Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for September 03, 2006

I’ve added my profile to RemedyFind detailing my history with Allergic Rhinitis:

Personal Bio: I grew up in a small town called Orangeville for most of my life. Late in high school, I had discovered a love for photography and became the yearbook photographer. My health issues started around 1990 after my last year of high school. I was 19 years old and I went to the doctor for allergies.

He gave a nasal spray called RHINARIS. It did nothing for my allergies so I went back to him and he gave me another prescription for the same thing but he told me to try it for a longer period of time. I tried it again and it had no effect so I figured it was something that you just have to live with.

I had just finished working in a photo lab and I had suspected that it could be the photo chemicals but I never handled them, never touched them and I only worked the cash so I really had nothing to do with them. That summer I went on a trip to England and spent three weeks walking around Liverpool discovering the places were the Beatles had found their fame.

Later in the year I moved to Toronto and I thought it was a good time to find a new doctor. I went to a walk in clinic for my allergies and I told him about how I thought the trip to England might have had an effect on my allergies having been out of my regular environment for three weeks but it made no difference. He found this interesting and commented on the fact that if anything it should’ve been worse because of the cold and damp weather. He refered me to an ear, nose and throat specialist.

Went to the specialist and he performed a weird procedure where he used something like a sodering gun and was burning something in each one of my nostrils. I went home with cotton balls in my nose and I wasn’t allowed to blow my nose for a couple of days. He said something would fall out of each nostril within the week and it did. Did it have any effect on my allergies? None.

Another attempt was made with my allergies when I went to a different doctor. He sent me to an allergy clinic in downtown Toronto. There I had a skin test done and the test came back that I was allergic to dust, pollen, grasses and mold. The strongest reaction? Cats. I found it strange because at the time, I didn’t own any cats and my parents never had any either. They told me that I had Allergic Rhinitis and recommended allergy shots over a five year plan. I started them for a few months and quit. It wasn’t making any difference.

I went four years dealing with my symptoms until I tried again. Another doctor I went to suggested I try Rhinocort. I tried it and again it made no difference. Then I read an article in the Toronto Star about a woman who had a variety of health issues that were greatly improved when she had her mercury fillings removed. I think one of her symptoms were allergies so it was off to my dentist. It seemed logical to me as I had a lot of dental work done around the time my allergies started. I had my mercury fillings removed and it made no difference.

I moved to a downtown location a year later and we lived close to a health food store so I asked them for some advice. She suggested taking a homeopathic remedy called Sinna and this time, I got results. It cleared my nose and there was mild improvement but I still had my allergies. It was helping but I was looking for the root cause.

I always felt that my allergies never fit the usual descriptions to describe them. The doctors would ask me if it changed with the seasons? NO. Did it change with the difference in weather? NO. I had allergies all year round and it never seemed to be affected by the types of food I ate.

This time I decide to go back to the doctor that gave me a referal to the allergy clinic and I started taking allergy shots again. Once a week for two years I took allergy shots and again, it didn’t really make any difference. Maybe a little…it was hard to tell.

I’ve always been a fairly healthy person despite my diet and since moving to Toronto, I’ve never had a regular doctor. I would go to the nearest walk in clinic if I had any minor issues.

Last year I finally developed a weird set of symptoms totally unrelated to my allergies that no doctor could figure out what was causing my problems. I had numerous test results: three blood tests, two urine tests, two ECG tests, chest x-ray, abdominal ultrasound, stool sample, colonoscopy, gastrocopy, hormone testing, hair analysis that all came back normal. I was really irritated because all of these tests and procedures recommended by doctors were showing normal. They seemed to think because the testing was normal then there was nothing wrong. I was of the opinion that they were doing the wrong type of testing. I had neurological symptoms and I was being told it was normal.

It wasn’t until I took to using Google on a daily basis to get an understanding of my symptoms that I began to question the regular doctors. I tried all kinds of alternative methods and nothing worked. No one was able to determine the root cause.

My best results were from Google searches and when I finally made a series of breakthroughs I began questioning everything and everyone. I began reading stories about CBC’s Wendy Mesley’s breast cancer and how she thought it was caused by the birth control pill. Newscaster Bill Cameron who went to a throat specialist to be told there was nothing wrong and he died nine months later of esophageal cancer. 14 year old Brooke Di Bernardo had weird symptoms for four years with doctors and specialists telling her there was nothing wrong because their tests came up normal. Another doctor told the parents that she was doing it for attention. They diagnosed her with pulmonary hypertension the day after she died. The family looked up the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension and they matched her symptoms exactly. How was this missed by so many doctors and specialists? I was outraged by these stories and I started to live by a very famous quote:

“The important thing is to never stop questioning” -Albert Einstein

And I never did. I questioned the doctors because I was finding things that made me better and I would present my findings to them only to be questioned and they never seemed to be interested in nutrition despite me eating things that made me feel better or had an impact on my symptoms. I even gave them a diet diary but they only seemed to be interested in disease and not prevention.

