Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for June 25, 2006


My Osteopath appointment is tomorrow and from what I’ve read, I think everyone should go at least once. I have coverage at work so why not?

Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a distinctive and complete system of health care, based on broad principles that “offer a way of thinking and acting in relation to questions of health and disease”.The procedures it uses in diagnosis and treatment promote healthy functioning in a person by correcting mechanical imbalances within and between the structures of the body. By structures we mean the muscles, bones, ligaments, organs, and fascia. The fascia is a very thin layer of tissue that is found under the skin. Correcting the mechanical imbalances in the structures is done by restoring, maintaining, and improving the harmonious working of the nervous and musculoskeletal systems.

The name osteopathy comes from the Greek osteon (bone) and pathos (to suffer), so it literally means suffering of the bone. The name has created some confusion, leading people to think that an osteopath treats only conditions of the bones. However, Dr. Still chose the name because he recognized the importance of a properly functioning musculoskeletal system for the total well-being of the individual.

Human Anatomy

The greatest interest of practitioners of osteopathy is the study of human anatomy and physiology. Following in Dr. Still’s footsteps, they know how important it is to have a thorough understanding of the correct position and function of each bone and other structures in the body. This is essential in order to find out about the normal and healthy working of the human body. Those working in osteopathy look at the causes of disease and suffering, originating in the abnormal working relationship that can exist within and between structures.

Dr. Still thought of the musculoskeletal system as the primary machinery of life and saw how disruptions in this delicate machine may lead to illness. For the osteopath, therefore, the physical integrity of the whole body is seen as one of the most important factors in health and disease. Rather than bone specialists, osteopaths are in fact masters in the biomechanics of the human machine.

These are the eight major principles of osteopathy and are widely accepted throughout the osteopathic community.

(1) The body is a unit.

(2) Structure and function are reciprocally inter-related.

(3) The body possesses self-regulatory mechanisms.

(4) The body has the inherent capacity to defend and repair itself.

(5) When the normal adaptability is disrupted, or when environmental changes overcome the body’s capacity for self maintenance, disease may ensue.

(6) The movement of body fluids is essential to the maintenance of health.

(7) The nerves play a crucial part in controlling the fluids of the body.

(8) There are somatic components to disease that are not only manifestations of disease, but also are factors that contribute to maintenance of the disease state.

These principles are not held by osteopaths to be empirical laws, nor contradictions to orthodox medical principles; they are thought to be the underpinnings of the osteopathic perspective on health and disease.

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June 25, 2006 - Posted by | Health |

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