Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for August 16, 2006

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Okay. So I’ve been making some mistakes. I must watch my calcium intake and stop taking vitamin D. The last two days I’ve been drinking milk and I always have a yop for breakfast. The past two mornings I’ve had some weird chest pains that seem to get better when I take the magnesium. I think it’s because of the calcium as I had milk both days when I usually have bottled water.

Picked up my book from the library tonight: The Miracle of Magnesium

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August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2006

Exposing Multivitamin Dangers and Deficiencies
By Gailon Totheroh
CBN News Health & Science Reporter

CBN.com – Even if you are eating the recommended number of daily fruits and vegetables, you still arent receiving all the nutrients you need. And government research says those multivitamins don’t begin to cover the gap. CBN News decided to take a deeper look at what science is saying about vitamins you should be taking.

In an article published in June 2002, the American Medical Association reversed their 20-year stance against multivitamins. Just buy a cheap one, the AMA essentially said, that is all you need. But will the popular dime-a-day multis really help consumers attain optimum health?

Nutrition-oriented physician and neuroscientist Russell Blaylock says the answer to that question is “no,” because the vitamin world is a wasteland. “For instance, we’ve found a lot of youthfulness in vitamin D. A lot of these multivitamins don’t even have vitamin D. If they have it, they have it in very low concentrations,” he said.

On top of that, Janie Johnson, general manager of a vitamin store chain, says the media from magazines to TV ads have left consumers confused. “And they’re steered in all different ways and they really don’t know what to take,” she said.

To help consumers identify optimum multis, CBN News employed a set of vitamin standards obtained from scientific research. We used a total of 25 guidelines. At 4 points for each guideline, a perfect score would be 100. Of 55 multivitamins evaluated, only 10 scored a 40 or above. All of the nationally advertised major brands scored a 12 or lower.

Certainly, there is plenty of controversy about what is best in vitamins. For instance, a recent CBN News story on vitamins spoke of having the minerals calcium and magnesium in about equal amounts. But many nutritionists favor double the calcium over magnesium.

In the debate over calcium and magnesium, researchers had largely based their recommendations on the fact that bone has a ratio of 2 parts calcium to 1 part magnesium. However, newer research shows most people have a significant dietary intake of calcium and can experience excess calcium calcifying the blood stream. That can induce circulatory problems.

Also, magnesium is now found to be crucial to muscle function, protection against MSG and related toxins, and 300 chemical reactions in the body.

The bottom line is that individuals may need medical guidance in deciding their optimum intakes of calcium and magnesium.

Other viewers of our previous story were curious about the issue of riboflavin and ultraviolet light.

Our sources recommend no more than 10 milligrams of vitamin B2, or riboflavin. A French study found that excess riboflavin “in the organs and tissues that are permeable to light, such as the eye or skin” could damage cell components “causing inflammation and accelerating aging.” So it is important not to take too much riboflavin.

While 10 milligrams is still several times the government’s recommendation, some multis should be avoided since they contain daily portions of 50 or more milligrams.

Blaylock says some afflictions may require higher doses of B2. Those diseases include Alzheimer’s and the nerve damage that often afflicts diabetics. “Outside of that restricted use, I don’t think that the general public should take more than 10 milligrams of riboflavin,” he said.

And even the most popular individual supplement vitamin C needs supplementation.

Research shows vitamin C works best when matched with bioflavonoids, at a quantity of 70 percent of the vitamin. In other words, 500 milligrams of C should be accompanied by 350 milligrams of bioflavonoids.

Bioflavonoids include the rind of citrus fruit and the popular quercetin derived from apples and red onions.

Yet with all the new research about the right nutrients for staving off disease, Johnson says consumers still seek out multivitamins mostly when they are sick.

She said, “They’re not doing it for the prevention, they’re doing it because of an issue. And they want to feel good, and they don’t want to be fatigued. So, they really kind of need to do the research on their own.”