I began to realize that simple obvious signs that I had ignored were actually symptoms and connected to my current health problems even though I had them for years. Symptoms like chapped lips, muscle twitching and blaming extreme tiredness on a lack of sleep.

Don’t get me wrong. Google should never replace a trained professional medical doctor and I’ve been wrong several times using it. But at the same time, when used to verify or validate what the doctors were telling me or to question what they were telling me, is when I found success.

Because of my success with my other health problems, I thought I would use Google again to try and figure out the cause of my allergies and I did. I came across a quote from the internet that quoted a doctor that said “99 percent of people who have allergies are allergic to microwaved food”. I questioned how people could be allergic to food that was microwaved so I looked further. I then found a study that talked about a chemical that was said to cause Allergic Rhinitis:

http://www.webmd.com/content/article/95/103140.htm

Plastic containers that contained the additive called: Benzyl Butyl Phthalate can cause Allergic Rhinitis. I started to wonder if this chemical was used for microwaveable containers so I stopped eating microwaved food.

I was just finishing my tenth accupuncture treatment and although it made a difference in the blockage in my nose, I still had my allergies. I was also trying different chinese herbs but they too didn’t seem to make a big difference either.

Then I stopped eating food in plastic microwaveable containers. Every day following my ban I could feel the inflamation in my nose slowing disappearing. Then I found another study that suggested that same chemical was found in our toothbrushes so I switched to one from the health food store.

Here’s the site: http://www.mst.dk/chemi/01083703.htm

I also cames across another study that suggested there was a link between Allergic Rhinitis and infants exposed to cigarette smoke:

http://www.brightsurf.com/news/headlines/view.article.php?ArticleID=24477

My father smoked until I was 10 years old and the above link was only a study on infants. My Allergic Rhinitis didn’t develop until I was 19 so is there a connection? Who knows…but it’s something I’m very suspicious of. I am the oldest child and my younger brother doesn’t have allergies just like the article suggested.

Very recently I’ve had really bad allergies for two days then they disappear. This has happened twice lately and I questioned it because it didn’t make any sense and it seemed to be related to take out food. Is it possible I ate microwaved food without knowing it? I ate a different resaurant each time so it’s possible that I may have an undiagnosed food allergy that I always thought was my regular allergies. I had roasted greek potatoes both times and I suspect it had something to do with the sauce.

Self discovery is a wonderful thing and I am thrilled that a site like RemedyFind is around to share my experiences to help other people.

My recent health problems? A combination of severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Did I learn this from a any doctor or specialist? Nope. I learned from self education. I’ve been to so many different types of doctors. Numerous Walk-in Clinic Doctors, my regular Doctor, a Naturopath, a Gastroenterologist, an Acupuncturist, a Chiropractor, an Osteopath, an Iridoligist and finally a Neurologist.

Each one of them provided me clues that I strung together for a self diagnosis. Some of them sent me in wrong directions and I came to the conlusion that they were guessing as much as I was. The fact that I had Google for my searches seemed to give me an advantage because I found that they never seemed to do any research of their own. I’d get the normal lines “We’re not sure why that happens…” or “I believe in the art of medicine…if it makes you feel good, keep doing it.”

I’ve never been a person to eat any type of raw fruits and I rarely had any vegetables with my meals. It wasn’t until I did my research about eating healthy and the importance of eating fruits and vegetables that I realized how malnutritioned I was. Did any doctor mention the importance of eating fruits and vegetables? Nope, not one.

For the past six months I’ve been constantly trying different combinations of vitamins, minerals and enzymes to find out what worked best. I noticed the biggest difference when I started taking vitamin A and vitamin E probably because they are fat soluble vitamins. Vitamin A helped the blockage in my nose and vitamin E made a huge difference to my skin and I was shocked at the improvement.

I have a severe Riboflavin deficiency that seems to be caused by a chronic level of Magnesium. Based on my diet over the past fifteen years it’s not hard to see why. But the main things that worked for my current symptoms?

