Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for March 15, 2007

Tried something different today. In Ann Louise Gittleman’s book I’m reading about copper overload, one of the things she keeps saying is to avoid copper completely. This morning I took 50 mg of zinc without any copper and all morning my nose is itchy and my tongue is white. Candida has returned by taking high dosage of zinc. Why? I do some reading and it’s actually a good thing.

Often a copper elimination results in the flare-up of a candida infection and the many symptoms associated with candida. The major reason candida continues to exist in an individual is because they are unable to reduce their excessive copper storage in the liver and in the brain. Whenever they undergo stress of any kind, copper builds up in the tissues resulting in a bio-unavailability of copper. It is the bio-unavailability of copper which permits candida to thrive. In essence, sufficient copper cannot be mobilized out of liver storage because of stress and weak adrenal glands. When copper is out of balance, our bodies cannot control yeast overgrowth. This often lead to chronic candida albicans infections that are resistant to treatment.

Calcium tends to buffer the side-effects associated with a copper elimination. A person, in the process of eliminating copper should take three calcium tablets three times a day. Doing so will not stop the copper elimination from occurring, but will minimize some of the distressing side effects caused by a copper-induced calcium deficiency.

Anxiety and Panic States Resulting from a Copper Elimination

Individual suffering from a copper elimination frequently experience feelings of anxiety and tension and for good reason.

As copper levels in the blood increases, the amount of anxiety tends to increase. Panic attacks, as well as anxiety attacks are also commonly due to a copper toxicity problem. Panic and anxiety attacks are frequently associated with an excessive buildup of lactic acid, caused by an excessive secretion of the stress hormone adrenalin. A copper toxicity problem is a common cause of increased adrenalin secretion. Adrenalin secretion is increased when blood sugar levels are low. Adrenalin is both a panic and anxiety hormone. A reduction in copper toxicity is effective in reducing the incidence and severity of both panic and anxiety attacks.

The major emotional cause of an increase in adrenalin secretion is adrenal insufficiency/hypoglycemia-induced fear. Copper, in excess, is instrumental in increasing adrenalin output just as copper is associated with increased estrogen hormone output. As copper eliminates into the blood, the amount of adrenalin increases resulting in excessive lactic acid accumulation (lactic acid dehydrogenase – a zinc-dependent enzyme). A reduction in copper toxicity results in a reduction of the anxiety attacks.

Copper also stimulates production of the neurotransmitters epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine. It is also required for monoamine oxidase, an enzyme related to serotonin production.

The Value of Calcium in Preventing a Lactic Acid Buildup

While zinc and vitamin B6 serve to release copper from the tissues, they do not fully address the lactic acid problem. Individuals suffering from copper toxicity commonly have excessively high calcium levels, as determined by a hair analysis. A high calcium level indicates a calcium bio-unavailability, which, in essence, is the same as a calcium deficiency.

A calcium deficiency results in increased adrenalin secretion which in turn results in excessive lactic acid buildup in the tissues. Calcium is necessary to mop-up excessive lactic acid. As a result of a calcium bio-unavailability, lactic acid levels continue to increase. Increasing one’s calcium intake allows for calcium to combine with the lactic acid to form calcium-lactate resulting in a reduction or elimination of both anxiety and panic attacks. Because of a calcium bio-unavailability, copper-toxic individuals have little or no protection against a lactic acid buildup, resulting in the creation of more anxiety. Zinc deficiency due to copper toxicity can also result in anxiety states.

Copper Toxicity Correction

There are numerous ways to eliminate excessive tissue copper. Nutrients such as zinc, manganese, molybdenum, Vitamin B-1, vitamin C and vitamin B-6 have all proven effective in certain cases.

March 15, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 14, 2007

Three things I tried differently today. I stopped taking my multivitamin and increased my zinc to 100 mg. I also took 0.75 mg of copper in the morning. Thirdly, I took five capsules of 200 mcr of chromium throught the day.

I’m thinking the new copper zinc ratio is a problem because my nose seems more stuffy than usual. After taking the zinc, it has quite an effect on my sinuses. I did have a banana today so could be that as well. I’m still unsure if the extra zinc is clearing my nose because of the candida or the copper imbalance or maybe both?

Both my daughter and my wife are suffering through a very bad cold. This morning I felt a sore throat coming on but nothing serious. Tonight, I can feel it again so I thought it would be a great time to try the colloidal minerals.

March 14, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 13, 2007

I came across this article today and it raised some interesting facts.

Chromium is destroyed by sugar, has a relationship with copper and a deficiency can cause anxiety and nerve degeneration. It also has a synergistic relationship with magnesium and zinc. So if I have chronically low levels of magnesium and zinc, it would only make sense to look at Chromium and I’ll stop taking the other minerals that reduce absorption like selenium and potassium.

I originally blogged about this article on February 13, 2007 and now that I’ve discovered the Zinc deficiency, it’s something I should look into further.

Chromium & Copper: These two elements are the most important nutrients next to calcium and magnesium for their anti-inflammatory properties. They share left / right-sided cell receptors and are considered essential to human health.

While neither one – with few exceptions – is generally found to be very deficient level-wise, chromium (Cr) is on average always lower than copper (Cu), with virtually no exceptions. Copper, on the other hand is elevated in the majority of patients, which creates a chronic copper / chromium conflict ratio-wise in these individuals.

In fact, of all the patients I have tested since the mid 70′s, nearly 90% exhibited a chemical profile that in addition to their own unique chemistry contained an underlying pattern that reflected the impact of high copper levels on various opposing nutrients, which include chromium, molybdenum, sulfur, nickel, Vitamin C, hesperidin, and others.

When supplementing chromium, its level will generally not increase at first, but instead it will gradually lower copper, and potassium, since they are high in ratio to chromium. Only after copper and potassium have been reduced to normal levels, chromium may at that point start to go up. However, since sufficient amounts of chromium are rarely used, in practice, copper and potassium just come down closer to normal, and chromium levels stay the same.

Magnesium levels frequently go up following long-term supplementation of chromium because of its synergism with chromium, and also because of potassium (which is a magnesium antagonist) going down, and thus not exerting an inhibiting effect on magnesium any longer.

There are other copper antagonists such as zinc, but while zinc is generally documented as such in the nutritional literature, it is not only the weakest of all copper antagonists, but its action on copper takes place only on an intestinal level, so once copper goes into storage, zinc will have no effect on lowering copper any longer, no matter how much is supplemented. The only time zinc could become a threat to copper is in situations where copper levels are already on the low side, and massive amounts of zinc in addition to other copper antagonists were consumed.

Many patients exhibit high levels of zinc and copper, in which case a common denominator such as ascorbic acid / Vitamin C has to be supplemented in larger amounts to help lower both, while certain foods such as nuts, shellfish or wheat germ… (containing high levels of copper and zinc), should be avoided. One major reason why some people require a much higher intake of Vitamin C compared to others is that they exhibit very high levels of copper, which in these people happens to interfere with nickel and Vitamin C metabolism.

