Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for December 30, 2006

Here’s another thought. I’ve come to the realization that I do have a candida overgrowth. Although I’ve had success with my allergies from avoiding microwaved food, I do still have stuffiness in my nose. So if candida is a fungus, and and fungus can cause sinusitis…

Here’s part of my blog from May 10th, 2006 and although I found it very interesting at the time, I never pursued it and didn’t make the connection to candida until now:

“Sinusitis can be caused by both bacteria and fungus. A bacterial infection usually occurs after a cold or virus when the congestion in the nose stops drainage from the sinuses. This fluid buildup in the sinuses breeds bacteria and may cause sinusitis. However, it has recently been proven that sinusitis can also be an immune response to a fungus.

In fact, the Mayo Clinic recently published a study which found that over 90% of sinus infections are fungal rather than bacterial. Thus, antibiotics (which are the most commonly prescribed treatment) are completely ineffective (not to mention damaging to the immune system) over 90% of the time.”

 I get so annoyed when I read things like this. The most commonly prescribed treatment for sinusitis is completely ineffective over 90% of the time. This is so unbelievable!! With today’s knowledge and technology… this is totally unacceptable. Am I the only who thinks like this?

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December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | 1 Comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

And some more…it gets more and more interesting as I do more searches:

Tryptophan
Dietary Supplement

HTML version Author: Kimberly Dick

Tryptophan has often been hyped as “nature’s prozac” or “nature’s serotonin solution.” While certainly an exaggeration, these extravagant claims have some basis in fact.

Serotonin deficiency is often a major factor in depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and weight gain, to name a few. Simply supplementing serotonin when there is a deficiency would appear to be the easiest solution; however, since serotonin cannot pass through the blood-brain barrier, direct supplementation with serontonin is in fact ineffective.

Most antidepressant drugs available today fall into the category of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil. These drugs work by preventing the excessive uptake of serotonin in the brain, leaving more available in the synapses between neurons. However, many of these drugs have considerable side effects, in addition to being fairly expensive.

Unlike serotonin, tryptophan (or more accurately, its breakdown product 5-hydroxytryptophan) can pass through the blood-brain barrier. Thus supplementation of tryptophan would appear to be a simple and natural alternative to SSRI drugs. Since tryptophan can be cheaply produced and is not regulated as a drug, it is a much cheaper alternative. As well, it does not have the side effects of many drugs as it is naturally occurring in the body.

Tryptophan on its own works best in depression cases where psychobiologic arousal is high, and serotonin production is inadequate to balance the effects of dopamine and norepinephrine – resulting in a anxious, agitated state. For more apathetic, vegetative depressive cases, tryptophan supplementation is more effective when combined with supplementation of tyrosine, a precursor to dopamine/norepinephrine.

Serotonin deficiency has been implicated in cases of obesity, as it is associated with the brain’s perception of hunger and satiety. Excessive intake of sugars and other carbohydrates is known to increase brain serotonin levels. By increasing serotonin levels, tryptophan can function as an appetite suppressant at low doses, and is sometimes very effective for weight loss.

As well, tryptophan has been successfully used as a sleep aid. Serotonin does play a role in sleep regulation, but more importantly, serotonin is the precursor to melatonin, a hormone crucial to the sleep cycle. On its own, melatonin supplementation has been shown to be an effective treatment for insomnia; however, combining melatonin with tryptophan may prove even more effective.

5-HTP: The New Tryptophan Alternative

The compound 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) is the intermediate product in the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin. It was first offered as an over-the-counter supplement in 1994, and is marketed as a natural antidepressant. Since tryptophan is still banned by the FDA and is available in the United States only by prescription, 5-HTP has been offered as an alternative.

Since it is a direct precursor to serotonin, 5-HTP is considerably more active than tryptophan. It is thought to have effectiveness comparable to many prescription antidepressant drugs.

Unlike tryptophan, which was and still is produced in large quantities in vats of bacteria, 5-HTP is generally extracted from the Griffonia seed. It can be and sometimes is produced synthetically from tryptophan, but it is generally cheaper to extract it naturally. This allows 5-HTP to be offered at a more reasonable price, although still considerably higher than tryptophan was when it was offered as a nutritional supplement.

