Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 07, 2007


When I first discovered my magnesium deficiency, I thought all I needed to do was take magnesium and fix the problem. It wasn’t until later that I discovered how important a mineral balance can be. At the time, I never really thought to do any research on calcium because it was in the opposite direction. I find it really interesting reading about it now.

Zinc, along with calcium and magnesium, are called the sedative elements. All three help inhibit excessive sympathetic nervous system dominance.

More info on calcium:

The Calcium and Magnesium Relationship

In addition to all of its enzyme functions, magnesium is an important component of cell membranes. As a result, it is vitally important in regulating what goes into, and what comes out of, all the body’s cells. This makes magnesium crucial to mineral balance.

In simple solutions, such as salt water, all dissolved minerals are evenly dispersed. This is not so in living cells, where they’re distributed differently, depending on their functions. This specialized distribution requires energy, and it’s absolutely vital to life processes and health.

Calcium and sodium ions, for the most part, are kept outside the cells, while magnesium and potassium are kept inside the cells. These four minerals are the most plentiful in the body, and collectively they are known as electrolytes.

When the level of magnesium within the cells falls below normal, calcium and sodium rush inside, while potassium and magnesium leak out. This can cause big problems.

Calcium excites nerves, whereas magnesium calms them down.

The normal concentration of magnesium ion inside cells is easily 10,000 times more than that of intracellular calcium ions – under healthy conditions. But if the amount of magnesium in a cell falls, for any reason, calcium ions flow into the cell. With this abnormal situation, a couple of things happen:

Higher than normal calcium inside a cell excites a lot of reactions. It puts the cell into hyperactive state. Heart and blood-vessel cells are especially excitable because they need to react rapidly during sudden stress situation. As such, they are truly vulnerable to deficits in magnesium that allow abnormal rises in calcium, with resulting hyperactivity.

Sometimes, a hyperactive state is just what you want. It is the essence of the body’s “fight-or-flight” reaction to danger. Without calcium, there is no muscle contraction, and without muscle contraction there is no fight or flight.

But in normal circumstances, you don’t want excess muscle contractions. The muscles would soon cramp, bringing on severe muscle pain. To relax, the muscles need magnesium. Magnesium, physiologically the opposite of calcium, relaxes muscles. Under normal, healthy cellular conditions, magnesium levels inside muscle cells are high and calcium levels are low, so that the muscles can relax. This is just one way in which calcium enhances and allows the fight-or-flight reaction while magnesium calms it all down.

If calcium levels inside a cell get especially high because of low magnesium, the cell physically changes. High calcium tends to make things stiff and hard. But if soft tissue begins to get hard, it’s a real problem — it’s called “calcification”. In artery and heart cells, the stiffness caused by calcification hampers proper function and can be an important aspect of heart disease.

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August 7, 2007 - Posted by | Health | , ,

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