A prescription from a medical doctor for a B2 Riboflavin injection when I convinced him that it matched my symptoms (And this was over a year after my symptoms first started). Then I discovered that I couldn’t get it from any pharmacy anywhere in Canada so I ordered it from Europe. An Omega Three supplement that was recommended by a friend for no reason other than good health, and Magnesium for a deficiency that a two doctors told me I didn’t have.

I’ve read the book by Carolyn Dean called “The Miracle of Magnesium” and it turns out I have nineteen symptoms of a magnesium deficiency.

“No one knows your health better than you.”

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September 3, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for August 08, 2006

Does sneezing point to Parkinson’s?
By JULIE WHELDON
 
10:31am 8th August 2006

Common allergies could be directly linked to the chances of developing Parkinson’s Disease, scientists have discovered. Research revealed that sufferers from allergies such as hayfever, that trigger runny noses and streaming eyes, are three times more likely to develop the brain condition.

The discovery could shed new light on Parkinson’s as it suggests inflammation may play a key role in the disease. However the researchers stressed there is little allergy sufferers can do to alter their risk of developing it. They should continue with their normal medicines to try to prevent their allergic symptoms.

Allergic rhinitis is the medical term for an inflammation of the nasal passages which is caused by the immune system over-reacting to substances in the air. One of the most common forms is hayfever which is triggered by pollen and the reaction can also be caused by dust and animal hair, leaving sufferers with permanent cold-like symptoms.

About a third of Britons will develop an allergy at some point in their lives and around 12 million get hayfever. The latest study, published in the journal Neurology, set out to discover if inflammation that is to blame for allergies is also linked to Parkinson’s Disease.

Previous research had revealed that taking anti-inflammatory drugs appeared to cut the risk of developing Parkinson’s, which affects around one in 500 people and leaves patients unable to control their movements.

Scientists from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota studied 196 people who developed Parkinson’s and, over a 20-year period, compared them with the same number who did not. They found that patients who had allergic rhinitis were 2.9 times more likely to develop Parkinson’s than those without the reaction.

Lead researcher Dr James Bower said: ‘The association with Parkin-son’s Disease is increased to almost three times that of someone who does not have allergic rhinitis. ‘That’s actually a pretty high elevation.’

The study did not examine in detail what kind of allergy each person had nor when symptoms began. The team also stressed that it did not prove the allergies were causing Parkinson’s – just that there is a link between the two diseases and it may come down to inflammation.

‘People with allergic rhinitis mount an immune response with their allergies so they may be more likely to mount an immune response in the brain as well, which would produce inflammation,’ suggested

Dr Bower. ‘The inflammation produced may release certain chemicals in the brain and inadvertently kill brain cells as we see in Parkinson’s. ‘This discovery is exciting because in future we may be able to develop medications to block the inflammation.’

He warned, however, there is little allergy sufferers can do now to reduce their potential risk of developing the brain disease. ‘I wouldn’t worry if you have allergies,’ he said. ‘Treat the allergy symptoms you have to alleviate them at the time.’ But he added: ‘At this point we have no good evidence that this treatment will protect you from possibly developing Parkinson’s disease later.’

August 8, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 28, 2006

Tobacco Smoke Linked to Allergic Rhinitis in Infants

May 18, 2006 – CINCINNATI—University of Cincinnati (UC) epidemiologists say it’s environmental tobacco smoke—not the suspected visible mold—that drastically increases an infant’s risk for developing allergic rhinitis by age 1.

Commonly known as hay fever, allergic rhinitis occurs when a person’s immune system mistakenly reacts to allergens (aggravating particles) in the air. The body then releases substances to protect itself, causing the allergy sufferer to experience persistent sneezing and a runny, blocked nose.

This is the first study to show a relationship between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and allergic rhinitis in year-old infants, the UC team reports in the June issue of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology and an early online edition May 17.

“Previous studies have addressed risk factors for allergic rhinitis, but they failed to examine multiple environmental exposures, and some yielded contradictory results,” says Jocelyn Biagini, lead author and an epidemiologist in UC’s environmental health department.

The study evaluated the effects of numerous indoor exposures to such things as environmental tobacco smoke, visible mold, pets, siblings and the day-care environment on 633 infants under age one.

“We found that infants who were exposed to 20 or more cigarettes a day were three times more likely to develop allergic rhinitis by their first birthday than those who were not exposed,” says Biagini.

These findings, she says, suggest that for the health of their children, it’s important for parents to eliminate tobacco smoke from their homes.