Chronically elevated copper levels in most patients may result from one-sided diets that lack co-factors or copper antagonists, or from the fact that many copper-rich foods are somewhat addictive, such as cocoa / chocolate products, colas, coffee, or tea (copper levels are even higher in tea than in coffee).

Other sources include seafood / shellfish, seeds and nuts, liver, soy products, foods or beverages that are cooked or stored in copper containers (beer), tap water (copper plumbing), and copper IUDs.

Due to the synergism of copper and aluminum (aluminium), a higher intake or absorption of aluminum – ranging from anti-perspirants, tetra packs, all the way to municipal drinking water treated with aluminum sulphate and polyaluminum chloride (used as coagulants) – will result in greater copper retention and lowered sulfur levels since both, aluminum and copper are sulfur antagonists. High copper levels, along with related sulfur deficiencies, can be considered to be one of the most prominent causes of many modern physical and mental health problems.

The correct approach consists of making copper (or calcium) more bioavailable by supplementing the appropriate co-factors, with the best choice being those that exhibit the lowest level in ratio to copper, and as mentioned above – may include Vitamin C, chromium, sulfur (MSM), molybdenum, nickel, or (rarely) zinc. Avoidance of foods high in copper is of utmost importance as well. This will take care of the medical conditions a practitioner was originally consulted for, and at the same time prevent the potential development of new medical problems elsewhere related to excessive copper intake.

Chromium is the “Gold Standard” to help normalize elevated copper, since it is its associated trace element. More aches and pains, arthritis, slow-healing fractures, sciatica and other back problems,various infections, etc, can be relieved with chelated chromium (not GTF), than with many other supplements – provided they conform to the side-specific requirements (see introduction above), and provided that calcium and magnesium are close to normal, since they are also involved with various disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Following a close second is sulfur, usually supplemented in the form of MSM, whose main action in addition to helping restore cartilage formation is the lowering of copper! So again, it is the high copper levels which created a need for sulfur to help reverse joint degeneration.

Copper works synergistically with potassium and calcium, so when patients do exhibit low copper levels, then calcium and potassium are frequently on the low side as well. Taking a 3mg copper pill for one or two months, or less, is all that is needed for an adult to normalize any copper deficiency, and then it should always be discontinued, otherwise copper will go too high – being another reason why most people should avoid multi-mineral formulations containing more than 1 mg of copper.

Chromium Synergists: Magnesium, Zinc, Vitamin B15

Chromium Antagonists / Inhibitors: Selenium, vanadium, potassium, cobalt, copper, iodine, Vitamin B12, rutin, sugar, alcohol, fat,

Low Levels / Deficiency – Symptoms and/or Risk Factors:

Chromium: Reduced glucose tolerance / impaired glucose metabolism, weakened immune system, increased susceptibility for infections (e.g. bladder, left tonsil), trabecular bone loss, inflammatory joint disease, elevated total cholesterol, birth defects, reduced life expectancy, nerve degeneration.

Chromium Deficiency

Chromium deficiency can produce nervousness, shakiness, and other general symptoms of anxiety. Chromium deficiency is common among alcoholics and people who consume large amounts of refined sugars.

The typical amount of chromium used in research trials is 200 mcg per day. Niacin administered at relatively low levels (100 mg) along with 200 mcg of chromium has been shown to be more effective than chromium alone.

Some people take up to 1mg (1,000 mcg) per day for short periods without problems; this is not suggested as a long-term regimen but rather to help replenish chromium stores when deficiency is present. All of the precursors to the active form of GTF are used in some formulas, but usually with chromium in lower doses, such as 50mcg, since it is thought to be better absorbed with niacin and the amino acids glycine, cysteine and glutamic acid.

Chromium has functions other than the role it plays in GTF. It is a vital ingredient in lecithin, which help
s the body keep fat in small particles. When the fat globules get too large, they get stuck on the walls of arteries and can cause atherosclerosis. Your body requires chromium when producing protein. If it can’t produce the amount it needs, you can suffer from premature aging.

Large amounts of chromium are found in your adrenal glands, indicating its importance in the production of their stress coping hormones. White blood cells contain quite a bit of chromium. When you don’t consume enough of the mineral, your white blood cells cannot function properly. This is one of the reasons you are more susceptible to illness when under stress. Chromium activates vitamin C, and is therefore needed to reap the full benefits from it.

March 13, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 12, 2007

Big difference with my skin and hair and my sinuses have cleared up tremendously but I’m still not sure if it is having any effect on the vibration. Started reading the book by Ann Louise Gittleman regarding copper imbalance.

One of the things she talking about is how eating heathly can actually cause your level of copper to increase. Interesting because one of the major dietary changes I did was eat more fruits and vegetables and less beef. Fruits and vegetables have very low levels of zinc and beef has the highest.

Still vibrating…

March 12, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 11, 2007

Last night was still a very weak vibration and this morning it was still weak but it seemed to stop and start again. The biggest difference is in my nose. The blockage/stuffiness that I usually have has been reduced by at least 95%.

Today I took the same dosage as yesterday except I took my regular three doses of magnesium. 50 mg of Zinc / 1 mg of Copper and 1500 mg of Magnesium. This dosage seems to be working and in my google searches, I came across something called the zinc taste test.

The doctor in the walk in clinic a few days ago said he’d never heard of a test for zinc. Well someone else certainly has:

Zinc Taste Test

The zinc taste test is used to evaluate this common state of deficiency. This simple and non-toxic test was devised and developed by Professor Derek Bryce-Smith, Professor of Biochemistry at Reading University. Professor Bryce Smith is an established authority on zinc and numerous other biochemical topics.

The test solution is zinc sulphate in purified water, at a concentration of 1 gram/litre. Once prepared the solution should be stored in a refrigerator and discarded after six months. The solution should be removed from storage and left at room temperature for about two hours before carrying out the test.

The test is based on the knowledge that the functions of taste and smell are dependent upon there being sufficient zinc available in the body. Thus, if zinc is deficient then taste function will be diminished. This principle is utilised in the taste test by offering a standard test solution of zinc sulphate for tasting. The response is then compared with a series of defined standards and the zinc status thus determined.

The test involves taking a sip of the solution (approximately 5-10 mls – using the beaker supplied) and holding it in the mouth for ten seconds, timed with a watch. Due to the possible influence of recently consumed food or drink on the taste experienced it is essential that neither be taken for approximately one hour before the test.

The defined standards are:

Grade one response: no specific taste sensation: tastes like plain water. This indicates a major deficiency of zinc requiring a supplement of at least 150 milligrammes (mg) of zinc per day.

Grade two response: no immediate taste is noticed but, within the ten seconds of the test, a `dry’ or `metallic’ taste is experienced. This indicates a moderate deficiency requiring a supplement of 100 mg of zinc per day.