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I just did a search based on the previous post suggesting that anxiety improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan. It goes on to say that a marginal B6 deficiency causing a serotonin depletion, may have produced the increased anxiety.

So here’s what I found:

Serotonin

Monoamine neurotransmitter that provides a chemical link between the neurons of the brain. Natural serotonin is produced by the body during the digestion of healthy foods that contain the amino acid L-Tryptophan.

Serotonin is one of the chemicals which regulates emotion, and it is thought to play a large role in the biology of depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, migraine, sexuality and appetite.

People who are suffering from problems in these health areas might have a serotonin deficiency. This deficiency may be caused by poor eating habits.

As well as being found in the brain, serotonin is found in abundance in the digestive system as well as the blood stream. When the proper foods are digested, the body creates natural serotonin.

For example, whey protein milkshakes contain the amino acid L-Tryptophan. When the protein is digested, the body converts the amino acid into natural serotonin as needed. This is the way nature intended for you to get your natural serotonin, from the digestion of various healthy foods.

Ask your doctor if natural serotonin may be an alternative to drugs or a complimentary treatment. In the treatment of depression and anxiety, SSRI pills (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) are often taken in hopes of increasing the brain’s serotonin levels by increasing the amount of time that it stays in the brain.

However if the body has a shortage of natural serotonin, due to a poor diet, the drugs are simply trying to make the most out of the little bit of supply there is in the body.

The question is, why not also increase the supply, instead of only trying to make the little bit there is linger for a longer time? This is not to say drugs don’t have their place, consult your doctor.

But think about this. If someone has a shortage of Vitamin C and it was causing the symptoms of scurvy, would they take a drug to make the little bit of vitamin they did have last longer in their body? They might, but why not also just drink some orange juice and naturally get some more of the vitamin into the body? Hello, hello? Is health food a big mystery?

The human body is designed to produce natural serotonin from foods that contain amino acids. If someone is very low on serotonin it might be because the food they eat is junk and does not have the nutrients the body needs to support proper health.

Here is what can happen:

1. You eat a junk diet of processed and packaged foods.

2. You find yourself with a serotonin deficiency because your body can’t make any from the junk food you eat.

3. You either make the effort to eat whey protein and similar health foods that your body can use to create natural serotonin … or you don’t.

Most people don’t. Sad but true. They end up at the doctor and buy expensive pills because they wouldn’t make an effort to eat some health foods.

Here are three ways to get more natural serotonin into your body.

1. Health Foods: Drink a whey protein milkshake every day. We do. We put a scoop of chocolate flavor in a blender with a half a banana and some skim milk. It tastes delicious and helps keep your tummy flat too.

If using a blender is too much work you can get these milkshakes in ready to drink packages. Put some in the refrigerator and enjoy one a day.

2. L-Tryptophan Supplements: These were off the market for a long time due to one bad batch made by a foreign company. Now they are back and have passed the regulatory requirements for purity. One company that makes these is Doctor’s Best.

3. These super high quality brain and mood formulas are made by a company we have great respect for. The editors of this website have used many of their products with great results. Their pure fish oil is also recommended for support of brain health.

I’m trying so many things right now for candida but this does make a lot of sense. I’ve seen the supplement called 5-HTP but I never knew what it was: L-Tryptophan!

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for December 30, 2006

I’ve been telling my doctor for sometime now that I have some really low vitamin B deficiencies and luckily convinced him to give me a riboflavin injection. I noticed several improvements but he seems hung up on the anxiety diagnosis from the neurologist. Any research on B vitamins suggest that they all work together so if you have one deficiency, you’ll have several and my doctor didn’t seem interested in pursuing it any further.

Found this tonight from who else? Doctor Google:

Anxiety and the Vitamin B complex

Deficiencies of members of the vitamin B complex appear to be common in patients with agoraphobia (fear of open spaces). (1) The same is likely to be true for other anxiety-related conditions. We will review the evidence suggesting that individual members of this family may affect the experience of anxiety.

