Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 18, 2008

Diabetes affects over 170 million people world wide and that figure is expected to double by the year 2030 – according to the World Health Organization. Left untreated, it leads to cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, blindness and joint problems. In extreme cases, as you lose circulation to the peripheral tissues, amputations may become necessary.

You can do something about this with a diabetes natural remedy involving changes to your diet, losing weight and supplementation – all of these together will allow you to control your diabetes and lead a normal life.

Type 2 Adult Diabetes

Type 2 Adult Diabetes really shouldn’t be called ‘Adult’ diabetes, since the majority of new diagnoses are in children; the blame for this lies fairly and squarely with the modern ‘fast food’ and soft drink diet.
Risk factors for diabetes include:

• High intake of sugar, refined and processed flour, caffeine, and soft drinks

• Lack of exercise – sitting around playing computer games, for example

Symptoms are varied and may include: sudden weight gain or extreme weight loss, fatigue, frequent urination and chronic thirst – these are warning signs (amongst others) which should be checked out.

A positive test showing sugar in the urine and blood is another test. The blood of a diabetic becomes thicker and stickier and the person can be more prone to blood clots which leads to stroke or heart disease.

In Type 2 diabetes, you’re actually producing plenty of insulin – in fact maybe too much because of the high sugar intake. The job of insulin is to carry sugar to the cells where it’s used to make energy.

In a diabetic, two things can happen: 1) The cells become resistant to insulin – in this case the cell membrane which is made up of goods fats and protein doesn’t function correctly and 2) The insulin becomes less effective – this is caused by excess intake of sugar, alcohol, refined flour etc depleting the minerals (particularly chromium) required to make the insulin work. Caffeine will severely aggravate the condition.

A diabetes natural remedy involves taking control of the disease, which is really nothing more than a nutritional deficiency and lifestyle disease. To get the disease under control it’s a matter of losing weight, exercising, having a good diet and using the right supplements.

Steps to take for a Diabetes Natural Remedy

• Increase your protein intake – this repairs the cell membrane.

• Reduce your intake of sugar and increase your intake of complex carbohydrates.

• Lose weight and exercise – reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease

• Eat frequently – have 6 meals a day – this helps keep your blood sugar more constant.

• Completely avoid milk and alcohol.

• Drink plenty of fresh, filtered water (8-10 glasses per day) and no pop or soft drinks.

• Supplementation is essential – use all 90 essential nutrients and additional antioxidants.

Diabetics lose vital minerals and vitamins in their urine and this further complicates the disease. In addition, these same nutrients, when they are replaced will actually reverse the disease and prevent further complications.

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September 7, 2009 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for May 18, 2008

Some quick searches tonight and I find a link between proteins (Amino Acids) and blood sugar.

Protein and Blood Sugar

What does protein do for my blood sugar control? The body uses protein for growth, maintenance, and energy. Protein is found in meats, poultry, fish, milk and other dairy products, eggs, beans, peas, and lentils. Starches and vegetables also have small amounts of protein. Lean meats and low-fat dairy products are the better diet choices to help prevent high blood cholesterol levels.

As you begin to eat for better control of your diabetes, protein will become an essential part of your diet. Protein serves as a blood sugar stabilizer. When eaten in combination with other foods, protein will prevent your blood sugar levels from rising too high or falling too low.

Protein Metabolism

During protein metabolism, some protein is converted to glucose in a process called gluconeogenesis, the formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources.

The basic difference between protein and carbohydrate is that while carbohydrates are made out of simple sugars (carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen), protein is made from amino acids (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sufur). The nitrogen is a basic component of the protein’s amino acids and accounts for 13 to 20% of the total mass.

The first step in protein metabolism is to break it into its constituent amino acids. These are absorbed into the blood stream.

The second step is to break down the amino acids into their constituent parts–catabolism, if you want to get technical about it. This removes the nitrogen or amino group from the amino acids. The process is called deamination.

Deamination breaks the amino group down into ammonia and what is termed the carbon skeleton. Ammonia is converted to urea, filtered through the kidneys, and excreted in urine. The carbon skeleton–which is composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen–can then by used either for protein synthesis, energy production (ATP), or converted to glucose by gluconeogenesis.

