Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 19, 2008

Back in February I ordered a bunch of amino acids from a health food company in the states because I wasn’t able to find them anywhere here in Canada. I tried them here and there in different doses without the any real results. I thought there would be a noticable difference because I had followed the results of the amino acid test. When I didn’t get the results I was looking for, it was off in another direction and I tried something else.

Today I decided to try them again. There are a number of other amino acids that depend on aspartic acid so it seemed like a logical place to start and interestingly, the amino acid test indicated that I had low levels of five of the six. I always feel like a detective when I find stuff like this. Find the needle in a hay stack that leads to the breakthough…I can only hope!

Aspartic Acid

Aspartic acid plays an important role in the citric acid cycle, or Krebs cycle, during which other amino acids and biochemicals, such as asparagine, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, isoleucine, and several nucleotides are synthesized.

Low aspartic acid can also be associated with low calcium and magnesium levels.

December 3, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 18, 2008

I received my package from UPS today. The amino acids made it across the border okay!! Each one is in a small glass jar and I can’t say I’ve seen anything like this before. I’m just glad I have them. Now let’s see if they have an effect.

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for February 06, 2008

I’ve looked EVERYWHERE for those amino acids threonine, aspartic acid (aspartate) and asparagine. Nobody seems to have them but I’m not sure why? They are part of the standard amino acids!

After a bit of googling tonight, I have found them. A company in the US sells each amino acid individually and will ship to Canada. I select the three that I am looking for and place the order. A couple of clicks and they are on the way.

I don’t understand why health foods stores in Canada don’t carry them? I just hope they won’t be a problem at the border!

August 20, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for January 24, 2008

Today I thought I’d make a short list of the amino acids that had very low levels in the test so I can focus on these one at a time:

1-Threonine
2-Aspartic acid (Aspartate)
3-Methionine
4-Glycine
5-Asparagine (Made from 2-Aspartic acid)
6-Isoleucine

Below is a quick overview of each amino acid and the best source of food to eat.

Asparagine: Asparagine is needed to maintain a balance, preventing over nervousness. Aspartic Acid and Asparagine have high concentrations in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. The hippocampus is a part of the brain that plays the main role in short-term memory, while the hypothalamus is involved in the biology of emotion, and serves as a neurological gate between the brain and the rest of the nervous system. Asparagine deficiency could be a contributing cause of fatigue and immune system stress including autoimmune disorders, infections and severe allergies. Asparagine is most commonly found in poultry, dairy, eggs, fish, lactalbumin, legumes, meat, nuts, seafood, seeds, soy, whey, whole grains, and beef.

Aspartic Acid: Aspartic Acid is a non-essential amino acid, existing mainly in the form of its amide, asparagine. It also performs an important role in the urea cycle and helping to transport minerals. Aspartic acid is a nonessential amino acid which is made from glutamic acid by enzymes using vitamin B6. The amino acid has important roles in the urea cycle and DNA metabolism.

Aspartic acid may also be a significant immunostimulant of the thymus and can protect against some of the damaging effects of radiation. Involved in immune system function by enhancing immunoglobulin production and anti- body formation. Calcium and magnesium deficiencies. Because of this association, low aspartic acid levels should lead the clinician to test for calcium and/or magnesium deficiencies. Aspartic Acid can be easily converted to glucose when demand for glucose exceeds supply. Aspartic acid plays an important role in the citric acid cycle, or Krebs cycle, during which other amino acids and biochemicals, such as asparagine, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, and isoleucine, are synthesized. Aspartic acid is found in high levels throughout the human body, especially in the brain, sprouting seeds, oat flakes, luncheon meats, sausage meat, wild game, avocado, asparagus.

Glycine: Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, especially in the spinal cord. High concentrations of glycine are found not only in the muscles, but in the skin and other connective tissues as well. Almost 1/3 of collagen, which keeps the skin and connective tissue firm and flexible, is composed of glycine. (High amounts of Glycine are also found in gelatin, which is a form of denatured collagen). Without glycine the body would not be able to repair damaged tissues; the skin would become slack as it succumbed to UV rays, oxidation, and free radical damage, and wounds would never heal. Sources of glycine: High protein food contains good amounts of glycine and is present in fish, meat, beans, and dairy products.

Isoleucine: Nitrogen balance in adults. L-Isoleucine is a branched chain amino acid found in high concentrations in muscle tissues. Food sources include almonds, cashews, chicken, chickpeas, eggs, fish, lentils, liver, meat, rye, seeds, and soy protein.

Methionine: Methionine is a precursor for the other sulfur amino acids, cystine, taurine, and glutathione. Methionine plays a role in cysteine, carnitine and taurine synthesis by the transsulfuration pathway, lecithin production, the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and other phospholipids. Methionine helps reduce histamine levels, which are amino acids that control dilation of blood vessels and influence brain function. Methionine is essential for the formation of healthy collagen used to form skin, nails, and connective tissue, and helps reduce the level of inflammatory histamines in the body. People with conditions linked to excessive histamine production, such as arthritis and chronic allergies, may benefit from methionine supplementation. Food sources include beans, eggs, fish, garlic, lentils, meat, onions, soybeans, seeds, yogurt.

Threonine: Required for formation of collagen. Needed by the gastrointestinal tract for normal functioning. Threonine is an important component in the formation of protein, collagen, elastin and tooth enamel. It is also important for production of neurotransmitters and health of the nervous system. Threonine is one of the immune-stimulating nutrients (cysteine, lysine, alanine, and aspartic acid are others), Threonine is found in most meats and fish, dairy foods, eggs, wheatgerm, bananas, carrots, nuts, beans and seeds. Rich sources of threonine include meats, dairy foods and eggs. Wheat germ, many nuts, beans, and seeds, and vegetables contains some small level of threonine.

June 14, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

%d bloggers like this: