Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 26, 2006

And after fifteen years of Allergic Rhinitis, Doctor Google may have found the answer when no other doctor could. A chemical called Benzyl Butyl Phthalate. Very interesting reading but I really don’t eat a lot of microwaved food in plastic but something to think about for sure.

Plastic Chemicals Linked to Asthma, Allergies

Oct. 6, 2004 — Certain chemicals commonly added to plastics are associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis (hay fever), and eczema, according to a new study.

The findings come from researchers including Carl-Gustaf Bornehag of the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute in Boras, Sweden. The report appears in the October issue of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Bornehag and colleagues compared 200 Swedish children who had persistent allergy or asthma symptoms with a similar number of kids without such symptoms.

Doctors screened the children for common allergens (substances that can trigger an allergic reaction or asthma symptoms) such as certain tree pollens, cat dander, dust mites, and mold.

Affected children had at least two incidents of eczema (an allergy-related skin condition), wheezing related to asthma, or hay fever symptoms (runny nose without a cold) in the past year. At the study’s end, they had at least two of three possible symptoms.

Researchers took dust samples from the moulding and shelves in the children’s bedrooms.

Samples containing higher concentrations of chemicals called phthalates were associated with symptoms of asthma, hay fever, and eczema.

PVC flooring in the children’s bedrooms was also associated with symptoms.

Phthalate Primer

Phthalates are commonly added to plastics as softeners and solvents. They’re used in a wide variety of products including nail polish and other cosmetics, dyes, PVC vinyl tile, carpet tiles, artificial leather, and certain adhesives.

By leaching out of products, phthalates have become “global pollutants,” say the researchers. More than 3.5 million metric tons of phthalates are produced annually.

Phthalates aren’t new, but they have become more common in recent decades. Towards the end of World War II, only “very low levels” of phthalates were produced.

In fact, phthalates are now so widespread that they are hard to avoid.

Asthma and allergies have also increased in the developed world during the last 30 years, prompting some experts to wonder if environmental changes are responsible, since genetic shifts might not be seen as quickly.

This study concentrated on three common phthalates: BBzP, DEHP, and di-n-butyl phthalate.

BBzP was associated with rhinitis and eczema and DEHP was linked to asthma; di-n-butyl phthalate was not associated with any symptoms.

The dust samples didn’t have outlandish concentrations of the phthalates. Levels fell within the range of what is normally found in indoor environments, say the researchers.

“Given the phthalate exposures of children worldwide, the results from this study of Swedish children have global implications,” they conclude.

So with the new information, I went back to the site with the effects of microwaved water to find out if the water was microwaved using plastic…and it was!

We have seen a number of comments on this, such as what was the water in the microwave boiled in. The thinking is that maybe some leaching took place if it was in plastic. It was boiled in a plastic cup, so this could be a possibility.

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May 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 26, 2006

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Great in Microwave!

“Major microwave oven manufacturers recommend the use of plastic wrap as a cover for microwave proof containers.”

And then there is the other side:

Students Studies Toxicity of Plastic Food Wrap

As a seventh grade student, Claire Nelson learned that Di(2-ethylhexyl)Adipate (DEHA), considered a carcinogen, is found in plastic wrap. She also learned that the FDA has never studied the effect of microwave cooking on plastic-wrapped food. So Claire began to wonder: “Can cancer-causing particles seep into food covered with household plastic wrap while it is being microwaved?”

Three years later, with encouragement from her high school science teacher and the cooperation of Jon Wilkes at the National Center for Toxicological Research, Claire set out to test her hypothesis. The research center let her use its facilities to perform her experiments, which involved microwaving plastic wrap in virgin olive oil.

Claire tested four different plastic wraps and found that “…not just the carcinogens but also xenoestrogens (substances that act like estrogen) were migrating into the oil… “ Xenoestrogens are linked to low sperm counts in men and to breast cancer in women.
Throughout her junior and senior years, Claire continued her experiments. An article in Options magazine reported that “her analysis found that DEHA was migrating into the oil at between 200 parts and 500 parts per million. The FDA standard is 0.05 parts per billion.”

Claire’s dramatic results have been published in science journals. She received the American Chemical Society’s top science prize for students during her junior year and fourth place at the International Science and Engineering Fair (Fort Worth, Texas) as a senior.

Claire’s experimental results suggest that heating plastic-wrapped foods in the microwave is dangerous, and that it’s safer to use tempered glass or a ceramic container instead. For the record, a study reported in the June 1998 issue of Consumer Reports suggested that toxins may migrate into food from plastic wrap at room temperature too. So the best choice may be to avoid plastic food wraps altogether.

Starting around 1995, I’ve had mild hair loss mostly on the top of my head. I thought it was normal although both of my parents have a full head of hair. The only person to ever comment on it was my acupuncture doctor. She found the hair loss unusual and mentioned that poor function of the kidneys could cause this.

Then I come across the following web site that talks about the effects of Xenoestrogen:

Exposure to xenoestrogen chemicals in food and water may also cause early follicle burnout.

May 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 26, 2006

My wife mentioned something interesting tonight. We were talking about the microwaved food and she mentioned that I could have the allergy to the food cooked in plastic containers. What if I cooked things using ceramic or glass?Would that will make a difference?

Something to think about…

May 26, 2006 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

   

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