Grade three response: an immediate slight taste is noted, which increases with time over the ten second period. This indicates a deficiency of minor degree requiring a supplement of 50 mg of zinc per day.

Grade four response: an immediate, strong and unpleasant taste is experienced. This indicates that no zinc deficiency exists. If this is the response to the first test done then obviously the diet already contains sufficient zinc and no supplement need be taken. If this is the response, however, after a period of zinc supplementation then the diet, prior to the supplement being given, must be assumed to have been deficient. Thus, if a relapse to this deficient state is to be further prevented a regular maintenance dose of zinc is required. One 15-20 mg dose per day is usually sufficient for this purpose.

During any period of supplementation the taste test should be repeated at appropriate intervals and the subsequent dose of zinc adjusted according to the above instructions. In addition, it should be noted that when starting any programme of zinc supplementation the starting dose should always be a minimum dose of 15-25 mg. This is then increased slowly in the following manner stopping at the required level as demanded by the results of the taste test. Thus in the first week: take one 15 mg (or 25 mg) dose per day. Second week: two 15 mg (or 25 mg) capsules or tablets per day. Third week: one 50 mg dose per day. Fourth week: two 50 mg doses per day. Fifth and subsequent weeks: three 50 mg doses per day.

The reason for this protracted introduction is that zinc treatment, in the presence of zinc deficiency, may initially induce a feeling of fatigue or depression: a slow introduction reduces this possibility. This initial paradoxical response (zinc is normally stimulant in its action – by improving vigour and vitality) is not inevitable but if it does occur it may discourage the user from continuing the treatment.

Continued use, after two to three weeks, will normally result in the expected improvement in vitality. Tiredness persisting beyond this time suggests the need for additional oil supplements or the anti-oxidant vitamins or minerals. Zinc should be taken each day after food.

If unusual tiredness occurs during the initial stages of treatment it should be taken at night before retiring to bed. In this way it will benefit any difficulty in sleeping and promote increased vitality the following day.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Adrenal Burnout

One of the most common symptoms of copper toxicity, adrenal burnout, is extreme fatigue, caused by depression of adrenal gland activity. Weak or exhausted adrenal glands are the major cause of hypoglycemia and hypoglycemia is the major cause of the fatigue suffered by a copper-toxic individual.

It is important to recognize the various types of fatigue. For example, a common type of fatigue is experienced when an individual is overworked. However, once that person gets some rest, his fatigue will vanish. Another type of fatigue is when an individual feels drained and feels like sleeping forever. He could sleep twenty hours and still wake up feeling exhausted. The difference between these two types of fatigue is one of simply being tired and the other is being burned out.

Infections: Bacterial and/or Yeast

Burnout cannot be cured by the simple prescription of rest. The adrenal glands are exhausted. They simply fail to respond to stimuli, whether painful or pleasurable. Excessive copper toxicity is the most single common cause of adrenal burnout. Another factor responsible for adrenal burnout or adrenal exhaustion is chronic stress, such as being the type of person who is a compulsive stress-seeker for various reasons.

A yeast overgrowth frequently ensues from antibiotic therapy. Believe it or not, the patient is often advised that they are suffering from a candida yeast infection and are more often than not advised to stop eating products that contain yeast in any form. The overgrowth of yeast is due to an internal metabolic dysfunction caused by a copper deficiency or bio-unavailability, and while aggravated by, is not due to external causes, such as yeast in foods and food supplements. Copper is a great infection fighter and if it is not available to an individual, infections can and do take over. Candida yeast infections can usually be corrected or improved by increasing copper availability.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Inordinate craving for chocolate is a sign of copper toxicity? Yup. Had that for years…

Specific Food Cravings Indicative of Copper Toxicity

Individuals suffering from copper toxicity have quite specific food cravings. It is ironic but true, that individuals crave foods, which are high in the very minerals they are deficient in (bio-unavailability). A mineral is bio-unavailable when there is a deficiency of essential nutrients necessary to utilize the mineral. A cardinal indicator of a copper toxic individual is an inordinate craving for chocolate, a food which is extremely high in copper.

People generally crave the foods that they are allergic to. If you ask a person to write down all of their favorite foods, you could discover that all the foods on their preferred food list would make them feel better, if only temporarily. In other words, initially they would physically and emotionally feel a positive response. Whether you are craving chocolate or avocados, or any other foods high in copper content, if you persist in eating these foods day after day, there is an underlying reason why you are eating them.

Many individuals have an intense craving for beef (particularly hamburger) and for a good reason. These individuals are usually deficient in zinc, usually due to constant acute stress. Aside from oysters, herring, oatmeal, wheat bran, and brewers yeast, foods which are not generally eaten in large quantities, hamburger is one of the richest sources of dietary zinc. Individuals who are capable of enduring acute stress crave meat and various seafoods, which are high in zinc, such as oysters and herring. There is a definite link between food cravings, mineral and vitamin deficiencies and disease. You can learn a great deal about a person by the foods that they eat, and more specifically, by the foods they have an intense craving for. Most Americans eat only twelve to sixteen foods consistently, compared to primitive tribes who eat a diet that frequently consists of sixty to sixty-five foods consistently. If you write down what you eat all week you will more likely than not; note that you have repeatedly eaten much the same foods over and over again.

March 11, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

WHY COPPER REACTIONS OCCUR

Most people have deficiencies of zinc, manganese and other minerals that contribute to excessive accumulation of copper in the body tissues. As one replenishes the zinc and other vital minerals, the body begins to eliminate excess copper.

Free or unbound copper, however, is quite toxic. Copper is a powerful oxidant, meaning it can inflame the tissues and cause oxidant damage. To avoid toxicity, it must be wrapped up or bound to protein molecule. Sulfur amino acids found in eggs and meats are helpful for this. Adequate adrenal glandular activity is also required for the liver to produce enough copper binding proteins.

To eliminate copper, it is first mobilized from tissue storage sites and moved into the blood. The blood transports it to the liver and kidneys through which it is eliminated. Symptoms occur because a lot of copper may be dumped into the blood at once, and it is not cleared from the blood rapidly enough by the liver and kidneys. Also, there is often a deficiency of the copper binding proteins, ceruloplasmin and metallothionine, due to sluggish liver production of these proteins. Remaining in the blood, especially in an unbound form, copper may cause headaches and other symptoms.

March 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Correction Of A Copper Elimination

How Can an Acute Copper Elimination be Effectively Cut-off?

If appropriate action is taken, the distressing symptoms associated with a copper elimination can be frequently diminished.