Blaylock says that assessment is right, that consumers need to do their homework, and do it based on good science and good sense. “You need to have a vitamin that has all its different components in the right concentrations and the right balances, complete, with no iron,” he said

August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2006

Tip of the day:

“Keep in mind that at room temperature the number of bacteria in milk DOUBLE around every 20 minutes.”

And here are some quotes I’ve found regarding cow’s milk:

“It’s not natural for humans to drink cow’s milk. Humans milk is for humans. Cow’s milk is for calves. You have no more need of cow’s milk than you do rats milk, horses milk or elephant’s milk. Cow’s milk is a high fat fluid exquisitely designed to turn a 65 lb baby calf into a 400 lb cow. That’s what cow’s milk is for!” –Dr Michael Klaper MD
 
“I no longer recommend dairy products after the age of 2 years. Other calcium sources offer many advantages that dairy products do not have.” –Dr. Benjamin Spock

August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2006

High-Calcium Dangers

A diet which is high in calcium increases the body’s need for magnesium and also may increase the excretion of phosphorus and calcium; however, dietary intake of magnesium remains relatively low. The chemical reaction of magnesium is alkaline (acid binding). It regulates the acid-alkaline balance of the body.

Undulant fever is said to clear up if above-adequate amounts of magnesium and manganese are given. Without sufficient magnesium one cannot control the adrenals, and this lack of control can result in diabetes, hyperexcitability, nervousness, mental confusion and difficulty coping with simple day-to-day problems. Depressed and suicidal people often display inadequate levels of magnesium.

August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2006

Magnesium deficiency and sudden death

An athletic 20 year man is playing basketball and suddenly collapses on the court and dies. On a hot July day, a young and vibrant college football player suddenly makes a great tackle and never gets up.. only to be pronounced dead 5 minutes later. High School track runner dies after finishing second in a race. The sad truth is 1 out of 50,000 young adults will fall victim to Sudden Death.

Most sudden deaths have been linked to a thickened, enlarged heart called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), or by a condition that disturbs the rhythm of the heart called an arrhythmia.

When one sweats, a significant amount of magnesium is lost. Magnesium is the most under-recognized electrolyte disorder in the U.S. Dr. Mildred Seelig, one of the country’s leading authorities on magnesium suggests that 80%-90% of the population is deficient is magnesium

It is beyond the extent of this article why the public is being denied the truth of the seriousness of magnesium deficiency and sudden death. The amount of medical research could fill a book, but it is unfortunately being ignored.

According to Micheal A. Brodsky M.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Medicine and the director of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Service at the University of California.. mineral imbalances interfere with the heart’s normal nerve function.

While most athletes have been conditioned to drink a potassium rich drink after sweating.. very few have been educated on the dangers of a magnesium deficiency. Dr. Brodsky states that arrhythmia therapy should focus on replenishing two key minerals: potassium and magnesium.

Almost all physicians have known for some time just how vital potassium is for normal heartbeat. Magnesium is an entirely different story, however. According to Carla Sueta M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine and cardiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine “apparently, many doctors still don’t realize how important a role this mineral can play in some heart patients. In fact, most never check the magnesium level. She has shown through her research that magnesium reduced the incidence of several types of ventricular arrhythmia by 53 to 76 percent.

Magnesium deficiency can be induced by the very drugs meant to help heart problems. Some types of diuretics (water pills) cause the body to excrete both magnesium and potassium, as does digitalis. And magnesium deficiency is often at the bottom of what’s called refractory potassium deficiency. The amount of magnesium in the body determines the amount of a particular enzyme that determines the amount of potassium in the body,” he explains. So if you are magnesium-deficient, you may in turn be potassium-deficient, and no amount of potassium is going to correct this unless you are also getting enough magnesium.

