Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 26, 2006


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Great in Microwave!

“Major microwave oven manufacturers recommend the use of plastic wrap as a cover for microwave proof containers.”

And then there is the other side:

Students Studies Toxicity of Plastic Food Wrap

As a seventh grade student, Claire Nelson learned that Di(2-ethylhexyl)Adipate (DEHA), considered a carcinogen, is found in plastic wrap. She also learned that the FDA has never studied the effect of microwave cooking on plastic-wrapped food. So Claire began to wonder: “Can cancer-causing particles seep into food covered with household plastic wrap while it is being microwaved?”

Three years later, with encouragement from her high school science teacher and the cooperation of Jon Wilkes at the National Center for Toxicological Research, Claire set out to test her hypothesis. The research center let her use its facilities to perform her experiments, which involved microwaving plastic wrap in virgin olive oil.

Claire tested four different plastic wraps and found that “…not just the carcinogens but also xenoestrogens (substances that act like estrogen) were migrating into the oil… “ Xenoestrogens are linked to low sperm counts in men and to breast cancer in women.
Throughout her junior and senior years, Claire continued her experiments. An article in Options magazine reported that “her analysis found that DEHA was migrating into the oil at between 200 parts and 500 parts per million. The FDA standard is 0.05 parts per billion.”

Claire’s dramatic results have been published in science journals. She received the American Chemical Society’s top science prize for students during her junior year and fourth place at the International Science and Engineering Fair (Fort Worth, Texas) as a senior.

Claire’s experimental results suggest that heating plastic-wrapped foods in the microwave is dangerous, and that it’s safer to use tempered glass or a ceramic container instead. For the record, a study reported in the June 1998 issue of Consumer Reports suggested that toxins may migrate into food from plastic wrap at room temperature too. So the best choice may be to avoid plastic food wraps altogether.

Starting around 1995, I’ve had mild hair loss mostly on the top of my head. I thought it was normal although both of my parents have a full head of hair. The only person to ever comment on it was my acupuncture doctor. She found the hair loss unusual and mentioned that poor function of the kidneys could cause this.

Then I come across the following web site that talks about the effects of Xenoestrogen:

Exposure to xenoestrogen chemicals in food and water may also cause early follicle burnout.

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May 26, 2006 - Posted by | Health | , , , , ,

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