Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for June 07, 2007


For the past three days the vibration has returned. I thought I was doing good with the added calcium but I guess not. Tomorrow I’ll switch to taking my regular magnesium . I’ll try it in a lower dosage of 250 mg at each meal for 750 mg. Last time I took magnesium alone, it caused my hands to go cold so I’ll be interested to see if that happens again.

I really need to find out if the magnesium is the cause of the vibration or is it just helping relax my nerves and it’s something else. Can an iron deficiency cause nervousness? Like most vitamin and mineral deficiencies, there seems to be no standard for the symptoms.

Every web site tell you something different. Most of them don’t mention nervousness with an iron deficiency but one did… In fact, it contained deficiency dosage and different stages of deficiency that shows it’s possible to have an iron deficiency and a normal Hemoglobin.

First Signs of Iron Deficiency
Home | Worth Knowing | First Signs of Iron Deficiency

If the body does not get enough iron, it is capable of falling back on its own reserves for a while. That is why iron deficiency with its typical symptoms usually becomes noticeable very late. If you feel exhausted and tired more often than usual, notice slight forgetfulness or are nervous, irritated and weary, this might be the first signs of iron deficiency. There are of course other illnesses which have similar symptoms. For this reason, please leave the exact diagnosis to your doctor.

If you notice the symptoms listed below, it is advisable to let your doctor check your blood iron values in any case. The sooner you identify the start of iron deficiency, the better it can be treated.

  • fatigue
  • reduction in physical and mental capacity
  • forgetfulness
  • poor concentration
  • attacks of weakness
  • headaches
  • nervousness
  • loss of appetite
  • gastro-intestinal disturbances
  • shortness of breath
  • heart complaints
  • attacks of weakness
  • increased susceptibility to infection
  • pale, brittle, dry skin
  • brittle flattened finger nails
  • cracked lips
  • loss of hair that is often dull and split

Iron Deficiency Therapy – Possibilities and Limitations

A daily dose of 80 – 100 mg free iron is considered as standard treatment for iron deficiency. Depending on the quality of the preparation, various amounts of iron are absorbed by the body. During a period of iron deficiency, the body increases the iron absorption rate from 10 % to approximately 50 % on its own, in order to quickly prevent the risk of iron deficiency anemia.

The aim of treatment is to completely eliminate the iron deficit and to replenish the iron stores. Accordingly, treatment can take, where iron depots are empty, up to 3 – 6 months, depending on the actual daily amount of iron taken. When treatment takes so long, it is important that you tolerate the iron preparation well. It is not rare that gastric intolerance hinders compliance. Treatment then only slowly achieves its aim – if at all. Please ask your doctor for a preparation that offers the body as much iron as possible and that is also well tolerated.

Iron deficiency stages: Latent iron deficiency

In latent iron deficiency, the iron stored in the depots has been used up. The organism now automatically falls back on the iron present in the blood. During this stage, you may start to experience unpleasant symptoms such as headache, susceptibility to cold, increasing nervousness and decrease in vitality. Treatment of latent iron deficiency lasts for approx. 6 – 8 weeks. Only after this period iron depots are replenished.

Serum ferritin: < 30 mg/l
Hemoglobin: Normal to slightly low.

And can iron levels effect the adrenals? Yup, it sure can.

Iron deficiency is known to depress the immune system, making the body more vulnerable to infection. Thyroid, para-thyroid and adrenal gland function are all influenced by an imbalance of iron.

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June 10, 2007 - Posted by | Health | , , , , , ,

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