Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for January 06, 2007


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I start going through the blog to see if I have missed anything. Looking for anything, any clues that I may have overlooked. I come across an entry on April 29th and this is when I first discovered the Niacin deficiency. It mentions about a how a deficiency can cause anxiety and lower the absorption of the A, D and E vitamins. How interesting. It wasn’t until I saw the iridologst a few months later did I discover that I had anxiety and this was before I tried taking vitamins A, D and E to know I had a deficiency.

Another interesting point? Niacin is usually the only vitamin that is not included in a multivitamin. They normally use Niacinamide instead at a very low dosage. I have been taking 150-300 mg of Niacin everyday since last April. Was I taking enough to correct a deficiency?

Niacin
Niacin (nicotinic acid) is another one of the B-complex vitamins that may be linked to neurological damage. Mild niacin deficiency is associated with weakness, tremor, anxiety, depression and irritability.

Niacin helps increase energy through improving food utilization and has been used beneficially for treating fatigue, irritability, and digestive disorders, such as diarrhea, constipation, and indigestion. It may also stimulate extra hydrochloric acid production.

Nicotinic acid also helps reduce blood pressure and, very importantly, acts as an agent to lower serum cholesterol. Treatment with about 2 grams a day of nicotinic acid has produced significant reductions in both blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

In general, niacin deficiency affects every cell, especially in those systems with rapid turnover, such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system. Other than photosensitivity, the first signs of niacin deficiency are noted as decreased energy production and problems with maintaining healthy functioning of the skin and intestines. These symptoms include weakness and general fatigue, anorexia, indigestion, and skin eruptions. These can progress to other problems, such as a sore, red tongue, canker sores, nausea, vomiting, tender gums, bad breath, and diarrhea. The neurological symptoms may begin with irritability, insomnia, and headaches and then progress to tremors, extreme anxiety and depression. The skin will worsen, as will the diarrhea and inflammation of the mouth and intestinal tract. There will be a lack of stomach acid production (achlorhydria) and a decrease in fat digestion and, thus, lower availability from food absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins, such as A, D, and E.

Found this entry from May 4th, 2006:

Diagnosis and Treatment

Niacin deficiency must be distinguished from other causes of stomatitis, glossitis, diarrhea, and dementia. Diagnosis is easy when the clinical findings include skin and mouth lesions, diarrhea, delirium, and dementia. More often, the condition is less fully developed, and a history of a diet lacking niacin and tryptophan is significant.

Multiple deficiencies of B vitamins and protein often occur together; therefore, a balanced diet is needed. Supplemental niacinamide 300 to 1000 mg/day should be given orally in divided doses. In most cases, 300 to 500 mg is sufficient. Niacinamide is generally used to treat deficiency states, because niacin can cause flushing, itching, burning, or tingling sensations, whereas niacinamide does not; however, niacinamide does not possess hypolipidemic or vasodilating properties as does niacin.

When oral therapy is precluded because of diarrhea or lack of patient cooperation, 100 to 250 mg should be injected sc bid to tid. In encephalopathic states, 1000 mg po plus 100 to 250 mg IM is recommended. Other B-complex vitamins should also be given in therapeutic dosages.

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January 7, 2007 - Posted by | Health | , , , ,

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