“An infant’s lungs and immune system are still developing in the first year of life,” says Grace LeMasters, PhD, coauthor and principal investigator of the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS). “Environmental tobacco smoke puts harmful particulates in the air that—when inhaled regularly at such an early age—could lead to serious allergic conditions like asthma.”

CCAAPS, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, is a five-year study examining the effects of environmental particulates on childhood respiratory health and allergy development.

About 43 percent of children, says Dr. LeMasters, are exposed to home environmental tobacco smoke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 21 percent of all American adults smoke cigarettes. Of them, 12 percent report smoking 25 or more cigarettes daily.

While household mold, long thought to be a major cause, did not contribute to allergic rhinitis development, Biagini says, it did increase the infant’s risk for ear infections.

Infants exposed to a mold patch about the size of a shoebox were five times more likely to contract ear infections requiring antibiotics than those living in mold-free homes, she explains.

The UC study also suggests that infants with older siblings are less likely to have allergic rhinitis.

“Research has shown that exposure to certain infections early in life may decrease your risk for allergic diseases,” explains James Lockey, MD, professor of environmental health and pulmonary medicine. “We found a ‘sibling protective effect’ for allergic rhinitis—this may mean the more siblings infants have, the more infections they are exposed to. As a result, the infant’s body may be better equipped to fight off allergic diseases later in life.”

Collaborators in the study were David Bernstein, MD, Gurjit Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD, Patrick Ryan, Linda Levin, PhD, Tiina Reponen, PhD, Jeff Burkle and Manuel Villareal, MD.

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, more than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies, many of which are can be triggered by airborne environmental pollutants.

University of Cincinnati

Yup, you guessed it. My father smoked when I was a kid and stopped when I was ten after his brother died of cancer. Only problem with this theory is that my brother doesn’t have allergies.

May 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 26, 2006

And after fifteen years of Allergic Rhinitis, Doctor Google may have found the answer when no other doctor could. A chemical called Benzyl Butyl Phthalate. Very interesting reading but I really don’t eat a lot of microwaved food in plastic but something to think about for sure.

Plastic Chemicals Linked to Asthma, Allergies

Oct. 6, 2004 — Certain chemicals commonly added to plastics are associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis (hay fever), and eczema, according to a new study.

The findings come from researchers including Carl-Gustaf Bornehag of the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute in Boras, Sweden. The report appears in the October issue of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Bornehag and colleagues compared 200 Swedish children who had persistent allergy or asthma symptoms with a similar number of kids without such symptoms.

Doctors screened the children for common allergens (substances that can trigger an allergic reaction or asthma symptoms) such as certain tree pollens, cat dander, dust mites, and mold.

Affected children had at least two incidents of eczema (an allergy-related skin condition), wheezing related to asthma, or hay fever symptoms (runny nose without a cold) in the past year. At the study’s end, they had at least two of three possible symptoms.

Researchers took dust samples from the moulding and shelves in the children’s bedrooms.

Samples containing higher concentrations of chemicals called phthalates were associated with symptoms of asthma, hay fever, and eczema.

PVC flooring in the children’s bedrooms was also associated with symptoms.

Phthalate Primer

Phthalates are commonly added to plastics as softeners and solvents. They’re used in a wide variety of products including nail polish and other cosmetics, dyes, PVC vinyl tile, carpet tiles, artificial leather, and certain adhesives.

By leaching out of products, phthalates have become “global pollutants,” say the researchers. More than 3.5 million metric tons of phthalates are produced annually.

Phthalates aren’t new, but they have become more common in recent decades. Towards the end of World War II, only “very low levels” of phthalates were produced.

In fact, phthalates are now so widespread that they are hard to avoid.

Asthma and allergies have also increased in the developed world during the last 30 years, prompting some experts to wonder if environmental changes are responsible, since genetic shifts might not be seen as quickly.

This study concentrated on three common phthalates: BBzP, DEHP, and di-n-butyl phthalate.

BBzP was associated with rhinitis and eczema and DEHP was linked to asthma; di-n-butyl phthalate was not associated with any symptoms.

The dust samples didn’t have outlandish concentrations of the phthalates. Levels fell within the range of what is normally found in indoor environments, say the researchers.

“Given the phthalate exposures of children worldwide, the results from this study of Swedish children have global implications,” they conclude.

So with the new information, I went back to the site with the effects of microwaved water to find out if the water was microwaved using plastic…and it was!

We have seen a number of comments on this, such as what was the water in the microwave boiled in. The thinking is that maybe some leaching took place if it was in plastic. It was boiled in a plastic cup, so this could be a possibility.

May 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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