Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for January 10, 2008


 

I raced home from work today to get to the Naturopath on time. I’ve been wondering about these results for weeks now. I have my own theories on what my deficiencies are but I’ve wasted enough time and money guessing. I’m really hoping that I can sit down, read this report and get on with it.

She hands me the report and she reviews it page by page. The first page has the essential and non-essential amino acids and my level of each one. I have five amino acids on the low end of the scale: Methionine, Threonine, Aspartate, Asparagine and Glycine.

After the first page of amino acids, it groups them together to create different markers based on their role in the body.

Gastrointestinal Markers, Magnesium Dependant Markers, B6, B12 and Folate Dependant Markers, Detoxification Markers, Neurological Markers and Urea Cycle Metabolites.

After that, it has a page that provides a supplimentation schedule and another section called presumptive needs / implied conditions. The last three pages go into detail for each identified deficiency and explains the possible causes.

Very details and a little overwhelming. I’m a little disappointed that the Naturopath doesn’t offer anything more than just reading the report. I suppose it’s a no brainer to start supplementing the ones that I am low in but she doesn’t mention it. In a way I’m glad because I’d like to do some research on what all this means and review what I’ve already tried and come to my own conclusions. How do I know it’s accurate? I looks just like the hair analysis and that was a complete waste of time.

As we finish up the report, she mentions that my level of Phosphoethanolamine is lower than normal and suggests trying Lecithin. I’ve never come across it in my research although they consider it to be a nonessential amino acid. Here’s the summary from the report and I’m beginning to think this test is very accurate:

Phophoethanolamine, a nonessential phosphorous bearing amino acid, is low in this urine specimen. Phosphoethanolamine is derived from dietary sources and is also formed endogenously from serine via phosphorylation of ethanolamine. When ethanolamine is high or normal and phosphoethanolamine is low there is a presumptive need for magnesium (magnesium dependent kinase). Phosphoethanolamine is a precursor of phosphotidyl choline, choline and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. If low phosphoethanolamine results in low acetylcholine, and there is insufficient choline from dietary lecithin, there may be depressed activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (eg. decreased peristalsis, ability to sweat), and poor memory and cognitive function. Low phosphoethanolamine is usually the result of magnesium deficiency or protein malnutrition.

Wow! That last line really hit a home run with me. I need to take all this information back to Dr. Google to see what I can find.

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June 2, 2009 - Posted by | Health | , , , ,

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