The Best Test To Determine Your Level of Magnesium

Although most physicians rarely check this important mineral, the few that do usually rely on test called Serum Magnesium. Unfortunately, this test only measures approximately 1% of the magnesium in your body.. a poor test at best. The “Gold Standard” and the most accurate test is the RBC Minerals or more commonly called Elemental Analysis in Packed Erythrocytes. This test examines the levels of eight minerals and seven toxic heavy metals. The erythrocyte is the red blood cell that floats in our serum to carry oxygen to our cells. The minerals this test analyzes from inside the red blood cell includes magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, selenium, vanadium and zinc. Another test which has proven to be extremely valuable in detecting magnesium deficiencies is called the Urine Magnesium Loading Test. In this test, the patient collects a 24-hour urine sample and the total magnesium is measured. The patient is then given a dose Magnesium Chloride 18% and another 24-hour urine specimen is collected. The magnesium is again measured. If the body retains more than a certain amount of magnesium, then it is concluded that the body is magnesium deficient.

Common Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency

The most common symptoms include back and neck pain, muscle spasms, anxiety, panic disorders, Raynaud’s spastic vessels, arrhythmia, fatigue, eye twitches, vertigo, migraines.

Best Sources of Magnesium

The best way of insuring enough magnesium is to eat a variety of whole foods, including whole grains, nuts, seeds and vegetables, preferably food grown on naturally composted soil. The green color of green vegetables is due to chlorophyll, which is a molecule that contains magnesium. Avoid refined processed foods, especially white sugar and white flour products, as most magnesium is removed from them.

What if I had taken the suggestion from the naturopath to heart and signed up for a gym membership and thrust myself into a strong excerise program? What if?

I could’ve died….

August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for August 16, 2006

I was talking to my mother the other day about my recent discoveries and I was explaining about tingling in my head and how it was related to the myelin sheath. She told me that she has felt the same kind of tingling in her head and often wondered if it was the same as mine. She says it’s very mild and doesn’t happen all of the time. My mother is a vegetarian and has been for most of her life so there’s no way that it could be related to riboflavin and magnesium deficiencies.

I grab my newest book “Encyclopedia of Nutritional Supplements” and I take it into work. It’s a long commute so it’s perfect reading. I look up myelin sheath in the rear index and to my surprise there is a listing for page 127.

It talks about the role of vitamin B12 in the development of the myelin sheath and I already knew that. But it goes on to say that vegetarians often need B12 supplements as significant quantities are found in animal foods.

I think my mother has a B12 deficiency so I call her up and tell her to see her doctor for a blood test and she agrees. She says that she has taken B12 from time to time but never noticed any difference. Doctor Google?

Does this affect all vegetarians?

Reports from around the world reveal that many long-term total vegetarians (vegetarians who do not use any eggs, meat, fish, poultry or dairy products) are especially at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency. Unfortunately, many total vegetarians fail to recognize the seriousness of B12 deficiency. Total vegetarians often have low serum B12 levels and may manifest neuropsychiatric disorders. While oral B12 supplements can restore serum levels of B12 and eliminate macrocytic anemia, the neurological disorders may persist even months after treatment. In some cases the damage done to the nervous system is not reversible.

On rare occasions a lacto-ovo-vegetarian (one that uses dairy products and eggs, but no meat, fish or poultry) may also have a low serum B12 level if their intake of vitamin B12 containing foods is very low. Most of those with low serum B12 levels can correct the macrocytic anemia with oral B12 supplements or an injection of B12. In one study, the serum B12 levels of adult lacto-ovo-vegetarians dropped 35 percent only two months after switching to a total vegetarian diet. This rapid drop may be the result of low B12 stores in the liver. It should be emphasized, however, that vitamin B12 deficiency most often occurs in total vegetarians.

Vitamin B12 also maintains the fatty sheath, called myelin, that surrounds and protects nerve fibers and promotes their normal growth. Like insulation around copper wires, this sheath allows your radiating network of nerves to send their electrical messages without short-circuiting. When B12 is missing, the myelin sheath breaks down, which eventually leads to nerve damage.

August 16, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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