The Importance of Zinc & Vitamin B6

Discomforting symptoms frequently occur when the individual is eliminating copper faster than their nutrient reservoirs of vitamin B6 and zinc can contain it. Many of the symptoms associated with copper toxicity relate to a copper induced vitamin B6, zinc and vitamin C deficiency. Both vitamin B6, and vitamin C are destroyed on contact with copper.3 Along with destroying vitamin B6 and vitamin C on contact, copper, in excess, causes a relative zinc deficiency. When zinc, vitamin B6 and vitamin C reserves become adequate, the distressing symptoms of copper toxicity are largely eliminated, hence the necessity to buildup the copper-toxic individual’s storage reservoirs of the above vitamins and minerals. Until the individual’s storage reservoirs of B6, vitamin C and zinc are sufficiently replete, symptoms will continue to be manifest.

Slowing Down a Copper Elimination

Numerous methods are available for slowing down the elimination of copper. Several means of slowing-down the elimination of copper would be to reduce the supplemental dosage to once a day, take or follow the recommended program every other day, add three calcium tablets three times a day and/or temporarily increase the individual’s dietary intake of dairy products. The individual must be made aware that this is only a temporary stop gap measure, because if one remained on dairy products on a continuous basis their metabolic rate would decrease resulting in an increased storage of copper. Dairy products are often effective in reducing the symptoms of a copper elimination because they temporarily reduce the individuals temporary stress-induced excessive metabolic rate.

Inasmuch as an increase in one’s metabolic rate will cause a flare-up in symptoms associated with a copper toxicity problem it becomes necessary to temporarily slow down one’s rate of metabolism. This is accomplished by increasing one’s calcium intake, increasing one’s dairy product intake, together with an increase in dietary fat intake, such as, avocadoes, nuts, salad oils, cooking oils, dairy products, etc.) Slowing down one’s rate of metabolism is definitely of value in reducing the symptoms associated with copper toxicity. When the distressing symptoms come under control, it is time to resume the original nutritional program.

March 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

These allergy symptoms are driving me crazy. My wife says this is the worst she has ever heard and she’s known me almost ten years. I recall something about “Copper Elimination” so I’m back to google to find out more.

Copper

A copper imbalance is present in over 50% of the mineral analyses received by Analytical Research Labs. Therefore, copper elimination symptoms occur frequently in the course of nutrition balancing programs. It is possible that copper toxicity may not be revealed on the hair test, yet one may experience the symptoms of copper elimination. This can occur because some individuals have hidden copper toxicity. Excessive copper is present in the body tissues, but is not revealed on the hair test because the copper is sequestered in other organs and tissues. In these cases, often the copper imbalance will be revealed on the second, or third hair test as copper is mobilized from tissue storage sites.

Common symptoms associated with copper elimination include, fatigue, mood swings, depression feelings, anxiety, mind racing, insomnia, skin rashes on the face and trunk, nausea and headaches. Occasionally old fears come to mind, since copper is associated with fears. Free-floating anxiety occurs at times. Copper causes a slight detachment from reality. When the copper is eliminated, one loses that detachment and for this reason can experience temporary anxiety. Other less common symptoms include pain in the testicles in men, changes in the menstrual cycle in women and joint pains.

Symptoms of copper elimination can be alleviated by several different methods. To help lower copper quickly, adding Moly-Cu 1-1-1 (molybdenum, black radish root, kelp and parsley leaves) may be helpful. These remove copper from the blood. Zinc and vitamin B6 are also helpful for some people. A copper detox reaction may be slowed down by taking Calcium 2-2-2 and perhaps with lecithin capsules (6 to 9 caps per day).

While it may sound odd, occasionally it is necessary to take chelated copper for a few days to relieve a copper reaction. The beneficial effect of taking copper in some people occurs because copper is needed to produce ceruloplasmin, the serum protein that binds copper. If copper becomes biologically unavailable, ceruloplasmin is not produced in sufficient quantity, provoking symptoms. The copper tablet provides bioavailable copper to stimulate ceruloplasmin synthesis. It is like priming an old-fashioned water pump – adding some water in order for the pump to work. The copper also affects the mineral balance, raising sodium and lowering potassium. This may also be necessary temporarily to relieve symptoms if the sodium/potassium ratio is low.

Copper Elimination Reactions

During the correction of a copper imbalance, copper elimination frequently causes transitory symptoms. These symptoms may include, headaches, usually of the migraine type, skin rashes, free-floating mental depression, anxiety, insomnia, fatigue, digestive disorders, abdominal bloating and a flare-up of a wide variety of chronic conditions related to a copper imbalance; such as hypoglycemia, candida albicans, etc.

These reactions generally last a day or two and then usually subside. In some cases, what appears to be adverse reactions may last for a month or more.

March 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 10, 2007

Today for something different. I’m going to try taking two 25 mg doses of zinc along with my multivitamin. Morning dosage is equal to 62 mg of zinc and 0.5 mg of copper. I also take my amino acids, vitamin C, potassium and vitamin K with some enzymes.

Picked up the book fromt he library today “Why Am I Always So Tired?” by leading nutritionist Ann Louise Gittleman. A book that talks about copper imbalance.

March 10, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 09, 2007

A while back I posted a comment from a web site regarding a link between mitral valve prolapse (magnesium loss) and candida.

“One doctor has reported that over 80% of the women who have been diagnosed as having mitral valve prolapse suffer from an overgrowth of candida albicans.”

Knowing what I know now, I’d be willing to bet that that the reason there is a link is because women taking birth control are creating a higher copper ratio, leading to a zinc deficiency causing an environment where candida than thrive and eventually, leading to magnesium loss.

Birth Control Pills and Copper Intrauterine Devices

One of the side effects of the pill is that it tends to raise copper levels in the body. This is due to the close association between the hormone estrogen and copper levels.

Several hundred milligrams of copper a year can easily be absorbed from a copper IUD. Many women still use the Copper-7 intrauterine birth control device, although it has been taken off the market. The only intra-uterine birth control device sold today, however, is a copper-T. These devices can be very harmful for women prone to high copper levels.

March 9, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 08, 2007

Today I switch back to taking three 25mg doses zinc with less copper and by early afternoon I notice a loss of magnesium. I take some extra magnesium and I’m fine.

So how do I increase my zinc intake, take less copper and increase my overall level of magnesium?

One thing that I’ve noticed with taking the zinc. I’ve always had itchy dry skin during the winter months and this year was no different. When I started taking zinc, I felt a subtle but very definite change in my skin. I don’t know how to describe it other than it feels tougher and the dry skin has gone.

March 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 07, 2007

I don’t feel the lower dosages of zinc are doing anything. I had the greatest success with around 80 mg of zinc a day without any copper. The only problem is that I think the high dosage is lowering my copper ratio and at the same time, I’m losing the magnesium.

I’d like to find a balance where I can take the most amount of zinc with the least amount of copper. I’ll need to do some more research on zinc and copper and the effect on the body.

ZINC

RDA 15 mg, recommended intake 20 to 30 mg daily; therapeutic dose up to 300 mg; best taken together with vitamin B6. Diets low in protein and high in fiber, phytates, calcium, fat and copper may decease the absorption of zinc. Increased zinc is needed with calcium or magnesium supplements, and during chronic infections, convalescence and stress.