Inositol Supplementation

Inositol is a key intermediate of the phosphatidyl-inositol cycle, a second-messenger system used by several noradrenergic, serotonergic and cholinergic receptors. Since ingestion has been shown to raise inositol levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, this nutrient could potentially serve as an anti-anxiety agent.

Indeed, when a group of 21 patients with panic disorder either with or without agoraphobia received 12 grams daily of inositol or placebo in random order for 4 weeks each, the inositol supplement was associated with a significantly greater reduction in the frequency and severity of panic attacks and of agoraphobia than the placebo. Moreover, while the efficacy of the nutrient was judged to be comparable to that of imipramine, its side effects were minimal.

Niacinamide Supplementation

Niacinamide has been shown in an animal study to have benzodiazepine-like actions including anti-conflict, anti-aggressive, muscle relaxant and hypnotic effects. In contrast to niacin, it passes readily from the plasma to the cerebrospinal fluid where it is taken up into brain cells by a high-affinity accumulation system, suggesting it is the preferred form of vitamin B3 for the treatment of anxiety.

Lactate (which is associated with anxiety) reacts with niacinamide-adenine dinucleotide [NA[D.sub.+]] to form pyruvic acid and reduced NAD (NADH + [H.sup.+]). The equilibrium of this reaction favors lactate and NA[D.sup.+]), but it can be driven by adding excess NA[D.sup.+]. It may be that supplementation with niacinamide helps to drive the reaction, thus reducing lactate concentrations.

Anecdotal reports suggest that niacinamide has anxiolytic effects comparable to the benzodiazepines, and it may be particularly effective for patients whose anxiety is secondary to reactive hypoglycemia. Typical dosages are between 500 mg twice daily and 1,000 mg 3 times daily. Hoffer believes that the optimal daily dosage is just below the amount that produces nausea.

Thiamine Deficiency

Elevated lactate may also be caused by inadequate pyruvate dehydrogenase activity resulting from a thiamine deficiency or dependency. In that case, the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA is inhibited, fostering its conversion to lactic acid. Symptoms of a prolonged moderate thiamine deficiency may include fearfulness progressing to agitation as well as emotional instability and psychosomatic complaints.

When more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline thiamine-deficient were currently feeling significantly more anxiety–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. There are no published studies on the repletion of a borderline thiamine deficiency to treat anxiety.

Vitamin B6 Deficiency

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter which is involved in the regulation of anxiety, requires vitamin B6 for its synthesis; thus a deficiency of this vitamin may theoretically result in heightened anxiety. Vitamin B6 is also required for the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin, a neurotransmitter suspected of being involved in anxiety.

When over 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those found to be chronically deficient in vitamin B6 had a significantly greater tendency to become anxious, although they were not significantly more anxious at the time of the study. Also, in an open trial, patients with hyperventilation syndrome who also had abnormal xanthurenic acid excretion (an indicator of vitamin B6 deficiency) improved following the administration of pyridoxine and tryptophan, suggesting that a marginal B6 deficiency, by causing serotonin depletion, may have produced the syndrome.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Anxiety may be part of the neuropsychiatric syndrome seen in advanced cases of pernicious anemia which is well-known to be caused by B12 deficiency. When cobalamin levels of more than 1,000 healthy young men were studied, those who were chronically borderline vitamin B12-deficient were significantly more anxious at the time of the study–although they were not customarily nervous individuals. Whether B12 supplementation reduces anxiety when the vitamin is borderline deficient remains to be investigated.

References

1. Abbey LC. Agoraphobia. J Orthomol Psychiatry 11:243-59, 1982

2. Benjamin J et al. Inositol treatment in psychiatry. Psychopharmacol Bull 31(1):167-75, 1995a

3. Levine J et al. Inositol treatment raises CSF inositol levels. Brain Res 627(1):168-70, 1993

4. Benjamin J et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of inositol treatment for panic disorder. Am J Psychiatry 15(7):1084-6, 1995b

So I’ve had a blood test for vitamin B12 and Thiamine and both were normal. Still waiting on the results from the vitamin B6 test. I’ve long discovered the Niacin deficiency with some great results but not for anxiety and Inositol I don’t know much about. I believe it’s included in B complex.

December 30, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

   

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