Most authorities believe that the amount of protein converted to glucose is quite small, except under conditions of intense exercise or metablic starvation. Under these conditions amino acids produce the major source of glucose for blood sugar maintenance.

September 7, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 17, 2008

For the past several weeks I’ve had a couple of different things happening and I’m not really sure of the cause. I’ve felt a subtle numbness in the tips of my fingers that seems to come and go. I’ve also had itchy watery eyes and I can’t seem to put my finger on it either. One day I’ll try chromium and then another day I’ll try calcium. They both seem to help stop my watering eyes and I’ve even noticed that eating fruits like apples, pears and bananas will improve my eyes on days that I don’t take any supplements. Weird…

The only thing I have in the back of my mind is diabetes or high/low blood sugar but I’ll need more research before I go running after that. Here’s what I found:

Calcium, vitamin D may lower diabetes risk
By Stephen Daniells, 03-Apr-2006

High intake of calcium and vitamin D, particularly from supplements, may lower the risk of diabetes by 33 per cent, say American scientists, as a leading European clinician reports that over a billion people are vitamin D deficient.

A growing body of epidemiological, animal and clinical studies has linked insufficient levels of vitamin D and calcium to a broad range of health problems such as osteoporosis, cancer and autoimmune diseases.

Vitamin D is found in low concentrations in some food, and most vitamin D is manufactured in the skin on exposure to sunlight. Recent studies have shown that sunshine levels in some northern countries are so weak during the winter months that the body makes no vitamin D at all.

Indeed, at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Glasgow yesterday, Professor Roger Bouillon from the University of Leuven reported that more than a billion people of all ages worldwide needed to up their vitamin D intake.

The new study, published in the journal Diabetes Care (Vol. 29, pp. 650-656), used data from the Nurses Health Study, and related the vitamin D and calcium intake of 83,779 registered nurses to the incidence of type-2 diabetes.

None of the women had diabetes at the start of the study, and the average body mass index was 24 kilograms per square metre (meaning that very few of the women were overweight or obese, factors that are strongly associated with increased risk of diabetes).

After 20 years of follow-up, during which time dietary and supplementary intakes were measured using validated food frequency questionnaires every two to four years, the authors concluded: “A combined daily intake of more than 1,200 milligrams of calcium and more than 800 international units (IU) of vitamin D was associated with a 33 per cent lower risk of type-2 diabetes.”

Interestingly, lead researcher Anastassios Pitas, from the Tufts-New England Medical Center, found that dietary intake of vitamin D did not result in a statistically significant benefit. But women who consumed from that 400 IU vitamin D per day from supplements had a 13 per cent lower risk of diabetes, compared to women who consumed less than 100 IU per day.

Both dietary calcium and supplements were associated with significant decreased risks of type 2 diabetes, with women who had total daily intakes of calcium greater than 1,200 milligrams had a 21 per cent lower risk compared to women who had intakes less than 600 mg per day.

“For both vitamin D and calcium, intakes from supplements rather than from diet were significantly associated with a lower range of type 2 diabetes,” said Pittas.

The mechanism as to why vitamin D and calcium may reduce the risk of diabetes is not clear, but the researchers proposed that the two nutrients work together. Vitamin D facilitates calcium absorption in the intestine, while calcium is reported play a role in normalising glucose intolerance.

The researchers did not rule out a direct role of vitamin D, independent of calcium, noting that studies have reported that vitamin D insufficiency had been linked to insulin resistance and reduced function of pancreatic beta-cells.

Strengths of this study included the large-scale and long-term follow-up, but the authors note the inability of the study design to measure all the possible confounders. Also, no blood samples were taken to measure serum vitamin D levels.

“If these results are confirmed in prospective studies or in randomised trials, they will have important health implications because both of these interventions can be implemented easily and inexpensively to prevent type 2 diabetes,” concluded the researchers.

An estimated 19 million people are affected by diabetes in the EU 25, equal to four per cent of the total population. This figure is projected to increase to 26 million by 2030.

In the US, there are over 20 million people with diabetes, equal to seven per cent of the population. The total costs are thought to be as much as $132 billion, with $92 billion being direct costs from medication, according to 2002 American Diabetes Association figures.

September 7, 2009 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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