How much zinc is too much?

The suggested upper safe limit is 50mg per day for a limited time. Too much zinc can deplete the body of iron and copper, leading to deficiencies of these minerals

Over 300 enzymes in the body need zinc to order to function properly; is needed to make important antioxidant enzymes; is essential for protein synthesis and collagen formation; governs the contractibility of muscles.

Zinc intake and absorption is needed to maintain the proper concentrations of vitamin E in the blood. Zinc levels can be decreased by diarrhea, kidney disease, cirrhosis or the liver, diabetes. Consuming “hard water” can upset zinc levels.

Inhibits Absorption: High intake of calcium, alcohol
Enhances Absorption: Phosphorus, copper, calcium, vitamin A

Functions

Zinc has a range of functions. It plays a crucial role in growth and cell division where it is required for protein and DNA synthesis, in insulin activity, in the metabolism of the ovaries and testes, and in liver function. As a component of many enzymes, zinc is involved in the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and energy.

Our body contains about 2-3g of zinc. There are no specific storage sites known for zinc and so a regular supply in the diet is required. Zinc is found in all parts of our body, 60% is found in muscle, 30% in bone and about 5% in our skin.

Particularly high concentrations are in the prostate gland and semen. Men need more zinc than women because male semen contains 100 times more zinc than is found in the blood. The more sexually active a man the more zinc he will require. The recommended amounts of zinc for adult men are 1/3 higher than those for women.

Researcher James Heffley, Ph.D., has determined through scientific studies that a man loses only about half a milligram (mg) of zinc in an ejaculation. This represents only about 4% of our average daily zinc intake.

Copper Toxicity: Liver cirrhosis, jaundice, symptoms of zinc deficiency.

I’m guessing that the extra copper intake was causing my jaundice and I’ve been tinkering with zinc and copper since Feb 4th. I won’t bother with the liver function blood tests. I think I was causing my own problem…

March 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 07, 2007

Second meeting with the nutritionist tonight. I had a brief summary of some of my new discoveries since we last met a month ago. I also printed the artcle “Introduction To Copper Toxicity” By Dr. Paul C. Eck and Dr. Larry Wilson as a reference.

She starts by saying that she’d like me to visit a naturopath for some testing. There are six different tests that she has requested but there is one small problem. For the tests to be accurate, I’ll need to stop taking my supplements for three weeks. She felt it was important to get a more accurate understanding of my deficiencies and weaknesses before starting any kind of treatment because right now, it’s a educated guess and I agree.

There is no way I can go without magnesium for three weeks. Anytime I miss one dosage I can feel the effect on my symptoms and the way I feel. I agreed to try it but explain that I don’t think I can do it. She said to contact the naturopath to arrange the appointment and speak directly to her about it. I can probably go without everything else except magnesium so I ask if I could switch to the homeopathic version. Again, she says I’ll have to check with the naturopath.

Here’s a list of the requested tests:

  • Food Sensitivity Work Up
  • Candida and Parasite Screen
  • Nutritional Deficiencies and Supplements
  • Toxic Metal Detection
  • Organ Stress Test
  • Geographic/Electromagnetic Sensitivity

Total Cost? $220.00 I wish the original naturopath did these type of tests. I might be a lot further ahead instead of wasting my time with the hair analysis and the hormone test.

I then show her my new research and talk about a zinc deficiency. Explain my experiements with high intake of copper and zinc. Told her about quitting the candida diet and having better success with copper and zinc than the diet itself. She looks up zinc in her nutritional book and gives a list of foods high in zinc. I also ask her about the copper/zinc ratio. I’ve read everything from 6-1, 10-1 and even 30-1 so which one is it? She says it should be a 6-1 ratio. She also says that I shouldn’t take more than 100 mg a day.

She wants me to continue with the candida diet and we talk about the types of foods that I can eat. I mention about the carrots and other vegetables high in sugar. She said I could have any kind of vegetable in moderation and that even potatoes are okay. She writes out a list of acceptable candida foods.

She’s still taking a very slow approach and I agree with her direction but I’m really looking for results.

I leave her clinc and although I agree with what was said, I really believe I’m on the edge of success with the zinc and I’d like to try a few things myself before I commit to her program.

Still vibrating…

March 8, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 04, 2007

Discovered a book written by nutritionist Ann Louise Gittleman that details the body’s copper imbalance. I looked it up in my library directory and ordered it.

Why Am I Always So Tired?: Discover How Correcting Your Body’s Copper Imbalance Can Keep Your Body From Giving Out Before Your Mind Does.

Copper overload is an insidious but increasingly common nutritional problem, says Ann Louise Gittleman, author of the bestselling Beyond Pritikin. She says that difficulty getting out of bed, midday slumps, mood swings, insomnia, and anxiety may be symptoms of a copper/zinc imbalance. She discovered this link after she encountered several patients in her nutritional practice–most of them women–who were not suffering from hypothyroidism, adrenal problems, or anemia (as she had suspected), but rather a mineral imbalance.

To remedy the overload, Gittleman outlines an easy plan for renewing health and increasing energy. She includes a questionnaire to help determine if copper overload may be a problem for you; gives resources for hair analysis in case your doctor doesn’t have one; instructs on how to read a tissue-analysis report; and outlines a sensible diet plan, including menus to keep the zinc/copper balance in check.

“Copper is an essential mineral and is required for normal health. However, in excess its presence in biological systems can become detrimental as illustrated by Bertrand’s Law of optimal nutritive concentration of an essential trace element. Conditions associated with copper deficiency are well known, although other than inborn errors of metabolism such as Wilson’s Disease, the effects of copper excess are not widely recongnized. Ann Louise Gittleman’s book is probably the first to deal with the subject of copper excess in the American population. A condition that is becoming more prevalent in each generation but clinically unrecognized until now.”

I went to her web site and there was a audio seminar section called “Are You a Copperhead?” I listened to her talk about excess copper and zinc deficiencies and one of the things that stood out for me was how having a fear of heights and hair loss can be related to a zinc/copper imbalance. Both of which, I’ve had for years. And the constant tireness? Yup…for years…

March 4, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 03, 2007

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So if a zinc deficiency is my problem, how much should I be taking? I’ve just started taking three doses of 25 mg a day plus my multivitamin for a total of 87 mg. There is no question that this is working for my sinusitis. The stuffiness in my nose is slowly disappearing and it was never this improved on the candida diet.

The funny thing is that I always discounted a zinc deficiency because all of the web sites seem to suggest that there would be little white dots on my nails and I didn’t have any. I do have the vertical lines but no white marks.

