Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 16, 2006


Exposing Multivitamin Dangers and Deficiencies
By Gailon Totheroh
CBN News Health & Science Reporter

CBN.com – Even if you are eating the recommended number of daily fruits and vegetables, you still arent receiving all the nutrients you need. And government research says those multivitamins don’t begin to cover the gap. CBN News decided to take a deeper look at what science is saying about vitamins you should be taking.

In an article published in June 2002, the American Medical Association reversed their 20-year stance against multivitamins. Just buy a cheap one, the AMA essentially said, that is all you need. But will the popular dime-a-day multis really help consumers attain optimum health?

Nutrition-oriented physician and neuroscientist Russell Blaylock says the answer to that question is “no,” because the vitamin world is a wasteland. “For instance, we’ve found a lot of youthfulness in vitamin D. A lot of these multivitamins don’t even have vitamin D. If they have it, they have it in very low concentrations,” he said.

On top of that, Janie Johnson, general manager of a vitamin store chain, says the media from magazines to TV ads have left consumers confused. “And they’re steered in all different ways and they really don’t know what to take,” she said.

To help consumers identify optimum multis, CBN News employed a set of vitamin standards obtained from scientific research. We used a total of 25 guidelines. At 4 points for each guideline, a perfect score would be 100. Of 55 multivitamins evaluated, only 10 scored a 40 or above. All of the nationally advertised major brands scored a 12 or lower.

Certainly, there is plenty of controversy about what is best in vitamins. For instance, a recent CBN News story on vitamins spoke of having the minerals calcium and magnesium in about equal amounts. But many nutritionists favor double the calcium over magnesium.

In the debate over calcium and magnesium, researchers had largely based their recommendations on the fact that bone has a ratio of 2 parts calcium to 1 part magnesium. However, newer research shows most people have a significant dietary intake of calcium and can experience excess calcium calcifying the blood stream. That can induce circulatory problems.

Also, magnesium is now found to be crucial to muscle function, protection against MSG and related toxins, and 300 chemical reactions in the body.

The bottom line is that individuals may need medical guidance in deciding their optimum intakes of calcium and magnesium.

Other viewers of our previous story were curious about the issue of riboflavin and ultraviolet light.

Our sources recommend no more than 10 milligrams of vitamin B2, or riboflavin. A French study found that excess riboflavin “in the organs and tissues that are permeable to light, such as the eye or skin” could damage cell components “causing inflammation and accelerating aging.” So it is important not to take too much riboflavin.

While 10 milligrams is still several times the government’s recommendation, some multis should be avoided since they contain daily portions of 50 or more milligrams.

Blaylock says some afflictions may require higher doses of B2. Those diseases include Alzheimer’s and the nerve damage that often afflicts diabetics. “Outside of that restricted use, I don’t think that the general public should take more than 10 milligrams of riboflavin,” he said.

And even the most popular individual supplement vitamin C needs supplementation.

Research shows vitamin C works best when matched with bioflavonoids, at a quantity of 70 percent of the vitamin. In other words, 500 milligrams of C should be accompanied by 350 milligrams of bioflavonoids.

Bioflavonoids include the rind of citrus fruit and the popular quercetin derived from apples and red onions.

Yet with all the new research about the right nutrients for staving off disease, Johnson says consumers still seek out multivitamins mostly when they are sick.

She said, “They’re not doing it for the prevention, they’re doing it because of an issue. And they want to feel good, and they don’t want to be fatigued. So, they really kind of need to do the research on their own.”

Blaylock says that assessment is right, that consumers need to do their homework, and do it based on good science and good sense. “You need to have a vitamin that has all its different components in the right concentrations and the right balances, complete, with no iron,” he said

Advertisements

August 16, 2006 - Posted by | Health | , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: