cells were tested using nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and vibratory perception threshold (which tests the nerves sensitivity by determining the lowest level at which vibrations applied at key nerve sites are first felt).

At the end of the trial, the vibration perception threshold had clearly improved by 30% in those who had taken the Benfotiamine supplements, while it had worsened in the placebo group by 5% at one site and by 32% at another. At the same time, people taking Benfotiamine experienced statistically significant improvements in nerve conduction velocity from the feet, even as this aspect of nerve function deteriorated in those taking the look-alike pills.

This is exactly why I don’t like doctors anymore.

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August 29, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 17, 2006

Vaccine Induced Demyelination

Myelination is an essential part of human brain development. Nerves can only conduct pulses of energy efficiently if covered by myelin. Like insulation on an electric wire, the fatty coating of myelin keeps the pulses confined and maintains the integrity of the electrical signal so that it has a high signal-to-noise ratio. When the insulation on a wire is damaged or destroyed, the flow of electrical current may be interrupted and a short-circuit occurs.

Oligodendrocyte cells give white matter its color by manufacturing myelin. If myelin falls into disrepair, nerve axons cease to function, even though they themselves aren’t damaged. Protecting oligodendrocytes after brain or spinal cord injury might keep nerve cells intact.

At birth, relatively few pathways have myelin insulation. Myelination in the human brain continues from before birth until at least 20 years of age. Up until the age of 10 or so, vast areas of the cortex are not yet myelinated. Up to the age of 20, large areas of the frontal lobes are not yet myelinated.

Myelination begins in the developmentally oldest parts of the brain, like the brain stem, moving to the areas of the nervous system that have developed more recently, like the prefrontal lobe and cortex. Myelin spreads throughout the nervous system in stages, which vary slightly in each individual. Impairment of myelination can alter neural communication without necessarily causing severe CNS (central nervous system) damage.

The prefrontal portions of the cerebrum have a profound influence on human behavior. If an individual is injected with vaccines, most of which have adjuvants like mercury and aluminum compounds, as well as foreign proteins (some from other species in which the vaccines were grown) and biological organisms, unprotected nerves may be impacted. The argument for a role of vaccines in the development of autistic disorders hinges on these biological effects upon nerves, damaging them in a way that influences behavior and learning patterns.

August 17, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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