Nutrient Interactions

Copper

Taking large quantities of zinc (50 mg/day or more) over a period of weeks can interfere with copper bioavailability. High intake of zinc induces the intestinal synthesis of a copper-binding protein called metallothionein. Metallothionein traps copper within intestinal cells and prevents its systemic absorption (see Copper). More typical intakes of zinc do not affect copper absorption and high copper intakes do not affect zinc absorption

Symptoms of high intake

Elevated intake of zinc (1- 2 gram per day) over an extended period can actually harm immune system instead of assisting it. Intake of zinc should be kept to under 100 mg per day as larger amounts may result in nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness and hallucinations.

If one wants to take a zinc supplement, take it at night on an empty stomach, as zinc can interfere with the absorption of other minerals such as copper and iron. In a multi-vitamin situation, make sure that the zinc and iron is nearly in the same amounts. Large intakes of zinc can cause nausea and diarrhea when more is needed.

Long-term use of zinc (including zinc in a multivitamin) should be accompanied by copper. For every 15 mg of zinc, include 1 mg of copper.

March 4, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 03, 2007

All of these recent articles have opened a huge door for me today. I feel like I’ve finally opened the door that has lead me to the Great Library of Alexandria filled with nutritional information written specifically for my symptoms. This is incredible.

So if my problem is related to a zinc deficiency and the bio-unavailability of copper how does all of this relate to a magnesium deficiency? I finally have my answer.

Zinc, Taurine and Vitamin B6

Deficiencies of zinc, taurine and vitamin B6 affect magnesium levels. These nutrients are synergistic with magnesium. High-carbohydrate diets deplete zinc and vitamin B6 and often lack taurine, which is found only in meats. Deficiencies of these nutrients may cause a magnesium loss or biounavailability.

Most diets are also low in magnesium. This is made worse by drinking a lot of milk, taking calcium supplements that do not contain magnesium, or eating refined-food diets. While calcium deficiency gets lots of press, magnesium deficiency also occurs commonly.

Handling Imbalanced Ca/Mg Ratios

An imbalanced Ca/Mg ratio usually indicates excessive carbohydrates in the diet. All foods contain carbohydrates. However, carbohydrate-rich foods are grains, pasta, bread, potatoes, beans, carrots, peas, corn, fruit, sweets and sugars such as fructose, dextrose, malt sweeteners, honey and maple syrup. At times, patients tell us they are not eating any of these foods, yet their Ca/Mg ratio is unbalanced. There are several explanations.

Many people are not aware or truthful about the amount of carbohydrates they consume. Carbohydrates may be hidden in many foods, especially prepared and packaged foods. Many, many items have added sugar, cornstarch, barley malt, flour, fructose and other starches or sugars. Also, remember the starchy vegetables – potatoes, carrots, beets, turnips, rutabaga, winter squash, corn, beans and peas. Although they are superior to eating sugar because they contain more fiber, vitamins and minerals, one can still overeat on them. Fruits, fruit juices, wine, beer, mixed drinks and soft drinks may be very high in carbohydrates.

Begin by reducing dietary carbohydrates, improving digestion and correcting the diet in accordance with the oxidation type. Supplementing with sufficient zinc, magnesium, vitamin B6 and taurine are helpful, along with supplements.

Reducing stress may be very important. Severe stress can inhibit or even override any dietary or supplement program! Any time the Ca/Mg ratio is very imbalanced – greater than 15:1 or less than 2.5:1 – emotional stress is likely and important to address.

If a double inversion is present (low Ca/Mg and low Na/K), or adrenal exhaustion is suspected, the first priority for correction is the Na/K ratio. As this improves, often the Ca/Mg ratio will improve as well. The two ratios may alternate in their improvement over a period of months.

If toxic metals are affecting the ratio, the diet and supplement program can help mobilize these from storage, at which time the ratio will often improve.

When zinc combines with certain foods it may not be absorbed into your body and it will do you no good. If you are taking zinc, the following foods should be avoided or taken 2 hours after you take zinc:

  • Bran
  • Fiber-containing foods
  • Phosphorus-containing foods such as milk or poultry
  • Whole-grain breads and cereals

Do not take zinc supplements and copper, iron, or phosphorus supplements at the same time. It is best to space doses of these products 2 hours apart, to get the full benefit from each dietary supplement.

March 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 03, 2007

Copper And Other Mineral Imbalances As A Cause Of Allergies

Minerals play many important roles in regulating body chemistry. Not only are minerals required for glandular activity, but they serve to regulate the nervous system and every other system of the body. Toxic amounts of any nutrient will displace other vital nutrients and by doing so, result in various metabolic dysfunctions, including a wide variety of allergies.

Research reveals that copper toxicity is a major contributing cause of allergies, particularly those allergies associated with low cortisol levels. Low cortisol levels result in a chronic inflammatory process. Allergies occur because copper, in excess, deplete vitamin C, folic acid, zinc and other nutrient reserves that are required by the pituitary and adrenal glands. An excess of tissue copper also impairs liver function, resulting in a wide variety of food allergies.

Copper toxicity also results in an over-stimulation of the nervous system which leads to alterations of the pituitary-adrenal axis. Copper toxicity is often involved as a principal cause of brain, or cerebral allergies.

A copper deficiency frequently results in a lowering of tissue calcium levels, which serves to contribute to the excess histamine-type of allergies.

Many individuals suffer from a copper imbalance which is not detectable on a standard blood serum test. Copper toxicity can be identified from a hair mineral analysis, where it is indicated by either a high copper level, a high calcium level, a very low copper level, or a low sodium to potassium ratio which indicates adrenal burnout.

Many times, a food allergy problem can be traced to the relatively high copper content of certain foods. Common foods that are high in copper are wheat, corn, soybeans, chocolate and shellfish. Perhaps it is more than coincidence that these particular foods are common causes of food allergies.

Allergies And Behavior

Another class of allergies is commonly referred to as central nervous system allergies. These are reactions that detrimentally affect one’s emotions and behavior. The causes of these allergies are, in many instances, the same as those discussed above. The principal difference is that they specifically affect brain function, so that reactions are particularly noticed in one’s behavior and attitude.

Biochemical mechanisms primarily responsible for brain allergies include;

• Excessive histamine release in the brain due to an elevated copper level, or zinc deficiency.

• Alterations of vitamin, or other mineral levels in the brain due to foods, or exposure to toxic metals.

• Changes in blood sugar levels due to diet, stress, or adrenal insufficiency. The brain is extremely sensitive to both low and high blood sugar levels.

• Specific neuro-chemical effects of food additives such as Nutra-Sweet which contains phenylalanine, a neuro-active amino acid.

In the majority of cases of central nervous system allergies, we find that a copper imbalance plays a vital role. Research confirms that a copper toxicity problem causes a zinc deficiency, which in turn may result in a rise in tissue sodium levels. A high sodium level, in turn, is responsible for many of the symptoms associated with brain allergies.

Common symptoms of brain allergies in children are hyperactivity, learning disorders and concentration deficit problems. In adults, a high sodium level frequently manifests itself as manic-depressive disorders, hyperactivity, anxiety and various phobias.

