Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 28, 2006

Tobacco Smoke Linked to Allergic Rhinitis in Infants

May 18, 2006 – CINCINNATI—University of Cincinnati (UC) epidemiologists say it’s environmental tobacco smoke—not the suspected visible mold—that drastically increases an infant’s risk for developing allergic rhinitis by age 1.

Commonly known as hay fever, allergic rhinitis occurs when a person’s immune system mistakenly reacts to allergens (aggravating particles) in the air. The body then releases substances to protect itself, causing the allergy sufferer to experience persistent sneezing and a runny, blocked nose.

This is the first study to show a relationship between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and allergic rhinitis in year-old infants, the UC team reports in the June issue of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology and an early online edition May 17.

“Previous studies have addressed risk factors for allergic rhinitis, but they failed to examine multiple environmental exposures, and some yielded contradictory results,” says Jocelyn Biagini, lead author and an epidemiologist in UC’s environmental health department.

The study evaluated the effects of numerous indoor exposures to such things as environmental tobacco smoke, visible mold, pets, siblings and the day-care environment on 633 infants under age one.

“We found that infants who were exposed to 20 or more cigarettes a day were three times more likely to develop allergic rhinitis by their first birthday than those who were not exposed,” says Biagini.

These findings, she says, suggest that for the health of their children, it’s important for parents to eliminate tobacco smoke from their homes.

“An infant’s lungs and immune system are still developing in the first year of life,” says Grace LeMasters, PhD, coauthor and principal investigator of the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS). “Environmental tobacco smoke puts harmful particulates in the air that—when inhaled regularly at such an early age—could lead to serious allergic conditions like asthma.”

CCAAPS, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, is a five-year study examining the effects of environmental particulates on childhood respiratory health and allergy development.

About 43 percent of children, says Dr. LeMasters, are exposed to home environmental tobacco smoke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 21 percent of all American adults smoke cigarettes. Of them, 12 percent report smoking 25 or more cigarettes daily.

While household mold, long thought to be a major cause, did not contribute to allergic rhinitis development, Biagini says, it did increase the infant’s risk for ear infections.

Infants exposed to a mold patch about the size of a shoebox were five times more likely to contract ear infections requiring antibiotics than those living in mold-free homes, she explains.

The UC study also suggests that infants with older siblings are less likely to have allergic rhinitis.

“Research has shown that exposure to certain infections early in life may decrease your risk for allergic diseases,” explains James Lockey, MD, professor of environmental health and pulmonary medicine. “We found a ‘sibling protective effect’ for allergic rhinitis—this may mean the more siblings infants have, the more infections they are exposed to. As a result, the infant’s body may be better equipped to fight off allergic diseases later in life.”

Collaborators in the study were David Bernstein, MD, Gurjit Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD, Patrick Ryan, Linda Levin, PhD, Tiina Reponen, PhD, Jeff Burkle and Manuel Villareal, MD.

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, more than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies, many of which are can be triggered by airborne environmental pollutants.

University of Cincinnati

Yup, you guessed it. My father smoked when I was a kid and stopped when I was ten after his brother died of cancer. Only problem with this theory is that my brother doesn’t have allergies.

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May 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 27, 2006

I mentioned to my wife that Cindy suggested going to a Osteopath but I didn’t know what it was. I checked my health plan and I’m covered!

About Osteopathy

Osteopathy takes advantage of the body’s natural tendency to strive toward a state of health and homeostasis. A much in demand specialty, the Osteopath is trained to palpate (feel) the body’s “living anatomy” (i.e. flow of fluids, motion and texture of tissues, and structural makeup). They address health problems with a non-invasive system of medicine called, “Osteopathic Manual Medicine” in order to restore normal function in areas impaired by trauma, chronic illness, acute health problems, etc.

This all sounds very interesting and there happens to be an office close by where we live.

May 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for May 27, 2006

Kevin Trudeau says you should visit a chiropractor once a month, whether you need to or not and today was my appointment.

My wife and I arrived at the chiropractor’s office and the first thing the receptionist hands us is a three page health questionnaire. I’m filling out the form for internal vibrations and my wife for her lower back pain. Both of us don’t really have any of the chronic symptoms listed in the questionnaire. In fact, my wife feels silly even going to a chiropractor at all. Having read the book by Kevin Trudeau, I was going for a check up and wasn’t really looking for anything more.

The doctor calls me into his office and reviews my file. I mention the internal vibration and the vitamin deficiencies. I told him about taking Niacin and the B Complex vitamins and how they have had the greatest effect. He said B complex vitamins play a large part of a healthy nervous system and explained that the first visit is primarily to check the range of motion, posture analysis, muscle tone and strength. The next ten minutes are spent in a variety of positions and he places pressure quite hard at times. He mentions that I should also be taking vitamin E at 200-400 IU. He says the B vitamins are lost through the urine and that is why treatment is slow and over a long period of time. Vitamin E however is stored within the body. I mention about my research and the parasympathetic nerves. He doesn’t say too much about them and mentions that I should research some other medical conditions called “Bruit” and “Fasciculations”.

As the appointment progresses, I decide to mention that my knees are weak when I try to get back up from a crouched position. I told him that I’ve been talking calcium/magnesium suppliments for about a week and it appears to mild improvement. He checks my knee strength with a hammer and trys a few things. I also mention that I have muscle twitching and he says it can be a symptom of calcium deficiency and could explain the weakness in my knees as nothing appears to be obviously wrong. By the end he says my upper back is stiffer than it should be and my neck is too straight causing my head to be further from my body. He recommends a follow up appointment in a week.

My wife then goes in for her appointment not really expecting too much and she came out with the following diagnosis: Sacroiliac joint syndrome and facet syndrome. She came out quite surprised at the things he was saying. Her posture was incorrect as one of her legs was longer than the other and one of her syndromes left uncorrected can lead to a hip replacement later in life. He mentioned these problems existed long before the pregnancy!

So why isn’t a chiropractor visit standard after child birth? Seems like the logical thing to do after the body has been through a tremendous amout of physical stress. If she didn’t have the birth, she could’ve gone for years not knowing about these conditions leading to more serious problems.

May 27, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

   

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