Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for March 11, 2007

Also came across this as a suggested dosage. I wonder if I can find anywhere that will do the zinc test? I’m in the third week already!

One Suggested Supplemetation Regime

During any period of supplementation the zinc taste test should be repeated at appropriate intervals and the subsequent dose of zinc adjusted up to the required level. In addition, it should be noted that when starting any programme of zinc supplementation the starting dose should always be a minimum dose of 15-25mg. This is then increased slowly in the following manner stopping at the required level as demanded by the results of the taste test.

  • In the first week: take one 15-25mg dose per day.
  • Second week: two 15-25mg capsules or tablets per day.
  • Third week: one 50mg dose per day.
  • Fourth week: two 50mg doses per day.
  • Fifth and subsequent weeks: three 50mg doses per day.

The reason for this protracted introduction is that zinc treatment, in the presence of zinc deficiency, may initially induce a feeling of fatigue or depression: a slow introduction reduces this possibility. This initial paradoxical response (zinc is normally stimulant in its action – by improving vigor and vitality) is not inevitable but if it does occur it may discourage the user from continuing the treatment. Continued use, after two to three weeks, will normally result in the expected improvement in vitality. Tiredness persisting beyond this time suggests the need for additional oil supplements or the anti-oxidant vitamins or minerals.

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March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for March 11, 2007

Last night was still a very weak vibration and this morning it was still weak but it seemed to stop and start again. The biggest difference is in my nose. The blockage/stuffiness that I usually have has been reduced by at least 95%.

Today I took the same dosage as yesterday except I took my regular three doses of magnesium. 50 mg of Zinc / 1 mg of Copper and 1500 mg of Magnesium. This dosage seems to be working and in my google searches, I came across something called the zinc taste test.

The doctor in the walk in clinic a few days ago said he’d never heard of a test for zinc. Well someone else certainly has:

Zinc Taste Test

The zinc taste test is used to evaluate this common state of deficiency. This simple and non-toxic test was devised and developed by Professor Derek Bryce-Smith, Professor of Biochemistry at Reading University. Professor Bryce Smith is an established authority on zinc and numerous other biochemical topics.

The test solution is zinc sulphate in purified water, at a concentration of 1 gram/litre. Once prepared the solution should be stored in a refrigerator and discarded after six months. The solution should be removed from storage and left at room temperature for about two hours before carrying out the test.

The test is based on the knowledge that the functions of taste and smell are dependent upon there being sufficient zinc available in the body. Thus, if zinc is deficient then taste function will be diminished. This principle is utilised in the taste test by offering a standard test solution of zinc sulphate for tasting. The response is then compared with a series of defined standards and the zinc status thus determined.

The test involves taking a sip of the solution (approximately 5-10 mls – using the beaker supplied) and holding it in the mouth for ten seconds, timed with a watch. Due to the possible influence of recently consumed food or drink on the taste experienced it is essential that neither be taken for approximately one hour before the test.

The defined standards are:

Grade one response: no specific taste sensation: tastes like plain water. This indicates a major deficiency of zinc requiring a supplement of at least 150 milligrammes (mg) of zinc per day.

Grade two response: no immediate taste is noticed but, within the ten seconds of the test, a `dry’ or `metallic’ taste is experienced. This indicates a moderate deficiency requiring a supplement of 100 mg of zinc per day.

Grade three response: an immediate slight taste is noted, which increases with time over the ten second period. This indicates a deficiency of minor degree requiring a supplement of 50 mg of zinc per day.

Grade four response: an immediate, strong and unpleasant taste is experienced. This indicates that no zinc deficiency exists. If this is the response to the first test done then obviously the diet already contains sufficient zinc and no supplement need be taken. If this is the response, however, after a period of zinc supplementation then the diet, prior to the supplement being given, must be assumed to have been deficient. Thus, if a relapse to this deficient state is to be further prevented a regular maintenance dose of zinc is required. One 15-20 mg dose per day is usually sufficient for this purpose.

During any period of supplementation the taste test should be repeated at appropriate intervals and the subsequent dose of zinc adjusted according to the above instructions. In addition, it should be noted that when starting any programme of zinc supplementation the starting dose should always be a minimum dose of 15-25 mg. This is then increased slowly in the following manner stopping at the required level as demanded by the results of the taste test. Thus in the first week: take one 15 mg (or 25 mg) dose per day. Second week: two 15 mg (or 25 mg) capsules or tablets per day. Third week: one 50 mg dose per day. Fourth week: two 50 mg doses per day. Fifth and subsequent weeks: three 50 mg doses per day.

The reason for this protracted introduction is that zinc treatment, in the presence of zinc deficiency, may initially induce a feeling of fatigue or depression: a slow introduction reduces this possibility. This initial paradoxical response (zinc is normally stimulant in its action – by improving vigour and vitality) is not inevitable but if it does occur it may discourage the user from continuing the treatment.

Continued use, after two to three weeks, will normally result in the expected improvement in vitality. Tiredness persisting beyond this time suggests the need for additional oil supplements or the anti-oxidant vitamins or minerals. Zinc should be taken each day after food.

If unusual tiredness occurs during the initial stages of treatment it should be taken at night before retiring to bed. In this way it will benefit any difficulty in sleeping and promote increased vitality the following day.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Adrenal Burnout

One of the most common symptoms of copper toxicity, adrenal burnout, is extreme fatigue, caused by depression of adrenal gland activity. Weak or exhausted adrenal glands are the major cause of hypoglycemia and hypoglycemia is the major cause of the fatigue suffered by a copper-toxic individual.

It is important to recognize the various types of fatigue. For example, a common type of fatigue is experienced when an individual is overworked. However, once that person gets some rest, his fatigue will vanish. Another type of fatigue is when an individual feels drained and feels like sleeping forever. He could sleep twenty hours and still wake up feeling exhausted. The difference between these two types of fatigue is one of simply being tired and the other is being burned out.

Infections: Bacterial and/or Yeast

Burnout cannot be cured by the simple prescription of rest. The adrenal glands are exhausted. They simply fail to respond to stimuli, whether painful or pleasurable. Excessive copper toxicity is the most single common cause of adrenal burnout. Another factor responsible for adrenal burnout or adrenal exhaustion is chronic stress, such as being the type of person who is a compulsive stress-seeker for various reasons.

A yeast overgrowth frequently ensues from antibiotic therapy. Believe it or not, the patient is often advised that they are suffering from a candida yeast infection and are more often than not advised to stop eating products that contain yeast in any form. The overgrowth of yeast is due to an internal metabolic dysfunction caused by a copper deficiency or bio-unavailability, and while aggravated by, is not due to external causes, such as yeast in foods and food supplements. Copper is a great infection fighter and if it is not available to an individual, infections can and do take over. Candida yeast infections can usually be corrected or improved by increasing copper availability.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Inordinate craving for chocolate is a sign of copper toxicity? Yup. Had that for years…

Specific Food Cravings Indicative of Copper Toxicity

Individuals suffering from copper toxicity have quite specific food cravings. It is ironic but true, that individuals crave foods, which are high in the very minerals they are deficient in (bio-unavailability). A mineral is bio-unavailable when there is a deficiency of essential nutrients necessary to utilize the mineral. A cardinal indicator of a copper toxic individual is an inordinate craving for chocolate, a food which is extremely high in copper.

People generally crave the foods that they are allergic to. If you ask a person to write down all of their favorite foods, you could discover that all the foods on their preferred food list would make them feel better, if only temporarily. In other words, initially they would physically and emotionally feel a positive response. Whether you are craving chocolate or avocados, or any other foods high in copper content, if you persist in eating these foods day after day, there is an underlying reason why you are eating them.

Many individuals have an intense craving for beef (particularly hamburger) and for a good reason. These individuals are usually deficient in zinc, usually due to constant acute stress. Aside from oysters, herring, oatmeal, wheat bran, and brewers yeast, foods which are not generally eaten in large quantities, hamburger is one of the richest sources of dietary zinc. Individuals who are capable of enduring acute stress crave meat and various seafoods, which are high in zinc, such as oysters and herring. There is a definite link between food cravings, mineral and vitamin deficiencies and disease. You can learn a great deal about a person by the foods that they eat, and more specifically, by the foods they have an intense craving for. Most Americans eat only twelve to sixteen foods consistently, compared to primitive tribes who eat a diet that frequently consists of sixty to sixty-five foods consistently. If you write down what you eat all week you will more likely than not; note that you have repeatedly eaten much the same foods over and over again.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Nutrition/Vitamins

Hair loss occurs when the diet is inadequate in the B vitamins – especially B6, biotin, inositol and folic acid; and the minerals magnesium, sulfur and zinc. The B vitamins, especially B5 (pantothenic acid and B3 (niacin), are especially important for hair growth.

Certain essential amino acids are found to control the thinning and thickening of hair in laboratory animals. For example, when rats were fed a diet deficient in magnesium, they lost their hair in bunches. The situation was even more serious with some other B-vitamins. When rats were fed a diet low in biotin or inositol, they became hairless! This nutrient-deficient condition was found to be reversible. When the rats were fed a diet that was rich in B vitamins, it resulted in the complete restoration of hair.

Heavy intake of vitamin supplements, in some cases, have resulted in stimulating hair growth. Men deficient in vitamin B6 often lose their hair. When they are deficient in folic acid, some men became completely bald! As in case of animals, when normal intake of theses vitamins were restored, the hair also returned in most instances.

Taking large doses of vitamin A (100,000 IU or more daily) for a long period of time, on the other hand, can trigger hair loss, but stopping the vitamin A will reverse the problem. As in case of deficiencies, often the hair grows back when the cause is corrected.

Essential fatty acids (flaxseed oil, primrose oil, and salmon oil are good sources) improves hair texture. Prevents dry, brittle hair.

Raw thymus glandular stimulates immune function and improves functioning capacity of glands. Dosage: 500 mg daily. (Caution: Do not give this supplement to a child.)

Poor circulation can also hamper hair growth. A study of young men diagnosed with male pattern baldness showed that the blood flow to their scalps was on average 2.6 times lower than in a control group. In many individuals the extremities, including the top of the head, are the most difficult places in the body for blood to reach. Follicles which are constantly deprived of blood, and therefore nutrients, cannot produce hair properly.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Hair Loss – Vitamins, Diet and Supplements

  • Vitamin A is an essential vitamin to help you with hair loss and thinning hair. However, be sure to not take more than 25,000 IU daily as it could lead to more hair loss or other severe problems.
  • Vitamin C and E are two antioxidants vitamins that are important for keeping your hair, looking fuller and shinier, and scalp healthy.
  • Vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin, deficiencies are associated with an increased production of sebum (oil produced by the hair follicles). However, too much B2 and increased sebum production may result in reduced strength of the hair shaft.
  • Vitamin B3, Niacin – can produce a skin “flush”, an uncomfortable feeing, or “hot flash”. If you do decide to take this, take the minimum and see how your body reacts first.
  • Vitamin B6, pyridoxine hydrochloride – studies have shown B6 to help with healthy hair growth.
  • Vitamin B12
  • Folic acid is known for its importance in healthy cellular activity, proper cell division, and proper hair growth.
  • Biotin – Helps produce keratin, may prevent graying and hair loss.
  • Inositol – Keeps hair follicles healthy at the cellular level.

Many of these vitamins are provided by taking a good daily multi-vitamin and from eating a healthy diet. Adjusting your diet will slow down the loss of hair as many of the vitamins that help you with health hair may be provided by the diet you eat.

Vitamin C can be found in several vegetables and fruit, especially in citrus fruits. Vitamin E is known to help with circulation in your scalp area. This is found in various beans, as well as oils. Sources of B2 come from grains, or breads and cereals, milk and milk products as well as meat, poultry, and fish. Niacin (B3) food sources include brewer’s yeast, wheat germ, fish, chicken, turkey and meat. B6 comes from brewer’s yeast, liver, whole grain cereals, vegetables, organ meats and egg yolk. Sources of B12 include chicken, fish, eggs and milk. Biotin is found in yeast, grains, liver, rice, milk, egg yolk, liver, kidney, soy and barley. Foods rich in inositol are whole grains, yeast, liver, citrus fruits, eggs, rice, and milk. With the addition of inositol, you will be able to promote hair growth beneath the scalp and have healthier hair.

…And lastly, supplement such as saw palmetto and zinc are very helpful for those looking for natural ways to help with hair loss. Saw palmetto is a type of fruit that is legendary in helping to solve problems with baldness and prostate health in the U.S. and throughout Europe.

Zinc is best known to effect hair loss when there is an absence of a substantial amount of the nutrient. Zinc deficiency not only produces problems with hair loss, but also with changes in the scalp. The scalp may become too dry or flaky and may often times be irritated because of the lack of nutrients. There are many times where zinc has also shown to be effective in stopping hair from turning gray.

Stopping hair loss and giving yourself a great looking, healthy head, of hair is not that difficult. Making sure that you are getting the vitamins you need, whether from a multi-vitamin or food sources, and even supplementing that with zinc and saw palmetto.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

   

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