Central nervous system allergies are handled the same way as other allergies. Imbalances in body chemistry need to be identified and corrected. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis needs to be restored to normalcy. Offending foods have to be avoided for a time. Digestion also needs to be improved.

Allergies As A Symptom Of Burnout

A common hair analysis pattern noted in allergy patients is a low sodium/potassium ratio (less than 2.5:1). We call this a burnout pattern, because it is associated with adrenal exhaustion.

Allergies are a common sign of adrenal burnout. The exhausted adrenal glands simply cannot provide sufficient cortical hormones required to prevent allergic reactions.

Another common hair analysis pattern in allergy sufferers is what we refer to as an all-four-low mineral pattern. The first four minerals on the chart (calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium) are below normal accepted values. This too, is a burnout pattern, one in which the person is under unrelenting stress, thus preventing recovery of the adrenal glands. Allergies usually accompany this particular mineral pattern.

A final hair analysis mineral pattern that is often seen when allergies are present is that both sodium and potassium levels are rock bottom, below 6 mg% for sodium and below 4 mg% for potassium. Again, this is a mineral pattern commonly associated with severe adrenal exhaustion.

Very often, in order to correct an allergy problem it is necessary to correct the underlying burnout condition. Otherwise we are just relieving symptoms and the associated allergies will never be permanently eliminated.

General Nutritional Recommendations For Allergies

Avoiding refined sugars and carbohydrates reduces allergies in a category of individuals who are classified as sugar and simple carbohydrate intolerant. Eating sugar, or simple carbohydrates in any form, places undue stress upon the adrenal glands, which are forced to respond to the sudden excess of sugar in the blood. The result is increased wear and tear on these glands, as well as on the liver and pancreas. The ingestion of sugar, especially in susceptible individuals, also upsets calcium, copper and other mineral levels, eventually causing a further alteration of body chemistry.

Refined carbohydrates lack fiber, which serves to slow the absorption of sugars into the blood stream. They also lack the essential trace elements desperately required for optimal adrenal gland support.

Eating foods appropriate for one’s oxidation type is particularly important. For the slow oxidizer, this means avoiding high-fat diets and eating adequate amounts of protein. Increasing one’s meat protein intake is often difficult for certain slow oxidizers, particularly those with a copper toxicity problem. Avoiding, or limiting dairy products is often helpful for the slow oxidizer. Dairy products are high in fat content which serves to further slow down an already slow rate of metabolism. Many slow oxidizers are also unable to tolerate milk sugar.

For the fast oxidizer, dietary fats are essential and in some cases increasing one’s intake of fats will rapidly reduce allergy symptoms related to stress-related, excessive adrenal gland activity.

Avoidance of chemical additives is suggested for everyone, but particularly allergy sufferers. Even though there may not be an allergy to any specific chemical, the body still has to detoxify these chemicals, adding to the burden on the liver and the endocrine glands.

The same principle holds true for environmental chemicals, hair sprays, room deodorants, chemical cleaners and other toxic substances that we are exposed to on a daily basis. Minimizing exposure to the above allergens reduce the burden on the liver and glandular system.

Conclusion

Our research indicates that the reason allergies are so common today is largely due to an adrenal burnout-induced imbalanced body chemistry. The body has become hypersensitive to foods and environmental chemicals, which cause many types of allergic reactions.

Body chemistry has become impaired due to inadequate diets, stress and environmental pollution. Today, children are born with toxic metal poisoning and nutrient deficiencies, which indicates that even if an individual eats well, they may still be afflicted with allergies.

March 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entry for March 03, 2007

Came across another article that talks about the relationship between copper, zinc, weak adrenals and candida. The headlines read like a summary of my health issues:

  • “Adrenal Gland Exhaustion: A Major Cause of Copper Toxicity”
  • “Excess Sugar Intake as a Cause of Copper Toxicity and Zinc Deficiency”
  • “Candida, Stress and Copper and Hypoglycemia”

This article is one of the most amazing things I have ever read.

Insight Into Copper Elimination
By Dr. Paul C. Eck and Dr. Larry Wilson

Introduction

Years of experience in dealing with copper toxic individuals reveal that such individuals experience certain difficulties while on a nutritional correction program. One common complaint is that they are unable to take their nutritional program three times a day. Some copper-toxic individuals find it difficult to take their supplements even once a day.

Stress and Increased Metabolic Rate

Any kind of stress, physical or emotional in nature, results in a necessary increase in the metabolic rate. Any increase in the metabolic rate, whatever its cause frequently results in the release of excess copper into the blood. It is to be noted that the major internal cause of a copper toxicity problem is a reduced ability to cope with stress. It is the intent of your nutritional program to increase your ability to cope with stress, hence avoiding any future excessive buildup of copper. Many of the distressing symptoms associated with copper toxicity are due to a stress-induced zinc deficiency.

Stress as a Cause of Copper Elimination

Whenever there is an increase in one’s rate of metabolism (usually due to stress, whether physical or emotional), copper is mobilized from primary storage sites in the liver and brain and is discharged into the blood. The principal way that excess copper can be eliminated from storage sites is to increase one’s rate of metabolism. People with high tissue copper levels, because of an adrenal insufficiency problem, are very susceptible to stress and consequentially suffer from periodical elimination of copper. Enabling such individuals to better cope with stress helps to prevent a buildup of excess copper in the tissues. In other words, sensitivity to stress is greatly reduced. Major copper eliminations are thus largely eliminated.

Adrenal Gland Exhaustion: A Major Cause of Copper Toxicity

Diminished adrenal activity is perhaps the single most important physiological reason for copper toxicity problems today. When adrenal activity is insufficient, ceruloplasmin (a copper-binding protein) synthesis in the liver declines. Copper that is not bound to a protein cannot be utilized, and so it is that unbound copper begins to accumulate in various tissues and organs.

According to hair analysis research conducted by Dr. Paul C. Eck, 70-80% of people tested reveal weak adrenal glands or what is termed adrenal insufficiency! Individuals with weak adrenal glands tend to store excess copper in various body tissues, principally the liver and brain. Excessive storage of copper, as we have stated previously, eventually results in organ damage.

The Importance of Zinc & Vitamin B6

Discomforting symptoms frequently occur when the individual is eliminating copper faster than their nutrient reservoirs of vitamin B6 and zinc can contain it. Many of the symptoms associated with copper toxicity relate to a copper induced vitamin B6, zinc and vitamin C deficiency. Both vitamin B6, and vitamin C are destroyed on contact with copper.3 Along with destroying vitamin B6 and vitamin C on contact, copper, in excess, causes a relative zinc deficiency. When zinc, vitamin B6 and vitamin C reserves become adequate, the distressing symptoms of copper toxicity are largely eliminated, hence the necessity to buildup the copper-toxic individual’s storage reservoirs of the above vitamins and minerals. Until the individual’s storage reservoirs of B6, vitamin C and zinc are sufficiently replete, symptoms will continue to be manifest.

Slowing Down a Copper Elimination

Numerous methods are available for slowing down the elimination of copper. Several means of slowing-down the elimination of copper would be to reduce the supplemental dosage to once a day, take or follow the recommended program every other day, add three calcium tablets three times a day and/or temporarily increase the individual’s dietary intake of dairy products. The individual must be made aware that this is only a temporary stop gap measure, because if one remained on dairy products on a continuous basis their metabolic rate would decrease resulting in an increased storage of copper. Dairy products are often effective in reducing the symptoms of a copper elimination because they temporarily reduce the individuals temporary stress-induced excessive metabolic rate.

Inasmuch as an increase in one’s metabolic rate will cause a flare-up in symptoms associated with a copper toxicity problem it becomes necessary to temporarily slow down one’s rate of metabolism. This is accomplished by increasing one’s calcium intake, increasing one’s dairy product intake, together with an increase in dietary fat intake, such as, avocadoes, nuts, salad oils, cooking oils, dairy products, etc.) Slowing down one’s rate of metabolism is definitely of value in reducing the symptoms associated with copper toxicity. When the distressing symptoms come under control, it is time to resume the original nutritional program.

Dietary Considerations: Need for Increase in Protein Intake

One of the major problems associated with a copper toxicity problem is a copper-induced protein deficiency. This no doubt occurs, in part, because an excess of tissue copper causes a zinc deficiency. “Zinc has…been found to be important in governing the net rate of synthesis of nucleic acids and protein, thereby importantly influencing tissue growth and reparative processes…”4 Adding to the problem, individuals suffering from copper toxicity frequently develop a distaste for meat protein due to their reduced ability to digest and assimilate protein. Over a period of time, a serious protein deficiency develops. As stated previously, one major reason why copper accumulates in the body is a deficiency of protein required to bind copper, thus increasing one’s metabolic rate. Although sometimes difficult, copper-toxic individuals should attempt to increase their protein intake (eggs, fish or chicken). Soy-protein products should be avoided, unless otherwise specified, if possible, inasmuch as soy products contain relatively high amounts of copper.

Copper-toxic individuals have a great need to increase their protein intake, but usually will not partake of an increased meat protein intake until their adrenal insufficiency problem is improved or corrected. Until such time, the copper-toxic individual must avail him or herself of digestive aids including hydrochloric acid and pancreatic enzymes.

An adequate level of zinc, so necessary to prevent an excessive copper buildup depends largely on the eating of red meat protein. As stated previously, individuals suffering from copper toxicity develop a strong aversion to the eating of zinc-rich red meat protein hence the tendency to the excessive accumulation of tissue copper.

Eliminate Foods High in Copper Content

Many diets today are high in copper and low in zinc content. In particular, vegetarian proteins such as soybean, nuts, seeds, tofu, avocado and grains, often highly beneficial for others, are high in copper content. Fast food hamburgers and other popular foods are also frequently soy-based. Soybean protein is coming into wider usage, due to its low cholesterol level and lower cost.

Other high-copper foods are organ meats, shellfish, wheat germ and bran, yeast, corn oil, margarine,
and mushrooms. Except for margarine, these are excellent health foods in general, but should be temporarily avoided by copper-toxic individuals.

Special Considerations Regarding Copper Detoxification

Diet for the Copper-Toxic Individual

As stated previously, copper-toxic individuals frequently have an aversion to eating protein, particularly red meat protein. It is important for such individuals to eat some protein at least twice a day, even if the quantity is small. Meat protein is rich in zinc content, a mineral essential to prevent copper toxicity and to promote the elimination of excess copper. It is for this reason (high zinc content) that red meats are often avoided. Otherwise, progress is delayed. Strict vegetarian diets are not advisable, but may be necessary for a period of time in severe cases, until adrenal activity has been adequately reestablished.

Excessive Intake of Sweets, Fruits and Fruit Juices

The majority of copper-toxic individuals have an insatiable craving for sweets, fruit, and fruit juices. Such cravings arise from the fact that copper-toxic individuals, in general, suffer from a severe potassium deficiency. Fruit, fruit juices and vegetables are high in potassium content, and hence the craving for these foods. Such foods should be limited as much as possible for optimal results. In many cases, a high complex carbohydrate diet is necessary until adrenal activity is increased.

Excess Sugar Intake as a Cause of Copper Toxicity and Zinc Deficiency

The eating of sugar and sugar-containing foods contributes greatly to a copper toxicity problem by causing a zinc deficiency. This occurs because zinc is required for sugar and carbohydrate metabolism. The greater the sugar and carbohydrate intake, the greater the chances for a zinc deficiency to develop. Individuals suffering from copper toxicity problem usually limit their diets, to a great extent, to simple carbohydrates and carbohydrates which are rapidly absorbed (vegetable and fruit juices).

A high sugar and carbohydrate diet lower tissue zinc levels. The consequences are many.

It has been established that prolonged and repeated increases in the glucose content of the blood rid the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas almost completely of zinc. Zinc is necessary for both the production and secretion of insulin, which is necessary to burn sugars and carbohydrates.

“By means of prolonged and repeated increases in the glucose content of the blood, Maske succeeded in ridding the islets almost completely of zinc.”

In other words, the eating of a sugar and a high carbohydrate diet, which is typical of the diet preferred by the copper-toxic individual, is conducive to causing a zinc deficiency. The end-result is an inability to derive sufficient energy from the metabolism of sugar and carbohydrates with a consequent buildup of copper in the tissues.

Refining of Food Removes Zinc

Processed foods should be avoided at all costs because the refining of foods, particularly cereals and grains, removes much of the zinc contained in these foods. What zinc remaining from the refining process is unavailable because the zinc is bound to phytin. Phytic acid forms an insoluble complex with zinc rendering it biounavailable.

Candida, Stress and Copper and Hypoglycemia

Eventually, over a period of time, copper is eliminated from storage sites. Future eliminations of copper, due to stress, are thus minimized. As a result, symptoms of anxiety, migraine headaches, skin disorders, severe constipation, fears, candida infections etc., are greatly minimized.

As a result of a low blood sugar induced increased adrenalin secretion, (diminished immune response) a flare-up in candida may occur.

Often a copper elimination results in the flare-up of a candida infection and the many symptoms associated with candida.

The major reason candida continues to exist in an individual is because they are unable to reduce their excessive copper storage in the liver and in the brain. Whenever they undergo stress of any kind, copper builds up in the tissues resulting in a bio-unavailability of copper. It is the bio-unavailability of copper which permits candida to thrive. In essence, sufficient copper cannot be mobilized out of liver storage because of stress and weak adrenal glands.

Candida Albicans (Yeast) Infections

Copper is a stimulant to oxidative or aerobic metabolism. Copper biounavailability, deficiency or imbalance, often results in a tendency for yeast infections. Copper compounds are used commercially to inhibit growth of yeast and fungi.

March 3, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

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